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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Sat, 22 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

 



Perfect Mess

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Read the news about America’s colleges and universities—rising student debt, affirmative action debates, and conflicts between faculty and administrators—and it’s clear that higher education in this country is a total mess. But as David F. Labaree reminds us in this book, it’s always been that way. And that’s exactly why it has become the most successful and sought-after source of learning in the world. Detailing American higher education’s unusual struggle for survival in a free market that never guaranteed its place in society—a fact that seemed to doom it in its early days in the nineteenth century—he tells a lively story of the entrepreneurial spirit that drove American higher education to become the best.             And the best it is: today America’s universities and colleges produce the most scholarship, earn the most Nobel prizes, hold the largest endowments, and attract the most esteemed students and scholars from around the world. But this was not an inevitability. Weakly funded by the state, American schools in their early years had to rely on student tuition and alumni donations in order to survive. This gave them tremendous autonomy to seek out sources of financial support and pursue unconventional opportunities to ensure their success. As Labaree shows, by striving as much as possible to meet social needs and fulfill individual ambitions, they developed a broad base of political and financial support that, grounded by large undergraduate programs, allowed for the most cutting-edge research and advanced graduate study ever conducted. As a result, American higher education eventually managed to combine a unique mix of the populist, the practical, and the elite in a single complex system.             The answers to today’s problems in higher education are not easy, but as this book shows, they shouldn’t be: no single person or institution can determine higher education’s future. It is something that faculty, administrators, and students—adapting to society’s needs—will determine together, just as they have always done.  


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Jerusalem 1900

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Perhaps the most contested patch of earth in the world, Jerusalem’s Old City experiences consistent violent unrest between Israeli and Palestinian residents, with seemingly no end in sight. Today, Jerusalem’s endless cycle of riots and arrests appears intractable—even unavoidable—and it looks unlikely that harmony will ever be achieved in the city. But with Jerusalem 1900, historian Vincent Lemire shows us that it wasn’t always that way, undoing the familiar notion of Jerusalem as a lost cause and revealing a unique moment in history when a more peaceful future seemed possible.   In this masterly history, Lemire uses newly opened archives to explore how Jerusalem’s elite residents of differing faiths cooperated through an intercommunity municipal council they created in the mid-1860s to administer the affairs of all inhabitants and improve their shared city. These residents embraced a spirit of modern urbanism and cultivated a civic identity that transcended religion and reflected the relatively secular and cosmopolitan way of life of Jerusalem at the time. These few years would turn out to be a tipping point in the city’s history—a pivotal moment when the horizon of possibility was still open, before the council broke up in 1934, under British rule, into separate Jewish and Arab factions. Uncovering this often overlooked diplomatic period, Lemire reveals that the struggle over Jerusalem was not historically inevitable—and therefore is not necessarily intractable. Jerusalem 1900 sheds light on how the Holy City once functioned peacefully and illustrates how it might one day do so again.


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Death Gap

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

We hear plenty about the widening income gap between the rich and the poor in America and about the expanding distance separating the haves and the have-nots. But when detailing the many things that the poor have not, we often overlook the most critical—their health. The poor die sooner. Blacks die sooner. And poor urban blacks die sooner than almost all other Americans. In nearly four decades as a doctor at hospitals serving some of the poorest communities in Chicago, David Ansell has witnessed firsthand the lives behind these devastating statistics. In The Death Gap, he gives a grim survey of these realities, drawn from observations and stories of his patients. While the contrasts and disparities among Chicago’s communities are particularly stark, the death gap is truly a nationwide epidemic—as Ansell shows, there is a thirty-five-year difference in life expectancy between the healthiest and wealthiest and the poorest and sickest American neighborhoods. If you are poor, where you live in America can dictate when you die. It doesn’t need to be this way; such divisions are not inevitable. Ansell calls out the social and cultural arguments that have been raised as ways of explaining or excusing these gaps, and he lays bare the structural violence—the racism, economic exploitation, and discrimination—that is really to blame. Inequality is a disease, Ansell argues, and we need to treat and eradicate it as we would any major illness. To do so, he outlines a vision that will provide the foundation for a healthier nation—for all. Inequality is all around us, and often the distance between high and low life expectancy can be a matter of just a few blocks. But geography need not be destiny, urges  Ansell. In The Death Gap he shows us how we can face this national health crisis head-on and take action against the circumstances that rob people of their dignity and their lives.


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Ambitious Elementary School

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The challenge of overcoming educational inequality in the United States can sometimes appear overwhelming, and great controversy exists as to whether or not elementary schools are up to the task, whether they can ameliorate existing social inequalities and initiate opportunities for economic and civic flourishing for all children. This book shows what can happen when you rethink schools from the ground up with precisely these goals in mind, approaching educational inequality and its entrenched causes head on, student by student.             Drawing on an in-depth study of real schools on the South Side of Chicago, Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Lisa Rosen argue that effectively meeting the challenge of educational inequality requires a complete reorganization of institutional structures as well as wholly new norms, values, and practices that are animated by a relentless commitment to student learning. They examine a model that pulls teachers out of their isolated classrooms and places them into collaborative environments where they can share their curricula, teaching methods, and assessments of student progress with a school-based network of peers, parents, and other professionals. Within this structure, teachers, school leaders, social workers, and parents collaborate to ensure that every child receives instruction tailored to his or her developing skills. Cooperating schools share new tools for assessment and instruction and become sites for the training of new teachers. Parents become respected partners, and expert practitioners work with researchers to evaluate their work and refine their models for educational organization and practice. The authors show not only what such a model looks like but the dramatic results it produces for student learning and achievement.             The result is a fresh, deeply informed, and remarkably clear portrait of school reform that directly addresses the real problems of educational inequality.   


Media Files:
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Ambitious Elementary School

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The challenge of overcoming educational inequality in the United States can sometimes appear overwhelming, and great controversy exists as to whether or not elementary schools are up to the task, whether they can ameliorate existing social inequalities and initiate opportunities for economic and civic flourishing for all children. This book shows what can happen when you rethink schools from the ground up with precisely these goals in mind, approaching educational inequality and its entrenched causes head on, student by student.             Drawing on an in-depth study of real schools on the South Side of Chicago, Elizabeth McGhee Hassrick, Stephen W. Raudenbush, and Lisa Rosen argue that effectively meeting the challenge of educational inequality requires a complete reorganization of institutional structures as well as wholly new norms, values, and practices that are animated by a relentless commitment to student learning. They examine a model that pulls teachers out of their isolated classrooms and places them into collaborative environments where they can share their curricula, teaching methods, and assessments of student progress with a school-based network of peers, parents, and other professionals. Within this structure, teachers, school leaders, social workers, and parents collaborate to ensure that every child receives instruction tailored to his or her developing skills. Cooperating schools share new tools for assessment and instruction and become sites for the training of new teachers. Parents become respected partners, and expert practitioners work with researchers to evaluate their work and refine their models for educational organization and practice. The authors show not only what such a model looks like but the dramatic results it produces for student learning and achievement.             The result is a fresh, deeply informed, and remarkably clear portrait of school reform that directly addresses the real problems of educational inequality.   


Media Files:
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Doodling for Academics

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

To an outsider, working as a university professor might seem like a dream: summers off, a few hours of class each week, an exchange of ideas with brilliant colleagues, books and late afternoon lattes. . . . Who wouldn’t envy that life?   But those in the trenches of academe are well acquainted with the professoriate’s dark underside: the hierarchies and pseudo-political power plays, the peculiar colleagues, the over-parented students, the stacks of essays that need to be graded ASAP.   No one understands this world better than novelist Julie Schumacher, who here provides a bitingly funny distraction designed to help you survive life in higher education without losing your mind. Sardonic yet shrewdly insightful, Doodling for Academics offers the perfect cognitive relief for the thousands of faculty and grad students whose mentors and loved ones failed to steer them toward more reasonable or lucrative fields.   Through forty pages of original illustrations and activities—from coloring to paper dolls to mad libs—this book traces the arc of a typical day on campus. Get a peek inside the enigma of the student brain. Imagine a utopian faculty meeting. Navigate the red tape maze of university administration. With the help of hilarious illustrations by Lauren Nassef, Schumacher infuses the world of campus greens and university quads with cutting wit, immersing you deep into the weirdly creative challenges of university life. Offering a satirical interactive experience for scholars, the combination of humor and activities in this book will bring academia into entertaining relief, making it the perfect gift for your colleagues, advisors, or newly minted graduates.


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Evolving God

Fri, 21 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

  Religion has been a central part of human experience since at least the dawn of recorded history. The gods change, as do the rituals, but the underlying desire remains—a desire to belong to something larger, greater, most lasting than our mortal, finite selves.   But where did that desire come from? Can we explain its emergence through evolution? Yes, says biological anthropologist Barbara J. King—and doing so not only helps us to understand the religious imagination, but also reveals fascinating links to the lives and minds of our primate cousins. Evolving God draws on King’s own fieldwork among primates in Africa and paleoanthropology of our extinct ancestors to offer a new way of thinking about the origins of religion, one that situates it in a deep need for emotional connection with others, a need we share with apes and monkeys. Though her thesis is provocative, and she’s not above thoughtful speculation, King’s argument is strongly rooted in close observation and analysis. She traces an evolutionary path that connects us to other primates, who, like us, display empathy, make meanings through interaction, create social rules, and display imagination—the basic building blocks of the religious imagination. With fresh insights, she responds to recent suggestions that chimpanzees are spiritual—or  even religious—beings, and that our ancient humanlike cousins carefully disposed of their dead well before the time of Neandertals.   King writes with a scientist’s appreciation for evidence and argument, leavened with a deep empathy and admiration for the powerful desire to belong, a desire that not only brings us together with other humans, but with our closest animal relations as well.  


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Profit of the Earth

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

While there is enormous public interest in biodiversity, food sourcing, and sustainable agriculture, romantic attachments to heirloom seeds and family farms have provoked misleading fantasies of an unrecoverable agrarian past. The reality, as Courtney Fullilove shows, is that seeds are inherently political objects transformed by the ways they are gathered, preserved, distributed, regenerated, and improved. In The Profit of the Earth, Fullilove unearths the history of American agricultural development and of seeds as tools and talismans put in its service.   Organized into three thematic parts, The Profit of the Earth is a narrative history of the collection, circulation, and preservation of seeds. Fullilove begins with the political economy of agricultural improvement, recovering the efforts of the US Patent Office and the nascent US Department of Agriculture to import seeds and cuttings for free distribution to American farmers. She then turns to immigrant agricultural knowledge, exploring how public and private institutions attempting to boost midwestern wheat yields drew on the resources of willing and unwilling settlers. Last, she explores the impact of these cereal monocultures on biocultural diversity, chronicling a fin-de-siècle Ohio pharmacist’s attempt to source Purple Coneflower from the diminishing prairie. Through these captivating narratives of improvisation, appropriation, and loss, Fullilove explores contradictions between ideologies of property rights and common use that persist in national and international development—ultimately challenging readers to rethink fantasies of global agriculture’s past and future.


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Blackface Nation

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As the United States transitioned from a rural nation to an urbanized, industrial giant between the War of 1812 and the early twentieth century, ordinary people struggled over the question of what it meant to be American. As Brian Roberts shows in Blackface Nation, this struggle is especially evident in popular culture and the interplay between two specific strains of music: middle-class folk and blackface minstrelsy. The Hutchinson Family Singers, the Northeast’s most popular middle-class singing group during the mid-nineteenth century, is perhaps the best example of the first strain of music. The group’s songs expressed an American identity rooted in communal values, with lyrics focusing on abolition, women’s rights, and socialism. Blackface minstrelsy, on the other hand, emerged out of an audience-based coalition of Northern business elites, Southern slaveholders, and young, white, working-class men, for whom blackface expressed an identity rooted in individual self-expression, anti-intellectualism, and white superiority. Its performers embodied the love-crime version of racism, in which vast swaths of the white public adored African Americans who fit blackface stereotypes even as they used those stereotypes to rationalize white supremacy. By the early twentieth century, the blackface version of the American identity had become a part of America’s consumer culture while the Hutchinsons’ songs were increasingly regarded as old-fashioned. Blackface Nation elucidates the central irony in America’s musical history: much of the music that has been interpreted as black, authentic, and expressive was invented, performed, and enjoyed by people who believed strongly in white superiority.  At the same time, the music often depicted as white, repressed, and boringly bourgeois was often socially and racially inclusive, committed to reform, and devoted to challenging the immoralities at the heart of America’s capitalist order.


Media Files:
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Blackface Nation

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As the United States transitioned from a rural nation to an urbanized, industrial giant between the War of 1812 and the early twentieth century, ordinary people struggled over the question of what it meant to be American. As Brian Roberts shows in Blackface Nation, this struggle is especially evident in popular culture and the interplay between two specific strains of music: middle-class folk and blackface minstrelsy. The Hutchinson Family Singers, the Northeast’s most popular middle-class singing group during the mid-nineteenth century, is perhaps the best example of the first strain of music. The group’s songs expressed an American identity rooted in communal values, with lyrics focusing on abolition, women’s rights, and socialism. Blackface minstrelsy, on the other hand, emerged out of an audience-based coalition of Northern business elites, Southern slaveholders, and young, white, working-class men, for whom blackface expressed an identity rooted in individual self-expression, anti-intellectualism, and white superiority. Its performers embodied the love-crime version of racism, in which vast swaths of the white public adored African Americans who fit blackface stereotypes even as they used those stereotypes to rationalize white supremacy. By the early twentieth century, the blackface version of the American identity had become a part of America’s consumer culture while the Hutchinsons’ songs were increasingly regarded as old-fashioned. Blackface Nation elucidates the central irony in America’s musical history: much of the music that has been interpreted as black, authentic, and expressive was invented, performed, and enjoyed by people who believed strongly in white superiority.  At the same time, the music often depicted as white, repressed, and boringly bourgeois was often socially and racially inclusive, committed to reform, and devoted to challenging the immoralities at the heart of America’s capitalist order.


Media Files:
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Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City

Mon, 17 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For long-time residents of Washington, DC’s Shaw/U Street, the neighborhood has become almost unrecognizable in recent years. Where the city’s most infamous open-air drug market once stood, a farmers’ market now sells grass-fed beef and homemade duck egg ravioli. On the corner where AM.PM carryout used to dish out soul food, a new establishment markets its $28 foie gras burger. Shaw is experiencing a dramatic transformation, from “ghetto” to “gilded ghetto,” where white newcomers are rehabbing homes, developing dog parks, and paving the way for a third wave coffee shop on nearly every block.Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City is an in-depth ethnography of this gilded ghetto. Derek S. Hyra captures here a quickly gentrifying space in which long-time black residents are joined, and variously displaced, by an influx of young, white, relatively wealthy, and/or gay professionals who, in part as a result of global economic forces and the recent development of central business districts, have returned to the cities earlier generations fled decades ago. As a result, America is witnessing the emergence of what Hyra calls “cappuccino cities.” A cappuccino has essentially the same ingredients as a cup of coffee with milk, but is considered upscale, and is double the price. In Hyra’s cappuccino city, the black inner-city neighborhood undergoes enormous transformations and becomes racially “lighter” and more expensive by the year.


Media Files:
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Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City

Mon, 17 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For long-time residents of Washington, DC’s Shaw/U Street, the neighborhood has become almost unrecognizable in recent years. Where the city’s most infamous open-air drug market once stood, a farmers’ market now sells grass-fed beef and homemade duck egg ravioli. On the corner where AM.PM carryout used to dish out soul food, a new establishment markets its $28 foie gras burger. Shaw is experiencing a dramatic transformation, from “ghetto” to “gilded ghetto,” where white newcomers are rehabbing homes, developing dog parks, and paving the way for a third wave coffee shop on nearly every block.Race, Class, and Politics in the Cappuccino City is an in-depth ethnography of this gilded ghetto. Derek S. Hyra captures here a quickly gentrifying space in which long-time black residents are joined, and variously displaced, by an influx of young, white, relatively wealthy, and/or gay professionals who, in part as a result of global economic forces and the recent development of central business districts, have returned to the cities earlier generations fled decades ago. As a result, America is witnessing the emergence of what Hyra calls “cappuccino cities.” A cappuccino has essentially the same ingredients as a cup of coffee with milk, but is considered upscale, and is double the price. In Hyra’s cappuccino city, the black inner-city neighborhood undergoes enormous transformations and becomes racially “lighter” and more expensive by the year.


Media Files:
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Petrograd, 1917

Mon, 17 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The 1917 Bolshevik Revolution irrevocably changed the course of history, with consequences still being felt a century later. This book offers a dramatic depiction of the chaotic events of the revolution, drawn from selected firsthand accounts. Assembling extracts from letters, journals, diaries, and memoirs from a remarkably diverse cast of both Russians and foreign nationals who were there when the revolution broke, Petrograd, 1917 is a strikingly close-up account of these world-shaking events. Each entry is supplemented with a short introductory note that sets it in context, and the book is rounded out with more than seventy illustrations, including photographs of the Romanovs and the violence in the streets as well as propaganda posters, postcards to loved ones, and more. In these pages, the drama and terror of those days comes to life once more, a century on.  


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Utopia 1516-2016

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This year marks the five-hundredth anniversary of Thomas More’s widely influential book Utopia, and this volume brings together a number of scholars to consider the book, its long afterlife, and specifically its effects on political activists over the centuries. In addition to thorough studies of Utopia itself, and appraisals of More’s relationship with Erasmus, the book presents detailed studies of the effect of Utopia on early modern England and the Low Countries, as well as philosophical reflections on ideology and the utopian mind, and much more.  


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Unchosen

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Drawing on a decade of pioneering reporting, Mya Guarnieri Jaradat brings us an unprecedented and compelling look at the lives of asylum seekers and migrant workers in Israel, who hail mainly from Africa and Asia. From illegal kindergartens to anti-immigrant rallies, from detention centers to workers’ living quarters, from family homes to the high court, The Unchosen sheds light on one of the most little-known but increasingly significant aspects of Israeli society.   In highlighting Israel’s increasingly harsh treatment of these newcomers, The Unchosen presents a fresh angle on the Israel-Palestine conflict, calling into question the state’s perennial justification of national security for mistreatment of Palestinians. More fundamentally, this beautifully written book captures the voices and the struggles of some of the most marginalized and silenced people in Israel today.  


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Unchosen

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Drawing on a decade of pioneering reporting, Mya Guarnieri Jaradat brings us an unprecedented and compelling look at the lives of asylum seekers and migrant workers in Israel, who hail mainly from Africa and Asia. From illegal kindergartens to anti-immigrant rallies, from detention centers to workers’ living quarters, from family homes to the high court, The Unchosen sheds light on one of the most little-known but increasingly significant aspects of Israeli society.   In highlighting Israel’s increasingly harsh treatment of these newcomers, The Unchosen presents a fresh angle on the Israel-Palestine conflict, calling into question the state’s perennial justification of national security for mistreatment of Palestinians. More fundamentally, this beautifully written book captures the voices and the struggles of some of the most marginalized and silenced people in Israel today.  


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Albino

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In Albino, photojournalist Ana Palacios takes us inside a shelter for people with albinism and reveals what daily life is like for those living with the genetic condition in Tanzania. As Palacios documents, widespread ignorance of the causes of albinism has fed stigmatization, marginalization, persecution, and prejudice within the country. In addition to the social and physical threats that those with albinism face from other Tanzanians, they must also confront the strong possibility of skin cancer—a disease for which effective treatment options can be found in the West, but which in Africa tends to reduce life expectancy for those with albinism to under thirty years. Bearing witness to the efforts of a group of Spanish aid workers to promote health and education in Tanzania, Albino highlights their work on programs to improve patient treatment and training for local doctors. In these subtle, complex, and ultimately optimistic images, Palacios shows the moments of struggle, but also joy, that mark the lives of the residents of the shelter.


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Advising in Austerity

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Citizens Advice is a network of UK philanthropic agencies that provide free, authoritative advice to the populace on a number of subjects ranging from financial matters to legal issues. In an era where austerity measures and cutbacks are as dominant as they are today, how should these advice agencies go about their business? How can and should they make do—and serve the public—with less funding, to say nothing of worries of further cuts in the future? This book brings together a team of expert contributors, many of whom have worked in advice agencies themselves, to help map out approaches and plans for advisors in these difficult times.


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Brussels Art Nouveau

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This volume offers a detailed look at the city that could rightly claim to have been the capital of Art Nouveau–Brussels. The first comprehensive overview to the Art Nouveau experience in the city, it presents close looks at key buildings in eleven different parts of the city, buildings designed and decorated by some of the greatest names in the movement.


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Biggest Damned Hat

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Alaska history from the days before statehood is rich in stories of colorful characters—prospectors, settlers, heroes, and criminals. And right alongside them were judges and lawyers, working first to establish the rule of law in the territory, then, later, laying the groundwork for statehood.  The Biggest Damned Hat presents a fascinating collection of stories ranging from the gold rush to the 1950s. Built on interviews and oral histories from more than fifty lawyers who worked in Alaska before 1959, and buttressed by research into legal history, the book offers a brilliantly multifaceted portrait of law in the territory—from laying the groundwork for strong civil and criminal law to helping to secure mining and fishing rights to the Alaska Court-Bar fight, which pitted Alaska’s community of lawyers against its nascent Supreme Court. Bringing to life a time long past—when some of the best lawyers had little formal legal education—The Biggest Damned Hat fills in a crucial part of the story of Alaska’s history.  


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Boundaries and Beyond

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Using the concept of boundaries, both physical and cultural, to explain the development of China’s maritime southeast and its interactions across maritime East Asia and the broader Asian Seas, this book offers a new way of understanding Chinese history in the late Imperial period. Ng Chin-keong examines social boundaries between “us” and “them;” challenges to rigid demarcations posed by the state; movements of people, goods, and ideas across borders and among cultures; and the line between tradition and innovation. The result is a novel way of understanding China’s relations with neighboring territories and people as well as the nature of tradition in China and its persistence in the face of changing circumstances.  


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British and the Vietnam War

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

During the presidency of Lyndon Johnson, the British government sought to avoid escalation of the war in Vietnam and to help bring about peace, but the British were only able to exert little, if any, influence on the United States. In this in-depth analysis of Britain’s involvement in the Vietnam War, Nicholas Tarling draws on many overlooked papers in the British archives in order to describe the making of Britain’s policy toward the war and its careful negotiations of its connection to America. The result is a revealing account of the Anglo-American relationship that shows that the illusion of Britain’s ability to influence the United States in the conduct of war has had a long history.  


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Bewnans Ke: The Life of St. Ke

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In 2000, a sixteenth-century manuscript containing a copy of a previously unknown play in Middle Cornish, probably composed in the second half of the fifteenth century, was discovered among papers bequeathed to the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth. This eagerly awaited edition of the play, published in association with the National Library of Wales, offers a conservatively edited text with a facing-page translation, and a reproduction of the original text at the foot of the page – vital for comparative purposes. Also included are a complete vocabulary, detailed linguistic notes, and a thorough introduction dealing with the language of the play, the hagiographic background of the St Kea material and the origins of other parts in the work of Geoffrey of Monmouth. The theme of the play is the contention between St Kea, patron of Kea parish in Cornwall, and Teudar, a local tyrant. This is combined with a long section dealing with the dispute over tribute payments between King Arthur and the Emperor Lucius Hiberius; Queen Guinevere’s adultery with Arthur’s nephew Modred; the latter’s invitation to Cheldric and his Saxon hordes to come to Britain to assist him in his conflict with his uncle; and Arthur’s battle with Modred.


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Armchair Traveller's History of Beijing

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As China’s global influence continues to rise, its capital, Beijing, has become increasingly important—and a popular tourist destination, greeting close to five million international visitors each year. An Armchair Traveller’s History of Beijing presents the capital from its earliest beginnings as a prehistoric campsite for Peking Man through its fluctuating fortunes under a dozen dynasties. Home to capitals of several states over time, the site of modern Beijing has been ruled by Mongolian chiefs and the glorious Ming emperors, whose tombs can still be found on its outskirts. Through Beijing, we can experience Chinese history itself, including its more famous residents—including Khubilai Khan, Mulan, and Marco Polo. Special emphasis is placed on Beijing’s precarious heritage in the twenty-first century, as modern construction wipes out much of the old city to make way for homes for twenty million people. This book also offers detailed information on sites of tourist interest, including the pros and cons of different sections of the Great Wall and the best ways to see the Forbidden City and the fast-disappearing relics of the city’s Manchu and Maoist eras. A chapter on food and drink examines not only local delicacies, but the many other Chinese dishes that form part of Beijing’s rich dining traditions. With its blend of rich history and expert tips, An Armchair Traveller’s History of Beijing is an essential introduction to one of the world’s most remarkable cities.  


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Confronting Technopoly

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In 1992, Neil Postman presciently coined the term “technopoly” to refer to “the surrender of culture to technology.” This book brings together a number of contributors from different disciplinary perspectives to analyze technopoly both as a concept and as it is seen and understood in contemporary society. Contributors present both analysis of and strategies for managing socio-technical conflict, and they also open up a number of fruitful new lines of thought around emerging technological, social, and even psychological forms.  


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Concept and Measurement of Violence against Women and Men

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Both a guide to international debate on the measurement of gender-based violence (GBV) for policy purposes and a handbook on how those measurements can be best achieved, this book draws on cutting-edge statistical research to propose new measurement methods designed for promoting gender equality in the contemporary world.  As policy aimed at reducing violence or providing assistance to women rarely tackles the underlying issue of gender inequality, and vice versa, there exists a clear need for guidance. Covering homicide (and femicide specifically), rape and sexual assault, domestic and intimate partner violence, female genital mutilation, and human trafficking, and including practical tools such as definitions of key terms, indicators, and coordination mechanisms, this book provides a framework for measuring GBV that will shape service design, service delivery, and research practices. Engaging with the political nature of statistics and the links between knowledge and power, The Concept and Measurement of Violence against Women and Men has the potential to set new standards and guidelines for decades to come.


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Cactus

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Cacti are full of contradictions. Although many are found in the driest and most barren environments on earth, some grow exclusively in the branches of the rainforest canopy. Many species bristle with ferocious-looking spines, while other varieties are perfectly smooth. And while they might strike us as the most austere plants on earth, nearly all of them exhibit remarkable floral displays—some even larger than the plant itself. In Cactus, Dan Torre explores these unique plants as they appear all around the world and throughout art, literature, and popular culture.             As Torre shows, cacti have played a prominent role in human history for thousands of years. Some species were revered by ancient civilizations, playing a part in their religious ceremonies; other varieties have been cultivated for their medicinal properties and even as a source of dye, as in the case of the prickly pear cactus and the cochineal insect, the source of red carmine used in everything from food to lipstick. Torre examines how cacti have figured in low-footprint gardens, as iconic features of the landscapes of Westerns, and as a delicious culinary ingredient, from nutritious Nopal pads to alluring Pitaya—or Dragon—fruits. Entertaining and informative, this book will appeal to any of us who have admired these hardy, efficient plants.


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Chinese Epigraphy in Singapore, 1819-1911

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The history of Singapore’s Chinese community has been carved in stone and wood throughout the country. This book looks specifically at sixty-two temples, native-place associations, and guildhalls where epigraphs made between 1819 and 1911 are still found today. These early inscriptions provide first-hand historical information on the aspirations and contributions of the early generation of Chinese settlers in Singapore and reveal the many ways that the epigraph’s chosen structures—and the institutions they represent—have evolved over the years. These epigraphs, newly translated into English, open a window into the world of Chinese communities in Singapore, offering an important source for the study of both Chinese overseas as well as the place of Buddhism and Taoism within the political and social climate of colonial and postcolonial Singapore.  


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Charges (The Supplicants)

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In recent years, the refugee problem has become impossible to ignore, as multiple crises in the Middle East and Africa have driven thousands of desperate people to attempt Mediterranean crossings in hopes of reaching Europe, and safety. Many have died en route, and those who make it face a far from certain future, as European governments have proved reluctant to fully acknowledge, let alone commit to ameliorating, their plight. In Charges (The Supplicants), Nobel Prize–winning writer Elfriede Jelinek offers a powerful analysis of the plight of refugees, from ancient times to the present. She responds to the immeasurable suffering among those fleeing death, destruction, and political suppression in their home countries and, drawing on sources as widely separated in time and intent as up-to-the-minute blog postings and Aeschylus’s “The Supplicants,” Jelinek asks what refugees want, how we as a society view them, and what political, moral, and personal obligations they impose on us. Looking at the global refugee crisis of our current moment, she analyzes challenges to the political, social, and psychological realities in safe, comfortable Western countries, exploring what everyday language and media coverage reveal about Western perceptions of refugees. In a world where insecurity seems to spread by the day, Charges (The Supplicants)is a timely, unflinching account of how we treat those who come to us in need.


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Constructing Iron Europe

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Although the years between the world wars were ones of diplomatic tension in Europe, they also saw the construction of countless miles of international railroads on the continent. In Constructing Iron Europe, Irene Anastasiadou examines this era of railroad building and argues that, contrary to most conventional histories—which view railroad building as an aspect of nation- or empire-building—the construction in this era was deliberately transnational, and ultimately aimed at tightening links between nations and constructing a closer-knit European community.


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Essential Guide to Planning Law

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This textbook is designed to give students all the background and contextual information they will need to understand the regulatory structures that enable public and urban planning in the United Kingdom. Aimed at beginning students with little to no previous knowledge of law or planning, it enables them to understand the intersections of law and planning and more deeply engage with either subject.


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Essential Guide to Planning Law

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This textbook is designed to give students all the background and contextual information they will need to understand the regulatory structures that enable public and urban planning in the United Kingdom. Aimed at beginning students with little to no previous knowledge of law or planning, it enables them to understand the intersections of law and planning and more deeply engage with either subject.


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Ethnicity and Democracy in the Eastern Himalayan Borderland

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book presents a close look at the growth, success, and proliferation of ethnic politics on the peripheries of modern South Asia, built around a case study of the Nepal ethnic group that lives in the borderlands of Sikkim, Darjeeling, and east Nepal. Grounded in historical and ethnographic research, it critically examines the relationship between culture and politics in a geographical space that is home to a diverse range of ethnic identities, showing how new modes of political representation, cultural activism, and everyday politics have emerged from the region.  


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Ethics, Life and Institutions

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

General complaints about moral decay, however frequent and even justified they may be, are of little use. This book does not complain; it acts. Jan Sokol’s Ethics, Life and Institutions applies our ever improving knowledge in various fields to questions of morality in an effort to enhance our ability to discern different moral phenomena and to discuss them more precisely. With few exceptions, moral philosophy considers the acting person to be an autonomous, independent individual pursuing his or her own happiness. But in the context of social institutions—for example, in workplaces—it is often an organization’s goals, not an individual’s, that take precedence. In complex networks of organizations, morals take a different shape. Divided into three parts, this book begins by exploring basic notions such as freedom, life, responsibility, and justice, and their relationship to practical philosophy; looks to the main schools of Western thought in the search for a common moral foundation; and reintroduces the forgotten idea of biological and cultural heritage—an idea that could prove fundamental in addressing our responsibility not only to human lives, but also to the natural world. In a closing analysis, Sokol brings all of these moral concepts to bear on problems connected to the growing complexity of institutions, offering hope for a practical philosophy for the modern world.


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Design by the Book

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Today, China’s classical antiquity is often studied through recovered artifacts, but before this practice became widespread, scholars instead reconstructed the distant past through classical texts and transmitted illustrations. Among the most important illustrated commentaries was the Sanli tu, or Illustrations to the Ritual Classics, whose origins are said to date back to the great commentator Zheng Xuan. Design by the Book, which accompanies an exhibition at Bard Graduate Center Gallery, discusses the history and cultural significance of the Sanli tu in medieval China. The Sanli tu survives in a version produced around 960 by Nie Chongyi, a professor at the court of the Later Zhou (951–960) and Northern Song (960–1127) dynasties. It is now mostly remembered—if at all—for its controversial entries and as a quaint predecessor of the more empirical antiquarian scholarship produced since the mid-eleventh century. But such criticism hides the fact that the book remained a standard resource for more than 150 years, playing a crucial role in the Song dynasty’s perception of ancient ritual and construction of a Confucian state cult. Richly illustrated, Design by the Book brings renewed focus to one of China’s most fascinating medieval works.   


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Decoding the Front

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

At the turn of the twentieth century, communications technology was still fairly primitive. The pressure of World War I, with its long fronts and need for quick, reliable communications, helped change that, with planners and generals pushing innovation and technology along even as they deployed more unusual, less technological solutions as well.Decoding the Front details the many different methods of and approaches to communication in World War I. Karen Derycke presents accounts of the use of photography and film, radio, telephone, and telegraph at the front, but she also looks at older technologies, like letters and postcards. Animals, too, were pressed into service, she reminds us, exploring the use of homing pigeons, horses, and dogs, all performing different jobs in a war that was becoming increasingly mechanized all around them. The result is a clear picture of the communications methods available to those fighting World War I and the many ways they affected the course and outcome of the war.  


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Daily Lives of Muslims

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For many in the West, Islam has become a byword for terrorism. From 9/11 to the attacks in France and Belgium, our headlines have been dominated by images of violence and extremism tied to radical Islam. At the same time, as the Western world struggles to cope with the growing crisis of Middle Eastern refugees, many of whom are Muslim, there is a concern over how—or whether—Muslims will integrate into Western society. The fear is that Muslims who fail to assimilate will be branded as outsiders, creating segregated communities that might provide a fertile breeding ground for jihadists. Such reductive narratives, however, fail to take into account the actual lives of most Muslims living in the West, choosing to focus on a minority of violent extremists.  In The Daily Lives of Muslims, Nilüfer Göle provides an urgently needed corrective to this distorted image of Islam.  The Daily Lives of Muslims engages with members of Muslim communities in twenty-one cities across Europe where controversies over integration have arisen, from the banning of the veil in France to debates surrounding Sharia law in the United Kingdom. In doing so, Göle brings the voices of this neglected majority into the debate and uncovers a sincere desire among many Muslims to participate in the public sphere, a desire which is too often stifled by Western insecurity and attempts to suppress the outward signs of religious difference. This is a timely and urgently needed perspective on an issue that is likely to remain in public debate for many years to come.  


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Daily Lives of Muslims

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For many in the West, Islam has become a byword for terrorism. From 9/11 to the attacks in France and Belgium, our headlines have been dominated by images of violence and extremism tied to radical Islam. At the same time, as the Western world struggles to cope with the growing crisis of Middle Eastern refugees, many of whom are Muslim, there is a concern over how—or whether—Muslims will integrate into Western society. The fear is that Muslims who fail to assimilate will be branded as outsiders, creating segregated communities that might provide a fertile breeding ground for jihadists. Such reductive narratives, however, fail to take into account the actual lives of most Muslims living in the West, choosing to focus on a minority of violent extremists.  In The Daily Lives of Muslims, Nilüfer Göle provides an urgently needed corrective to this distorted image of Islam.  The Daily Lives of Muslims engages with members of Muslim communities in twenty-one cities across Europe where controversies over integration have arisen, from the banning of the veil in France to debates surrounding Sharia law in the United Kingdom. In doing so, Göle brings the voices of this neglected majority into the debate and uncovers a sincere desire among many Muslims to participate in the public sphere, a desire which is too often stifled by Western insecurity and attempts to suppress the outward signs of religious difference. This is a timely and urgently needed perspective on an issue that is likely to remain in public debate for many years to come.  


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Demystifying Evaluation

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

If a social service agency is going to be effective, it has to be evaluated regularly to determine whether it is meeting its goals and actually delivering the services it intends to. To do so well, however, requires skilled evaluators and an understanding within agencies of what their role entails. This brief introductory guidebook aims to demystify the work of evaluation, from basic concepts and approaches to choices of methods and implementation. Combining theoretical and practical aspects, it will be of use at all stages of considering, commissioning, conducting, and critiquing evaluations.


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Datafied Society

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As machine-readable data comes to play an increasingly important role in everyday life, researchers find themselves with rich resources for studying society. The novel methods and tools needed to work with such data require not only new knowledge and skills, but also a new way of thinking about best research practices. This book critically reflects on the role and usefulness of big data, challenging overly optimistic expectations about what such information can reveal; introducing practices and methods for its analysis and visualization; and raising important political and ethical questions regarding its collection, handling, and presentation.


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Delivering Social Welfare

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As the system of social welfare governance and delivery in the United Kingdom faces continued, radical change, this important book argues that this change is so extensive that we should consider it a fundamental transformation or revolution. Assessing twenty years of changes across the whole of the United Kingdom, Derek Birrell and Ann Marie Gray show how a new public governance perspective has replaced the dominance of public management, reflecting the increasingly plural and fragmented nature of public policy implementation. Drawing on examples across a range of policy areas, this comprehensive book unravels the complex ways in which changes in social policy and governance interact in the delivery of social welfare, making it essential reading for welfare researchers, students, and policy makers.


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Delivering Social Welfare

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As the system of social welfare governance and delivery in the United Kingdom faces continued, radical change, this important book argues that this change is so extensive that we should consider it a fundamental transformation or revolution. Assessing twenty years of changes across the whole of the United Kingdom, Derek Birrell and Ann Marie Gray show how a new public governance perspective has replaced the dominance of public management, reflecting the increasingly plural and fragmented nature of public policy implementation. Drawing on examples across a range of policy areas, this comprehensive book unravels the complex ways in which changes in social policy and governance interact in the delivery of social welfare, making it essential reading for welfare researchers, students, and policy makers.


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Directory of World Cinema: Iran 2

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Created at the intersection of religion and ever-shifting political, economic, and social environments, Iranian cinema produces some of the most critically lauded films in the world today. The first volume of the Directory of World Cinema: Iran turned the spotlight on the award-winning cinema of Iran, with particular attention to the major genres and movements, historical turning points, and prominent figures that have helped shape it. Considering a wide range of genres, including Film Farsi, new wave, war film, art house film, and women’s cinema, the book was greeted with enthusiasm by film studies scholars, students working on alternative or national cinema, and fans and aficionados of Iranian film. Building on the momentum and influence of its predecessor, Directory of World Cinema: Iran 2 will be welcomed by all seeking an up-to-date and comprehensive guide to Iranian cinema. Praise for the first volume “Successfully maps the long history of creativity, intellectualism and imagination of Iran. This book makes an important contribution to the area of Iranian cinema and film and is recommended to those who want to know more about Iran and its extraordinary cinema.”—Arezou Zalipour, Media International Australia


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From Depression to Devolution

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From Depression to Devolution is the first book in more than thirty years to offer an extended, detailed look at the Welsh economy in the twentieth century. Leon Gooberman tracks the Welsh economy through the many far-reaching economic upheavals of that time, which ranged from depression to war to deindustrialization to international economic integration. Throughout, Gooberman shows, Wales was a laboratory for the United Kingdom’s experiments in government intervention in the economy, from clearance of land left derelict by industry to investments in urban renewal.  


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Freaks of History

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Disability studies have long been the domain of medical and pedagogical academics. However, in recent years, the subject has outgrown its clinical origins. In Freaks of History, James MacDonald presents two dramatic explorations of disability within the wider themes of sexuality, gender, foreignness, and the other. Originally directed by Martin Harvey and performed by undergraduate students at the University of Exeter, Wellclose Square and Unsex Me Here analyze cultural marginalization against the backdrop of infamous historical events.             MacDonald, who is cerebral palsied, recognizes that disability narratives are rarely written by and for disabled people. Therefore his plays, accompanied by critical essays and director’s notes, are a welcome addition to the emerging discourse of Crip theory, and essential reading for disability students and academics alike.


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Fanfiction and the Author

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Whether you look at quantity, quality, or readership, we are in an unprecedented era of fan fiction. Thus far, however, the genre has been subject to relatively little rigorous qualitative or quantitative study—a problem that Judith May Fathallah remedies here through close analysis of fanfiction related to Sherlock, Supernatural, and Game of Thrones. Her large-scale study of the sites, receptions, and fan rejections of fanfic demonstrate how it often legitimates itself through traditional notions of authorship even as its explicit discussion and deconstruction of the author figure contests traditional discourses of authority and opens new spaces for writing that challenges the authority of media professionals.


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For Humanism

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Today, anti-humanism is a dominant, even definitive, feature of contemporary theory. This book sets out to challenge this by establishing the historical context that resulted in humanism’s eclipse, critiquing anti-humanism, and exploring alternative, neglected traditions and possible new directions.    Humanism is a diverse and complex tradition that may facilitate the renewal of progressive theory through the championing of human subjectivity, agency and freedom. Across four extended essays, David Alderson, Kevin Anderson, Barbara Epstein and Robert Spencer engage critically with the Marxist tradition, recent developments in poststructuralism, postcolonialism and queer theory.


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For Study and Delight

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Two hundred years have passed since the founding of the Leiden Print Room, an image archive that is now part of the Leiden University Libraries. This wide-ranging volume celebrates the archive’s long and rich history by presenting a complete survey of the Leiden collections, from rare drawings dated to the early sixteenth century to some of the most recent acquisitions. Among the artists represented are Jan Gossart, Barend van Orley, Carel Visser, and Emo Verkerk. Beautifully illustrated, this will be the standard reference on the Leiden Print Room for years to come.


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Fragments of Metropolis - Rhein & Ruhr

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Expressionism powerfully heralded the onset of the twenties. Today, the buildings that remain demonstrate great creativity with form and skillful use of light, color, and material, highlighting verticality and drama—the essence of the modern metropolis. With Fragments of Metropolis: Berlin, researcher Christoph Rauhut and photographer Niels Lehmann set out to document all the remaining expressionist buildings in Berlin. With Fragments of Metropolis—Rhein | Ruhr, Rauhut and Lehmann present the results of the next phase of this major undertaking, showing that the Rhine-Ruhr region had a similarly rich expressionist heritage.Lehmann’s new photographs are here set alongside drawings, an illustrated index of buildings, and maps that help the reader group the buildings by area, including Bochum, Bottrop, Dortmund, Duisburg, Düsseldorf, Essen, Gelsenkirchen, Hagen, Cologne, Münster, Oberhausen, and more. Simultaneously a celebration of a lost period and a reminder of the riches it has left to us, Fragments of Metropolis—Rhein | Ruhr is a stunning achievement of historical and artistic preservation.


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Goldstruck Limited Edition

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This beautifully illustrated book offers the first look back on a storied career by acclaimed jewelry designer Stephen Webster. Setting luxurious reproductions of Webster’s stunning creations alongside a charming collection of musings on his life and experience, it is a book like no other, a hybrid that enhances our understanding of Webster’s work and the genesis of his artistic vision.  Tracing Webster’s career back to his earliest days and his enrollment in a jewelry-making course at his local college in Rochester, Kent, the book is full of anecdotes and memories that offer autobiographical insights into the inspirations and influence that have fired his work for decades. The many photographs from his own collection amplify the intimate feel of the book, giving a true behind-the-scenes look at a life devoted to the making of beautiful objects. Enclosed in a luxurious amethyst-colored slipcase, the limited edition of Goldstruck is packaged with a unique illustrative print of the Wrath Ring from the Seven Deadly Sins collection, created exclusively by Stephen’s design studio for the publication of Goldstruck and signed by the author.  


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From the Land of the Snowlion

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Tibet is home to a rich artistic heritage, including some of the world’s most treasured works of material and textile art. Particularly well represented within the Tibetan tradition are carpets; metalwork, including poles, singing bowls, and tingsha prayer chimes, and furniture, especially intricately painted trunks and cabinets. This book is an attractively presented, authoritative overview. Drawing on a private collection, In the Land of the Snowlion brings together breathtakingly beautiful examples of traditional Tibetan material and textile art from the fifteenth to the twentieth centuries. Many of the objects pictured play a central role in Tibetan culture, but their uses have remained relatively little known. Hand-woven or hand-knotted sheep’s wool rugs, for example, were often crafted for seating or riding, while highly ornamented poles were sometimes designed to support paintings. This lavish, large-format book fills this gap in the knowledge about Tibetan art and culture, with 450 full-color illustrations, as well as essays by the collectors, Michael and Justyna Buddeberg, and contributions from a distinguished group of international specialists in Tibetan art: Koos de Jong, Christiane Kalantari, Petra Maurer, Ulrike Montigel, H. H. Neumann, Lisa Niedermayr, Bruno Richtsfeld, Rupert Smith, Friedrich Spuhler, Elena Tsareva, Hans Weihreter, and Thoma Wild. Some of the most beautiful and historically significant works of Tibetan art are in the Buddeberg Collection, and In the Land of the Snowlion makes them available to the public for the first time.  


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Sound System

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Musicians have often wanted to change the world, and many—from underground grime artists to mainstream pop icons—channel that desire through the political power of music. Music has a unique ability to unsettle the most fundamental political and social conventions—or, alternatively, to stabilize the status-quo.  Sound System is the story of one musician’s journey to discover what exactly makes music so powerful. Years of touring, protesting, and performing have given Dave Randall an insider’s view of the music industry, enabling him to shed light on the most tightly held secrets of celebrity, commodification, and culture. He finds remarkable examples of music as a force of social change as well as something that has been used to keep people in their place throughout history. From the Glastonbury Festival to the Arab Spring, Pop Idol to Trinidadian Carnival, Randall finds political inspiration across the musical spectrum.   A blistering, intelligent polemic about the political power of music, Sound System investigates the raves, riots, and revolution of contemporary culture to answer the question—how can we make music serve the interest of the many, rather than the few?  


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Stefan Hunstein

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The artist Stefan Hunstein journeyed to the Arctic in 2012 and returned with magical photographs of untouched landscapes. In their majesty and beauty, their immensity and their palpable, deadly cold, the photographs echo the visions of ice in painting and literature, especially during the Romantic era. Stefan Hunstein: In the Ice offers a selection of more than fifty of these breathtaking photographs for the first time. In these photographs, Hunstein, famous for his critical examination of contemporary history through the artistic processing of pre-existing pictures, is behind the camera himself, and his unusual work feels almost unreal in its outlines, shadows, and reflections. Luminous and haunting, the photographs were printed on glass using a special technique, and the reproductions gathered here capture the intersection of the fragile and the monstrous, the beauty of nature and the dangers it hides.  


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Spell of Capital

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book explores the tradition, impact, and contemporary relevance of two key ideas from Western Marxism: Georg Lukács’s concept of reification, in which social aspects of humanity are viewed in objectified terms, and Guy Debord’s concept of the spectacle, where the world is packaged and presented to consumers in uniquely mediated ways. Bringing the original, yet now often forgotten, theoretical contexts for these terms back to the fore, Samir Gandesha and Johan Hartle offer a new look at the importance of Western Marxism from its early days to the present moment—and reveal why Marxist cultural critique must continue to play a vital role in any serious sociological analysis of contemporary society.


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Spectacle and Leisure in Paris

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Through the lens of seven scholars, this book examines fine art and commercial design as they both reflected and helped create the vibrant culture of public spectacle in late nineteenth-century Paris. Posters and prints circulated across the city, as the new art form of cinema flourished, all part of a diverse urban climate of leisure that was particularly French. These rich visual materials served to promote the careers and talents of such celebrities as Jane Avril, Loïe Fuller, and Sarah Bernhardt. Alphonse Mucha and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec developed the potential of color lithography to meet the demands of these stars, while fine artists ranging from Edgar Degas and Édouard Manet to Pablo Picasso and Édouard Vuillard focused on such spectacles as the racetrack, ballet, café-concert, theater, and opera, asserting them as defining elements of Parisian modernity in this image-saturated milieu.  


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Syntax of Dutch

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Syntax of Dutch series synthesizes the currently available syntactic knowledge of Dutch. In this first of three volumes on verbs and verb phrases, Hans Broekhuis and Norbert Corver offer a general introduction to verbs, including a review of verb classifications and discussions on inflection, tense, mood, modality, and aspect. The book continues with a comprehensive discussion of complementation, or argument structure and verb frame alternations.


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Syntax of Dutch

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Syntax of Dutch series synthesizes the currently available syntactic knowledge of Dutch. In this second of three volumes on verbs and verb phrases, Hans Broekhuis and Norbert Corver, continuing the discussion of complementation from Volume I, provide a focus on clausal complements, including a detailed consideration of finite and infinitival argument clauses, complex verb constructions, and verb clustering.


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Arguments Against the Christian Religion in Amsterdam by Saul Levi Morteira, Spinoza's Rabbi

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This is the first book to offer a translation into English—as well as a critical study—of a Spanish treatise written in about 1650 by Rabbi Saul Levi Morteira, whose most renowned congregant was Baruch Spinoza. Aimed at encouraging the practice of halachic Judaism among the Amsterdam-based descendants of conversos, Spanish and Portuguese Sephardic Jews who had been forced to convert to Christianity, the book stages a dialogue between two conversos that ultimately leads to a vision of a Jewish homeland—an outcome that Morteira thought was only possible through his program for rejudaization.


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Andrea Bischof

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Andrea Bischof is one of Austria’s most revered contemporary artists. One of the most recognizable aspects of her paintings is their overall harmony and controlled coloration, reflecting the influence of the French impressionists and post-impressionist movements like the Nabis and Fauves. Laying down layer after layer of dazzling tones, she gradually builds depth into her paintings until they seem to pulse and breathe.            Andrea Bischof: Color Truth chronicles Bischof’s development from the monochrome works of her early career to her later, more experimental works on paper to the strongly colored, large canvases of her most recent Pulsations series. Featuring more than eighty full-color illustrations, the book provides a stunning overview of Bischof’s work, while an in-depth interview with the artist offers fascinating insights into their conception and creation.  


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Alaska on the Go

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Every year, nearly two million tourists visit Alaska, and at least half of them spend time exploring the state’s waterways. For families that want to do so in a more independent fashion than a cruise ship or guided tour would allow, Erin Kirkland has written the perfect guide to navigating the state’s unique ferry system.   A staple of coastal transportation since the 1950s, the Alaska Marine Highway System is a vital link to cities that are often inaccessible except by air. Alaska on the Go offers fascinating accounts of both the small coastal towns and the larger population centers serviced by the highway along with easy-to-navigate route descriptions, helpful packing lists, and tips for inland and onboard adventures. Portable and personable, and covering all thirty routes that make up the Alaska Marine Highway System, Alaska on the Go is the perfect companion for the intrepid traveler.


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Warlord Democrats in Africa

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Democratization after war has been identified as a crucial mechanism to build peace in war-ridden societies, by resolving conflict through ballots rather than bullets. But, an often ignored by-product of the reliance on elections is that military leaders often become an integral part of the new democratic system, using resources and networks generated by the previous war to dominate the emerging political landscape.  Warlord Democrats in Africa brings together a range of contributors to answer a crucial and overlooked question: What is the effect of the inclusion of ex-military leaders into electoral politics on post-war security? The essays in this volume examine whether it is possible for warlord democrats to make a positive contribution by shepherding their wartime constituencies to support the building of peace and democracy, or whether they are more likely to use their electoral platforms to sponsor political violence and keep war-affected communities mobilized through aggressive discourses. Containing a wealth of fresh empirical detail and theoretical insight, and focusing on some of Africa's most high-profile political figures, from Paul Kagame to Rick Mahar and Afonso Dhlakama, Warlord Democrats in Africa offers a crucial analysis of democratization after conflict.  


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Warlord Democrats in Africa

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Democratization after war has been identified as a crucial mechanism to build peace in war-ridden societies, by resolving conflict through ballots rather than bullets. But, an often ignored by-product of the reliance on elections is that military leaders often become an integral part of the new democratic system, using resources and networks generated by the previous war to dominate the emerging political landscape.  Warlord Democrats in Africa brings together a range of contributors to answer a crucial and overlooked question: What is the effect of the inclusion of ex-military leaders into electoral politics on post-war security? The essays in this volume examine whether it is possible for warlord democrats to make a positive contribution by shepherding their wartime constituencies to support the building of peace and democracy, or whether they are more likely to use their electoral platforms to sponsor political violence and keep war-affected communities mobilized through aggressive discourses. Containing a wealth of fresh empirical detail and theoretical insight, and focusing on some of Africa's most high-profile political figures, from Paul Kagame to Rick Mahar and Afonso Dhlakama, Warlord Democrats in Africa offers a crucial analysis of democratization after conflict.  


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Voyage to War

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The outbreak of World War II in 1939 found Peter Dulley (1903–41) living and working in Hong Kong, where he had met and married Therese Sander. Soon, this weekend sailor found himself called up as part of the Royal Hong Kong Naval Volunteers, as part of which he was eventually assigned to captain a five-hundred-ton tugboat on the long journey from Hong Kong to Aden. Therese, meanwhile, was evacuated to the Philippines, and then to Australia—with but one brief intermediary stop in Hong Kong, which was to be the last time she saw Peter, who would die in World War II during the Japanese invasion of Hong Kong in 1941. ​This book, assembled with loving care by Therese and Peter’s son—who was born in the Philippines soon after the evacuation of Hong Kong—gathers six years of letters from Peter to Therese. Equal parts moving and funny, dramatic and quotidian, the letters paint a wonderful portrait of daily life in Hong Kong and at sea in the early days of the war. As World War II recedes ever further into the past, A Voyage to War reminds us that it was fought by real people, who tried to hold on to what they cared about even as the war threw everything into deadly disarray.


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Volcanoes

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Ashes were already falling, not as yet very thickly. I looked round: a dense black cloud was coming up behind us, spreading over the earth like a flood.   That’s Pliny the Younger, writing to Tacitus about the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 CE, one of many volcanic eruptions that have become part of the story of human history. We have always, it seems, been simultaneously fascinated and terrified by volcanoes, and this book brings together an unforgettable selection of firsthand accounts from around the world and through the centuries. In these pages, anonymous seventeenth-century seafarers tell of exploding islands, Alexander Von Humboldt and Charles Darwin show us volcanoes through the eyes of developing science, and artists sketch the spectacular London sunsets created by the eruption of Krakatoa, half the world away. As the years pass, words and paintings give way to the first photograph of an eruption, and eventually to detailed satellite imagery, but the awesome force of volcanoes still comes through, sublime and spectacular. As we were reminded in 2010 when the eruption of Iceland’s Eyjafjallajökull snarled travel throughout Europe, volcanoes remain powerful and unpredictable even today. In the pages of this book, we can appreciate their majesty from a safe distance.  


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Victory in the Kitchen

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

When World War II began, Britain had an immediate crisis on its hands: its ability to import food drastically curtailed, the island would very quickly have to find ways both to produce more and use less. For that latter task, the kitchen was the headquarters, and this little book presents the battle plan. Drawn from scattered sources in the archives of the Imperial War Museums and presented here in a charming gift book, the recipes of Victory is in the Kitchen helped guide British cooks as they coped with unprecedented scarcity and restrictions. Rustling up creative dishes out of meager rations, the recipes gathered here include scrap bread pudding, potato pastry, and sheep’s heart pie, as well as adapted English standbys like Lancashire hot pot, Queen’s Pudding, and crumpets. ​Interwoven with the recipes are colorful reproductions of inspirational wartime posters, while an introduction sets the historical context. The resulting package is the perfect gift for any cook, a reminder of a time when ration books and recipes had to be made to work together.


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Thomas Aquinas's Relics as Focus for Conflict and Cult in the Late Middle Ages

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book offers a new way of looking at Saint Thomas Aquinas—not as a living man, but as a posthumous source of relics. Marika Räsänen delves deep into the strange relationship between Aquinas’s physical remains and the devotional moments they enabled—in many cases in situations where the actual relics were not even present, but were only re-created verbally, pictorially, or allegorically. Both the actual relics and these extended manifestations of them, Räsänen shows, were equally real to the medieval spectator, though the question of the material presence of Aquinas’s remains became increasingly important over time amid the political tumult of southern Italy.  


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Taking Up McLuhan's Cause

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book brings together a number of prominent scholars to explore a relatively under-studied area of Marshall McLuhan’s thought: his idea of formal cause and the role that formal cause plays in the emergence of new technologies and in structuring societal relations. Aiming to open a new way of understanding McLuhan’s thought in this area, and to provide methodological grounding for future media ecology research, the book runs the gamut, from contributions that directly support McLuhan’s arguments to those that see in them the germs of future developments in emergent dynamics and complexity theory.


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Tony Cragg

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

British artist Tony Cragg has risen to become one of the most important international sculptors of the present day. From the beginning his creative work has found inspiration in nature as a model. His large-format sculptures made from metal, marble, wood, and glass are derived from organic natural shapes. The materials used are integral to each sculpture’s means of expression. Each piece is developed through a time-consuming process, during which the work is formed and the material and surface are treated. As a result, Cragg’s sculptures literally “grow” into space, often evoking through their shape or movement endlessly growing structures. Created to accompany an exhibition at the Hessisches Landesmuseum Darmstadt, this book provides an in-depth look at Cragg’s newest works, many seen for the first time. It also showcases specimens from his remarkable personal collection of fossils and minerals that are the inspiration for many of his works. Illustrated with fifty color plates, Tony Cragg: Unnatural Selection celebrates the work of a significant sculptor whose work continues to surprise and amaze.  


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Tiger Remembers

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Born in the Year of the Fire Tiger, Ann Wee moved to Singapore in 1950 to marry into a Singaporean Chinese family, entering into a new world of cultural expectations and domestic rituals. She went on to become a pioneer in Singapore’s fledging social welfare department and is often described as the founding mother of social work in Singapore. In A Tiger Remembers, she draws on her decades of experience getting to know the many shapes and forms of the Singapore family and witnessing how they transformed since the ’50s.   Wee’s talent is for remembering and paying homage to the things history books often deem insignificant—things that can contain some of the most illuminating details about the day to day inner workings of families from many backgrounds, such as terms of endearment; the emotional nuance in social relations; questions of hygiene; the stories of convicts; tales of ghost wives and changeling babies; anecdotes from rural clan settlements and migrant dormitories; and the migration of families from squatter settlements into public housing. Affectionately observed and wittily narrated, with a deep appreciation of how far Singapore has come, this book brings to life generations of social change through a focus on the institution of the family.  


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Taiwan by Design

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The influence of Taiwan on contemporary design is strong and growing. Focusing on the vibrant and cutting-edge designs being created in Taiwan today, curator Annie Ivanova offers here the first comprehensive compendium of the elements and influences of the growing Asian design aesthetic emerging from Taiwan. Ivanova has chosen eighty-eight objects that exemplify Taiwan’s design excellence, in which centuries of craft traditions continue to be practiced alongside the latest developments in digital media. Among the objects discussed are technological innovations such as the smart scooter, digital helmet, and reengineered skateboard, in addition to ecofurniture, Ming–Dynasty-inspired objects, and even a burial urn. Ivanova shows how Taiwanese designers are finding inspiration in the vanishing worlds of night markets and temples and how classical elements from colonial architecture and are being reimagined for the home. Taiwan by Design showcases the best in Taiwanese product design, revealing that it is undoubtedly among the most interesting and innovative work in international design today.


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Player's Power to Change the Game

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In recent decades, what could be considered a gamification of the world has occurred, as the ties between games and activism, games and war, and games and the city grow ever stronger. In this book, Anne-Marie Schleiner explores a concept she calls “ludic mutation,” a transformative process in which the player, who is expected to engage in the preprogrammed interactions of the game and accept its imposed subjective constraints, seizes back some of the power otherwise lost to the game itself. Crucially, this power grab is also relevant beyond the game because players then see the external world as material to be reconfigured, an approach with important ramifications for everything from social activism to contemporary warfare.


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People's History of the Russian Revolution

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Russian Revolution may be the most misunderstood and misrepresented event in modern history, its history told in a mix of legends and anecdotes. In A People's History of the Russian Revolution, Neil Faulkner sets out to debunk the myths and pry fact from fiction, putting at the heart of the story the Russian people who are the true heroes of this tumultuous tale. In this fast-paced introduction, Faulkner tells the powerful narrative of how millions of people came together in a mass movement, organized democratic assemblies, mobilized for militant action, and overturned a vast regime of landlords, profiteers, and warmongers.   Faulkner rejects caricatures of Lenin and the Bolsheviks as authoritarian conspirators or the progenitors of Stalinist dictatorship, and forcefully argues that the Russian Revolution was an explosion of democracy and creativity—and that it was crushed by bloody counter-revolution and replaced with a form of bureaucratic state-capitalism.   Grounded by powerful first-hand testimony, this history marks the centenary of the Revolution by restoring the democratic essence of the revolution, offering a perfect primer for the modern reader.


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Palestine's Horizon

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

After enduring years of violent occupation, the Palestinian community is now exploring different avenues for peace. These include the pursuit of rights under international law in venues such as the UN and International Criminal Court, while establishing a new emphasis on global solidarity and non-violent action through the Boycott Divestment Sanctions (BDS) movement, among others. Richard Falk has been working within and studying the Israel/Palestine conflict for several decades, and in Palestine's Horizon, he looks closely at these transformations, offering a close analysis of one of the most controversial issues of our times.   Falk explores the intricacies and interconnections within the history and politics of Israel and Palestine, while delving into the complicated relationships the conflict has created within the global community. He refutes the notion that the Palestinian struggle is a lost cause and offers new tactics and possibilities for change. He also puts the ongoing conflict in context, reflecting on the legacy of Edward Said and drawing on the importance of his ideas as a humanist model for peace that is mindful of the formidable difficulties that come with achieving a solution to the long struggle. One of the most established and authoritative voices on the conflict, Falk now presents his most sustained and focused historical overview to date.  


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Palestine's Horizon

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

After enduring years of violent occupation, the Palestinian community is now exploring different avenues for peace. These include the pursuit of rights under international law in venues such as the UN and International Criminal Court, while establishing a new emphasis on global solidarity and non-violent action through the Boycott Divestment Sanctions (BDS) movement, among others. Richard Falk has been working within and studying the Israel/Palestine conflict for several decades, and in Palestine's Horizon, he looks closely at these transformations, offering a close analysis of one of the most controversial issues of our times.   Falk explores the intricacies and interconnections within the history and politics of Israel and Palestine, while delving into the complicated relationships the conflict has created within the global community. He refutes the notion that the Palestinian struggle is a lost cause and offers new tactics and possibilities for change. He also puts the ongoing conflict in context, reflecting on the legacy of Edward Said and drawing on the importance of his ideas as a humanist model for peace that is mindful of the formidable difficulties that come with achieving a solution to the long struggle. One of the most established and authoritative voices on the conflict, Falk now presents his most sustained and focused historical overview to date.  


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Pablo Picasso

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Although he is best known for pioneering Cubism, Picasso’s works over a prolific seven-decade career are characterized by an impressive stylistic eclecticism and engage with almost every major artistic movement that followed in his wake. Pablo Picasso provides a concise overview of the great Spanish painter, sculptor, and printmaker’s life and work, with insights into the creation of key works and rarely seen photographs of Picasso’s studio from the David Douglas Duncan collection that shed light on his vibrant personality and artistic process. Lively, accessible, and lavishly illustrated, this new book offers a concise introduction to the life and work of this great master of art.


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Pistiros VI

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This sixth and final installment in the Pistiros series devoted to excavations in that former Greek emporium in inland Thrace (today Bulgaria) closes an extraordinary, three-decade-long collaboration among Bulgarian, Czech, and British classical archaeologists. Pistiros VI details the most important find by the Charles University Prague team of the joint project: a hoard consisting of 549 silver and three gold coins that probably belonged to a mercenary (and likely gambler) serving in Lysimachus’s army. The hoard is unique both in being uncovered during regular archaeological excavation, which enabled the team to record precisely the situation of its deposition, as well as in the types of coins it contained, imitated by the first coinage of Central European Celts just after the return of part of their army to an area in modern Bohemia. Illustrated throughout and featuring a full catalog of coins certain to delight numismatists, Pistiros VI is a capstone achievement of great importance in the fields of archaeology and classical studies.


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Romaphobia

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Demonized by the media and persecuted for hundreds of years, Roma communities are among the most persecuted groups in Europe. Romaphobia explores this complicated history and reveals that little has been done to identify—and thus attack—the root causes of discrimination against the Roma.   Aiden McGarry identifies the origins of this discrimination in the early history of the European nation state, and he argues that the Roma, unfairly characterized as landless nomads, have been excluded from national communities because they don’t conform to the idea of “belonging” to a particular territory. By understanding Romaphobia as a prejudice rooted in European notions of territoriality, McGarry contends, we are better equipped to find a way towards the inclusion of Roma in society, an understanding that has ramifications beyond the Roma and can provide vital insights for similarly marginalized communities across the world.  


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Revolutionary Learning

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Going beyond previous books on Marxism and education, Revolutionary Learning is a groundbreaking collection of essays exploring the Marxist and feminist theories of education and learning. Scholar-activists Sara Carpenter and Sharazad Mojab closely examine the core philosophical concepts behind Marxist analysis of learning and extend its critique with significant implications for critical education scholarship, research, and practice by drawing upon work by feminist, anti-racist, and anti-colonial scholars.    They reconsider the contributions of Marx, Gramsci, and Freire to educational theory from an explicitly feminist perspective, moving Marxist analysis of education into a more complex relation to patriarchal and imperialist capitalism. Their distinctive approach focuses on the nature of schooling and educational institutions, and pushes past previous literature on Marxist-feminism.  Revolutionary Learning’s significance lies not only in its contribution to theory, but also in its engagement with pedagogical practice through careful attention to the daily work of educators and how this can be connected to the broader environment of public policy, civil society, and the market.   


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Rafael Soriano

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Cuban painter Rafael Soriano (1920–2015) was an acclaimed master of geometric abstraction and a global figure in the twentieth-century art world—his work resonated with such international artists of Latin American origin as Roberto Matta, Rufino Tamayo, and Wifredo Lam. As a result of the revolution in Cuba in 1959, Soriano left the country in 1962 for the United States. The effect of the Cuban revolution on his art as well as his aesthetics in general are the focus of this book, an unprecedented examination of his entire oeuvre. Featuring more than ninety paintings, pastels, and drawings, this bilingual English-Spanish catalog for an accompanying exhibition at the McMullen Museum of Art, Boston College; the Long Beach Museum of Art; and the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at Florida International University begins with a contextual analysis of Soriano’s relationship to the Cuban avant-garde and his position within the emerging mid-century modernists. Essays then trace his evolving styles, examining his work through the lens of surrealism and European and Latin American transnational aesthetics. The idea of exile and struggle is a leitmotif and is framed within questions of transcendence and spirituality. Taken together, the contributions suggest both Soriano’s rootedness in Latin America and his striving for universality. The most comprehensive exploration of Soriano’s work to date, Rafael Soriano: The Artist as Mystic deftly takes the idea of exile and struggle so prominent in the artist’s work and frames it within important questions of transcendence and spirituality. This book will be essential reading for anyone intrigued by Latin American and modern art.  


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Race, Gangs and Youth Violence

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As we bear witness to continued protest and debate over the deaths of black youth at the hands of would-be protectors, this book challenges current thinking about serious youth violence, gangs, and their racialization by the media and the police. Written by an expert with more than fourteen years of field experience in London, it brings together ethnographic research, theory, and practice to influence policy. Placing gangs and urban violence in a broader social and political economic context, Anthony Gunter argues that government policy and associated funding for anti-gang work is counterproductive, due to entrenched prejudices. The street gang label is unfairly linked by both the media and police to black urban youth and street-based lifestyles, cultures, and friendship groups, leading to the further criminalization of innocent black youth via police targeting. For anyone concerned about youth violence and social justice—from community members and social service practitioners to policy makers and scholars within the multidisciplinary field of youth studies—Race, Gangs and Youth Violence is a timely, essential read.


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Reflective Practice and Learning from Mistakes in Social Work

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Reflecting back on one’s work to determine where one succeeded or failed is crucial in any field, but it’s particularly important in social work, where mistakes can cause real harm. In this book, Alessandro Sicora argues for the value of reflecting on our professional mistakes, and he offers a number of tools, for individuals and groups—backed by real-world examples—designed to help social workers at every stage of their career establish a regular, reliable, and effective reflective practice.


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Romanesque - Picasso

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This beautifully illustrated book, the catalog for an exhibition on view at the National Museum of Art of Catalonia in Barcelona and coorganized with the Picasso Museum in Paris, explores important affinities between Picasso and Romanesque art. Using two key moments as starting points, Juan José Lahuerta and Emilia Philippot first discuss the summer of 1906, when Picasso stayed in the village of Gòsol in the Catalan Pyrenees, and then turn to 1934, as he visited the Romanesque art collections of what is today the National Museum of Art of Catalonia. Picasso’s discovery of the Romanesque nurtured his interest in other “primitive” or ethnographic art, later echoed in such decisive works as Les Demoiselles d’Avignon. Importantly, while Lahuerta and Philippot avoid any attempt to trace direct Romanesque influences on Picasso—as they note, his work consistently escapes such linear accounts—they do demonstrate that Picasso’s interest in the twelfth-century sculpture Virgin from Gósol, his lifelong fascination with the theme of the crucifixion, and his study of the skull all reflect elements that were also of major importance in Romanesque art and architecture. What these shared features allow, Lahuerta and Philippot ultimately argue, is not only a richer understanding of Picasso’s work, but also a rediscovering and reinvention of Romanesque art in our contemporary moment, causing the medieval to become refreshingly and paradoxically modern.


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Roman Villa of Hoogeloon and the Archaeology of the Periphery

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How did the Roman villa complex of Hoogeloon develop in the relatively poor and peripheral hinterland of the Lower Rhine? In this volume, leading specialists in the field offer a multidimensional perspective on the social dynamics that led to the villa’s creation, including the central role played by military and urban networks and native social structures. The essays here examine everything from town and country relations and monetization to the agrarian economy of the region and the ethnic identity of the inhabitants. Shining new light on this key site and the integration of marginal areas in the Roman Empire, this book is essential reading for anyone interested in a comparative analysis of the Roman countryside.


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Good Times, Bad Times

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Two-thirds of UK government spending now goes to the welfare state, and where that money is spent—healthcare, education, pensions, benefits—is at the heart of major political and public debate. Much of that debate is dominated by the myth that the population is divided into those who benefit from the welfare state and those who pay into it. But this groundbreaking book—fully revised in this second edition with current data, discussion of key policy changes, and a new preface reflecting on the changed UK political context following the 2015 election and 2016 Brexit vote—uses extensive research and survey evidence to challenge that view. It shows that our complex and ever-changing lives mean that all of us rely on the welfare state throughout our lifetimes, not just a small welfare-dependent minority. Using everyday life stories and engaging graphics, top UK social policy expert John Hills clearly demonstrates how the facts are far removed from the popular misconceptions.


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Hoarse Oaths of Fife

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Like so many of the major battles of World War I, the Battle of Loos, in September 1915, was a tragedy for fighting men on both sides. It was, however, particularly devastating for Scottish soldiers, as the Highland Light Infantry, the Seaforths, and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders bore the brunt of the German machine gun attacks, to devastating effect. This novel tells the story of the Battle of Loos through the eyes of Kenny Roberts, a soldier serving with the Fourth Black Watch alongside the Punjabi Muslims of the Vaughan's Rifles; it brings the tragedy of Loos to life in vivid, unforgettable detail.  


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Henry Moore

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Henry Moore (1898–1986), known as the “Picasso of Sculpture,” is regarded as one of the most important sculptors of the twentieth century and the epitome of the modern artist. He influenced the history of twentieth-century sculpture more decisively than anyone else and was one of the first contemporary sculptors to install his work in public spaces throughout the world. His oeuvre has been a lasting source of inspiration for generations of artists, from Hans Arp and Alberto Giacometti to today’s younger generation of sculptors. This book offers a sumptuous catalog of some his most significant works, revealing the interrelationship between nature and abstraction often typified in his sculptures. Moore’s work was revolutionary in its use of voids, openings, and holes that heighten the sculptural, three-dimensional effect of his pieces. Through one hundred and fifty color plates, this book illustrates the innovation of Moore’s work, which led to his rise as a dominant figure in modern sculpture, and demonstrates his collaborative influence on other generations of artists.  


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Hans Hofmann

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The painter Hans Hofmann (1880–1966), who was a friend of Picasso, Braque, Matisse, the Fauves, and Robert and Sonia Delaunay, lived in Paris during the early twentieth century and was heavily inspired by the art being produced there. He later went on to found an art school in Munich in 1915 and achieved international fame as an art teacher. In 1932 he immigrated to the United States and later opened the Hans Hofmann School of Fine Arts in New York, where he had a profound influence on a new generation of American artists, including Jackson Pollock, Helen Frankenthaler, Frank Stella, and Barnett Newman.Hans Hofmann: Creation in Form and Color presents a lushly illustrated retrospective of his work, including his brightly colored paintings, watercolors, and drawings. It offers a close look at his role as a significant figure in abstract expressionism and American modernism during the twentieth century as well as his fundamental influence as a teacher on the development of modern art in America.  


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Literature of Wales

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Literature of Wales provides a concise and informative guide to Welsh literature from the earliest surviving poetry of Taliesin and Aneirin in the sixth century - the oldest attested vernacular literature in Europe. The book traces the flowering of medieval Welsh literature and the developments of the Renaissance period in Wales up to the Welsh literary revival of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries, which also saw the rapid burgeoning of 'Anglo-Welsh' writing - literature in English written out of a Welsh background. It concludes by surveying the contemporary situation in the literatures of both languages. Dafydd Johnston here gives a balanced critical assessment relating the literature to its historical background. Numerous extracts translated from Welsh and quotations in English give the general reader a taste of the richness of Welsh literature.


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Leading Public Design

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Leading Public Design offers compelling insights into what it takes to lead public and social organizations to create better public futures. Drawing on more than a decade of work in public sector innovation—as director of an influential governmental innovation lab, as an academic and lecturer, and as a former management consultant—Christian Bason combines his rich contextual understanding of public service outcomes and design methods to provide lessons for those in public work.Leading Public Design develops a clear framework for understanding and mastering an emerging management practice: the ability to redesign public organizations from the outside-in, shaping policies and services so that they are truly useful and meaningful, while leveraging all of society’s resources to produce better outcomes. Incorporating his own extensive practical experience with new research conducted from 2010 to 2014 among public managers in the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, Finland, and Denmark, Bason demonstrates how this new practice could be catalyzed using approaches from ethnographic field work, pattern recognition, visualization, scenarios, and prototyping.


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Life at the End of Life

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Artist and scholar Marcia Brennan serves as Artist in Residence at the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, and the experience of seeing, close-up, the transitional states and transformational visions involved in the approaching end of life raised countless questions about the intersection of life, death, and art.             Those questions are at the heart of this unique book. Bridging disparate fields, including art history, medical humanities, and religious studies, Life at the End of Life explores the ways in which art can provide a means for rendering otherwise abstract, deeply personal, and spiritual experiences vividly concrete and communicable, even as they remain open-ended and transcendent. In the face of death, suffering, and uncertainty, Brennan shows how artistic expression can offer valuable aesthetic and metaphysical avenues for understanding and for making meaning.  


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Prague

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Since its birth as a city, Prague's appearance, character, and life have been shaped by the River Vltava. The flow of the river enabled the settlement of the Prague basin, the creation of the capital of the Bohemian Kingdom, and, later, the Czech state. In the course of their joint history, the city has gradually tamed the river, and as Prague has changed, so too has its river. This exquisitely illustrated book celebrates both the historical and living bond between Prague and the Vltava. After first exploring the river’s major transformations—most radically those of the nineteenth century, when the river banks became riverside roads, centers of social life, and elegant promenades all overhung with architecturally imposing grand houses—Kateřina Bečková takes readers on a stroll, in photographs, through the contemporary city. She tells the stories of its flour mills, bridges, islands, embankments, monuments, and community spaces, linking unique, riverside panoramic views of the town with fascinating insight into the evolution of Prague’s everyday life over time. Also including historical and documentary illustrations, maps, and lists of key figures, locations, and landmarks (both today’s and yesterday’s) with the various names they have had over the centuries, Prague: A City and Its River is both a cultural guide and beautiful work of art—an enlightening homage to the river that continues to shape one of the most historic and beautiful capitals of Eastern Europe.


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Omnia Sunt Communia

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In Omnia Sunt Communia, Massimo de Angelis offers a radical political economy, illuminating the steps necessary to arrive at a post-capitalist world. By conceptualizing the idea of commons not just as common goods but as a set of social systems, de Angelis shows their pervasive presence in everyday life, and he maps out a strategy for total social transformation.   From the micro to the macro, de Angelis unveils the commons as fields of power relations—shared space, objects, and subjects—that explode the limits of daily life under capitalism. He exposes attempts to co-opt the commons, through the use of seemingly innocuous words such as “participation” and “governance,” and he reveals the potential for radical transformation rooted in the social reproduction of our communities, life, work, and society as a whole.  


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Omnia Sunt Communia

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In Omnia Sunt Communia, Massimo de Angelis offers a radical political economy, illuminating the steps necessary to arrive at a post-capitalist world. By conceptualizing the idea of commons not just as common goods but as a set of social systems, de Angelis shows their pervasive presence in everyday life, and he maps out a strategy for total social transformation.   From the micro to the macro, de Angelis unveils the commons as fields of power relations—shared space, objects, and subjects—that explode the limits of daily life under capitalism. He exposes attempts to co-opt the commons, through the use of seemingly innocuous words such as “participation” and “governance,” and he reveals the potential for radical transformation rooted in the social reproduction of our communities, life, work, and society as a whole.  


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On Western Terrorism - New Edition

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Admired by some, condemned by others, and feared by all—the military might of the West is undeniably colossal. In On Western Terrorism, world-renowned intellectual Noam Chomsky discusses Western power and propaganda with filmmaker and investigative journalist Andre Vltchek. It offers the perfect introduction to Chomsky’s significant political thought and provides an accessible approach for anyone who wishes to better understand the West’s fraught role in the world.   Beginning with stories of the New York newsstand where Chomsky started his political education as a teenager, the discussion broadens out to encompass colonialism, imperial control, propaganda, the Arab Spring, and drone warfare. Chomsky and Vltchek offer a powerful critique of the legacy of colonialism, touching upon many countries including Syria, Nicaragua, Cuba, China, Chile, and Turkey.   Updated with a fresh design and a new foreword by Chomsky, On Western Terrorism remains an influential and powerful critique of the West’s role in the world, inspiring all who read it to think independently and critically. 


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María Zambrano

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Maria Zambrano (1904–91) was one of the most original Spanish thinkers of the twentieth century, known for her attempt to use poetic reason to overcome the limitations of Enlightenment-based rationality. This book offers a close look at her work, arguing that while the presence of a spiritual component is undeniable, at the same time her thought is far from mystical or unapproachable—rather, it offers an alternative form of rationality, one that links the personal to the political and makes the path to self-development also the path of civic and political engagement.  


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Mesoamerican Codex Re-entangled

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This innovative work aims to piece together the cultural biography of Mesoamerica’s precolonial codices. Today, fewer than twenty manuscripts are all that remain of the Mesoamerican book-making tradition. These pictographic and hieroglyphic texts have often been researched according to their content, but such studies have ignored their nature as material objects. By tracing the paths these books have followed over the past five hundred years, Ludo Snijders offers fascinating insights into their production, use and reuse, destruction, rediscovery, and reinvention.


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Miniatures

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Tansey miniatures, now held by the Bomann Museum in Celle, represent one of the most significant collections of European miniature paintings. This volume is the sixth in a series exploring the collection in key periods. Each volume presents new photographic reproductions of the miniatures at actual size and with close-up photographs that show important details. This volume covers portrait miniatures created throughout the Baroque period of the seventeenth-century, with more than one hundred representative works. Essays by specialists in the field offer insights into the artworks, their patrons, and the period. The resulting book is as informative as it is beautiful, a stunning testament to a bygone age and a once-popular form.  


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New Perspective on Antisthenes

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Antisthenes (c. 445–c. 365 BC) was a Greek philosopher and student of Socrates. This book offers a comprehensive survey of his philosophy in all its aspects. It covers his theory of definition and contradiction; his theology, via a running commentary on his discussion of passages of Homer; and his ethics.  


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Nationalism and Transnationalism in Spain and Latin America, 1808-1923

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The long nineteenth century was a time of powerful tensions in the Hispanic Atlantic corridor, with Latin American republics, many newly independent, clashing repeatedly with Spain and its interests. But that was only part of the story, as this collection reveals. Though debates were fierce, there was nonetheless crucial ongoing dialogue between the Spanish intelligentsia and that of the Latin American republics, ensuring that ideas and innovations flowed between the nations and further cemented their cultural ties even as their political ones became more attenuated.  


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New Social Mobility

Sat, 15 Apr 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Despite being a hotly debated topic, social mobility remains one of the most misunderstood processes of our time. In this accessible and engaging book, leading mobility analyst Geoff Payne draws on the latest sociological evidence to demonstrate how our politicians have failed to grasp the ways in which mobility works. The New Social Mobility argues that we must consider the wider dimensions of mobility and life chances—notably the workings of the labor market—to assess more accurately the causes and consequences of mobility as both social and political processes. Bringing together a range of literature and research, Payne covers key themes of mobility analysis and offers a critical and original approach to social mobility. This comprehensive, important book will challenge the well-established opinions of politicians, pressure groups, the press, scholars, and the public alike.


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