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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Thu, 23 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

 



Building Nature's Market

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

For the first 150 years of their existence, “natural foods” were consumed primarily by body builders, hippies, religious sects, and believers in nature cure. And those consumers were dismissed by the medical establishment and food producers as kooks, faddists, and dangerous quacks. In the 1980s, broader support for natural foods took hold and the past fifteen years have seen an explosion—everything from healthy-eating superstores to mainstream institutions like hospitals, schools, and workplace cafeterias advertising their fresh-from-the-garden ingredients.Building Nature’s Market shows how the meaning of natural foods was transformed as they changed from a culturally marginal, religiously inspired set of ideas and practices valorizing asceticism to a bohemian lifestyle to a mainstream consumer choice. Laura J. Miller argues that the key to understanding this transformation is to recognize the leadership of the natural foods industry. Rather than a simple tale of cooptation by market forces, Miller contends the participation of business interests encouraged the natural foods movement to be guided by a radical skepticism of established cultural authority. She challenges assumptions that private enterprise is always aligned with social elites, instead arguing that profit-minded entities can make common cause with and even lead citizens in advocating for broad-based social and cultural change.


Media Files:
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Ku Klux Kulture

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In popular understanding, the Ku Klux Klan is a hateful white supremacist organization. In Ku Klux Kulture, Felix Harcourt argues that in the 1920s the self-proclaimed Invisible Empire had an even wider significance as a cultural movement.Ku Klux Kulture reveals the extent to which the KKK participated in and penetrated popular American culture, reaching far beyond its paying membership to become part of modern American society. The Klan owned radio stations, newspapers, and sports teams, and its members created popular films, pulp novels, music, and more. Harcourt shows how the Klan’s racist and nativist ideology became subsumed in sunnier popular portrayals of heroic vigilantism. In the process he challenges prevailing depictions of the 1920s, which may be best understood not as the Jazz Age or the Age of Prohibition, but as the Age of the Klan. Ku Klux Kulture gives us an unsettling glimpse into the past, arguing that the Klan did not die so much as melt into America’s prevailing culture.


Media Files:
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Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The search for a “patient zero”—popularly understood to be the first person infected in an epidemic—has been key to media coverage of major infectious disease outbreaks for more than three decades. Yet the term itself did not exist before the emergence of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s. How did this idea so swiftly come to exert such a strong grip on the scientific, media, and popular consciousness? In Patient Zero, Richard A. McKay interprets a wealth of archival sources and interviews to demonstrate how this seemingly new concept drew upon centuries-old ideas—and fears—about contagion and social disorder. McKay presents a carefully documented and sensitively written account of the life of Gaétan Dugas, a gay man whose skin cancer diagnosis in 1980 took on very different meanings as the HIV/AIDS epidemic developed—and who received widespread posthumous infamy when he was incorrectly identified as patient zero of the North American outbreak. McKay shows how investigators from the US Centers for Disease Control inadvertently created the term amid their early research into the emerging health crisis; how an ambitious journalist dramatically amplified the idea in his determination to reframe national debates about AIDS; and how many individuals grappled with the notion of patient zero—adopting, challenging and redirecting its powerful meanings—as they tried to make sense of and respond to the first fifteen years of an unfolding epidemic. With important insights for our interconnected age, Patient Zero untangles the complex process by which individuals and groups create meaning and allocate blame when faced with new disease threats. What McKay gives us here is myth-smashing revisionist history at its best.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/06/9780226063959.jpg




Patient Zero and the Making of the AIDS Epidemic

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The search for a “patient zero”—popularly understood to be the first person infected in an epidemic—has been key to media coverage of major infectious disease outbreaks for more than three decades. Yet the term itself did not exist before the emergence of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the 1980s. How did this idea so swiftly come to exert such a strong grip on the scientific, media, and popular consciousness? In Patient Zero, Richard A. McKay interprets a wealth of archival sources and interviews to demonstrate how this seemingly new concept drew upon centuries-old ideas—and fears—about contagion and social disorder. McKay presents a carefully documented and sensitively written account of the life of Gaétan Dugas, a gay man whose skin cancer diagnosis in 1980 took on very different meanings as the HIV/AIDS epidemic developed—and who received widespread posthumous infamy when he was incorrectly identified as patient zero of the North American outbreak. McKay shows how investigators from the US Centers for Disease Control inadvertently created the term amid their early research into the emerging health crisis; how an ambitious journalist dramatically amplified the idea in his determination to reframe national debates about AIDS; and how many individuals grappled with the notion of patient zero—adopting, challenging and redirecting its powerful meanings—as they tried to make sense of and respond to the first fifteen years of an unfolding epidemic. With important insights for our interconnected age, Patient Zero untangles the complex process by which individuals and groups create meaning and allocate blame when faced with new disease threats. What McKay gives us here is myth-smashing revisionist history at its best.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/06/9780226063959.jpg




Ground Down by Growth

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Why has India’s astonishing economic growth not reached the people at the bottom of its social and economic hierarchy? Traveling the length and breadth of the subcontinent, this book shows how India’s “untouchables” and “tribals” fit into the global economy.             India’s Dalit and Adivasi communities make up a staggering one in twenty-five people across the globe and yet they remain among the most oppressed. Conceived in dialogue with economists, Ground Down by Growth reveals the lived impact of global capitalism on the people of these communities. Through anthropological studies of how the oppressions of caste, tribe, region, and gender impact the working poor and migrant labor in India, this startling new anthology illuminates the relationship between global capital and social inequality in the Indian context. Collectively, the chapters of this volume expose how capitalism entrenches social difference, transforming traditional forms of identity-based discrimination into new mechanisms of exploitation and oppression. 



Ground Down by Growth

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Why has India’s astonishing economic growth not reached the people at the bottom of its social and economic hierarchy? Traveling the length and breadth of the subcontinent, this book shows how India’s “untouchables” and “tribals” fit into the global economy.             India’s Dalit and Adivasi communities make up a staggering one in twenty-five people across the globe and yet they remain among the most oppressed. Conceived in dialogue with economists, Ground Down by Growth reveals the lived impact of global capitalism on the people of these communities. Through anthropological studies of how the oppressions of caste, tribe, region, and gender impact the working poor and migrant labor in India, this startling new anthology illuminates the relationship between global capital and social inequality in the Indian context. Collectively, the chapters of this volume expose how capitalism entrenches social difference, transforming traditional forms of identity-based discrimination into new mechanisms of exploitation and oppression. 



Building Nature's Market

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

For the first 150 years of their existence, “natural foods” were consumed primarily by body builders, hippies, religious sects, and believers in nature cure. And those consumers were dismissed by the medical establishment and food producers as kooks, faddists, and dangerous quacks. In the 1980s, broader support for natural foods took hold and the past fifteen years have seen an explosion—everything from healthy-eating superstores to mainstream institutions like hospitals, schools, and workplace cafeterias advertising their fresh-from-the-garden ingredients.Building Nature’s Market shows how the meaning of natural foods was transformed as they changed from a culturally marginal, religiously inspired set of ideas and practices valorizing asceticism to a bohemian lifestyle to a mainstream consumer choice. Laura J. Miller argues that the key to understanding this transformation is to recognize the leadership of the natural foods industry. Rather than a simple tale of cooptation by market forces, Miller contends the participation of business interests encouraged the natural foods movement to be guided by a radical skepticism of established cultural authority. She challenges assumptions that private enterprise is always aligned with social elites, instead arguing that profit-minded entities can make common cause with and even lead citizens in advocating for broad-based social and cultural change.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/50/9780226501376.jpg




Embodied Mind, Meaning, and Reason

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Mark Johnson is one of the great thinkers of our time on how the body shapes the mind. This book brings together a selection of essays from the past two decades that build a powerful argument that any scientifically and philosophically satisfactory view of  mind and thought must ultimately explain how bodily perception and action give rise to cognition, meaning, language, action, and values.   A brief account of Johnson’s own intellectual journey, through which we track some of the most important discoveries in the field over the past forty years, sets the stage. Subsequent chapters set out Johnson’s important role in embodied cognition theory, including his cofounding (with George Lakoff) of conceptual metaphor theory and, later, their theory of bodily structures and processes that underlie all meaning, conceptualization, and reasoning. A detailed account of how meaning arises from our physical engagement with our environments provides the basis for a nondualistic, nonreductive view of mind that he sees as most congruous with the latest cognitive science. A concluding section explores the implications of our embodiment for our understanding of knowledge, reason, and truth. The resulting book will be essential for all philosophers dealing with mind, thought, and language.  


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God's Businessmen

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The evangelical embrace of conservatism is a familiar feature of the contemporary political landscape. What’s less well-known, however, is that the connection predates the Reagan revolution, going all the way back to the Depression and World War II. Evangelical businessmen at the time were quite active in opposing the New Deal—on both theological and economic grounds—and in doing so claimed a place alongside other conservatives in the public sphere. Like previous generations of devout laymen, they self-consciously merged their religious and business lives, financing and organizing evangelical causes with the kind of visionary pragmatism that they practiced in the boardroom. In God’s Businessmen, Sarah Ruth Hammond explores not only these men’s personal trajectories but also those of the service clubs and other institutions that, like them, believed that businessmen were God’s instrument for the Christianization of the world. Hammond presents a capacious portrait of the relationship between the evangelical business community and the New Deal—and in doing so makes important contributions to American religious history, business history, and the history of the American state.


Media Files:
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Correspondence of Hannah Arendt and Gershom Scholem

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Few people thought as deeply or incisively about Germany, Jewish identity, and the Holocaust as Hannah Arendt and Gershom Scholem. And, as this landmark volume reveals, much of that thinking was developed in dialogue, through more than two decades of correspondence.             Arendt and Scholem met in 1932 in Berlin and quickly bonded over their mutual admiration for and friendship with Walter Benjamin. They began exchanging letters in 1939, and their lively correspondence continued until 1963, when Scholem’s vehement disagreement with Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem led to a rupture that would last until Arendt’s death a dozen years later. The years of their friendship, however, yielded a remarkably rich bounty of letters: together, they try to come to terms with being both German and Jewish, the place and legacy of Germany before and after the Holocaust, the question of what it means to be Jewish in a post-Holocaust world, and more. Walter Benjamin is a constant presence, as his life and tragic death are emblematic of the very questions that preoccupied the pair. Like any collection of letters, however, the book also has its share of lighter moments: accounts of travels, gossipy dinner parties, and the quotidian details that make up life even in the shadow of war and loss.             In a world that continues to struggle with questions of nationalism, identity, and difference, Arendt and Scholem remain crucial thinkers. This volume offers us a way to see them, and the development of their thought, anew.  


Media Files:
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Conservation Paleobiology

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In conservation, perhaps no better example exists of the past informing the present than the return of the California condor to the Vermilion Cliffs of Arizona. Extinct in the region for nearly one hundred years, condors were successfully reintroduced starting in the 1990s in an effort informed by the fossil record—condor skeletal remains had been found in the area’s late-Pleistocene cave deposits. The potential benefits of applying such data to conservation initiatives are unquestionably great, yet integrating the relevant disciplines has proven challenging. Conservation Paleobiology gathers a remarkable array of scientists—from Jeremy B. C. Jackson to Geerat J. Vermeij—to provide an authoritative overview of how paleobiology can inform both the management of threatened species and larger conservation decisions. Studying endangered species is difficult. They are by definition rare, some exist only in captivity, and for those still in their native habitats any experimentation can potentially have a negative effect on survival. Moreover, a lack of long-term data makes it challenging to anticipate biotic responses to environmental conditions that are outside of our immediate experience. But in the fossil and prefossil records—from natural accumulations such as reefs, shell beds, and caves to human-made deposits like kitchen middens and archaeological sites—enlightening parallels to the Anthropocene can be found that might serve as a primer for present-day predicaments. Offering both deep-time and near-time perspectives and exploring a range of ecological and evolutionary dynamics and taxa from terrestrial as well as aquatic habitats, Conservation Paleobiology is a sterling demonstration of how the past can be used to manage for the future, giving new hope for the creation and implementation of successful conservation programs.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/50/9780226506722.jpg




Conservation Paleobiology

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In conservation, perhaps no better example exists of the past informing the present than the return of the California condor to the Vermilion Cliffs of Arizona. Extinct in the region for nearly one hundred years, condors were successfully reintroduced starting in the 1990s in an effort informed by the fossil record—condor skeletal remains had been found in the area’s late-Pleistocene cave deposits. The potential benefits of applying such data to conservation initiatives are unquestionably great, yet integrating the relevant disciplines has proven challenging. Conservation Paleobiology gathers a remarkable array of scientists—from Jeremy B. C. Jackson to Geerat J. Vermeij—to provide an authoritative overview of how paleobiology can inform both the management of threatened species and larger conservation decisions. Studying endangered species is difficult. They are by definition rare, some exist only in captivity, and for those still in their native habitats any experimentation can potentially have a negative effect on survival. Moreover, a lack of long-term data makes it challenging to anticipate biotic responses to environmental conditions that are outside of our immediate experience. But in the fossil and prefossil records—from natural accumulations such as reefs, shell beds, and caves to human-made deposits like kitchen middens and archaeological sites—enlightening parallels to the Anthropocene can be found that might serve as a primer for present-day predicaments. Offering both deep-time and near-time perspectives and exploring a range of ecological and evolutionary dynamics and taxa from terrestrial as well as aquatic habitats, Conservation Paleobiology is a sterling demonstration of how the past can be used to manage for the future, giving new hope for the creation and implementation of successful conservation programs.


Media Files:
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Idealization and the Aims of Science

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Science is the study of our world, as it is in its messy reality. Nonetheless, science requires idealization to function—if we are to attempt to understand the world, we have to find ways to reduce its complexity.  Idealization and the Aims of Science shows just how crucial idealization is to science and why it matters. Beginning with the acknowledgment of our status as limited human agents trying to make sense of an exceedingly complex world, Angela Potochnik moves on to explain how science aims to depict and make use of causal patterns—a project that makes essential use of idealization. She offers case studies from a number of branches of science to demonstrate the ubiquity of idealization, shows how causal patterns are used to develop scientific explanations, and describes how the necessarily imperfect connection between science and truth leads to researchers’ values influencing their findings. The resulting book is a tour de force, a synthesis of the study of idealization that also offers countless new insights and avenues for future exploration.


Media Files:
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Village with My Name

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

When journalist Scott Tong moved to Shanghai, his assignment was to start up the first full-time China bureau for “Marketplace,” the daily business and economics program on public radio stations across the United States. But for Tong the move became much more—it offered the opportunity to reconnect with members of his extended family who had remained in China after his parents fled the communists six decades prior. By uncovering the stories of his family’s history, Tong discovered a new way to understand the defining moments of modern China and its long, interrupted quest to go global.  A Village with My Name offers a unique perspective on the transitions in China through the eyes of regular people who have witnessed such epochal events as the toppling of the Qing monarchy, Japan’s occupation during World War II, exile of political prisoners to forced labor camps, mass death and famine during the Great Leap Forward, market reforms under Deng Xiaoping, and the dawn of the One Child Policy. Tong’s story focuses on five members of his family, who each offer a specific window on a changing country: a rare American-educated girl born in the closing days of the Qing Dynasty, a pioneer exchange student, an abandoned toddler from World War II who later rides the wave of China’s global export boom, a young professional climbing the ladder at a multinational company, and an orphan (the author’s daughter) adopted in the middle of a baby-selling scandal fueled by foreign money. Through their stories, Tong shows us China anew, visiting former prison labor camps on the Tibetan plateau and rural outposts along the Yangtze, exploring the Shanghai of the 1930s, and touring factories across the mainland.   With curiosity and sensitivity, Tong explores the moments that have shaped China and its people, offering a compelling and deeply personal take on how China became what it is today.  


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Democracy in America?

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

America faces daunting problems—stagnant wages, high health care costs, neglected schools, deteriorating public services. Yet the government consistently ignores the needs of its citizens, paying attention instead to donors and organized interests. Real issues are held hostage to demagoguery, partisanship beats practicality, and trust in government withers along with the social safety net.   How did we get here? Through decades of dysfunctional government. In Democracy in America? veteran political observers Benjamin I. Page and Martin Gilens marshal an unprecedented array of evidence to show that while other countries have responded to a rapidly changing economy by helping people who’ve been left behind, the United States has failed to do so.  Instead, we have actually exacerbated inequality, enriching corporations and the wealthy while leaving ordinary citizens to fend for themselves.   What’s the solution? More democracy. More opportunity for citizens to shape what their government does. To repair our democracy, Page and Gilens argue, we must change the way we choose candidates and conduct our elections, reform our governing institutions, and curb the power of money in politics. By doing so, we can reduce polarization and gridlock, address pressing challenges, and enact policies that truly reflect the interests of average Americans.   This book presents a damning indictment. But the situation is far from hopeless. With increased democratic participation as their guide, Page and Gilens lay out a set of proposals that would boost citizen participation, curb the power of money, and democratize the House and Senate. The only certainty is that inaction is not an option. Now is the time to act to restore and extend American democracy.  


Media Files:
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Miles Davis Lost Quintet and Other Revolutionary Ensembles

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Miles Davis’s Bitches Brew is one of the most iconic albums in American music, the preeminent landmark and fertile seedbed of jazz-fusion. Fans have been fortunate in the past few years to gain access to Davis’s live recordings from this time, when he was working with an ensemble that has come to be known as the Lost Quintet. In this book, jazz historian and musician Bob Gluck explores the performances of this revolutionary group—Davis’s first electric band—to illuminate the thinking of one of our rarest geniuses and, by extension, the extraordinary transition in American music that he and his fellow players ushered in.               Gluck listens deeply to the uneasy tension between this group’s driving rhythmic groove and the sonic and structural openness, surprise, and experimentation they were always pushing toward. There he hears—and outlines—a fascinating web of musical interconnection that brings Davis’s funk-inflected sensibilities into conversation with the avant-garde worlds that players like Ornette Coleman and John Coltrane were developing. Going on to analyze the little-known experimental groups Circle and the Revolutionary Ensemble, Gluck traces deep resonances across a commercial gap between the celebrity Miles Davis and his less famous but profoundly innovative peers. The result is a deeply attuned look at a pivotal moment when once-disparate worlds of American music came together in explosively creative combinations.  


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Newsprint Metropolis

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

At the close of the nineteenth century, new printing and paper technologies fueled an expansion of the newspaper business. Newspapers soon saturated the United States, especially its cities, which were often home to more than a dozen dailies apiece. Using New York, Philadelphia, Milwaukee, and Chicago as case studies, Julia Guarneri shows how city papers became active agents in creating metropolitan spaces and distinctive urban cultures.Newsprint Metropolis offers a vivid tour of these papers, from the front to the back pages. Paying attention to much-loved features, including comic strips, sports pages, advice columns, and Sunday magazines, she tells the linked histories of newspapers and of the cities they served. Guarneri shows how themed sections for women, businessmen, sports fans, and suburbanites illustrated entire ways of life built around consumer products. But while papers provided a guide to individual upward mobility, they also fostered a climate of civic concern and responsibility. Charity campaigns and metropolitan sections painted portraits of distinctive, cohesive urban communities. Real estate sections and classified ads boosted the profile of the suburbs, expanding metropolitan areas while maintaining cities’ roles as economic and information hubs. All the while, editors were drawing in new reading audiences—women, immigrants, and working-class readers—helping to give rise to the diverse, contentious, and commercial public sphere of the twentieth century.


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Paraliterary

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Literature departments are staffed by, and tend to be focused on turning out, “good” readers—attentive to nuance, aware of history, interested in literary texts as self-contained works. But the vast majority of readers are, to use Merve Emre’s tongue-in-cheek term, “bad” readers. They read fiction and poetry to be moved, distracted, instructed, improved, engaged as citizens. How should we think about those readers, and what should we make of the structures, well outside the academy, that generate them? We should, Emre argues, think of such readers not as non-literary but as paraliterary—thriving outside the institutions we take as central to the literary world. She traces this phenomenon to the postwar period, when literature played a key role in the rise of American power. At the same time as American universities were producing good readers by the hundreds, many more thousands of bad readers were learning elsewhere to be disciplined public communicators, whether in diplomatic and ambassadorial missions, private and public cultural exchange programs, multinational corporations, or global activist groups. As we grapple with literature’s diminished role in the public sphere, Paraliterary suggests a new way to think about literature, its audience, and its potential, one that looks at the civic institutions that have long engaged readers ignored by the academy.  


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World in Guangzhou

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Only decades ago, the population of Guangzhou was almost wholly Chinese. Today, it is a truly global city, a place where people from around the world go to make new lives, find themselves, or further their careers. A large number of these migrants are small-scale traders from Africa who deal in Chinese goods—often knockoffs or copies of high-end branded items—to send back to their home countries. In The World in Guangzhou, Gordon Mathews explores the question of how the city became a center of “low-end globalization” and shows what we can learn from that experience about similar transformations elsewhere in the world.   Through detailed ethnographic portraits, Mathews reveals a world of globalization based on informality, reputation, and trust rather than on formal contracts. How, he asks, can such informal relationships emerge between two groups—Chinese and sub-Saharan Africans—that don't share a common language, culture, or religion? And what happens when Africans move beyond their status as temporary residents and begin to put down roots and establish families?   Full of unforgettable characters, The World in Guangzhou presents a compelling account of globalization at ground level and offers a look into the future of urban life as transnational connections continue to remake cities around the world. 


Media Files:
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World in Guangzhou

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Only decades ago, the population of Guangzhou was almost wholly Chinese. Today, it is a truly global city, a place where people from around the world go to make new lives, find themselves, or further their careers. A large number of these migrants are small-scale traders from Africa who deal in Chinese goods—often knockoffs or copies of high-end branded items—to send back to their home countries. In The World in Guangzhou, Gordon Mathews explores the question of how the city became a center of “low-end globalization” and shows what we can learn from that experience about similar transformations elsewhere in the world.   Through detailed ethnographic portraits, Mathews reveals a world of globalization based on informality, reputation, and trust rather than on formal contracts. How, he asks, can such informal relationships emerge between two groups—Chinese and sub-Saharan Africans—that don't share a common language, culture, or religion? And what happens when Africans move beyond their status as temporary residents and begin to put down roots and establish families?   Full of unforgettable characters, The World in Guangzhou presents a compelling account of globalization at ground level and offers a look into the future of urban life as transnational connections continue to remake cities around the world. 


Media Files:
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Deep Refrains

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

We often say that music is ineffable, that it does not refer to anything outside of itself. But if music, in all its sensuous flux, does not mean anything in particular, might it still have a special kind of philosophical significance?   In Deep Refrains, Michael Gallope draws together the writings of Arthur Schopenhauer, Friedrich Nietzsche, Ernst Bloch, Theodor Adorno, Vladimir Jankélévitch, Gilles Deleuze, and Félix Guattari in order to revisit the age-old question of music’s ineffability from a modern perspective. For these nineteenth- and twentieth-century European philosophers, music’s ineffability is a complex phenomenon that engenders an intellectually productive sense of perplexity. Through careful examination of their historical contexts and philosophical orientations, close attention to their use of language, and new interpretations of musical compositions that proved influential for their work, Deep Refrains forges the first panoptic view of their writings on music. Gallope concludes that music’s ineffability is neither a conservative phenomenon nor a pious call to silence. Instead, these philosophers ask us to think through the ways in which music’s stunning force might address, in an ethical fashion, intricate philosophical questions specific to the modern world.    


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Finance in America

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The economic crisis of 2008 led to an unprecedented focus on the world of high finance—and revealed it to be far more arcane and influential than most people could ever have imagined. Any hope of avoiding future crises, it’s clear, rest on understanding finance itself.             To understand finance, however, we have to learn its history, and this book fills that need. Kevin R. Brine, an industry veteran, and Mary Poovey, an acclaimed historian, show that finance as we know it today emerged gradually in the late nineteenth century and only coalesced after World War II, becoming ever more complicated—and ever more central to the American economy. The authors explain the models, regulations, and institutions at the heart of modern finance and uncover the complex and sometimes surprising origins of its critical features, such as corporate accounting standards, the Federal Reserve System, risk management practices, and American Keynesian and New Classic monetary economics. This book sees finance through its highs and lows, from pre-Depression to post-Recession, exploring the myriad ways in which the practices of finance and the realities of the economy influenced one another through the years.             A masterwork of collaboration, Finance in America lays bare the theories and practices that constitute finance, opening up the discussion of its role and risks to a broad range of scholars and citizens.  


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Great William

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Great William is the first book to explore how seven renowned writers—Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, Virginia Woolf, Charles Olson, John Berryman, Allen Ginsberg, and Ted Hughes—wrestled with Shakespeare in the very moments when they were reading his work. What emerges is a constellation of remarkable intellectual and emotional encounters.Theodore Leinwand builds impressively detailed accounts of these writers’ experiences through their marginalia, lectures, letters, journals, and reading notes. We learn why Woolf associated reading Shakespeare with her brother Thoby, and what Ginsberg meant when referring to the mouth feel of Shakespeare’s verse. From Hughes’s attempts to find a “skeleton key” to all of Shakespeare’s plays to Berryman’s tormented efforts to edit King Lear, Leinwand reveals the palpable energy and conviction with which these seven writers engaged with Shakespeare, their moments of utter self-confidence and profound vexation. In uncovering these intense public and private reactions, The Great William connects major writers’ hitherto unremarked scenes of reading Shakespeare with our own.


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Market and Other Orders

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In addition to his groundbreaking contributions to pure economic theory, F. A. Hayek also closely examined the ways in which the knowledge of many individual market participants could culminate in an overall order of economic activity. His attempts to come to terms with the “knowledge problem” thread through his career and comprise the writings collected in the fifteenth volume of the University of Chicago Press’s Collected Works of F. A. Hayek series.The Market and Other Orders brings together more than twenty works spanning almost forty years that consider this question. Consisting of speeches, essays, and lectures, including Hayek’s 1974 Nobel lecture, “The Pretense of Knowledge,” the works in this volume draw on a broad range of perspectives, including the philosophy of science, the physiology of the brain, legal theory, and political philosophy. Taking readers from Hayek’s early development of the idea of spontaneous order in economics through his integration of this insight into political theory and other disciplines, the book culminates with Hayek’s integration of his work on these topics into an overarching social theory that accounts for spontaneous order in the variety of complex systems that Hayek studied throughout his career.Edited by renowned Hayek scholar Bruce Caldwell, who also contributes a masterly introduction that provides biographical and historical context, The Market and Other Orders forms the definitive compilation of Hayek’s work on spontaneous order.


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From Sight to Light

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

From its inception in Greek antiquity, the science of optics was aimed primarily at explaining sight and accounting for why things look as they do. By the end of the seventeenth century, however, the analytic focus of optics had shifted to light: its fundamental properties and such physical behaviors as reflection, refraction, and diffraction. This dramatic shift—which A. Mark Smith characterizes as the “Keplerian turn”—lies at the heart of this fascinating and pioneering study.                    Breaking from previous scholarship that sees Johannes Kepler as the culmination of a long-evolving optical tradition that traced back to Greek antiquity via the Muslim Middle Ages, Smith presents Kepler instead as marking a rupture with this tradition, arguing that his theory of retinal imaging, which was published in 1604, was instrumental in prompting the turn from sight to light. Kepler’s new theory of sight, Smith reveals, thus takes on true historical significance: by treating the eye as a mere light-focusing device rather than an image-producing instrument—as traditionally understood—Kepler’s account of retinal imaging helped spur the shift in analytic focus that eventually led to modern optics.              A sweeping survey, From Sight to Light is poised to become the standard reference for historians of optics as well as those interested more broadly in the history of science, the history of art, and cultural and intellectual history.


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Hidden Hitchcock

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

No filmmaker has more successfully courted mass-audience understanding than Alfred Hitchcock, and none has been studied more intensively by scholars. In Hidden Hitchcock, D. A. Miller does what seems impossible: he discovers what has remained unseen in Hitchcock’s movies, a secret style that imbues his films with a radical duplicity. Focusing on three films—Strangers on a Train, Rope, and The Wrong Man—Miller shows how Hitchcock anticipates, even demands a “Too-Close Viewer.” Dwelling within us all and vigilant even when everything appears to be in good order, this Too-Close Viewer attempts to see more than the director points out, to expand the space of the film and the duration of the viewing experience. And, thanks to Hidden Hitchcock, that obsessive attention is rewarded. In Hitchcock’s visual puns, his so-called continuity errors, and his hidden appearances (not to be confused with his cameos), Miller finds wellsprings of enigma.Hidden Hitchcock is a revelatory work that not only shows how little we know this best known of filmmakers, but also how near such too-close viewing comes to cinephilic madness.  


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Quantum Anthropology

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Quantum Anthropology offers a fresh look at humans, cultures, and societies that builds on advances in the fields of quantum mechanics, quantum philosophy, and quantum consciousness. Radek Trnka and Radmila Lorencová have developed an inspiring theoretical framework that transcends the boundaries of individual disciplines, and in this book they draw on philosophy, psychology, sociology, and consciousness studies to redefine contemporary sociocultural anthropological theory. Quantum anthropology, they argue, is a promising new perspective for the study of humanity that takes into account the quantum nature of our reality. This meta-ontology offers novel pathways for exploring the basic categories of our species’ being.


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Thailand

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Since the World War II, Thailand has positioned itself as a key strategic ally of the United States, serving as a bulwark against communism in Southeast Asia and as a base for American troops during the Vietnam War. In return, the United States has provided millions of dollars in military and economic aid, while staunchly supporting the country’s despotic regimes. However, recent decades have seen a striking reversal in Thailand’s foreign relations, with China, once a sworn enemy, now treated as a valued ally by the Thai junta. This shift reflects China’s growing status as a world power, and it represents a major setback to American efforts at curbing the spread of Chinese influence in Asia. It has also had a dramatic impact on Thailand itself, as the country’s ruling elite seek to follow the Chinese model of authoritarianism combined with neoliberalism.In this up-to-date study of Thai foreign policy, Benjamin Zawacki provides a compelling account of Thailand’s modern history and its changing role in the world order, from the beginning of its alliance with the United States in 1945 to the 2014 coup and beyond. Featuring extensive interviews with more than seventy high-level figures in Thailand and the United States, including deposed prime minister Thaksin Shinawatra, the book offers unprecedented insight into the inner workings of the Thai elite and their dealings with the United States and China. As the Sino-American rivalry escalates, Southeast Asia will become an increasingly important theater in global affairs. Understanding the current transitions of power in Thailand are essential for comprehending the profound implications of China’s influence, not only for the region, but for the wider world. 


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Theatre Theory Reader

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Theatre Theory Reader provides the first comprehensive and critical anthology of texts reflecting on the development of the theater theory of the Prague School—or Prague Linguistic Circle—beginning with early twentieth-century composer and aesthetician Otakar Zich. The majority of the thirty-eight texts date from the 1930s and early 1940s, the period when the Prague Linguistic Circle was most active as both a theoretical laboratory and a focal point for scholars, artists, and intellectuals. A substantial afterword places these writings in context, describing the emergence of the Prague School in an effort to promote a deeper understanding of its texts. Organized thematically and structurally rather than chronologically, the Theatre Theory Reader explores issues and themes in the study of the theater as an art form and as artistic practice. Just as the Prague School theorists viewed theory as a toolbox of approaches to theater analysis, this anthology should be considered a toolbox of analytic possibilities.


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Unreal Objects

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

More than ever before, scientific and technological innovations are playing increasingly important roles in our lives. New products developing today will fundamentally shape the world around us and manipulate our lived experience in the future. In twenty years, we could be zooming on hoverboards to visit real-life Jurassic Parks or navigating with our optic-implanted GPS systems. In this age of blossoming innovation, however, many wonder: how and why are these important projects chosen? And what are the ultimate consequences of this process?   In Unreal Objects, Kate O’Riordan unpacks these crucial questions and fills a gap in the theorization of digital materialities. Through her investigation, she discovers that many objects—such as genomic projects, artificial meat, and re-creation of extinct species—cannot be granted scientific legitimacy and developed without extraordinary amounts of media, celebrity endorsements, and private investment. As a result of these filters, only certain projects take center stage when it comes to funding and political attention. O’Riordan calls these unreal objects; scientific projects and technologies whose utopian visions for the future are combined with investment and materialization in the here and now. By separating the media hype from the reality, O’Riordan shows how the huge amount of attention paid to these unreal objects hides more pressing social injustices and inequalities, while at the same time conjuring utopian visions for how life might be lived.  


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Unmade Up

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The death of rock star David Bowie in 2016 continues to leave the music world and the hearts of his numerous fans with a dark void. To many, Bowie was a larger-than-life celebrity who seemed beyond mortality. And indeed, his legacy and influence thrives, and interest in all things Bowie has only grown in his afterlife.   In the 1980s, British artist Edward Bell worked closely with Bowie and provided the artwork for the album covers of Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps) and Tin Machine II. Bowie later purchased all of Bell’s art for his private collection. In Unmade Up he offers an intimate look at their friendship and the art at the center of it.   Lushly illustrated in color throughout, Unmade Up includes original artwork and photographs, many of which have never been published. It is a fantastic celebration of Bowie’s unique style and vision, and it will be an essential book for every Bowie fan.  


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Mokusei!

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Two men talk in Tokyo. One, a Belgian, is a diplomat. The other, Dutch, is a photographer. What, they wonder, is the real face of Japan? How can they get beyond the European idea of the nation and its people—with its exoticism—and see Japan as it truly is? The Belgian has an idea: he helps the photographer find a model to shoot in front of Mount Fuji as the “typical Japanese.” The plan works better than either had imagined—in fact, it works too well: the photographer falls in love, neglects his friend and his career, and, feeling out of place and disillusioned in Holland, returns to Japan as often as possible over the next five years. A reunion is planned: the three will meet again at Mount Fuji. Time, it seems, has stood still . . . except the woman has a secret, and plans of her own. This moving novel of obsession and difference is the latest masterwork from one of the greatest European writers working today, redolent with the power of desire and alive to the limits of our understanding of others.


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Minorities and Law in Czechoslovakia

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Across the whole of modern Czech history—from 1918, through World War II, and into the postwar years—ethnic and minority issues have been of the utmost prominence. Moreover, Czechoslovakia has in the past been held up as a model for solving problems related to ethnic and minority tensions through legal regulations—regulations that played a key role in delineating minority status. Primarily intended for an international, non-Czech audience, this book takes a long-term perspective on issues related to ethnic and language minorities in Czechoslovakia. Bridging legal and historical disciplines, Jan Kuklík and René Petráš show that as ethnic minority issues once again come to the forefront of policy debates in Europe and beyond, a detailed knowledge of earlier Czech difficulties and solutions may help us to understand and remedy contemporary problems.


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Money Museum of the Deutsche Bundesbank

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Money, whether in the form of banknotes, coins, or digital credits in our bank accounts, is at the heart of nearly everything we do in modern life. But we rarely give it any sustained thought. What, after all, is money, really? How does it work? Where does it come from? Who controls the banks? How does monetary policy work, and what roles do central banks play in its use?             Those questions and more are answered in this catalog to a new permanent exhibition at the Museum of Money at the Deutsche Bundesbank in Frankfurt. More than five hundred illustrations trace the history and uses of money, while accessible texts explain its workings, the ways that money and its use have changed over time, and what it means for individuals, businesses, banks, and nations today.  


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Management of the Matobo Hills in Zimbabwe

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Since 1992, when the World Heritage Committee established its category of “cultural landscapes,” scholarly debates have ensued as to how they could best be managed. One approach, which appears to have gained significance over the past two decades, considers using traditional conservation practices in addition to engaging local indigenous communities in the stewardship of these exemplary sites. Based on the perspectives of the indigenous people of the Matobo Hills, this investigation studies the extent to which both traditional conservation practices and local involvement can be germane to the administration of World Heritage Cultural Landscapes.  


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Mexico Modern

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The 1920s and ’30s were a time of incredible creativity and influence for modern Mexican art, as a dynamic cultural exchange between Mexico and the United States—which included artists such as Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, and Rufino Tamayo; photographers such as Edward Weston, Tina Modotti, and Manuel Alvarez Bravo; and designers such as Miguel Covarrubias and William Spratling—helped shape a new Mexican cultural identity in the wake of the tumultuous revolution. This book draws on the collection of the Harry Ransom Center in Austin, Texas, as well as other museums, to showcase the brilliant art made by Mexican artists in the period while also setting it in context, showing how it was championed by journalists, publishers, and promoters in both Mexico and the United States. Full of stunning reproductions of works both familiar and less well known, Mexico Modern showcases a truly remarkable place and time in the history of art.  


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Living by Numbers

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

How do we really think about the world? We may use words to tell stories about it or draw pictures to represent it, but one thing we do far more than either of those is make calculations of the things that are in it—and to do that we use numbers. Numbers give shape and texture to almost everything we feel, say, dream, and do, a fact that Steven Connor explores in this qualitative assessment of the quantifiable. Looking at how numbers play a part in nearly every aspect of our lives, he offers a fascinating portrait of the world as a world of numbers.             Connor explores a host of thought-provoking aspects of our numerical existence. He looks at the unexpected oddities that shape the loneliest number—the number one. He looks at counting as a human phenomenon and the ways we negotiate crowds, swarms, and multitudes. He demonstrates the work of calculation as it lies at the heart of poetry, jokes, painting, and music. He shows how we use numbers to adjust to uncertainty and chance and how they help us visualize the world in diagrammatic ways, and he unveils how numbers even help us think about death. Altogether, Connor brings into relief an aspect of our lives so ubiquitous that we often can’t see it, unveiling a rich new way of thinking about our existence.  


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Instability in the Middle East

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Middle Eastern instability is manifest externally in many ways: by crises afflicting governing regimes, the rise of political Islam, terrorism, revolution, civil war, increased migration, and the collapse of many states. This book examines the roots of this instability using a theoretically original and empirically supported historical-sociological comparative analysis. Countering common interpretations of postcolonial Middle Eastern development, Instability in the Middle East focuses on the highly uneven and unsynchronized pace of change in individual sociodemographic, economic, and political dimensions of modernization. Drawing on the theory of multiple modernities, Černý investigates the broader cultural, religious, and international political context of uneven modernization in the Middle East and tests his model using a time series of dozens of indicators over the past fifty years, revealing a long-term trend of cumulative change across the region.


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In Their Place

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The alleged failings of low-income neighborhoods attracts a great deal of academic and political scrutiny and research. However, the realities of localized spaces—such as family home front doors, bedrooms, street corners, and local schools—have not received nearly as much attention. With In Their Place, Stephen Crossley highlights how these spaces are represented from afar by politicians who exaggerate stories for political gain and how these fabrications actively manipulate media coverage of these British individuals and communities. A devastating critique of the Conservative government’s approach to tackling inequality, In Their Place will reorient those interested in human geography away from the large scale transnational policies back to the physical spaces that show the realities of life for Britain’s low-income neighborhoods.  


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Islamophobia Industry

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

It is undeniable that there is a rising tide of Islamaphobia sweeping across the United States and Europe. With The Islamophobia Industry, Nathan Lean takes us through the disturbing worlds of conservative bloggers, right wing talk show hosts, evangelical religious leaders, and politicians—all united in a quest to revive post-9/11 xenophobia and convince their compatriots that Islam is the enemy. Lean uncovers modern scare tactics, reveals each groups’ true motives, and exposes the ideologies that drive their propaganda machine.   Situating Islamaphobia within a long history of national and international fears, The Islamophobia Industry challenges the illogical narrative of hate that dominated discussions about Muslims and Islam for too long. With this new, updated edition, Lean includes material on the 2016 election and the rhetoric of fear that contributed to Trump’s win, the effects of Brexit and Europe’s refugee crisis, and the bleak realities about how the new government shaping the United States will increase racism and hate crime, as we are already beginning to see. He discusses the Islamaphobia industry’s most extreme figures: Breitbart writers, Bill Maher, Steve Bannon, Newt Gingrich, and more.   Sharp, intelligent, and shocking, this updated edition offers a timely and in-depth look into the creation and continuation of Islamophobia in the United States and United Kingdom.  


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Islamophobia Industry

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

It is undeniable that there is a rising tide of Islamaphobia sweeping across the United States and Europe. With The Islamophobia Industry, Nathan Lean takes us through the disturbing worlds of conservative bloggers, right wing talk show hosts, evangelical religious leaders, and politicians—all united in a quest to revive post-9/11 xenophobia and convince their compatriots that Islam is the enemy. Lean uncovers modern scare tactics, reveals each groups’ true motives, and exposes the ideologies that drive their propaganda machine.   Situating Islamaphobia within a long history of national and international fears, The Islamophobia Industry challenges the illogical narrative of hate that dominated discussions about Muslims and Islam for too long. With this new, updated edition, Lean includes material on the 2016 election and the rhetoric of fear that contributed to Trump’s win, the effects of Brexit and Europe’s refugee crisis, and the bleak realities about how the new government shaping the United States will increase racism and hate crime, as we are already beginning to see. He discusses the Islamaphobia industry’s most extreme figures: Breitbart writers, Bill Maher, Steve Bannon, Newt Gingrich, and more.   Sharp, intelligent, and shocking, this updated edition offers a timely and in-depth look into the creation and continuation of Islamophobia in the United States and United Kingdom.  


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Is that Biedermeier?

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Art from the Biedermeier Era, which began with the Congress of Vienna in 1815 and ended with the revolutions of 1848, is generally associated with the increasing prominence and purchasing power—and conservative or sentimental taste—of the middle class. This book presents a large number of artworks from the latter half of that period and beyond that offer a different perspective. Focusing on Austrian painters like Ferdinand Georg Waldmüller, Rudolf von Alt, and Friedrich von Amerling, as well artists from Northern Italy, Hungary, Bohemia, and Slovenia, including Giuseppe Tominz, József Borsos, Bedřich Havránek, and Francesco Hayez, it presents portraits, landscapes, and genre pictures that are far from typical of how we think of the art of that era. Changes to furniture design in the period are also addressed; the package as a whole greatly broadens our understanding of the diversity of art and its development in the Biedermeier years and beyond.  


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In) Formation

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Contemporary artist Alice Teichert’s paintings are known for their holographic depth and unique luminosity, for their visual poetry and multifaceted proximity to music. Using ever-surprising combinations of lines, shapes, and color, she unfolds new realms that, once the viewer moves beyond trying to decipher them, and simply looks, slowly begin to reveal themselves. This is the first full-length book covering her work, presenting paintings from throughout her career in which viewers can trace her inspirations—including old masters and illuminated books and manuscripts from the medieval era—even as those influences are utterly transfigured by Teichert’s creativity and skill. Born in Paris, she lives and works today in Port Hope, Ontario.  


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Inequality Crisis

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Economic inequality has at last taken center stage in political discourse, but little is said to explain or to offer solutions to it. Written by an award-winning academic and policy maker, The Inequality Crisis provides a comprehensive, evenhanded survey of all the available evidence. Fully up to date with the latest developments, from Brexit to Donald Trump’s election, this accessible, jargon-free introduction is international in scope and packed with eye-opening facts. In his closing chapters, Roger Brown evaluates whether current UK government policies will actually help reduce inequality and offers practical suggestions relevant the world over, including raising taxes on higher earners, implementing tougher action against tax dodgers, helping people on lower incomes to save, and reducing inequalities in education.


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Little Grey Lies

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

London between the wars was a place of anxiety and uncertainty. After the postwar boom of the 1920s, the aftereffects of the stock market crash hit London and, even as the fortunes of the aristocracy went into decline, there was hunger and a rising tide of virulent fascism. It is in this setting that Max, a French journalist looking for his next story, and Lena, an American singer, find themselves in Hédi Kaddour’s Little Grey Lies. Once lovers, but now friends, Max and Lena travel with Lena’s new man, Thibault, and with Max’s barely masked jealousy. Then they meet the striking Colonel Strether, the epitome of military decorum and bearing. An aging war hero, Strether seems to Max to be his best chance at a story, but as the two men talk, it seems Stether may not be who he says he is and the old soldier’s past begins to trouble Max and Lena as they crash forward through memories and truths not theirs.As in his other work, internationally renowned poet and novelist Hédi Kaddour offers shifting time-frames and kaleidoscopic viewpoints in a mannered metafictional thriller that bears comparison to both Robert Coover and John Le Carré. Little Grey Lies is historical suspense at its best.


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Journal of Three Months' Walk in Persia in 1884 by Captain John Compton Pyne

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In 1884, John Compton Pyne, a British soldier, having finished his tour of duty in India, decided to make a detour on his trip home in order to spend three months crossing Persia, unaccompanied except by the local muleteers. Among his accouterments he packed a small leather-bound sketchbook in which he not only wrote a journal but also added beautiful and charming watercolor illustrations. This edition reprints his adventurous journal alongside an introduction that contextualizes this trip against the background of the Persian influence in British culture, and sets this influence as a driving force behind Pyne’s travels.  


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Jane Austen: Illustrated Quotations

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

“Next week I shall begin my operations on my hat, on which you know my principal hopes of happiness depend.”—from a letter to Cassandra, October 27, 1798  “You express so little anxiety about my being murdered under Ash Park Copse by Mrs. Hulbert’s servant, that I have a great mind not to tell you whether I was or not.”—from a letter to Cassandra, January 8, 1799  “Single women have a dreadful propensity for being poor, which is one very strong argument in favour of matrimony.”—from a letter to Fanny Knight, March 13, 1817   Much loved for the romantic plot lines and wryly amusing social commentary that spring from the pages of Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma, and her other novels Jane Austen was also a prolific letter writer and penned missives on many subjects. To her sister Cassandra she wrote with candid humor about the effects of the Peninsular War (“How horrible it is to have so many people killed! And what a blessing that one cares for none of them!”), about her dislike of parties and social obligations (“We are to have a tiny party here tonight. I hate tiny parties, they force one into constant exertion.”), and about her impressions of London (“Here I am once more in this scene of dissipation and vice, and I begin to find already my morals corrupted.”). Austen’s characters likewise offer commentary on topics like moral character, gender inequality, ageing, and the disappointments of marriage. In Pride and Prejudice, for example, Charlotte Lucas cautions Elizabeth Bennet, “It is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are about to pass your life.” Drawing together fifty quotations from Jane Austen’s letters and novels with illustrations that illuminate everyday aspects of life in the Georgian era, this beautifully produced volume will make the perfect gift for Janeites.


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Jane Austen: The Chawton Letters

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The life of Jane Austen has fascinated the millions of readers around the world who cherish her work. A new collection presents an intimate portrait of Austen in her own words, showing the many details of her life that found echoes in her fiction, especially her keen observations of the “little matters”—the routines of reading, dining and taking tea, paying visits to family and friends, and walking to the shops or to send the post.             Brilliantly edited by Kathryn Sutherland, Jane Austen: The Chawton Letters uses Austen’s letters drawn from the collection held at Jane Austen’s House Museum at her former home in Chawton, Hampshire, to tell her life story. At age twenty-five, Austen left her first home, Steventon, Hampshire, for Bath. In 1809, she moved to Chawton, which was to be her home for the remainder of her short life. In her correspondence, we discover Austen’s relish for her regular visits to the shops and theaters of London, as well as the quieter routines of village life. We learn of her anxieties about the publication of Pride and Prejudice, her care in planning Mansfield Park, and her hilarious negotiations over the publication of Emma.  (To her sister, Cassandra, Austen calls her publisher John Murray, “a Rogue, of course, but a civil one.”) Throughout, the Chawton letters testify to Jane’s close ties with her family, especially her sister, and the most moving letter is written by Cassandra just days after Jane’s death. The collection also reproduces pages from the letters in Austen’s own distinctive hand.             This collection makes a delightful modern-day keepsake from one of the world’s best-loved writers on the two-hundredth anniversary of her death.  


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Looking to London

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

London is celebrated as one of the most ethnically diverse capitals in the world and has been a magnet for migration since its founding. In Looking to London, Cynthia Cockburn visits five London Boroughs, studying how each responds as new influxes of refugees join established Kurdish, Somali, Tamil, Sudanese, and Syrian communities under the watchful eyes of the regimes they fled and United Kingdom’s anti-terror police. Cockburn brings her lively and lucid style to a national moment when right-wing, nativist, and racist sentiment is being challenged by a compassionate “refugees welcome” movement. London is an important contribution to the intense debate about security and terrorism, national identity, and human rights.  


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Knits and Pieces

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Once a skill of practical necessity, knitting is one of the world’s most popular crafts and hobbies today. Written by a leading blogger in the contemporary craft scene, Knits and Pieces offers a comprehensive and entertaining illustrated guide to knitting’s history and contemporary appeal.   Danielle Holke traces the origins of knitting to the basic human need for clothing as protection against the elements, and she follows its thread to the war years when many women took up knitting on behalf of soldiers and to today’s activist craft movement such as knitting graffiti and yarn-bombing. Holke explores the recent knitting revival led by bloggers, podcasts, celebrities, and social media, and she discusses how the wider availability of natural and exotic fibers combined with the growing interest in DIY crafts has helped create a truly international knitting community.   Illustrated throughout and including facsimiles of some iconic patterns, Knits and Pieces is a must-have for knitting enthusiasts and craft lovers.    


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Egypt beyond Representation

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Egypt beyond Representation develops and applies a new approach to study Aegyptiaca Romana from a bottom-up, Roman perspective. Current approaches to these objects are often still plagued by top-down projections of modern definitions and understandings of Egypt and Egyptian material culture onto the Roman world. This book instead argues that these artifacts should be studied in their own right, without reducing them to fixed Egyptian meanings. This study shows that, while “Egyptianness” may have been among Roman associations, these objects were able to do much more than merely representing notions of Egypt.  


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Development Against Democracy

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Today, US policies towards newly independent states striving for democracy have evolved in a radically different political environment with seemingly little in common with the post-WWII period. Development Against Democracy, however, reveals a surprising continuity in US foreign policy, including in justifications of humanitarian intervention that echo those of counterinsurgency decades earlier in Latin America, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. Irene L. Gendzier argues that the fundamental ideas on which theories of modernization and development rest have been resurrected in contemporary policy and its theories. Our world has been permanently altered by globalization, the proliferation of so-called failed states, the unprecedented exodus of refugees, and Washington’s permanent war against terrorism. One of the most controversial and groundbreaking books of development studies and US foreign policy, the new updated edition of Development Against Democracy is a critical guide to postwar studies of modernization and development.  


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Plays in Time

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Plays in Time collects four plays by Karen Malpede set during influential events from the late twentieth century to the present: the Bosnian war and rape camps; the invasion and occupation of Iraq and Israel’s 2006 bombardment of Lebanon; 9/11 and the US torture program; and the heroism of climate scientists facing attack from well-funded climate change deniers. In each play in this anthology, nature, poetry, ritual, and empathy are presented in contrast to the abuse of persons and world. Despite their serious topics, the plays are full of humor and distinctively entertaining personalities.   Each play was developed by Theater Three Collaborative for production in New York and internationally in Italy, Australia, London, Berlin, and Paris.  


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Portraits of the English Civil Wars

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The period of the English Civil Wars (1642–1651) was one of the most momentous in British history. Though the events of this significant time period have been examined in great detail from a historical point of view, the period has never before been discussed in detail focusing specifically on portraiture. Art historians have tended to ignore the timeframe because it falls between Van Dyck, court painter to Charles I, and Sir Peter Lely, court painter to Charles II. But this book seeks to change that perspective, revealing that these tumultuous years represent as much of an artistic transformation as a political one.   In this book, Angus Haldane examines the portraiture and history of the English Civil Wars through representations of the protagonists who were involved in the conflict. Each portrait is presented here alongside a short biography of the protagonist’s life, and is accompanied by an extended discussion on the iconography of the painting and its art historical relevance, including aspects of patronage. The first book in the new series the Face of War, it will be an essential reference for anyone interested in the history of portraiture and the historical figures of the English Civil War.  


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Place of Placelessness

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Tulou, the traditional fortified multifamily dwellings prevalent in southern Fujian, China, are the focus of this three-pronged biography of environments in the Hekeng River Valley. This book explores every aspect of the historical settlement environments surrounding a tulou, incorporating oral histories and interviews to create a complete picture of the cultural, architectural, agricultural, and economic influences that build up these lineage societies. Highlighted also are the tensions between political systems and families in keeping these heritage sites alive.  


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Private Oceans

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

As the era of thriving small-scale fishing communities continues to wane, Fiona McCormack opens a window into contemporary fisheries quota systems and explores how neoliberalism has become entangled with our approach to environmental management. Grounded in fieldwork and participant observation in New Zealand, Iceland, Ireland, and Hawaii, Private Oceans offers a comparative analysis of the processes of privatization in ecosystem services and traces how value has been repositioned in the market away from productive activities, ultimately causing broad collapse of fishing communities worldwide.  


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Palestine-Israel Conflict

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Palestine-Israel conflict is the most notorious and ingrained conflict in living memory. Yet the way it is reported in the media is confusing and often misleading. In The Palestine-Israel Conflict, Gregory Harms and Todd M. Ferry provide an authoritative introduction to the topic. Balanced, accessible, and annotated, it covers the full history of the region from Biblical times up to the present. Perfect for both general readers and students, it offers a comprehensive yet lucid rendering of the conflict, setting it in historical context. This fourth edition brings us up to date with a new introduction, conclusion, and material covering recent events: Israel’s Operation Protective Edge, the Palestinian unity deal between Fatah and Hamas, and ongoing Palestinian resistance, America’s Middle East policy, and the election of Trump. ​Cutting through layers of confused and inconsistent information, this new edition of The Palestine-Israel Conflict will clarify the ongoing struggle for all readers.


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Rethinking Poverty

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

We live in an age of extreme inequality, when a wealthy minority of the global population lives in historical luxury even as middle-class people fear for the future and twenty percent of the world struggles with chronic poverty. Social policy has failed to find answers to this crisis, and we are beginning to see powerful calls for a new way of thinking about how to escape it. This book argues that we need to start by reframing the whole question, starting not with poverty as a problem to be solved, but with our vision of a good society as a goal to be achieved. That frees us up to consider bold, forward-looking social policies that can have a far-reaching impact. The proposals here are based on a research program carried out by the Webb Memorial Trust that included population surveys of more than twelve thousand people. The way forward, we see, is to increase people’s sense of agency in building the society they want.


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Refrigerator

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

From a late-night snack to a cold beer, there’s nothing that whets the appetite quite like the suctioning sound of a refrigerator being opened. In the early 1930s fewer than ten percent of US households had a mechanical refrigerator, but today they are nearly universal, the primary means by which we keep our food and drink fresh. Yet, for as ubiquitous as refrigerators are, most of us take them for granted, letting them blend into the background of our kitchens, basements, garages, and all the other places where they seem so perfectly convenient. In this book, Helen Peavitt amplifies the hum of the refrigerator in technological history, showing us just how it became such an essential appliance.             Peavitt takes us to the early closets, cabinets, and boxes into which we first started packing ice and the various things we were trying to keep cool. From there she charts the development of mechanical and chemical technologies that have led to modern-day refrigeration on both industrial and domestic scales, showing how these technologies have created a completely new method of preserving and transporting perishable goods, having a profound impact on society from the nineteenth century and on. She explores the ways the marketing of refrigerators have expressed and influenced our notions of domestic life, and she looks at how refrigeration has altered the agriculture and food industries as well as our own appetites.             Strikingly illustrated, this book offers an informative and entertaining history of an object that has radically changed—in a little over one hundred years—one of the most important things we do: eat.   


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Reclaiming the State

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Trump. Brexit. The alt-right. It’s increasingly apparent that old political notions—believed to be consigned to the dustbin of history—are now resurrected. The neonationalist, anti-globalization, and anti-establishment attitude engulfing the United States and United Kingdom hints suspiciously at a yearning for national sovereignty. Reclaiming the State offers an urgent and prescient political analysis and economic program for the Left who are strategizing for these uncertain times.   Many of our assumptions—about ideology, democracy, trade, and globalization—are being thrown into doubt, deposed by populism, nationalism, and racism. In response to these challenging times, economist Bill Mitchell and political theorist Thomas Fazi propose a reconceptualization of the sovereign state as a vehicle for change. They offer a progressive view of sovereignty based not on the demonization of the other, but as a way to bring the economy back under democratic control. With nationalism gaining support across the United States with each passing week, Reclaiaming the State provides innovative ideas to mobilize and reenergize a tired, divided Left.


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Reconstructing the Lansdowne Collection of Classical Marbles

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Begun by Gavin Hamilton (1723–98), one of the most prominent British explorers of classical sites of the eighteenth century, the Lansdowne Collection came to hold more than one hundred stellar examples of classical statuary, displayed in a specially designed gallery in Lansdowne-House in London. The collection, however, was dispersed in the years after 1930, and its works are now scattered across the globe. This book reunites the collection for the first time in nearly ninety years, under the expert guidance of Roman sculpture specialist Elizabeth Angelicoussis. The first volume of this set relates the history of the collection and the gallery, while the second catalogs and assess each known sculpture and sets it in the context of the most current research into Roman art history.  



Heroic Works

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Designer Bookbinders is one of the foremost bookbinding societies and its International Bookbinding Competition in association with Mark Getty and the Bodleian Library continues to attract top binders from around the world. For 2017, the theme of the competition was myths, heroes, and legends. Throughout the ages, every culture has created myths and legends that recount the great deeds of its heroes. This year’s entries reflect a remarkable range of styles, materials, and approaches to great classics of world literature, as well as modern texts.Heroic Works collects the full 184 entries from the 2017 competition, highlighting the twenty-eight winning bindings and offering a veritable showcase for the creativity and craftsmanship of the international bookbinding community. As beautifully designed as many of the bindings it displays, this showcase of the best in modern bookbinding will become a collector’s item among aficionados of bookbinding—as well as a handsome addition to any personal library.  


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Henry Moore

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Few twentieth-century sculptors created works as distinctive and recognizable as those of English sculptor Henry Moore (1898–1986). Deliberately seeking out the challenge of the monumental, and taking the whole of the outdoors as a field for his creativity, Moore drew inspiration from artists ranging from the Renaissance to the modern era to create some of the most ambitious and striking artworks of his age. This book presents an overview of Moore’s work, reproducing his sculptures in their settings to show how his use of natural forms and deliberate attempts to integrate his art with the landscape around it gave it a power and scale unmatched by the work of any other artist. The resulting book is both beautiful and awe-inspiring, a fitting tribute to a true modern master.  


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Young People Leaving State Care in China

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

For children who grow up being cared for by the state, rather than their families, in China, the past twenty years has seen a shift: China has gone away from keeping those children in institutions and towards alternative approaches that attempt to honor children’s rights to an inclusive childhood and adulthood. This book reviews the changes in policy and practice that underlie this shift, and, through interviews with young people involved with state care in the period, presents a clear view of how the change in approach has affected individual lives. As this is an issue that all countries struggle with, the lessons on offer here will be of value not just to those working in and studying China but to a broader range of practitioners in child welfare and development.


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Second Seedtime

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Since his first collection of poetry appeared in 1953, Philippe Jaccottet has sought to express the ineffable that lies at the heart of our material world in his essential, elemental poetry. As one of Switzerland’s most prominent and prolific men of letters, Jaccottet has published more than a dozen books of poetry and criticism.  One of Europe’s finest contemporary poets, Jaccottet is a writer of exacting attention. Through keen observations of the natural world, of art, literature, music, and reflections on the human condition, Jaccottet opens his readers’ eyes to the transcendent in everyday life. The Second Seedtime is a collection of “things seen, things read, and things dreamed.” The volume continues the project Jaccottet began three decades earlier in his first volume of notebooks, Seedtime. Here, again, he gathers flashes of beauty dispersed around him like seeds that may blossom into poems or moments of inspiration. He returns, insistently, to such literary touchstones as Dante, Montaigne, Góngora, Goethe, Kierkegaard, Hölderlin, Michaux, Hopkins, Brontë, and Dickinson, as well as musical greats including Bach, Monteverdi, Purcell, and Schubert. The Second Seedtime is the vivid chronicle of one man’s passionate engagement with the life of the mind, the spirit, and the natural world.


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Slow Growth

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Slow Growth provides an accessible introduction to the art of landscape architecture. Ideas and techniques of naturalistic landscape design are explored in eleven chapters, which are illustrated by Hal Moggridge’s renderings of many of his projects.   The book begins by discussing the human response to landscape and to being outdoors in the British Isles and explores examples of design organized by an understanding of how people move on foot. Moggridge then examines eighteenth century English landscape style through a series of historic restoration projects, followed by twentieth-century projects for rural parks and lakes. The book also includes analysis of urban views and skylines and how these can be safeguarded. The broad scope of Slow Growth will make it an indispensable overview of key issues in landscape design.  


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Seal Named Patches

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Two polar explorers are out to solve a mystery: Where is their special seal, Patches? Scientists Roxanne Beltran and Patrick Robinson set off on a polar adventure, traveling to Antarctica to study the lives of Weddell seals. By finding Patches, a wily seal they’ve been tracking since its birth, they’ll be able to learn a lot about how much the seals get to eat and how many pups they raise. A Seal Named Patches takes young readers into the world at the very bottom of the globe, where they meet the extraordinary animals that live in cold, icy conditions. Through breathtaking photos and real-life stories, young readers will learn about how scientists do fieldwork, the challenges of researching animals in harsh climates, and even what it’s like to fly a helicopter over Antarctica. This engaging story will especially entertain and educate children in grades K-2 (ages 5–8.)


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Space Invaders

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Under conditions of increasing global economic inequalities, we are witnessing the flourishing of grassroots people’s movements fighting for improved livelihoods. Whether it’s the flurry of Occupy protests that peppered the planet a few years ago or the current wave of anti-austerity mobilizations, there is a consistent geographical logic to all forms of protest. In Space Invaders, Paul Routledge draws upon his extensive experiences over the past thirty years working with various forms of protest in Europe, Asia, and Latin America to provide an account of how a radical geographical imagination can inform our understanding of social processes.   


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Storming Heaven

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The only comprehensive survey of Italian autonomist theory, Storming Heaven explores its origins in the anti-Stalinist left of the 1950s and traces it through its glory days twenty years later. Emphasizing the dynamic nature of class composition and struggle as the distinguishing feature of autonomist thought, Steve Wright documents how class politics developed alongside emerging social movements. A critical and historical exploration of autonomist Marxism in postwar Italy, Storming Heaven moves beyond traditional analytical frameworks and instead assesses the strengths and limitations of the theory and how it foreshadowed many of contemporary European social struggles, such as the refusal of work, self-organization, openness to non-militarized political violence, mass illegality, and the extension of revolutionary agency. This updated edition also offers a substantial new afterword looking at the recent debates around operaismo and autonomia in Italy.     


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Student Revolt

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In 2010, young people across Britain took to the streets to defy a wave of government education cuts that slashed grants to college students and astronomically increased tuition fees. Education was no longer accessible for all, and students across the country refused to stand by silently. A well-publicized year of occupations and protests followed—ultimately, to little effect. The current government continues to threaten fresh budget cuts on higher education. What happened to the student revolt? And what can we learn from its failure?   Matt Myers tells the story of that momentous year through the voices of the people involved: activists, students, university workers, and politicians. He weaves their testimonies together to create a narrative that starkly captures both the deep divisions of the movement and the intense energy generated by its players. With an extended introduction by Paul Mason, Student Revolt provides a lively, poignant oral history of the 2010 movement for today’s activists, as well as a long-overdue reflection on its many lessons.


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Shadows of War

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In 1855, Roger Fenton (1819–69) traveled to the war-torn Crimea to capture scenes of the conflict and the soldiers involved. A pioneering photographer who helped establish photography as an art form, Fenton was also one of the first to document the brutality of war through this then-fledgling medium. Today, many of his images, like The Valley of the Shadow of Death, showing a dirt road scattered with cannonballs, are considered to be among most iconic photographs of war.  Shadows of War draws on the extensive holding of Fenton’s photographs in the Royal Collection, bringing together 250 photographs of the Crimean War, taken between March and June 1855. Because of the long exposure times needed for early photography, Fenton was never able to photograph battles, but his landscapes and portraits tell the story of camp life, mortar batteries, and the besieged town of Sebastopol,  in a way that even the most powerful words could not. Shadows of War also highlights the impact Fenton’s images had on people back in Britain, who saw the realities of war documented in photographs for the first time.   The first book to focus on Fenton’s Crimean War photography, Shadows of War will fascinate anyone with an interest in history and photography.  


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Secrets of the Centenarians

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In October 1995, a blind, deaf, French grandmother broke a world record. Jeanne Calment became, so far as we know, the oldest human being who has ever lived when she reached the age of 120 years and 238 days. She went on to survive for nearly three more years—dying in 1997 at 122 years and 164 days. On the long journey to her record-breaking age, Madame Calment acquired more and more company. The United States today has more centenarians than any other country, and they are the fastest-growing section of the population, with at least fourteen times as many centenarians as there were sixty years ago. Secrets of the Centenarians delves into the intriguing background of this incredible increase. In the book, John Withington explores the factors that determine who among us will reach one hundred and who will not. Is it determined by lifestyle or by genetics or by geography? Why do women outnumber men so heavily among centenarians? What kind of life can you expect if you reach one hundred? Is surviving that long a blessing or a curse? Withington answers these questions and more, along the way telling stories of celebrity centenarians like the comedians Bob Hope and George Burns, songwriter Irving Berlin, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, Britain’s Queen Mother, and the scientist who invented LSD. Finally, Withington explores whether—even if the number of centenarians keeps increasing—there remains a maximum life span beyond which we cannot survive. Thoughtful, well-researched, and highly entertaining, Secrets of the Centenarians reveals some of the most intriguing secrets of growing older.  


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Durkheim

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT




Durkheim

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT




Ghosts

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

From that cheerful puff of smoke known as Casper to the hunkiest potter living or dead, Sam Wheat, there is probably no more iconic entity in supernatural history than the ghost. And these are just recent examples. From the earliest writings such as the Epic of Gilgamesh to today’s ghost-hunting reality TV shows, ghosts have chilled the air of nearly every era and every culture in human history. In this book, Lisa Morton uses her scholarly prowess—more powerful than any proton pack—to wrangle together history’s most enduring ghosts into an entertaining and comprehensive look at what otherwise seems to always evade our eyes.   Tracing the ghost’s constantly shifting contours, Morton asks the most direct question—What exactly is a ghost?—and examines related entities such as poltergeists, wraiths, and revenants. She asks how a ghost is related to a soul, and she outlines all the different kinds of ghosts there are. To do so, she visits the spirits of the classical world, including the five-part Egyptian soul and the first haunted-house, conceived in the Roman playwright Plautus’s comedy, Mostellaria. She confronts us with the frightening phantoms of the Middle Ages—who could incinerate priests and devour children—and reminds us of the nineteenth-century rise of Spiritualism, a religion essentially devoted to ghosts. She visits with the Indian bhuta and goes to the Hungry Ghost Festival in China, and of course she spends time in Mexico, where ghosts have a particularly strong grip on belief and culture. Along the way she gathers the ectoplasmic residues seeping from books and film reels, from the Gothic novel The Castle of Otranto to the 2007 blockbuster Paranormal Activity, from the stories of Ann Radcliffe to those of Stephen King. Wide-ranging, informative, and slicked with over fifty unearthly images, Ghosts is an entertaining read of a cultural phenomenon that will delight anyone, whether they believe in ghosts or not. 


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1997

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Spice Girl Geri Halliwell dressed in a Union Jack, Prime Minister Tony Blair posing with Noel Gallagher of Oasis at No. 10, and a nation united in mourning for Princess Diana. These are the images that have come to define Britain in the pivotal year of 1997. In hindsight, the year is now remembered by many as a time of optimism and vibrancy, quickly lost. It symbolized a time when it seemed like Britain was becoming a more tolerant, cosmopolitan, freer, and more equitable country. So what happened?   Richard Power Sayeed has set out to find where the hope of the late ‘90s was lost. In 1997: The Future that Never Happened, he offers an evocative portrait of an era too quickly put into the past. Sayeed cuts through the nostalgia to show how many of the crises afflicting Britain today, actually had their roots in that crucial year. For example, the rise of New Labour masked the steady creep of British politics towards the right, while the Stephen Lawrence inquest exposed the tenacity of racism in both British society and the state, foreshadowing the widespread hate crimes of today. Far from being the crowning height of Britain’s cool, Sayeed instead sees 1997 as a missed opportunity, a turning point when there was a chance to genuinely transform British culture and society that was sadly lost. Providing an in-depth account of crucial events, while looking beyond politics to consider the role of music, art and popular culture, Sayeed powerfully traces Britain’s current malaise back to its origins.  


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1997

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Spice Girl Geri Halliwell dressed in a Union Jack, Prime Minister Tony Blair posing with Noel Gallagher of Oasis at No. 10, and a nation united in mourning for Princess Diana. These are the images that have come to define Britain in the pivotal year of 1997. In hindsight, the year is now remembered by many as a time of optimism and vibrancy, quickly lost. It symbolized a time when it seemed like Britain was becoming a more tolerant, cosmopolitan, freer, and more equitable country. So what happened?   Richard Power Sayeed has set out to find where the hope of the late ‘90s was lost. In 1997: The Future that Never Happened, he offers an evocative portrait of an era too quickly put into the past. Sayeed cuts through the nostalgia to show how many of the crises afflicting Britain today, actually had their roots in that crucial year. For example, the rise of New Labour masked the steady creep of British politics towards the right, while the Stephen Lawrence inquest exposed the tenacity of racism in both British society and the state, foreshadowing the widespread hate crimes of today. Far from being the crowning height of Britain’s cool, Sayeed instead sees 1997 as a missed opportunity, a turning point when there was a chance to genuinely transform British culture and society that was sadly lost. Providing an in-depth account of crucial events, while looking beyond politics to consider the role of music, art and popular culture, Sayeed powerfully traces Britain’s current malaise back to its origins.  


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Epitaphs of the Great War

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Epitaphs of the Great War: Passchendaele collects the headstone inscriptions from the graves of those killed during the Third Battle of Ypres—Passchendaele. Limited by the Imperial War Graves Commission to sixty-six characters, these inscriptions are masterpieces of compact emotion. But, as Sarah Wearne shows in this collection, their enforced brevity means that many inscriptions rely on the reader being able to pick up on references and allusions, many of which are unfamiliar to twenty-first-century readers. Consequently, alongside the inscriptions Wearne offers expanded religious, literary, or anecdotal context in order to give full voice to the bereaved.   Published in association with the Commonwealth War Graves Commission, this collection gathers together epitaphs of the ordinary and the famous, the privileged and the poor, generals and privates alike to offer a full perspective on those who fought and died and those they left behind.   


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Egon Schiele

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Few modern artists have such a following today as Egon Schiele (1890–1918), who in his short life created numerous works that draw in casual viewers and dedicated art lovers alike. Though he enjoyed some success during his lifetime, it wasn’t until the early 1950s that his lasting importance began to be widely appreciated. This book offers striking reproductions of works from each of Schiele’s creative periods, revealing an artists who captivates the viewer with emotional subjects and technical ingenuity in equal measure. Accompanying those artworks are selections from the rich trove of documents Schiele left behind, including his little-known existential poetry.


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Hungarian Film 1929 - 1947

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

What does it mean for someone or something to be Hungarian? That was the far-reaching question that people grappled with in Hungary in the wake of the losses and transformation brought by World War I. Because the period also saw the rise of cinema, audiences, filmmakers, critics, and officials often looked at films with an eye to that question, too: Did the Hungary seen on screen represent the Hungary they knew from everyday life? And—crucially—did the major role played by Jewish Hungarians in the film industry make the sector and its creations somehow Jewish rather than Hungarian? Jews, it was soon decided, could not really be Hungarian, and acts of Parliament soon barred them from taking major roles in cinema production. This book tells the troubled story of that period in Hungarian cinematic history, taking it up through World War II.


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Henri Matisse

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Henri Matisse (1869–1954) is one of the most original and beloved French artists, his colorfully luminescent paintings a stirring affirmation of life, levity, and sensitivity. This book reproduces a large number of Matisse’s works alongside the story of his life, from his early paintings to his late masterpieces, the cutouts, which he created when he was confined to his bed and unable to paint. Drawing on previously unavailable archival materials, Markus Müller traces the trajectory of Matisse’s career, showing how his oeuvre turned towards the color-intensive, near-abstract cutouts. A celebration of a great artist who never stopped seeking new ways to create, this book is the perfect introduction to Matisse’s genius.  


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Man-Made Woman

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

On July 27th, 2015, Colin Cremin overcame a lifetime of fear and repression and came to work dressed as a woman called Ciara. Wearing full makeup, a blouse, a black skirt, and pantyhose, Cremin walked down the steps of a lecture theater in front of a hundred seated students and, without comment, gave her lecture as usual. In Man-Made Woman, Cremin charts her personal journey as a male-to-female cross-dresser in the ever-changing world of gender politics.   Interweaving personal narrative with political discourse, Man-Made Woman is a vivid exploration of gender, identity, fetishism, aesthetics, and popular culture through the lenses of feminism, Marxism, and psychoanalytic theory. Cremin’s anti-moralistic approach dismantles the abjection associated with male-to-female cross dressing, examines the causes of repression, and considers what it means to publicly materialize desire on one’s body. Man-Made Woman is an experiment that ultimately draws both author and reader into a conflict with their material, ideological, and libidinal relationship to patriarchal-capitalism.   With an emancipatory and empowering voice, Cremin interrogates her, his, and our relationship to the gender binary. In light of recent debate surrounding transgender bathroom rights in the United States, Man-Made Woman is a deeply personal account that offers timely insight for anyone interested in contemporary trans politics and queer theory.  


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Nikolai Evreinov & Others: »The Storming of the Winter Palace«

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In 1920, on the third anniversary of the October Revolution, dramatist Nikolai Evreinov directed a cast of 10,000 actors, dancers, and circus performers—as well as a convoy of armored cars and tanks—in The Storming of the Winter Palace. The mass spectacle, presented in and around the real Winter Palace in Petrograd, was intended to recall the storming as the beginning of the October Revolution. But it was a deceptive reenactment because, in producing the events it sought to reenact, it created a new kind of theater, agit-drama, promulgating political propaganda and deliberately breaking down the distinction between performers and spectators.Nikolaj Evreinov: “The Storming of the Winter Palace” tells the fascinating story of this production. Taking readers through the relevant history, the authors describe the role of The Storming of the Winter Palace in commemorating Soviet power. With a wealth of illustrations, they also show how photographs of Evreinov’s theatrical storming eventually became historical documents of the October Revolution themselves.  


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Nature's Mirror

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Since the Renaissance, art in Belgium and the Netherlands has been known for its innovations in realistic representation and its fluency in symbolism. New market forces and artistic concerns fueled the development of landscape as an independent genre in Belgium in the sixteenth century, and landscape emerged as a major focus for nineteenth-century realist and symbolist artists. Nature’s Mirror, and the exhibition it accompanies, traces these landmark developments with a rich array of seldom-seen works.Nature’s Mirror presents its collection of prints and drawings in chronological order, exploring the evolving dialogue between subjective experience and the external world from the Renaissance through the First World War. Essays by American and Belgian specialists examine artists within the regional, political, and industrial contexts that strongly influenced them. Featuring more than one hundred works, many from the leading private collection of Belgian art in America, the Hearn Family Trust, Nature’s Mirror explores the evolution of Belgian art in this fruitful period with remarkable lucidity and detail.  


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Changing Communities

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Changing Communities brings together policy analysis, theoretical understandings of migration and displacement, and illustrations of the diverse ways in which communities themselves perceive these processes of change. Marjorie Mayo draws from both previous studies and her own original research to examine a range of responses, taking account of the varying possibilities, challenges, and interests involved—both within and between communities, locally and transnationally. The book highlights examples of some of the creative, cultural ways in which communities—including diaspora communities—reflect upon their experiences of change and find modes of responding and expressing their unique voices, in such art forms as poetry, storytelling, and photography.


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Changing Communities

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Changing Communities brings together policy analysis, theoretical understandings of migration and displacement, and illustrations of the diverse ways in which communities themselves perceive these processes of change. Marjorie Mayo draws from both previous studies and her own original research to examine a range of responses, taking account of the varying possibilities, challenges, and interests involved—both within and between communities, locally and transnationally. The book highlights examples of some of the creative, cultural ways in which communities—including diaspora communities—reflect upon their experiences of change and find modes of responding and expressing their unique voices, in such art forms as poetry, storytelling, and photography.


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Crow

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Though not generally perceived as graceful, crows are remarkably so—a single curve undulates from the tip of the bird’s beak to the end of its tail. They take flight almost without effort, flapping their wings easily and ascending into the air like spirits. Crow by Boria Sax is a celebration of the crow and its relatives in myth, literature, and life. Sax takes readers into the history of crows, detailing how in a range of cultures, from the Chinese to the Hopi Indians, crows are bearers of prophecy. For example, thanks in part to the birds’ courtship rituals, Greeks invoked crows as symbols of conjugal love. From the raven sent out by Noah to the corvid deities of the Eskimo, from Taoist legends to Victorian novels and contemporary films, Sax’s book ranges across history and culture and will interest anyone who has ever been intrigued, puzzled, annoyed, or charmed by these wonderfully intelligent birds.


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Constitutional Reform in Britain and France

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The United Kingdom and France have very distinctive constitutional identities, so a book that compares the two takes on a complicated task. Elizabeth Gibson-Morgan here begins by detailing the two nations' shared historical, political, and cultural background, then goes on to explore the sweeping transformations that their constitutional frameworks have undergone in the past twenty-five years at both national and regional levels, with a particular emphasis on Wales and Scotland. Where Gibson-Morgan truly breaks new ground, however, is in her approach: rather than treat each country separately, she explains the pattern of institutional development in both from a comparative Franco-British perspective.


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Crossing between Tradition and Modernity

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Crossing Between Tradition and Modernity presents thirteen essays written in honor of Milena Doleželová-Velingerová (1932–2012), a member of the Prague School of Sinology and an important scholar of Chinese literature who was at the forefront in introducing literary theory into sinology. Doleželová-Velingerová was that rare scholar who wrote with equal knowledge and skill about both modern and premodern Chinese literature. The essays emulate Doleželová-Velingerová’s scholarship in terms of treating a broad range of historical periods, literary genres, and topics—from Tang travel essays to cultural identity in postcolonial Hong Kong. Organized into two parts, “Language, Structure, and Genre,” and “Identities and Self-Representations,” the essays are motivated by an abiding concern with issues of language, narrative structure, and the complex nature of literary meaning that were at the heart of Doleželová-Velingerová’s work.


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Computer Game Worlds

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Computer games have become ubiquitous in today’s society. Many scholars have speculated on the reasons for their massive success. Yet we haven’t considered the most basic questions: Why do computer games exist? What specific circumstances led to the creation of this entirely new type of game? What sorts of knowledge facilitated the requisite technological and institutional transformations? With Computer Game Worlds, Claus Pias sets out to answer these questions. Tracing computer games from their earliest forms to the unstoppable commercial and cultural phenomena they have become today, Pias then provides a careful epistemological reconstruction of the process of playing games, both at computers and by computers themselves. The book makes a valuable theoretical contribution to the ongoing discussion about computer games.  


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Critical Guide to Intellectual Property

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

From genetically modified foods to digital piracy, the concept of intellectual property (IP) and the laws upholding it play a central economic role in our society today, but its political and ideological dimensions have rarely been understood outside of specialist circles. This collection cuts through the legal jargon that so often surrounds IP in order to provide a comprehensive history and close analysis that explore the corporate interests that have shaped how IP is conceived and managed.   Up-to-date and comprehensive, this book examines the wider implications of the concept of IP and questions how IP law has been used to safeguard and assert the ownership of ideas and creativity. Today, with mounting challenges from the growth of free software and open source movements, this collection provides an accessible and alternative guide to IP, exploring its significance within the wider struggle between capital and the commons.  


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Challenging the Politics of Early Intervention

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

So often, the ills of society are blamed on negligent parenting, leading to the development of social service policies built around the concept of early intervention. Interrogating this concept, this book explores the history of our understanding of children, family, and parenting, and its implications for society. With a particular focus on the intersection of brain science and social policy, the authors challenge our long-held consensus on early intervention. Accessibly written and highly topical, Challenging the Politics of Early Intervention is a comprehensive and critical assay of our contemporary belief that so-called bad parents raise substandard future citizens unfit for the new capitalism.


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Challenging the Myth of Gender Equality in Sweden

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Sweden has the reputation of being one of the most gender-equal countries in the world, and it is often held up as a model for other societies—but the reality is much more complicated, as this volume shows. The first book to provide a thorough analysis of the myth of Swedish gender equality, it demonstrates how that dominant idea has become a form of heteronormative, racially specific nationalism that ultimately excludes those who fall outside the social norm.


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Orwell's Nose

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In 2012 writer John Sutherland permanently lost his sense of smell. At about the same time, he embarked on a rereading of George Orwell and—still coping with his recent disability—noticed something peculiar: Orwell was positively obsessed with smell. In this original, irreverent biography, Sutherland offers a fresh account of Orwell’s life and works, one that sniffs out a unique, scented trail that wends from Burmese Days through Nineteen Eighty-Four and on to The Road to Wigan Pier.             Sutherland airs out the odors, fetors, stenches, and reeks trapped in the pages of Orwell’s books. From Winston Smith’s apartment in Nineteen Eighty-Four, which “smelt of boiled cabbage and old rag mats,” to the tantalizing aromas of concubine Ma Hla May’s hair in Burmese Days, with its “mingled scent of sandalwood, garlic, coconut oil, and jasmine,” Sutherland explores the scent narratives that abound in Orwell’s literary world. Along the way, he elucidates questions that have remained unanswered in previous biographies, addressing gaps that have kept the writer elusively from us. In doing so, Sutherland offers an entertaining but enriching look at one of the most important writers of the twentieth century and, moreover, an entirely new and sensuous way to approach literature: nose first.  


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Qanemcit Amllertut/Many Stories to Tell

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This bilingual collection shares new translations of old stories recorded over the last four decades though interviews with Yup’ik elders from throughout southwest Alaska. Some are true qulirat (traditional tales), while others are recent. Some are well known, like the adventures of the wily Raven, while others are rarely told. All are part of a great narrative tradition, shared and treasured by Yup’ik people into the present day. This is the first region-wide collection of traditional Yup’ik tales and stories from Southwest Alaska. The elders and translators who contributed to this collection embrace the great irony of oral traditions: that the best way to keep these stories is to give them away. By retelling these stories, they hope to create a future in which the Yup’ik view of the world will be both recognized and valued.


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Red International and Black Caribbean

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Too often grouped together, the black radicalism movement has a history wholly separate from the international communist movement of the early twentieth century. In Red International and Black Caribbean Margaret Stevens sets out to correct this enduring misconception. Focusing on the period 1919-39, Stevens explores the political roots of a dozen Communist organizations and parties that were headquartered in New York City, Mexico, and the Caribbean. She describes the inner workings of the Red International—the revolutionary global political network established under the Communist International—in relation to struggles against racial and colonial oppression. In doing so, she also highlights how the significant victories and setbacks of black people fighting against racial oppression developed within the context of the global Communist movement.   Challenging dominant accounts, Red International and Black Caribbean debunks the “great men” narrative, emphasizes the role of women in their capacity as laborers, and paints the true struggles of black peasants and workers in Communist parties.   


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Social Reproduction Theory

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Crystallizing the essential principles of social reproductive theory, this anthology provides long-overdue analysis of everyday life under capitalism. It focuses on issues such as childcare, healthcare, education, family life, and the roles of gender, race, and sexuality—all of which are central to understanding the relationship between exploitation and social oppression. Tithi Bhattacharya brings together some of the leading writers and theorists, including Lise Vogel, Nancy Fraser, and Susan Ferguson, in order for us to better understand social relations and how to improve them in the fight against structural oppression.


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Standing Up for Civil Rights in St. Louis

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The bustling river city of St. Louis occupies a special place in the long history of African American advocacy for civil rights and equal justice. The city was home to a small but thriving population of free blacks even before the Civil War. It was the location of the first large-scale Emancipation Proclamation—before Lincoln issued its more famous successor. And the city was the site of a number of early, successful civil rights lawsuits, which came to be known as freedom suits.             Standing Up for Civil Rights in St. Louis tells the stories of the many ordinary men and women who took extraordinary steps to fight for equal rights in St. Louis. Written for upper elementary school readers, the book presents the long arc of the struggle for civil rights, giving young readers a new perspective that goes beyond the iconic Southern scenes of the 1950s and ’60s. Amanda E. Doyle and Melanie A. Adams range across history to tell the whole story, moving from pre-Civil War St. Louis to the events in Ferguson in 2014. The book is packed with inspiring stories, excerpts from primary sources, historic photographs, and modern illustrations that, taken together, make civil rights history relevant to today’s readers.


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Together Still

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The international community of letters mourned the recent death of Yves Bonnefoy, universally acclaimed as one of France’s greatest poets of the last half century. A prolific author, he was often considered a candidate for the Nobel Prize and published a dozen major collections of poetry in verse and prose, several books of dream-like tales, and numerous studies of literature and art. His oeuvre has been translated into scores of languages, and he himself was a celebrated translator of Shakespeare, Yeats, Keats, and Leopardi.Together Still is his final poetic work, composed just months before his death. The book is nothing short of a literary testament, addressed to his wife, his daughter, his friends, and his readers throughout the world. In these pages, he ruminates on his legacy to future generations, his insistence on living in the present, his belief in the triumphant lessons of beauty, and, above all, his courageous identification of poetry with hope.


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Wobblies of the World

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Founded in 1905, Chicago’s Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) is a union unlike any other. With members affectionately called “Wobblies” and an evolutionary and internationalist philosophy and tactics, it rapidly grew across the world. Considering the history of the IWW from an international perspective for the first time, Wobblies of the World brings together a group of leading scholars to present a lively collection of accounts from thirteen diverse countries, revealing a fascinating story of anarchism, syndicalism, and socialism.   Drawing on many important figures of the movement—Har Dayal, James Larkin, William D. “Big Bill” Haywood, Enrique Flores Magón, and more—the contributors describe how the IWW and its ideals spread, exploring the crucial role the IWW played in industries such as shipping, mining, and agriculture. Ultimately, the book illuminates Wobblie methods of organizing, forms of expression, practices, and transnational issues, offering a fascinating alternative history of the group.   


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