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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Sun, 04 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

 



Religion of Existence

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

TheReligion of Existence reopens an old debate on an important question: What was existentialism? At the heart of existentialism, Noreen Khawaja argues, is a story about secular thought experimenting with the traditions of European Christianity. This book explores how a distinctly Protestant asceticism formed the basis for the chief existentialist ideal, personal authenticity, which is reflected in approaches ranging from Kierkegaard’s religious theory of the self to Heidegger’s phenomenology of everyday life to Sartre’s global mission of atheistic humanism. Through these three philosophers, she argues, we observe how ascetic norms have shaped one of the twentieth century’s most powerful ways of thinking about identity and difference—the idea that the “true” self is not simply given but something that each of us is responsible for producing. Engaging with many central figures in modern European thought, this book will appeal to philosophers and historians of European philosophy, scholars of modern Christianity, and those working on problems at the intersection of religion and modernity.


Media Files:
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Alice in Space

Wed, 30 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, Lewis Carroll created fantastic worlds that continue to delight and trouble readers of all ages today. Few consider, however, that Carroll conceived his Alice books during the 1860s, a moment of intense intellectual upheaval, as new scientific, linguistic, educational, and mathematical ideas flourished around him and far beyond. Alice in Space reveals the contexts within which the Alice books first lived, bringing back the zest to jokes lost over time and poignancy to hidden references. Gillian Beer explores Carroll’s work through the speculative gaze of Alice, for whom no authority is unquestioned and everything can speak. Parody and Punch, evolutionary debates, philosophical dialogues, educational works for children, math and logic, manners and rituals, dream theory and childhood studies—all fueled the fireworks. While much has been written about Carroll’s biography and his influence on children’s literature, Beer convincingly shows him at play in the spaces of Victorian cultural and intellectual life, drawing on then-current controversies, reading prodigiously across many fields, and writing on multiple levels to please both children and adults in different ways. With a welcome combination of learning and lightness, Beer reminds us that Carroll’s books are essentially about curiosity, its risks and pleasures. Along the way, Alice in Space shares Alice’s exceptional ability to spark curiosity in us, too.


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Bleak Liberalism

Wed, 30 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Why is liberalism so often dismissed by thinkers from both the left and the right? To those calling for wholesale transformation or claiming a monopoly on “realistic” conceptions of humanity, liberalism’s assured progressivism can seem hard to swallow. Bleak Liberalism makes the case for a renewed understanding of the liberal tradition, showing that it is much more attuned to the complexity of political life than conventional accounts have acknowledged. Amanda Anderson examines canonical works of high realism, political novels from England and the United States, and modernist works to argue that liberalism has engaged sober and even stark views of historical development, political dynamics, and human and social psychology. From Charles Dickens’s Bleak House and Hard Times to E. M. Forster’s Howards End to Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook, this literature demonstrates that liberalism has inventive ways of balancing sociological critique and moral aspiration. A deft blend of intellectual history and literary analysis, Bleak Liberalism reveals a richer understanding of one of the most important political ideologies of the modern era.


Media Files:
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Bleak Liberalism

Wed, 30 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Why is liberalism so often dismissed by thinkers from both the left and the right? To those calling for wholesale transformation or claiming a monopoly on “realistic” conceptions of humanity, liberalism’s assured progressivism can seem hard to swallow. Bleak Liberalism makes the case for a renewed understanding of the liberal tradition, showing that it is much more attuned to the complexity of political life than conventional accounts have acknowledged. Amanda Anderson examines canonical works of high realism, political novels from England and the United States, and modernist works to argue that liberalism has engaged sober and even stark views of historical development, political dynamics, and human and social psychology. From Charles Dickens’s Bleak House and Hard Times to E. M. Forster’s Howards End to Doris Lessing’s The Golden Notebook, this literature demonstrates that liberalism has inventive ways of balancing sociological critique and moral aspiration. A deft blend of intellectual history and literary analysis, Bleak Liberalism reveals a richer understanding of one of the most important political ideologies of the modern era.


Media Files:
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Building a New Educational State

Wed, 30 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Building a New Educational State examines the dynamic process of black education reform during the Jim Crow era in North Carolina and Mississippi. Through extensive archival research, Joan Malczewski explores the initiatives of foundations and reformers at the top, the impact of their work at the state and local level, and the agency of southerners—including those in rural black communities—to demonstrate the importance of schooling to political development in the South. Along the way, Malczewski challenges us to reevaluate the relationships among political actors involved in education reform.             Malczewski presents foundation leaders as self-conscious state builders and policy entrepreneurs who aimed to promote national ideals through a public system of education—efforts they believed were especially critical in the South. Black education was an important component of this national agenda. Through extensive efforts to create a more centralized and standard system of public education aimed at bringing isolated and rural black schools into the public system, schools became important places for expanding the capacity of state and local governance. Schooling provided opportunities to reorganize local communities and augment black agency in the process. When foundations realized they could not unilaterally impose their educational vision on the South, particularly in black communities, they began to collaborate with locals, thereby opening political opportunity in rural areas. Unfortunately, while foundations were effective at developing the institutional configurations necessary for education reform, they were less successful at implementing local programs consistently due to each state’s distinctive political and institutional context.


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Grasping Hand

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In 2005, the Supreme Court ruled that the city of New London, Connecticut, could condemn fifteen residential properties in order to transfer them to a new private owner. Although the Fifth Amendment only permits the taking of private property for “public use,” the Court ruled that the transfer of condemned land to private parties for “economic development” is permitted by the Constitution—even if the government cannot prove that the expected development will ever actually happen. The Court’s decision in Kelo v. City of New London empowered the grasping hand of the state at the expense of the invisible hand of the market.             In this detailed study of one of the most controversial Supreme Court cases in modern times, Ilya Somin argues that Kelo was a grave error. Economic development and “blight” condemnations are unconstitutional under both originalist and most “living constitution” theories of legal interpretation. They also victimize the poor and the politically weak for the benefit of powerful interest groups and often destroy more economic value than they create. Kelo itself exemplifies these patterns. The residents targeted for condemnation lacked the influence needed to combat the formidable government and corporate interests arrayed against them.  Moreover, the city’s poorly conceived development plan ultimately failed: the condemned land lies empty to this day, occupied only by feral cats. The Supreme Court’s unpopular ruling triggered an unprecedented political reaction, with forty-five states passing new laws intended to limit the use of eminent domain. But many of the new laws impose few or no genuine constraints on takings. The Kelo backlash led to significant progress, but not nearly as much as it may have seemed. Despite its outcome, the closely divided 5-4 ruling shattered what many believed to be a consensus that virtually any condemnation qualifies as a public use under the Fifth Amendment. It also showed that there is widespread public opposition to eminent domain abuse. With controversy over takings sure to continue, The Grasping Hand offers the first book-length analysis of Kelo by a legal scholar, alongside a broader history of the dispute over public use and eminent domain and an evaluation of options for reform.  


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Reckoning with Matter

Tue, 29 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

From Blaise Pascal in the 1600s to Charles Babbage in the first half of the nineteenth century, inventors struggled to create the first calculating machines. All failed—but that does not mean we cannot learn from the trail of ideas, correspondence, machines, and arguments they left behind.   In Reckoning with Matter, Matthew L. Jones draws on the remarkably extensive and well-preserved records of the quest to explore the concrete processes involved in imagining, elaborating, testing, and building calculating machines. He explores the writings of philosophers, engineers, and craftspeople, showing how they thought about technical novelty, their distinctive areas of expertise, and ways they could coordinate their efforts. In doing so, Jones argues that the conceptions of creativity and making they exhibited are often more incisive—and more honest—than those that dominate our current legal, political, and aesthetic culture.  


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Inheritance of Loss

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

How do contemporary generations come to terms with losses inflicted by imperialism, colonialism, and war that took place decades ago? How do descendants of perpetrators and victims establish new relations in today’s globalized economy? With Inheritance of Loss, Yukiko Koga approaches these questions through the unique lens of inheritance, focusing on Northeast China, the former site of the Japanese puppet state Manchukuo, where municipal governments now court Japanese as investors and tourists. As China transitions to a market-oriented society, this region is restoring long-neglected colonial-era structures to boost tourism and inviting former colonial industries to create special economic zones, all while inadvertently unearthing chemical weapons abandoned by the Imperial Japanese Army at the end of World War II.   Inheritance of Loss chronicles these sites of colonial inheritance––tourist destinations, corporate zones, and mustard gas exposure sites––to illustrate attempts by ordinary Chinese and Japanese to reckon with their shared yet contested pasts. In her explorations of everyday life, Koga directs us to see how the violence and injustice that occurred after the demise of the Japanese Empire compound the losses that later generations must account for, and inevitably inherit.


Media Files:
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Inheritance of Loss

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

How do contemporary generations come to terms with losses inflicted by imperialism, colonialism, and war that took place decades ago? How do descendants of perpetrators and victims establish new relations in today’s globalized economy? With Inheritance of Loss, Yukiko Koga approaches these questions through the unique lens of inheritance, focusing on Northeast China, the former site of the Japanese puppet state Manchukuo, where municipal governments now court Japanese as investors and tourists. As China transitions to a market-oriented society, this region is restoring long-neglected colonial-era structures to boost tourism and inviting former colonial industries to create special economic zones, all while inadvertently unearthing chemical weapons abandoned by the Imperial Japanese Army at the end of World War II.   Inheritance of Loss chronicles these sites of colonial inheritance––tourist destinations, corporate zones, and mustard gas exposure sites––to illustrate attempts by ordinary Chinese and Japanese to reckon with their shared yet contested pasts. In her explorations of everyday life, Koga directs us to see how the violence and injustice that occurred after the demise of the Japanese Empire compound the losses that later generations must account for, and inevitably inherit.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/41/9780226412139.jpg




Provisional Authority

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Policing as a global form is often fraught with excessive violence, corruption, and even criminalization. These sorts of problems are especially omnipresent in postcolonial nations such as India, where Beatrice Jauregui has spent several years studying the day-to-day lives of police officers in its most populous state, Uttar Pradesh. In this book, she offers an empirically rich and theoretically innovative look at the great puzzle of police authority in contemporary India and its relationship to social order, democratic governance, and security.   Jauregui explores the paradoxical demands placed on Indian police, who are at once routinely charged with abuses of authority at the same time that they are asked to extend that authority into any number of both official and unofficial tasks. Her ethnography of their everyday life and work demonstrates that police authority is provisional in several senses: shifting across time and space, subject to the availability and movement of resources, and dependent upon shared moral codes and relentless instrumental demands. In the end, she shows that police authority in India is not simply a vulgar manifestation of raw power or the violence of law but, rather, a contingent and volatile social resource relied upon in different ways to help realize human needs and desires in a pluralistic, postcolonial democracy.   Provocative and compelling, Provisional Authority provides a rare and disquieting look inside the world of police in India, and shines critical light on an institution fraught with moral, legal and political contradictions.  


Media Files:
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Provisional Authority

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Policing as a global form is often fraught with excessive violence, corruption, and even criminalization. These sorts of problems are especially omnipresent in postcolonial nations such as India, where Beatrice Jauregui has spent several years studying the day-to-day lives of police officers in its most populous state, Uttar Pradesh. In this book, she offers an empirically rich and theoretically innovative look at the great puzzle of police authority in contemporary India and its relationship to social order, democratic governance, and security.   Jauregui explores the paradoxical demands placed on Indian police, who are at once routinely charged with abuses of authority at the same time that they are asked to extend that authority into any number of both official and unofficial tasks. Her ethnography of their everyday life and work demonstrates that police authority is provisional in several senses: shifting across time and space, subject to the availability and movement of resources, and dependent upon shared moral codes and relentless instrumental demands. In the end, she shows that police authority in India is not simply a vulgar manifestation of raw power or the violence of law but, rather, a contingent and volatile social resource relied upon in different ways to help realize human needs and desires in a pluralistic, postcolonial democracy.   Provocative and compelling, Provisional Authority provides a rare and disquieting look inside the world of police in India, and shines critical light on an institution fraught with moral, legal and political contradictions.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/40/9780226403700.jpg




Working Law

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, virtually all companies have antidiscrimination policies in place. Although these policies represent some progress, women and minorities remain underrepresented within the workplace as a whole and even more so when you look at high-level positions. They also tend to be less well paid. How is it that discrimination remains so prevalent in the American workplace despite the widespread adoption of policies designed to prevent it? One reason for the limited success of antidiscrimination policies, argues Lauren B. Edelman, is that the law regulating companies is broad and ambiguous, and managers therefore play a critical role in shaping what it means in daily practice. Often, what results are policies and procedures that are largely symbolic and fail to dispel long-standing patterns of discrimination. Even more troubling, these meanings of the law that evolve within companies tend to eventually make their way back into the legal domain, inconspicuously influencing lawyers for both plaintiffs and defendants and even judges. When courts look to the presence of antidiscrimination policies and personnel manuals to infer fair practices and to the presence of diversity training programs without examining whether these policies are effective in combating discrimination and achieving racial and gender diversity, they wind up condoning practices that deviate considerably from the legal ideals.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/40/9780226400761.jpg




Working Law

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Since the passage of the Civil Rights Act, virtually all companies have antidiscrimination policies in place. Although these policies represent some progress, women and minorities remain underrepresented within the workplace as a whole and even more so when you look at high-level positions. They also tend to be less well paid. How is it that discrimination remains so prevalent in the American workplace despite the widespread adoption of policies designed to prevent it? One reason for the limited success of antidiscrimination policies, argues Lauren B. Edelman, is that the law regulating companies is broad and ambiguous, and managers therefore play a critical role in shaping what it means in daily practice. Often, what results are policies and procedures that are largely symbolic and fail to dispel long-standing patterns of discrimination. Even more troubling, these meanings of the law that evolve within companies tend to eventually make their way back into the legal domain, inconspicuously influencing lawyers for both plaintiffs and defendants and even judges. When courts look to the presence of antidiscrimination policies and personnel manuals to infer fair practices and to the presence of diversity training programs without examining whether these policies are effective in combating discrimination and achieving racial and gender diversity, they wind up condoning practices that deviate considerably from the legal ideals.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/40/9780226400761.jpg




Affective Circuits

Fri, 25 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

The influx of African migrants into Europe in recent years has raised important issues about changing labor economies, new technologies of border control, and the effects of armed conflict. But attention to such broad questions often obscures a fundamental fact of migration: its effects on ordinary life. Affective Circuits brings together essays by an international group of well-known anthropologists to place the migrant family front and center. Moving between Africa and Europe, the book explores the many ways migrants sustain and rework family ties and intimate relationships at home and abroad. It demonstrates how their quotidian efforts—on such a mass scale—contribute to a broader process of social regeneration.             The contributors point to the intersecting streams of goods, people, ideas, and money as they circulate between African migrants and their kin who remain back home. They also show the complex ways that emotions become entangled in these exchanges. Examining how these circuits operate in domains of social life ranging from child fosterage to binational marriages, from coming-of-age to healing and religious rituals, the book also registers the tremendous impact of state officials, laws, and policies on migrant experience. Together these essays paint an especially vivid portrait of new forms of kinship at a time of both intense mobility and ever-tightening borders.  


Media Files:
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Affective Circuits

Fri, 25 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

The influx of African migrants into Europe in recent years has raised important issues about changing labor economies, new technologies of border control, and the effects of armed conflict. But attention to such broad questions often obscures a fundamental fact of migration: its effects on ordinary life. Affective Circuits brings together essays by an international group of well-known anthropologists to place the migrant family front and center. Moving between Africa and Europe, the book explores the many ways migrants sustain and rework family ties and intimate relationships at home and abroad. It demonstrates how their quotidian efforts—on such a mass scale—contribute to a broader process of social regeneration.             The contributors point to the intersecting streams of goods, people, ideas, and money as they circulate between African migrants and their kin who remain back home. They also show the complex ways that emotions become entangled in these exchanges. Examining how these circuits operate in domains of social life ranging from child fosterage to binational marriages, from coming-of-age to healing and religious rituals, the book also registers the tremendous impact of state officials, laws, and policies on migrant experience. Together these essays paint an especially vivid portrait of new forms of kinship at a time of both intense mobility and ever-tightening borders.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/40/9780226405155.jpg




Collective Memory and the Historical Past

Fri, 25 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

There is one critical way we honor great tragedies: by never forgetting. Collective remembrance is as old as human society itself, serving as an important source of social cohesion, yet as Jeffrey Andrew Barash shows in this book, it has served novel roles in a modern era otherwise characterized by discontinuity and dislocation. Drawing on recent theoretical explorations of collective memory, he elaborates an important new philosophical basis for it, one that unveils important limitations to its scope in relation to the historical past.             Crucial to Barash’s analysis is a look at the radical transformations that the symbolic configurations of collective memory have undergone with the rise of new technologies of mass communication. He provocatively demonstrates how such technologies’ capacity to simulate direct experience—especially via the image—actually makes more palpable collective memory’s limitations and the opacity of the historical past, which always lies beyond the reach of living memory. Thwarting skepticism, however, he eventually looks to literature—specifically writers such as Marcel Proust, Walter Scott, and W. G. Sebald—to uncover subtle nuances of temporality that might offer inconspicuous emblems of a past historical reality.  


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Sins of the Fathers

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

National identity and political legitimacy always involve a delicate balance between remembering and forgetting. All nations have elements in their past that they would prefer to pass over—the catalog of failures, injustices, and horrors committed in the name of nations, if fully acknowledged, could create significant problems for a country trying to move on and take action in the present. Yet denial and forgetting carry costs as well. Nowhere has this precarious balance been more potent, or important, than in the Federal Republic of Germany, where the devastation and atrocities of two world wars have weighed heavily in virtually every moment and aspect of political life. The Sins of the Fathers confronts that difficulty head-on, exploring the variety of ways that Germany’s leaders since 1949 have attempted to meet this challenge, with a particular focus on how those approaches have changed over time. Jeffrey K. Olick asserts that other nations are looking to Germany as an example of how a society can confront a dark past—casting Germany as our model of difficult collective memory.


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Untrodden Ground

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

When Thomas Jefferson struck a deal for the Louisiana Purchase in 1803, he knew he was adding a new national power to those specified in the Constitution, but he also believed his actions were in the nation’s best interest. His successors would follow his example, setting their own constitutional precedents. Tracing the evolution and expansion of the president’s formal power, Untrodden Ground reveals the president to be the nation’s most important law interpreter and examines how our commanders-in-chief have shaped the law through their responses to important issues of their time.             Reviewing the processes taken by all forty-four presidents to form new legal precedents and the constitutional conventions that have developed as a result, Harold H. Bruff shows that the president is both more and less powerful than many suppose. He explores how presidents have been guided by both their predecessors’ and their own interpretations of constitutional text, as well as how they implement policies in ways that statutes do not clearly authorize or forbid. But while executive power has expanded far beyond its original conception, Bruff argues that the modern presidency is appropriately limited by the national political process—their actions are legitimized by the assent of Congress and the American people or rejected through debilitating public outcry, judicial invalidation, reactive legislation, or impeachment. Synthesizing over two hundred years of presidential activity and conflict, this timely book casts new light on executive behavior and the American constitutional system.


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Therapeutic Revolutions

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

When asked to compare the practice of medicine today to that of a hundred years ago, most people will respond with a story of therapeutic revolution: Back then we had few effective remedies, but now we have more (and more powerful) tools to fight disease, from antibiotics to psychotropics to steroids to anticancer agents. This collection challenges the historical accuracy of this revolutionary narrative and offers instead a more nuanced account of the process of therapeutic innovation and the relationships between the development of medicines and social change. These assembled histories and ethnographies span three continents and use the lived experiences of physicians and patients, consumers and providers, and marketers and regulators to reveal the tensions between universal claims of therapeutic knowledge and the actual ways these claims have been used and understood in specific sites, from postwar West Germany pharmacies to twenty-first century Nigerian street markets. By asking us to rethink a story we thought we knew, Therapeutic Revolutions offers invaluable insights to historians, anthropologists, and social scientists of medicine.  


Media Files:
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Therapeutic Revolutions

Wed, 23 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

When asked to compare the practice of medicine today to that of a hundred years ago, most people will respond with a story of therapeutic revolution: Back then we had few effective remedies, but now we have more (and more powerful) tools to fight disease, from antibiotics to psychotropics to steroids to anticancer agents. This collection challenges the historical accuracy of this revolutionary narrative and offers instead a more nuanced account of the process of therapeutic innovation and the relationships between the development of medicines and social change. These assembled histories and ethnographies span three continents and use the lived experiences of physicians and patients, consumers and providers, and marketers and regulators to reveal the tensions between universal claims of therapeutic knowledge and the actual ways these claims have been used and understood in specific sites, from postwar West Germany pharmacies to twenty-first century Nigerian street markets. By asking us to rethink a story we thought we knew, Therapeutic Revolutions offers invaluable insights to historians, anthropologists, and social scientists of medicine.  


Media Files:
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Crime and Justice, Volume 45

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Sentencing Policies and Practices in Western Countries: Comparative and Cross-national Perspectives is the forty-fifth addition to the Crime and Justice series. Contributors include Thomas Weigend on criminal sentencing in Germany since 2000; Julian V. Roberts and Andrew Ashworth on the evolution of sentencing policy and practice in England and Wales from 2003 to 2015; Jacqueline Hodgson and Laurène Soubise on understanding the sentencing process in France; Anthony N. Doob and Cheryl Marie Webster on Canadian sentencing policy in the twenty-first century; Arie Freiberg on Australian sentencing policies and practices; Krzysztof Krajewski on sentencing in Poland; Alessandro Corda on Italian policies; Michael Tonry on American sentencing; and Tapio Lappi-Seppälä on penal policy and sentencing in the Nordic countries.


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Big Bosses

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Sharp, resourceful, and with a style all her own, Althea Altemus embodied the spirit of the independent working woman of the Jazz Age. In her memoir, Big Bosses, she vividly recounts her life as a secretary for prominent (but thinly disguised) employers in Chicago, Miami, and New York during the late teens and 1920s. Alongside her we rub elbows with movie stars, artists, and high-profile businessmen, and experience lavish estate parties that routinely defied the laws of Prohibition. Beginning with her employment as a private secretary to James Deering of International Harvester, whom she describes as “probably the world’s oldest and wealthiest bachelor playboy,” Altemus tells us much about high society during the time, taking us inside Deering’s glamorous Miami estate, Vizcaya, an Italianate mansion worthy of Gatsby himself. Later, we meet her other notable employers, including Samuel Insull, president of Chicago Edison; New York banker S. W. Straus; and real estate developer Fred F. French. We cinch up our trenchcoats and head out sleuthing in Chicago, hired by the wife of a big boss to find out how he spends his evenings (with, it turns out, a mistress hidden in an apartment within his office, no less). Altemus was also a struggling single mother, a fact she had to keep secret from her employers, and she reveals the difficulties of being a working woman at the time through glimpses into women’s apartments, their friendships, and the dangers—sexual and otherwise—that she and others faced. Throughout, Altemus entertains with a tart and self-aware voice that combines the knowledge of an insider with the wit and clarity of someone on the fringe. Anchored by extensive annotation and an afterword from historian Robin F. Bachin, which contextualizes Altemus’s narrative, Big Bosses provides a one-of-a-kind peek inside the excitement, extravagances, and the challenges of being a working woman roaring through the ’20s.


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Everyday Creativity

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Kirin Narayan’s imagination was captured the very first time that, as a girl visiting the Himalayas, she heard Kangra women join their voices together in song. Returning as an anthropologist, she became fascinated by how they spoke of singing as a form of enrichment, bringing feelings of accomplishment, companionship, happiness, and even good health—all benefits of the “everyday creativity” she explores in this book. Part ethnography, part musical discovery, part poetry, part memoir, and part unforgettable portraits of creative individuals, this unique work brings this remote region in North India alive in sight and sound while celebrating the incredible powers of music in our lives.            With rare and captivating eloquence, Narayan portrays Kangra songs about difficulties on the lives of goddesses and female saints as a path to well-being. Like the intricate geometries of mandalu patterns drawn in courtyards or the subtle balance of flavors in a meal, well-crafted songs offer a variety of deeply meaningful benefits: as a way of making something of value, as a means of establishing a community of shared pleasure and skill, as a path through hardships and limitations, and as an arena of renewed possibility. Everyday Creativity makes big the small world of Kangra song and opens up new ways of thinking about what creativity is to us and why we are so compelled to engage it.


Media Files:
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Everyday Creativity

Tue, 22 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Kirin Narayan’s imagination was captured the very first time that, as a girl visiting the Himalayas, she heard Kangra women join their voices together in song. Returning as an anthropologist, she became fascinated by how they spoke of singing as a form of enrichment, bringing feelings of accomplishment, companionship, happiness, and even good health—all benefits of the “everyday creativity” she explores in this book. Part ethnography, part musical discovery, part poetry, part memoir, and part unforgettable portraits of creative individuals, this unique work brings this remote region in North India alive in sight and sound while celebrating the incredible powers of music in our lives.            With rare and captivating eloquence, Narayan portrays Kangra songs about difficulties on the lives of goddesses and female saints as a path to well-being. Like the intricate geometries of mandalu patterns drawn in courtyards or the subtle balance of flavors in a meal, well-crafted songs offer a variety of deeply meaningful benefits: as a way of making something of value, as a means of establishing a community of shared pleasure and skill, as a path through hardships and limitations, and as an arena of renewed possibility. Everyday Creativity makes big the small world of Kangra song and opens up new ways of thinking about what creativity is to us and why we are so compelled to engage it.


Media Files:
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Cherubino's Leap

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

For the Enlightenment mind, from Moses Mendelssohn’s focus on the moment of surprise at the heart of the work of art to Herder’s imagining of the seismic moment at which language was discovered, it is the flash of recognition that nails the essence of the work, the blink of an eye in which one’s world changes.  In Cherubino’s Leap, Richard Kramer unmasks such prismatic moments in iconic music from the Enlightenment, from the “chromatic” moment—the single tone that disturbs the thrust of a diatonic musical discourse—and its deployment in seminal instrumental works by Emanuel Bach, Haydn, and Mozart; on to the poetic moment, taking the odes of Klopstock, in their finely wrought prosody, as a challenge to the problem of strophic song; and finally to the grand stage of opera, to the intense moment of recognition in Gluck’s Iphigénie en Tauride and the exquisitely introverted phrase that complicates Cherubino’s daring moment of escape in Mozart’s Figaro. Finally, the tears of the disconsolate Konstanze in Mozart’s Die Entführung aus dem Serail provoke a reflection on the tragic aspect of Mozart’s operatic women. Throughout, other players from literature and the arts—Diderot, Goethe, Lessing among them—enrich the landscape of this bold journey through the Enlightenment imagination.


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Invention of Culture

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In anthropology, a field that is known for its critical edge and intellectual agility, few books manage to maintain both historical value and contemporary relevance. Roy Wagner's The Invention of Culture, originally published in 1975, is one.   Wagner breaks new ground by arguing that culture arises from the dialectic between the individual and the social world. Rooting his analysis in the relationships between invention and convention, innovation and control, and meaning and context, he builds a theory that insists on the importance of creativity, placing people-as-inventors at the heart of the process that creates culture. In an elegant twist, he shows that this very process ultimately produces the discipline of anthropology itself.   Tim Ingold’s foreword to the new edition captures the exhilaration of Wagner’s book while showing how the reader can journey through it and arrive safely—though transformed—on the other side.  


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Tigers of a Different Stripe

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Tigers of a Different Stripe takes readers inside the unique world of merengue típico, a traditional music of the Dominican Republic. While in most genres of Caribbean music women usually participate as dancers or vocalists, in merengue típico they are more often instrumentalists and even bandleaders—something nearly unheard of in the macho Caribbean music scene. Examining this cultural phenomenon, Sydney Hutchinson offers an unexpected and fascinating account of gender in Dominican art and life.             Drawing on over a decade of fieldwork in the Dominican Republic and New York among musicians, fans, and patrons of merengue típico—not to mention her own experiences as a female instrumentalist—Hutchinson details a complex nexus of class, race, and artistic tradition that unsettles the typical binary between the masculine and feminine. She sketches the portrait of the classic male figure of the tíguere, a dandified but sexually aggressive and street-smart “tiger,” and she shows how female musicians have developed a feminine counterpart: the tíguera, an assertive, sensual, and respected female figure who looks like a woman but often plays and even sings like a man. Through these musical figures and studies of both straight and queer performers, she unveils rich ambiguities in gender construction in the Dominican Republic and the long history of a unique form of Caribbean feminism.


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Tigers of a Different Stripe

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Tigers of a Different Stripe takes readers inside the unique world of merengue típico, a traditional music of the Dominican Republic. While in most genres of Caribbean music women usually participate as dancers or vocalists, in merengue típico they are more often instrumentalists and even bandleaders—something nearly unheard of in the macho Caribbean music scene. Examining this cultural phenomenon, Sydney Hutchinson offers an unexpected and fascinating account of gender in Dominican art and life.             Drawing on over a decade of fieldwork in the Dominican Republic and New York among musicians, fans, and patrons of merengue típico—not to mention her own experiences as a female instrumentalist—Hutchinson details a complex nexus of class, race, and artistic tradition that unsettles the typical binary between the masculine and feminine. She sketches the portrait of the classic male figure of the tíguere, a dandified but sexually aggressive and street-smart “tiger,” and she shows how female musicians have developed a feminine counterpart: the tíguera, an assertive, sensual, and respected female figure who looks like a woman but often plays and even sings like a man. Through these musical figures and studies of both straight and queer performers, she unveils rich ambiguities in gender construction in the Dominican Republic and the long history of a unique form of Caribbean feminism.


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Christianity and Race in the American South

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

The history of race and religion in the American South is infused with tragedy, survival, and water—from St. Augustine on the shores of Florida’s Atlantic Coast to the swampy mire of Jamestown to the floodwaters that nearly destroyed New Orleans. Determination, resistance, survival, even transcendence, shape the story of race and southern Christianities. In Christianity and Race in the American South, Paul Harvey gives us a narrative history of the South as it integrates into the story of religious history, fundamentally transforming our understanding of the importance of American Christianity and religious identity. Harvey chronicles the diversity and complexity in the intertwined histories of race and religion in the South, dating back to the first days of European settlement. He presents a history rife with strange alliances, unlikely parallels, and far too many tragedies, along the way illustrating that ideas about the role of churches in the South were critically shaped by conflicts over slavery and race that defined southern life more broadly. Race, violence, religion, and southern identity remain a volatile brew, and this book is the persuasive historical examination that is essential to making sense of it.


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Seventeenth-Century Opera and the Sound of the Commedia dell’Arte

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In this book, Emily Wilbourne boldly traces the roots of early opera back to the sounds of the commedia dell’arte. Along the way, she forges a new history of Italian opera, from the court pieces of the early seventeenth century to the public stages of Venice more than fifty years later. Wilbourne considers a series of case studies structured around the most important and widely explored operas of the period: Monteverdi’s lost L’Arianna, as well as his Il Ritorno d’Ulisse and L’incoronazione di Poppea; Mazzochi and Marazzoli’s L’Egisto, ovvero Chi soffre speri; and Cavalli’s L’Ormindo and L’Artemisia. As she demonstrates, the sound-in-performance aspect of commedia dell’arte theater—specifically, the use of dialect and verbal play—produced an audience that was accustomed to listening to sonic content rather than simply the literal meaning of spoken words. This, Wilbourne suggests, shaped the musical vocabularies of early opera and facilitated a musicalization of Italian theater. Highlighting productive ties between the two worlds, from the audiences and venues to the actors and singers, this work brilliantly shows how the sound of commedia performance ultimately underwrote the success of opera as a genre.  


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Rhetoric in Tooth and Claw

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

We tend to think of rhetoric as a solely human art. After all, only humans can use language artfully to make a point, the very definition of rhetoric. Yet when you look at ancient and early modern treatises on rhetoric, what you find is surprising: they’re crawling with animals. With Rhetoric in Tooth and Claw, Debra Hawhee explores this unexpected aspect of early thinking about rhetoric, going on from there to examine the enduring presence of nonhuman animals in rhetorical theory and education. In doing so, she not only offers a counter-history of rhetoric but also brings rhetorical studies into dialogue with animal studies, one of the most vibrant areas of interest in humanities today. By removing humanity and human reason from the center of our study of argument, Hawhee frees up space to study and emphasize other crucial components of communication, like energy, bodies, and sensation. Drawing on thinkers from Aristotle to Erasmus, Rhetoric in Tooth and Claw tells a new story of the discipline’s history and development, one animated by the energy, force, liveliness, and diversity of our relationships with our “partners in feeling,” other animals.


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Partisans and Partners

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

There’s no question that Americans are bitterly divided by politics. But in Partisans and Partners, Josh Pacewicz finds that our traditional understanding of red/blue, right/left, urban/rural division is too simplistic. Wheels-down in Iowa—that most important of primary states—Pacewicz looks to two cities, one traditionally Democratic, the other traditionally Republican, and finds that younger voters are rejecting older-timers’ strict political affiliations. A paradox is emerging—as the dividing lines between America’s political parties have sharpened, Americans are at the same time growing distrustful of traditional party politics in favor of becoming apolitical or embracing outside-the-beltway candidates. Pacewicz sees this change coming not from politicians and voters, but from the fundamental reorganization of the community institutions in which political parties have traditionally been rooted. Weaving together major themes in American political history—including globalization, the decline of organized labor, loss of locally owned industries, uneven economic development, and the emergence of grassroots populist movements—Partisans and Partners is a timely and comprehensive analysis of American politics as it happens on the ground.


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Partisans and Partners

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

There’s no question that Americans are bitterly divided by politics. But in Partisans and Partners, Josh Pacewicz finds that our traditional understanding of red/blue, right/left, urban/rural division is too simplistic. Wheels-down in Iowa—that most important of primary states—Pacewicz looks to two cities, one traditionally Democratic, the other traditionally Republican, and finds that younger voters are rejecting older-timers’ strict political affiliations. A paradox is emerging—as the dividing lines between America’s political parties have sharpened, Americans are at the same time growing distrustful of traditional party politics in favor of becoming apolitical or embracing outside-the-beltway candidates. Pacewicz sees this change coming not from politicians and voters, but from the fundamental reorganization of the community institutions in which political parties have traditionally been rooted. Weaving together major themes in American political history—including globalization, the decline of organized labor, loss of locally owned industries, uneven economic development, and the emergence of grassroots populist movements—Partisans and Partners is a timely and comprehensive analysis of American politics as it happens on the ground.


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Executing Freedom

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In the mid-1990s, as public trust in big government was near an all-time low, 80% of Americans told Gallup that they supported the death penalty. Why did people who didn’t trust government to regulate the economy or provide daily services nonetheless believe that it should have the power to put its citizens to death? That question is at the heart of Executing Freedom, a powerful, wide-ranging examination of the place of the death penalty in American culture and how it has changed over the years. Drawing on an array of sources, including congressional hearings and campaign speeches, true crime classics like In Cold Blood, and films like Dead Man Walking, Daniel LaChance shows how attitudes toward the death penalty have reflected broader shifts in Americans’ thinking about the relationship between the individual and the state. Emerging from the height of 1970s disillusion, the simplicity and moral power of the death penalty became a potent symbol for many Americans of what government could do—and LaChance argues, fascinatingly, that it’s the very failure of capital punishment to live up to that mythology that could prove its eventual undoing in the United States.


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Data-Centric Biology

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In recent decades, there has been a major shift in the way researchers process and understand scientific data. Digital access to data has revolutionized ways of doing science in the biological and biomedical fields, leading to a data-intensive approach to research that uses innovative methods to produce, store, distribute, and interpret huge amounts of data. In Data-Centric Biology, Sabina Leonelli probes the implications of these advancements and confronts the questions they pose. Are we witnessing the rise of an entirely new scientific epistemology? If so, how does that alter the way we study and understand life—including ourselves?  Leonelli is the first scholar to use a study of contemporary data-intensive science to provide a philosophical analysis of the epistemology of data. In analyzing the rise, internal dynamics, and potential impact of data-centric biology, she draws on scholarship across diverse fields of science and the humanities—as well as her own original empirical material—to pinpoint the conditions under which digitally available data can further our understanding of life. Bridging the divide between historians, sociologists, and philosophers of science, Data-Centric Biology offers a nuanced account of an issue that is of fundamental importance to our understanding of contemporary scientific practices.


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Data-Centric Biology

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In recent decades, there has been a major shift in the way researchers process and understand scientific data. Digital access to data has revolutionized ways of doing science in the biological and biomedical fields, leading to a data-intensive approach to research that uses innovative methods to produce, store, distribute, and interpret huge amounts of data. In Data-Centric Biology, Sabina Leonelli probes the implications of these advancements and confronts the questions they pose. Are we witnessing the rise of an entirely new scientific epistemology? If so, how does that alter the way we study and understand life—including ourselves?  Leonelli is the first scholar to use a study of contemporary data-intensive science to provide a philosophical analysis of the epistemology of data. In analyzing the rise, internal dynamics, and potential impact of data-centric biology, she draws on scholarship across diverse fields of science and the humanities—as well as her own original empirical material—to pinpoint the conditions under which digitally available data can further our understanding of life. Bridging the divide between historians, sociologists, and philosophers of science, Data-Centric Biology offers a nuanced account of an issue that is of fundamental importance to our understanding of contemporary scientific practices.


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Big Bosses

Fri, 18 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Sharp, resourceful, and with a style all her own, Althea Altemus embodied the spirit of the independent working woman of the Jazz Age. In her memoir, Big Bosses, she vividly recounts her life as a secretary for prominent (but thinly disguised) employers in Chicago, Miami, and New York during the late teens and 1920s. Alongside her we rub elbows with movie stars, artists, and high-profile businessmen, and experience lavish estate parties that routinely defied the laws of Prohibition. Beginning with her employment as a private secretary to James Deering of International Harvester, whom she describes as “probably the world’s oldest and wealthiest bachelor playboy,” Altemus tells us much about high society during the time, taking us inside Deering’s glamorous Miami estate, Vizcaya, an Italianate mansion worthy of Gatsby himself. Later, we meet her other notable employers, including Samuel Insull, president of Chicago Edison; New York banker S. W. Straus; and real estate developer Fred F. French. We cinch up our trenchcoats and head out sleuthing in Chicago, hired by the wife of a big boss to find out how he spends his evenings (with, it turns out, a mistress hidden in an apartment within his office, no less). Altemus was also a struggling single mother, a fact she had to keep secret from her employers, and she reveals the difficulties of being a working woman at the time through glimpses into women’s apartments, their friendships, and the dangers—sexual and otherwise—that she and others faced. Throughout, Altemus entertains with a tart and self-aware voice that combines the knowledge of an insider with the wit and clarity of someone on the fringe. Anchored by extensive annotation and an afterword from historian Robin F. Bachin, which contextualizes Altemus’s narrative, Big Bosses provides a one-of-a-kind peek inside the excitement, extravagances, and the challenges of being a working woman roaring through the ’20s.


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Islamic Studies in the Twenty-First Century

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In recent decades, traditional methods of philology and intellectual history, applied to the study of Islam and Muslim societies, have met with considerable criticism from rising generations of scholars who have turned to the social sciences, most notably anthropology and social history, for guidance. This change has been accompanied by the rise of new fields, studying, for example, Islam in Europe and Africa, and new topics, such as the role of gender. This collection surveys these transformations and others, taking stock of the field and showing new paths forward.  


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Landscapes

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In 1975, German readers were introduced to the Rheinlandschaften, a collection of stunning images of the Rhineland captured in the first half of the twentieth century by photographer August Sander (1876–1964). This fresh edition, now in English, brings Sander’s work to a new audience and into our own time. These photographs showcase a variety of scenes, from a sunrise over Cologne to the slopes of the Rhine valley. The Rhine River flows through many of these pictures, its dynamic curves and lively current leading the eye through an intriguing mix of natural and urban landscapes. A new essay by art historian Wolfgang Kemp provides context for Sander’s work while introducing his contemporaries, including the writer Hans Ludwig Mathar and the painter Franz M. Jansen. Also explored are the ties between Sander’s landscapes and his portrait photography, which is celebrated worldwide. Crucially, Kemp highlights the need to consider the Rhineland’s unique political situation in the 1920s and 1930s for any discussion of Sander’s artistic approach. Shining welcome light on the full range of Sander’s practice, this book offers a glorious journey through the landscapes that most affected him.


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From Greed to Wellbeing

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Despite our fitful attempts over decades at reform, the global financial system seems caught in cycles of boom and bust, instability, and scandal. In this timely new book, Joel Magnuson builds on the classic works of E. F. Schumacher and other kindred spirits to provide a Buddhist economics perspective on this recurring pattern, and offers new possibilities for real change. The book centers on the belief that greed, aggression, and delusion (Buddhism’s “three poisons”) are embedded within our financial institutions and that they perpetuate the continued widespread attachment to endless economic growth and financial accumulation that are responsible for social and ecological malaise. Arguing that mainstream economics fails to adequately address this cycle, Magnuson presents a new framework of Buddhist economics, helping readers gain a deeper understanding of current economic problems and offering a course toward genuine well-being.


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Digital Sociologies

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

This handbook offers a much-needed overview of the rapidly growing field of digital sociology. Rooted in a critical understanding of inequality as foundational to digital sociology, it connects digital media technologies to traditional areas of study in sociology, such as labor, culture, education, race, class, and gender. It covers a wide variety of topics, including web analytics, wearable technologies, social media analysis, and digital labor. The result is a benchmark volume that places the digital squarely at the forefront of contemporary investigations of the social.


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Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, Volume I

Wed, 16 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Few government programs in the United States are as controversial as those designed to help the poor. From tax credits to medical assistance, the size and structure of the American safety net is an issue of constant debate. These two volumes update the earlier Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States with a discussion of the many changes in means-tested government programs and the results of new research over the past decade. While some programs that experienced falling outlays in the years prior to the previous volume have remained at low levels of expenditure, many others have grown, including Medicaid, the Earned Income Tax Credit, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, and subsidized housing programs. For each program, the contributors describe its origins and goals, summarize its history and current rules, and discuss recipients’ characteristics and the types of benefits they receive.  This is an invaluable reference for researchers and policy makers that features detailed analyses of many of the most important transfer programs in the United States.  


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Philosophy of Living Nature

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

The Philosophy of Living Nature focuses on the approach of the Western philosophical tradition to physis, or nature. Zdenek Kratochvíl reveals, on a philosophical level, the roots of today’s environmental crisis, presenting an etymological investigation of the concept of “nature” itself and arguing for the necessity of focusing on the world and its plurality as the background for phenomena and the context of things, as a unity of horizons, as a paradigm for understanding nature. However, as Kratochvíl makes clear, questions about the natural world have stakes far beyond the realm of philosophy: chapters in this wide-ranging and richly nuanced book deal with the identity of living organisms and the relation of life and being. Together, they provide an analysis of Darwinian and neo-Darwinian evolution and question in what sense we may know living beings.


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Undoing Impunity

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Acts of sexual violence are often committed with impunity—perpetrators do not consider their actions consequential. Yet throughout history, impunity for sexual violence has been challenged by fearless, just, and compassionate speech—both in courts of justice and outside of them. Those who speak out not only advance a politics of accountability, but also an ethics of recognition, suffering, and hurt. Undoing Impunity explores the contours of the politics and ethics pertaining to sexual violence in contemporary South Asian communities. Using a historical lens, V. Geetha closely examines explicitly feminist responses from the region and, drawing from them, suggests that sexual violence and the impunity it claims for itself are best understood in relation to cultural attitudes towards sexuality. In all, Undoing Impunity is an important and timely look at the social, psychological, and legal conditions that allow perpetrators to act without fear of responsibility or guilt. The book forms part of the Sexual Violence and Impunity in South Asia series, supported by the International Development Research Centre, Canada.


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Poppy

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Few weeds have been more successful throughout history than the poppy. Hated by farmers for its stubbornness, the poppy has been a favorite of artists and poets, due to its distinct and brilliant color, and it has functioned symbolically as everything from a war memorial to an emblem of the exotic cultures of the East. In this book, Andrew Lack explores all the aspects of one of our most familiar flowers, combining biology, history, and culture to paint a bright portrait of this fascinating plant.             Lack looks deep into the past of the poppy’s ancient history—before it seemed to inhabit only ditches and cornfields—and examines the biology that gives it its unique coloring. He analyzes the poppy’s many members of this beautiful family, including the opium poppy, which is the source of one of the world’s oldest—and most ravaging—narcotics. He describes how the poppy came to be associated with war and remembrance, and he looks at how they have been used to commemorate everything from weddings to funerals. Beautifully illustrated, the book will appeal to gardeners or anyone fascinated by the way plants have so powerfully figured in human culture and traditions.  


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Callsign Nassau

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Based on exclusive interviews with personnel and materials from the archives of the Royal Netherlands Army Special Forces Regiment, Callsign Nassau reveals the unique history of the Dutch Green Berets and their operations in the post-Cold War era. Arthur ten Cate and Martijn van der Vorm trace how the Netherlands transformed its Army Special Forces Regiment after 1989 for use in international interventions. Focusing on the Special Forces’ secret missions abroad—especially in Iraq, Afghanistan, and West Africa—this book provides exceptional insights into the Dutch commando community, the use of the Special Forces in modern coalition warfare, and the challenges facing contemporary counterinsurgency campaigns.   


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Conflicted Democracies and Gendered Violence

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Conflicted Democracies and Gendered Violence elucidates the centrality of political and foundational violence in the governance of conflicted democracies in the postcolony, calling attention to the urgent need for transformation. Spectacular and quotidian gendered and sexualized violence by states and collectives holds in place fraught and unjust histories and relations between elites and subalterns, majoritarian subjects and non-dominant “Others.” At the intersections of nationalist and decolonial confrontations, such violence regularizes states of emergency and exception. Through oral history, archival, and legal research undertaken over three years, this interdisciplinary work underscores the need for transitional and transformative justice mechanisms in conflicted democracies to address protracted conflict (focusing on their internal dimensions) and social upheaval. India serves as a case in point, exemplified by ongoing and recent conflicts in Jammu and Kashmir and the Punjab and episodic social upheavals in Gujarat (in 2002) and Odisha (in 2008). Victim-survivor narratives of counter-memory, historical records, and legal analyses of formative cases detail the depth and texture of social suffering and illustrate the inadequacy and inhumanity of official responses to events of extraordinary violence. Expanding on methods in justice and accountability and espousing the right to heal, scholars and practitioners raise critical questions regarding the state, civil society, and diverse institutions, and the most elemental of constituents: victim-survivors.   Contributors: Angana P. Chatterji, Mallika Kaur, Roxanna Altholz, Paola Bacchetta, Rajvinder Singh Bains, Mihir Desai, Laurel E. Fletcher, Parvez Imroz, Jeremy J. Sarkin, and Pwi Wu.


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Japan's Cuisines

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Cuisines in Japan have an ideological dimension that cannot be ignored. In 2013, ‘traditional Japanese dietary cultures’ (washoku) was added to UNESCO’s Intangible Cultural Heritage list. Washoku’s predecessor was “national people’s cuisine,” an attempt during World War II to create a uniform diet for all citizens. Japan’s Cuisines reveals the great diversity of Japanese cuisine and explains how Japan’s modern food culture arose through the direction of private and public institutions. Readers discover how tea came to be portrayed as the origin of Japanese cuisine, how lunch became a gourmet meal, and how regions on Japan’s periphery are reasserting their distinct food cultures. From wartime foodstuffs to modern diets, this fascinating book shows how the cuisine from the land of the rising sun shapes national, local, and personal identity.  


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Guide d'identification des Arbres du Mali

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT




Faith and Charity

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Since the 1980s, programs of humanitarian assistance in Africa have for the most part operated along neoliberal lines. Faith and Charity examines how that approach has changed relationships between religious action, humanitarian assistance, and social change. Exploring the logics of economic liberalization, including the reduction of government spending and the rise of the private sector, the authors look at how these changes have also transformed the attitudes of individuals towards society and the economy in ways that privilege individual achievement over any kind of collective well-being.  


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Into the Story 2

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Following the first collection of story drama structures, Into the Story 2: More Stories! More Drama! presents a well-argued approach to the value of children’s picture books as a way to look at contemporary issues of social justice while building connections that promote a literacy that is multi-dimensional. Story drama structures offer teachers opportunities for the rich conversations and deep reflections that foster habits of mind critical for life in the twenty-first century. This new volume, piloted internationally over the last decade, will become an invaluable resource for uncovering curricula in ways that are fresh and innovative for students and teachers of all levels.


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Imagined Communities on the Baltic Rim

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Prior to the high Middle Ages, the Baltic Rim was largely terra incognita—but by the late Middle Ages, it was home to diverse small and large communities. But the Baltic Rim was not simply the place those people lived—it was also an imagined space through which they defined themselves and their identities. This book traces the transformation of the Baltic Rim in this period through a focus on the self-image of a number of communities: urban and regional, cultic, missionary, legal, and political. Contributors look at the ways these communities defined themselves in relationship to other groups, how they constructed their identities and customs, and what held them together or tore them apart.  


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Film Production and Consumption in Contemporary Taiwan

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

This book uses the potent case study of contemporary Taiwanese queer romance films to address the question of how capitalism in Taiwan has privileged the film industry at the expense of the audience's freedom to choose and respond to culture on its own terms. Interweaving in-depth interviews with filmmakers, producers, marketers, and spectators, Ya-Fong Mon takes a biopolitical approach to the question, showing how the industry uses investments in technoscience, ancillary marketing, and media convergence to seduce and control the sensory experience of the audience—yet that control only extends so far: volatility remains a key component of the filmgoing experience.  


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Faith and Sword

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

With the recent surge in terrorist acts and military confrontations, as well as ever-strengthening fundamentalist ideologies, the Christian–Muslim divide is perhaps more visible than ever—but it is not new. Alan G. Jamieson explores here the long and bloody history of the Christian–Muslim conflict, revealing in his concise yet comprehensive study how deeply this ancient divide is interwoven with crucial events in world history.  Faith and Sword opens with the tumultuous first centuries of the conflict, examining the religious precepts that framed clashes between Christians and Muslims and that ultimately fueled the legendary Crusades. Traversing the full breadth of the Arab lands and Christendom, Jamieson chronicles the turbulent saga from the Arab conquests of the seventh century to the rise of the powerful Ottoman Empire and its fall at the end of World War I. He then explores the complex dynamics that emerged later in the twentieth century, as Christendom was transformed into the secular West and Islamic nations overthrew European colonialism to establish governments straddling modernity and religiosity.  From the 1979 Iranian revolution to the Lebanon hostage crisis to—in this new expanded edition—the recent wars in Syria, Iraq, and Afghanistan, Faith and Sword reveals the essence of this enduring struggle and its consequences.  


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Policy Debates as Dynamic Networks

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

How do policy debates work? How can interest groups and legislators influence political processes through the media? This book introduces discourse network analysis as a methodological toolbox for the study of policy debates. With this set of methods, political discourse is cast as a temporal network of actors and their statements in the media over time. In a case study, Philip Leifeld applies discourse network analysis to the policy debate on old-age security in Germany. Demonstrating that German pension politics was characterized by an increasing polarization of competing coalitions towards the end of the 1990s, Leifeld shows how structural breaks in the discourse network can explain major policy changes and a radical turn to privatization in 2001.



Cotton

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

This book brings together contributors from a wide range of disciplines to explore the importance of cotton as a major resource for US fashion businesses. It is rooted in a lengthy investigative research project that deployed undergraduate and graduate students and faculty researchers to US fashion businesses that rely on cotton to make their garments—with the goal of better understanding how such a key resource is sourced, priced, transported, manipulated, and, ultimately, sold on to the consumer as a stylish garment. The contributors focus in particular on the role of brands in the marketing of cotton goods, and the way that brand marketing creates distinctions, valuable in the marketplace, between various versions of what are at base similar items of clothing, like t-shirts and underclothes. The book also explores the importance of the “Made in the USA” campaign, with its appeal to consumers concerned about local manufacturing employment, reduced resource use, and social responsibility.  


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Graham Dean

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Graham Dean, one of Britain’s leading figurative painters, has resolutely followed his own path. In particular he has challenged accepted ideas about watercolor, wresting it away from its eighteenth-century roots in landscape painting choosing instead to apply it to making monumental, life-size depictions of the human body. His striking, large-scale paintings can take years to complete and are celebrated for having a depth and vividness of color more often associated with work in oils. In this first comprehensive and lavishly illustrated survey of Dean’s work, James Atlee takes us inside Dean’s studio and offers an intimate conversation with the painter about his life and career. Dean discusses the details of his unusual technique, and he reflects on the role of the model in his artistic practice as well as the people and influences that have shaped his career, including the importance of his early years in Liverpool. In addition, the book provides valuable insights into key works among his oeuvre. Containing nearly one hundred and fifty works lushly reproduced in color, this book will appeal to the many aficionados of Dean’s art and offer a perfect introduction for those encountering it for the first time.  


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Innocence Slaughtered

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Among the many deadly innovations that were first deployed on the battlefields of World War I, none was as terrifying—or notorious—as poison gas. First used by the Germans on April 22, 1915, gas was instantly seen as a new way of fighting war, an indication that total warfare was here, and would be far more devastating and cruel than anyone had imagined. This book investigates the effects of chlorine gas at all levels, from its effects on individual soldiers to its impact on combat operations and tactics to its eventual role in the push to codify rules of warfare. Gathering eleven historians and experts on chemical weapons, Innocence Slaughtered puts WWI's cruelest innovation into its historical, industrial, and social context.  


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New Patterns in Global Television Formats

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

The past twenty years have seen major changes in the ways that television formats and programming are developed and replicated internationally for different markets—with locally focused repackagings of hit reality shows leading the way. But in a sense, that’s not new: TV formats have been being exported for decades, with the approach and methods changing along with changes in broadcast technology, markets, government involvement, and audience interest. This book brings together scholars of TV formats from around the world to analyze and discuss those changes and offer an up-to-the-minute analysis of the current state of TV formats and their use and adaptation worldwide.  


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Carnation

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

From wedding bouquets to funeral wreaths, carnations can be seen everywhere in human culture. Their colorful but delicately folded petals have made them one of the foremost decorative flowers, from the gardens of the Ottoman Empire to American Mothers Day bouquets, via Chinese medicines and French Empresses. In this book, Twigs Way explores the extraordinary history of this inimitable flower.              The author traces the trials and tribulations of early breeders—compelled by florists’ fascinations for the striped and spotted—which led to delightfully colored (and delightfully named) varieties such as Lustie Gallant and Bleeding Swain. She looks at the symbolism of the red and white—and even green—carnations made famous by Oscar Wilde, and glides through many of the rooms in literature and history that we have filled with the carnation’s glorious scent. Travelling from Europe to China, Way explores how carnations have been used by herbalists the world over as a treatment for ailments to both mind and body, and she looks at the many paintings that have attempted to capture their unique complexities. Lavishly illustrated and full of unexpected delights, this book will—like the carnation itself—charm the mind and invigorate the senses.  


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Art of the Islands

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

The Celtic, Pictish, Anglo-Saxon, and Viking peoples who inhabited the British Isles and Ireland from late prehistory to the Normal Conquest left behind a rich visual heritage that continues to be felt today. The traditions of each of these peoples has been studied separately, but rarely has the historical interaction of these cultures been adequately considered.             Michelle P. Brown remedies this oversight, presenting an extensively illustrated art historical overview of this formative period in the region’s history. Describing the interactions between the region’s inhabitants, she also explores the formation of national and regional identities. Brown ranges across works as diverse as the Book of Kells, the Tara Brooch, the Aberlemno Stone, the Lindisfarne Gospels, the Alfred Jewel, and the Benedictional of St. Ethelwold, showing how their complex imagery can be best interpreted. She also considers the impact of the art of this period upon the history of art in general, exploring how it has influenced many movements since, from the Carolingian Renaissance and the Romanesque style to the nineteenth-century Arts and Crafts movement.


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Arts Club of Chicago at 100

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Founded in 1916 in the wake of the scandalous Armory Show, the Arts Club of Chicago aimed to present the city with new images, sounds, and ideas. Conceived as an exhibition and social space that would cultivate sophisticated conversations around a range of media, the Arts Club has maintained its core interest in presenting culture “in the making.” Today, it continues to serve as a key venue in Chicago for the presentation of work by the national and international avant-garde, including such artistic luminaries as Sharon Lockhart, Josiah McElheny, Pedro Cabrita Reis, and many more. This volume addresses the visual art, music, theater, dance, architecture, and literature presented by the Club over its one-hundred-year history with new scholarship by leading writers in each field. Janine Mileaf and Susan F. Rossen offer an in-depth look at the tastemakers of modernism in the city, from Sherwood Anderson and Gertrude Stein to local cultural player Rue Winterbotham Carpenter. In addition, each copy of the book also includes an original artist’s project by Walid Raad. A dynamic exploration of the intertwined histories of the Arts Club and Chicago, The Arts Club of Chicago at 100 celebrates both an institution and a city that have remained innovative and forward-thinking throughout the decades.


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A Life In Trans Activism

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

A. Revathi’s memoir The Truth about Me became a sensation in India when it was published in 2011. The pathbreaking autobiography told the story of Revathi’s childhood uneasiness with her male body, her exile to a house of hijras (the South Asian term for trans people) in Delhi, and her eventual transition. Now in her second book, Revathi: A Life in Trans Activism, Revathi opens up once again, telling the story of her life as an activist. In the Thiruchengode temple, with the hills of the Ardhanareeshwara as her backdrop, Revathi begins a conversation about what it means to live on the margins of society. She shares stories about her life working for the NGO, Sangama, which helps transgender people, and her remarkable journey there from office assistant to director. She describes her research into the lives of those who make the transition from female to male identity; her efforts to provide a voice to those who do not fit the gender binary; and her travels around the world to discuss the community’s experience. Revathi also sheds light on her decision to quit Sangama and continue her struggle as an independent activist—including her collaboration with a theater group performing a play based on her autobiography. As told to Nandini Murali, Revathi: A Life in Trans Activism provides insight  into one of the least talked about subjects in our society—from the point of view of a person most qualified to talk about it. This is a rare and searingly honest account of Revathi’s life—on both sides of the gender binary.


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Key Issues in Corrections

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Key Issues in Corrections is a fascinating book that critically analyzes the most important challenges affecting the correctional system in the United States. Jeffrey Ian Ross, an expert in the field, builds on his acclaimed book Special Problems in Corrections to examine both long-standing and emerging issues, grounding the discussion in empirical research and current events. This fully updated edition integrates new scholarship, lawsuits, and the use of technology; introduces and evaluates new corrections policies and practices; and features two new sections, “The Privatization of Prisons” and “The Death Penalty,” as well as links to a companion website. Offering a no-nonsense approach to the problems faced by correctional officers, correctional managers, prisoners, and the public, this solutions-focused book will be a vital resource for students of criminology.


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Key Issues in Corrections

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Key Issues in Corrections is a fascinating book that critically analyzes the most important challenges affecting the correctional system in the United States. Jeffrey Ian Ross, an expert in the field, builds on his acclaimed book Special Problems in Corrections to examine both long-standing and emerging issues, grounding the discussion in empirical research and current events. This fully updated edition integrates new scholarship, lawsuits, and the use of technology; introduces and evaluates new corrections policies and practices; and features two new sections, “The Privatization of Prisons” and “The Death Penalty,” as well as links to a companion website. Offering a no-nonsense approach to the problems faced by correctional officers, correctional managers, prisoners, and the public, this solutions-focused book will be a vital resource for students of criminology.


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Direct Payments and Personal Budgets

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

This third edition of the leading textbook on personalization in social welfare payment systems in the United Kingdom brings the analysis wholly up to date, taking into account the major changes enacted by the Coalition Government since 2009 and pointing the way to the likely future, when all social welfare payments and support will be delivered directly, via a personal budget. This close examination of the theory and practice will be essential to scholars, policy makers, and practitioners.


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Evidence-based Policy Making in the Social Sciences

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

This book gathers an expert group of social scientists to showcase emerging forms of analysis and evaluation for public policy analysis. Each chapter highlights a different method or approach, putting it in context and highlighting its key features before illustrating its application and potential value to policy makers. Aimed at upper-level undergraduates in public policy and social work, it also has much to offer policy makers and practitioners themselves.


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Evidence-based Policy Making in the Social Sciences

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

This book gathers an expert group of social scientists to showcase emerging forms of analysis and evaluation for public policy analysis. Each chapter highlights a different method or approach, putting it in context and highlighting its key features before illustrating its application and potential value to policy makers. Aimed at upper-level undergraduates in public policy and social work, it also has much to offer policy makers and practitioners themselves.


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Grain of the Clay

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Ceramics give pleasure to our everyday lives, from the beauty of a vase’s elegant curves to the joy of a meal served upon a fine platter. Ceramics originate in a direct engagement with the earth and maintain a unique place in the history of the arts. In this book, Allen S. Weiss sharpens our perception of and increases our appreciation for ceramics, all the while providing a critical examination of how and why we collect them.             Weiss examines the vast stylistic range of ceramics and investigates both the theoretical and personal reasons for viewing, using, and collecting them. Relating ceramics to other arts and practices—especially those surrounding food—he explores their different uses such as in the celebrated tea ceremony of Japan. Most notably, he considers how works previously viewed as crafts have found their rightful way into museums, as well as how this new-found engagement with finely wrought natural materials may foster an increased ecological sensitivity. The result is a wide-ranging and sensitive look at a crucial part of our material culture.  


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Gay Men at the Movies

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Cinema has long played a major role in the formation of community among marginalized groups, and this book details that process for gay men in Sydney, Australia from the 1950s to the present. Scott McKinnon builds the book from a variety of sources, including film reviews, media reports, personal memoirs, oral histories, and a striking range of films, all deployed to answer the question of understanding cinema-going as a moment of connection to community and identity—how the experience of seeing these films and being part of an audience helped to build a community among the gay men of Sydney in the period.  


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Marx 2020

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

As we approach the year 2020, the question of how Marxism can remain relevant in a constantly changing environment where social movements are spreading across the globe is as charged and important as ever. In this provocative and critically engaged introduction to Marxism, Ronaldo Munck offers an accessible examination of the essential role that Marxism still plays in today’s thought and policies. To do so, Munck analyzes Marx’s theories in the context of global development, the environmental crisis, financial austerity, and feminism andqueer theory, among other ideas and current events. Munck also offers a straightforward report on the state of Marxism in the wake of the global financial crash. Encompassing transformations in both the Global South and the Global North, Marx 2020 provides a thought-provoking guide to Marxist and alternative thought and the action it inspires.  


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Mediated City

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Mediated City begins by asking: how does news circulate in a major post-industrial city? To answer, Stephen Coleman analyzes a wide-range of practices involved in producing, circulating, and consuming news, and he examines the various ways and mediums through which individuals and groups may find out about, follow, or discuss local issues and events. He directly critiques the assumptions  of many scholars about the centrality of certain news media, and he shows that questions about what news really is and what types of media constitute and deliver it truly matter. The first book to critically trace the patterns of news circulation within a city, Mediated City is poised to radically change how media scholars consider the local transmission and function of information.


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China and the New Maoists

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Forty years after his death, Mao remains a totemic, if divisive, figure in contemporary China. He retains an immense symbolic importance within China’s national mythology even though the rise of a capitalist economy has seen the ruling class become increasingly ambivalent and contradictory in their attitudes towards him and his legacy. Despite his highly visible presence in Chinese public life, however, his enduring influence has so far been little understood in the West.   In China and the New Maoists, the authors seek to change that, by closely examining the vocal figures in China today who claim to be the true ideological heirs to Mao, from academics to activists. They also explore efforts by the state to draw on Mao’s image as a source of legitimacy even as the state attempts to control and sanitize his influence. Featuring interviews with many key proponents of the new Maoism movement, including those involved in the rise of cyber-activism and the wider protest movement in China, China and the New Maoists provides an insightful, on-the-ground look at the current social and ideological pulse of China.   The battle for Mao’s historical legacy will likely play a crucial role in determining China’s political future, and this book provides a fascinating portrait of a country undergoing dramatic upheavals while still struggling to come to terms with its past.  


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Cooperatives Confront Capitalism

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Business co-operatives can offer successful alternative models of decision making, employment, and operation without the existence of managerial and hierarchical structures. Through case studies spanning the United States, Europe, and Latin America—including the first in-depth look at the Cuban co-operative movement, Peter Ranis explores how co-operatives have evolved in response to the recent economic crisis and how the success of co-operatives is spurring the reinvention of labor unions today.   Placing the work of key radical theorists including Marx, Gramsci, and Luxembourg alongside that of contemporary political economists such as Block, Piketty, and Stiglitz, Cooperatives Confront Capitalism provides a unique theoretical synthesis and offers a far-reaching analysis of the ideas, achievements, and wider historical context of the cooperative movement. It will be essential reading for anyone interested in how co-operatives and democratic worker organizations can create a lasting solution to unemployment and poverty.


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Jar of Wild Flowers

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In celebration of the ninetieth birthday of eminent artist and writer John Berger, A Jar of Wild Flowers brings together essays, reflections, and conversations about his work. For decades, Berger’s poetic humanism has inspired and brought together historically, geographically, and socially disparate subjects. His work continues to unite genres and range across types of experience, opening up radical questions about the meaning of belonging and community. In keeping with this spirit, the contributions to A Jar of Wild Flowers challenge us to take the brave step outside ourselves to offer extended generosity and compassion.   This international and cross-cultural collection includes short pieces by thirty of Berger’s friends, artistic collaborators, and others inspired by his work, including Julie Christie, Sally Potter, Ram Rahman, Ali Smith, Nick Thorpe, Hsiao-Hung Pai, and many others. This will be an anthology to be treasured by any fan of Berger’s extensive and influential ouevre.   


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Jar of Wild Flowers

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In celebration of the ninetieth birthday of eminent artist and writer John Berger, A Jar of Wild Flowers brings together essays, reflections, and conversations about his work. For decades, Berger’s poetic humanism has inspired and brought together historically, geographically, and socially disparate subjects. His work continues to unite genres and range across types of experience, opening up radical questions about the meaning of belonging and community. In keeping with this spirit, the contributions to A Jar of Wild Flowers challenge us to take the brave step outside ourselves to offer extended generosity and compassion.   This international and cross-cultural collection includes short pieces by thirty of Berger’s friends, artistic collaborators, and others inspired by his work, including Julie Christie, Sally Potter, Ram Rahman, Ali Smith, Nick Thorpe, Hsiao-Hung Pai, and many others. This will be an anthology to be treasured by any fan of Berger’s extensive and influential ouevre.   


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Liberating Dylan Thomas

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Criticism of Dylan Thomas has tended to rest too heavily on the lazy assumption that his poems are primarily a reflection of his inner, psychological troubles. With Liberating Dylan Thomas, Rhian Barfoot undertakes the challenge of freeing Thomas from such constraints, analyzing the poetry instead on its own terms, identifying the sophisticated conception of the possibilities and limitations of language that underpin Thomas’s complex practice. Barfoot highlights the sensuous quality of the poems and Thomas’s exhilarating, demanding linguistic innovations. By separating Thomas the unforgettable figure from the work he created, Barfoot allows us to appreciate it anew.


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Landscape Vision of Paul Nash

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Paul Nash (1889-1946) has long been admired as one of the outstanding English landscape painters of the twentieth century. He has a deep affinity for sites in southern England, including the rolling downland near Swanage, the gaunt coastline at Dymchurch, the enigmatic stone circles at Avebury, and the twin hills in Oxfordshire known as the Wittenham Clumps, which became the focal symbol of his art.             In this book, Roger Cardinal surveys the full range of Nash’s work, from the ravaged Flanders landscapes of World War I to the spectacular aerial battles of World War II and on to the meditative late oils, his final masterpieces. Movingly written and beautifully illustrated, it offers a definitive account of the painter and a lovely addition to the bookshelves of any art lover.  


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Jagadamba

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

While Mahatma Gandhi is hailed across the world as a champion of humanity and nonviolent struggle, the struggles of the woman who accompanied him closely all his life, his wife Kasturba Gandhi, remain untold. This playtext, Jagadamba, rights that wrong with a long monologue in which Kasturba speaks from her heart about the different facets of her life—an often difficult marriage, the great man’s selfless immersion in politics and its consequences for their family, their troubled sons, and, most importantly, her own desires and hopes. Originally conceived in the Marathi language for actress Rohini Hattangadi, who received an Academy Award nomination for her portrayal of Kasturba in Richard Attenborough’s classic biopic Gandhi, this play charts the journey of a simple girl who went on to become “Jagadamba,” or the “Universal Mother,” as the wife of the Mahatma. As Shanta Ghokale writes in her introduction: “Wives of great men have hard lives, often lived in negation of values they hold most dear. Jagadamba is the personal feelings of a devoted wife who had held her own in a life made mentally, physically, and morally turbulent by her husband’s ideas and political work.”


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Of the Nation Born

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Part of a new series titled Sexual Violence and Impunity in South Asia, supported by the International Development Research Centre, Canada, Of the Nation Born takes Bangladesh as its focus, compiling some of the best writing and research to date on sexual violence and impunity. The book brings together both new and established scholars to look at areas as wide-ranging as the law and its histories, nationalism, memory and sexuality, the status of minorities, religion and its directives, universities as sites of gender-contestation, and more. With an introduction by acclaimed scholar Meghna Guhathakurta, the book offers a comprehensive overview of the situation in Bangladesh from the 1971 war for liberation to the present.  Guhathakurta gives readers an excellent entry point for understanding the complex realities of how impunity for the perpetrators of sexual violence has become standard in Bangladesh in particular, and South Asia in general. Of the Nation Born is a valuable cross-disciplinary study and the first of its kind.



Mathematical Structures in Languages

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Mathematical Structures in Languages introduces a number of mathematical concepts that are of interest to the working linguist. The areas covered include basic set theory and logic, formal languages and automata, trees, partial orders, lattices, Boolean structure,  generalized quantifier theory, and linguistic invariants, the last drawing on Edward L. Keenan and Edward Stabler’s Bare Grammar: A Study of Language Invariants, also published by CSLI Publications. Ideal for advanced undergraduate and graduate students of linguistics, this book contains numerous exercises and will be a valuable resource for courses on mathematical topics in linguistics. The product of many years of teaching, Mathematic Structures in Languages is very much a book to be read and learned from.


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Prague of Charles IV, 1316 - 1378

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In The Prague of Charles IV, 1316–1378, Czech professor of art history Jan Royt renders a vivid image of the capital of the Bohemian Kingdom during the High Gothic period, presenting the city in the broader historical context of Prague’s golden age during the reign of Charles IV (1346–1378).   Following Charles’s coronation as the Holy Roman Emperor in 1355, for the first time in history Prague, the capital of the Lands of the Bohemian Crown, was simultaneously the capital of the Holy Roman Empire. Thanks to royal and imperial care, which reflected Charles’s Western European education and cosmopolitan openness as well as his respect for the royal Bohemian tradition, Prague flourished, becoming a unique and beautiful city. The cathedral, the stone bridge, the university, and construction of the New Town and its churches laid out in its distinctive cross pattern still remain visible reminders of the period today. Prague’s Gothic architecture provides the artistic backbone to a city renowned for its painting, sculpture, and haunting music.   Filled with photographs of Prague’s historic monuments and sights, this account of the medieval roots of one of the most visited and beloved cities in the world is at once history, cultural guide, and sumptuous art book.


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Aleksandr Sokurov

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Released in 2002, Russian Ark drew astonished praise for its technique: shot with a Steadicam in one ninety-six-minute take, it presented a dazzling whirl of movement as it followed the Marquis de Custine as he wandered through the vast Winter Palace in St. Petersburg—and through three hundred years of Russian history.             This companion to Russian Ark addresses all key aspects of the film, beginning with a comprehensive synopsis, an in-depth analysis, and an account of the production history. Birgit Beumers goes on from there to discuss the work that went into the now-legendary Steadicam shot—which required two thousand actors and three orchestras—and she also offers an account of the film’s critical and public reception, showing how it helped to establish director Aleksandr Sokurov as perhaps the leading filmmaker in Russia today.  


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Aleksandr Askoldov

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Filmed in 1966 and ’67, but kept from release for twenty years, The Commissar is unquestionably one of the most important and compelling films of the Soviet era. Based on a short story by Vasily Grossman, it tells of a female Red Army commissar who is forced to stay with a Jewish family near the frontlines of the battle between the Red and White Armies as she waits to give birth. The film drew the ire of censors for its frank portrayal of the violence faced by Russian Jews in the wake of the revolution.             This book is the first companion to the film in any language. It recounts the film’s plot and turbulent production history, and it also offers a close analysis of the artistic vision of its director, Aleksandr Askoldov, and the ways that viewers can trace in the film not only his complex aesthetics, but also the personal crises he endured in the years leading up to the film. The result is an indispensable companion to an unforgettable film.


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Hezbollah

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Few political parties have been as misunderstood—or as roundly condemned—as Lebanon’s Hezbollah. With this book, Joseph Daher presents a new way of looking at Hezbollah: through the lens of political economy.             By discarding more common approaches to the party that focus on religious discourse or military questions, Daher is freed up to analyze what the party actually is: an organization that is operating within a specific political and socio-economic context, one that simultaneously offers it a rich ground of support and limits its range of action. Daher clearly and carefully positions Hezbollah within that context, focusing on its historic ties with its main sponsor, Iran, its media and cultural wings, its relationship with Western economic policies, and the impact of the Shi’a population on the sectarian politics of Lebanon. Offering additional attention to the party’s positions on worker’s rights and women’s issues, this fresh take on Hezbollah will be incredibly useful for understanding the world’s most tumultuous region.  


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Chicago in Quotations

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Carl Sandburg was an ardent champion of Chicago, famously issuing the challenge: “Show me another city with lifted head singing so proud to be alive and strong and cunning.” For pianist Otis Spann, it was the “mother of the blues,” and a beacon to “every good musician who ever left the South.” But the union leader Eugene V. Debs had harsher words for the city, calling it “unfit for human habitation,” and Rudyard Kipling claimed it was “inhabited by savages” and hoped never to see it again.             Whether you look upon the city with admiration, disgust, or an incongruous combination of the two, Chicago has captured the imagination of generations of poets, novelists, journalists, and commentators who have visited or called it home. Chicago in Quotations offers a compendium of the most colorful impressions that citizens of—or visitors to—the Second City will appreciate.


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Housing Politics in the United Kingdom

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Affordable housing in the United Kingdom has become an ever more potent issue in recent years, as rapid population growth and a long-term lag in new housing construction have combined to making finding secure, affordable housing difficult for a broad range of people. This book uses insights from public choice theory, the new institutionalism, and social constructionism to lay bare the historically entrenched power relationships among markets, planners, and electoral politics that have made this problem seem so intractable.


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Housing Politics in the United Kingdom

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Affordable housing in the United Kingdom has become an ever more potent issue in recent years, as rapid population growth and a long-term lag in new housing construction have combined to making finding secure, affordable housing difficult for a broad range of people. This book uses insights from public choice theory, the new institutionalism, and social constructionism to lay bare the historically entrenched power relationships among markets, planners, and electoral politics that have made this problem seem so intractable.


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New York in Quotations

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

“Make your mark in New York and you are a made man,” wrote Mark Twain, encapsulating both the naked ambition of the city’s citizens and the opportunities up for grabs in the Big Apple. Others take a more cynical approach, calling the city “an aviary overstocked with jays” (O. Henry), a “sucked orange” (Ralph Waldo Emerson), or “fantastically charmless and elaborately dire” (Henry James). Over the last three-and-a-half centuries, this glamorous, twenty-four hour city has attracted a multitude of thinkers, poets, novelists and playwrights, many of whom have brilliantly encapsulated its unique spirit through verse, prose, or the ultimate wisecrack.


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Paris in Quotations

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

“We’ll always have Paris,” croons Humphrey Bogart in Casablanca to a young Ingrid Bergman. F. Scott Fitzgerald commented that “the best of America drifts to Paris.” But, should one never get the opportunity to visit Paris, one might take consolation in the words of critic William Hazlitt, who called it a “beast of a city.” Be it praise or colorful invective, everyone, it seems, has something to say about the city and this slender volume—filled with wise, witty, and sometimes scandalous quotes—presents the full range of impressions it has made. Paris in Quotations takes readers on a one-of-a-kind tour of the City of Lights, in which we hear from the likes of Molière and Thomas Gold Appleton, who thought that, “When good Americans die, they go to Paris.” For centuries, Paris has reigned over the popular imagination. For those planning a visit, this collection will be warmly welcomed.


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Participatory Research

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Drawing on in-depth case studies, this book examines the nature of participatory research in the social sciences and its role in increasing research participation among vulnerable or marginalized populations. In so doing, Participatory Research details how inclusion and collaboration can be enhanced among vulnerable research participants—such as those with profound learning difficulties, victims of abuse and trauma, and children and young people—and shows how useful the approach can be with these groups. Also exploring important ethical issues and challenges associated with participatory research, this book will be an invaluable resource for an international audience of students, researchers, and academics seeking to put participatory research methods into practice.


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Personhood, Identity and Care in Advanced Old Age

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

As humans live longer, the elderly population increases, and the challenges we face in addressing their needs continue to evolve. This book explores the theoretical and practical issues raised by advanced aging in the contemporary world. Developing new sociological theory, Paul Higgs and Chris Gilleard suggest that mental and physical frailty forms a central theme in narratives about deep old age and that discussions of personhood are needed to address this concept. After examining key terms like personhood, the fourth age, frailty, and abjection, Higgs and Gilleard consider the broader implications of these concepts for issues of care—both its meanings and its management. As the care needs of the elderly and options for meeting these needs grow more complex, it is important to examine our collective hopes and fears concerning the end of life, including questions about personhood and expectations for the quality and content of end-of-life care.


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Personhood, Identity and Care in Advanced Old Age

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

As humans live longer, the elderly population increases, and the challenges we face in addressing their needs continue to evolve. This book explores the theoretical and practical issues raised by advanced aging in the contemporary world. Developing new sociological theory, Paul Higgs and Chris Gilleard suggest that mental and physical frailty forms a central theme in narratives about deep old age and that discussions of personhood are needed to address this concept. After examining key terms like personhood, the fourth age, frailty, and abjection, Higgs and Gilleard consider the broader implications of these concepts for issues of care—both its meanings and its management. As the care needs of the elderly and options for meeting these needs grow more complex, it is important to examine our collective hopes and fears concerning the end of life, including questions about personhood and expectations for the quality and content of end-of-life care.


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Translating the Queer

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Translating the Queer examines how concepts of queer knowledge and its representations have been disseminated throughout Latin America, a dissemination that has been accompanied by processes of translation, adaptation, and resistance. Héctor Domínguez Ruvalcaba discusses the formation of pre-gay identities as well as today’s LGBTQI political movement in addition to alternative forms of non-heterosexual practices that have emerged from within marginal populations. He analyzes how queer theory is employed as a means to understand varied cultural and political expressions, and he asks: How far can the queer really go as a conceptual tool? Offering an essential look at queer history, culture, and politics in Latin America, Translating the Queer will be an invaluable resource for anyone interested in the evolution of queer theory and identity in recent decades.


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Translating the Queer

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Translating the Queer examines how concepts of queer knowledge and its representations have been disseminated throughout Latin America, a dissemination that has been accompanied by processes of translation, adaptation, and resistance. Héctor Domínguez Ruvalcaba discusses the formation of pre-gay identities as well as today’s LGBTQI political movement in addition to alternative forms of non-heterosexual practices that have emerged from within marginal populations. He analyzes how queer theory is employed as a means to understand varied cultural and political expressions, and he asks: How far can the queer really go as a conceptual tool? Offering an essential look at queer history, culture, and politics in Latin America, Translating the Queer will be an invaluable resource for anyone interested in the evolution of queer theory and identity in recent decades.


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Crusader Landscapes in the Medieval Levant

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Crusader Landscapes in the Medieval Levant is a collection of scholarly essays addressing a number of aspects of the archaeology and history of settlement in the crusader states established in the Middle East during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, collectively known as the Latin East, and on their influence on the neighbouring geographical areas. Wide-ranging in both subjects and disciplinary approaches and richly illustrated, this book includes analyses of the territory, fortifications, warfare, military orders, the church, daily life, arts, and literature.  


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Memories of a Bygone Age

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Set against the backdrop of Iran’s struggle against the rising powers of Russia and Britain, the memoirs of Mirza Riza Khan Arfa’-ed-Dowleh—otherwise known as Prince Arfa (1853–1902)—are packed with picaresque adventures as the prince tells the story of his rise from humble provincial beginnings to the heights of the Iranian state. With this translation, his incredible story is brought to life for the first time in English. Prince Arfa writes with arresting wit about the deadly intrigues of the Qajar court. Lamentingly, but resolutely, he chronicles the decline of Iran from a once great empire to an almost bankrupt, lawless state, in which social unrest is channelled and exploited by the clergy. He describes the complex interactions between Iran and Europe, including an account of Naser-od-Din Shah’s profligate visits to Britain and France; the splendor and eccentricities of the doomed Tsar Nicholas II’s court; the Tsar’s omen-laden coronation; and his own favor with the Tsarina, who would grant him concessions on matters of vital importance to his country. The result is a memoir of extraordinary political intrigue.  


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Negotiated Reform

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Multilevel structures are becoming increasingly characteristic of the world in which we live. This book is a unique study of policy making in a multilevel political system extending from the national to the international level. Taking as its subject the process of financial market reforms that took place following the recent financial crisis, it brings together an international group of renowned social scientists to explore the interplay between international organizations, European authorities, and regulators in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Germany in global financial decision making. Contributors thoroughly explore a small set of reform issues—including bank structure, bank capital, resolution, and over-the-counter trading of derivatives—to provide a detailed view of the vertical and horizontal interactions between these actors as related to a set of key questions: Are those states affected by the crisis adopting internationally negotiated regulations? Or are they instead determining the European and international reform agenda? Are the agreed upon policies contributing to greater harmonization of financial regulation in a multilevel political system? Or is the process being dominated by differing national interests?


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New Age of Ageing

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Society does something strange to us as we get old. We are no longer seen as valued participants in the world but marginalized as burdens and problems to be solved. We become the other. This book presents a different vision of the future. Drawing on fifty interviews with people aged fifty to ninety, it proves aging is not simply passive decline but a process of learning, joy, political engagement, challenge, and achievement. For example: Mary, 83, has resisted her children’s suggestion to downsize and is fostering two teenage boys. Joseph, 68, fights for the rights of small farmers worldwide. Through their voices and the voices of many others, we come to understand both the difficulties and possibilities of aging. Increased longevity has consequences for us all. By challenging our assumptions and stereotypes, this book proves that a society that takes better account of older people is better for everyone.


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Anthropologies of Value

Tue, 15 Nov 2016 06:00:00 GMT

One of the most vibrant areas of inquiry in anthropology today surrounds questions of the commodification of human and natural life. In a world where cost-benefit analysis dominates economic and governmental decision-making, prices are routinely put on death and environmental devastation—but little thought is given to what those valuations mean, both to those being blithely commodified or to the society behind it.             Anthropologies of Value brings together a roster of stellar contributors to consider the question of the commodification of life through an anthropological lens. Explicitly questioning the validity of such commonplace binary oppositions as north/south, core/periphery, Western/non-Western, the collection aims to bridge disparate approaches and offer a new way forward for understanding, and combating, the rampant commodification of contemporary life.  


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