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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Wed, 23 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

 



Tax Policy and the Economy, Volume 31

Tue, 22 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The papers in Tax Policy and the Economy Volume 31 are all directly related to important and often long-standing issues, often including how transfer programs affect tax rates and behavior. In the first paper, Alan Auerbach, Laurence Kotlikoff, Darryl Koehler, and Manni Yu take a lifetime perspective on the marginal tax rates facing older individuals and families arising from a comprehensive set of sources. In the second, Gizem Kosar and Robert A. Moffitt provide new estimates of the cumulative marginal tax rates facing low-income families over the period 1997-2007. In the third paper, Emmanuel Saez presents evidence on the elasticity of taxable income with respect to tax rates, drawing on data from the 2013 federal income tax reform.  In the fourth, Conor Clarke and Wojciech Kopczuk survey the treatment of business income taxation in the United States since the 1950s, providing new data on how business income and its taxation have evolved over time.  In the fifth paper, Louis Kaplow argues that the reduction in statutory tax rates from base-broadening may not reduce effective marginal tax rates on households.   


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Democratic Constitution

Mon, 21 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Supreme Court is seen today as the ultimate arbiter of the Constitution. Once the Court has spoken, it is the duty of the citizens and their elected officials to abide by its decisions. But the conception of the Supreme Court as the final interpreter of constitutional law took hold only relatively recently. Drawing on the pragmatic ideals characterized by Charles Sanders Peirce, John Dewey, Charles Sabel, and Richard Posner. Brian E. Butler shows how this conception is inherently problematic for a healthy democracy.             Butler offers an alternative democratic conception of constitutional law, “democratic experimentalism,” and applies it in a thorough reconstruction of Supreme Court cases across the centuries, such as Brown v. Board of Education, Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission, Lucas v. South Carolina Coastal Council, and Lochner v. New York. In contrast to the traditional tools and conceptions of legal analysis that see the law as a formally unique and separate type of practice, democratic experimentalism combines democratic aims and experimental practice. Butler also suggests other directions jurisprudential roles could take: for example, adjudication could be performed by primary stakeholders with better information. Ultimately, Butler argues persuasively for a move away from the current absolute centrality of courts toward a system of justice that emphasizes local rule and democratic choice.   


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MOOCs and Their Afterlives

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

A trio of headlines in the Chronicle of Higher Education seem to say it all: in 2013, “A Bold Move Toward MOOCs Sends Shock Waves;” in 2014, “Doubts About MOOCs Continue to Rise,” and in 2015, “The MOOC Hype Fades.” At the beginning of the 2010s, MOOCs, or Massive Open Online Courses, seemed poised to completely revolutionize higher education. But now, just a few years into the revolution, educators’ enthusiasm seems to have cooled. As advocates and critics try to make sense of the rise and fall of these courses, both groups are united by one question: Where do we go from here? Elizabeth Losh has gathered experts from across disciplines—education, rhetoric, philosophy, literary studies, history, computer science, and journalism—to tease out lessons and chart a course into the future of open, online education. Instructors talk about what worked and what didn’t. Students share their experiences as participants. And scholars consider the ethics of this education. The collection goes beyond MOOCs to cover variants such as hybrid or blended courses, SPOCs (Small Personalized Online Courses), and DOCCs (Distributed Open Collaborative Course). Together, these essays provide a unique, even-handed look at the MOOC movement and will serve as a thoughtful guide to those shaping the next steps for open education.


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MOOCs and Their Afterlives

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

A trio of headlines in the Chronicle of Higher Education seem to say it all: in 2013, “A Bold Move Toward MOOCs Sends Shock Waves;” in 2014, “Doubts About MOOCs Continue to Rise,” and in 2015, “The MOOC Hype Fades.” At the beginning of the 2010s, MOOCs, or Massive Open Online Courses, seemed poised to completely revolutionize higher education. But now, just a few years into the revolution, educators’ enthusiasm seems to have cooled. As advocates and critics try to make sense of the rise and fall of these courses, both groups are united by one question: Where do we go from here? Elizabeth Losh has gathered experts from across disciplines—education, rhetoric, philosophy, literary studies, history, computer science, and journalism—to tease out lessons and chart a course into the future of open, online education. Instructors talk about what worked and what didn’t. Students share their experiences as participants. And scholars consider the ethics of this education. The collection goes beyond MOOCs to cover variants such as hybrid or blended courses, SPOCs (Small Personalized Online Courses), and DOCCs (Distributed Open Collaborative Course). Together, these essays provide a unique, even-handed look at the MOOC movement and will serve as a thoughtful guide to those shaping the next steps for open education.


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Holocaust, Israel and the "Jew"

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book is the first comprehensive study of postwar antisemitism in the Netherlands. It focuses on the way stereotypes are passed on from one decade to the next, as reflected in public debates, the mass media, protests and commemorations, and everyday interactions. The Holocaust, Israel and ‘the Jew’ explores the ways in which old stories and phrases relating to "the stereotypical Jew" are recycled and modified for new uses, linking the antisemitism of the early postwar years to its enduring manifestations in today’s world.   The chapters cover themes including soccer-related antisemitism, Jewish responses, philosemitism, antisemitism in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Turkish communities, contentious acts of remembrance, the neo-Nazi tradition, and the legacy of Theo van Gogh. The book concludes with a lengthy epilogue on "the Jew" in the politics of the radical right, the attacks in Paris in 2015, and the refugee crisis.


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Cinéma Mon Amour

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Art and film have long held a mutual fascination, which is the subject of a recent exhibition at one of the leading Swiss art museums, Aargauer Kunsthaus, featuring works by internationally acclaimed artists who engaged with themes surrounding film in art. Lavishly illustrated, Cinéma Mon Amour brings together works by Martin Arnold, John Baldessari, Fiona Banner, Marc Bauer, Pierre Bismuth, Candice Breitz, Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller, collectif_fact, Tacita Dean, Stan Douglas, Thomas Galler, Christoph Girardet and Matthias Müller, Douglas Gordon, Teresa Hubbard and Alexander Birchler, Samson Kambalu, Daniela Keiser, Urs Lüthi, Philippe Parreno, Julian Rosefeldt, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Sam Taylor-Johnson, and Mark Wallinger, alongside essays that discuss topics such as the film industry, found footage, specific movies and genres, the mechanisms of film, cinema as space, and the filmmaker’s gaze. With copious full-color images, it is a captivating exploration of the productive spaces at the intersections of film and art that will have much to offer artists, filmmakers, or scholars working in either area.  


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Crime Fiction in German

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Crime Fiction in German is the first volume in English to offer a comprehensive overview of German-language crime fiction, from its origins in the early nineteenth century to its vibrant growth in the new millennium. In addition to introducing readers to crime fiction from Germany, Austria, Switzerland, and the former East Germany, Katharina Hall expands the notion of a German crime-writing tradition by investigating Nazi crime fiction, Jewish-German crime fiction, Turkish-German crime fiction, and the Afrika-Krimi. Significant trends, including the West German social crime novel, women’s crime writing, regional crime fiction, historical crime fiction, and the Fernsehkrimi television crime drama are also explored, highlighting the genre’s distinctive features in German-language contexts.


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Changing Lives in Laos

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

During the last two decades, Laos has undergone major transformations due to a massive influx of foreign investment. Improved communications and new forms of mobility have dramatically altered rural life. Changing Lives in Laos brings together contributions from young scholars that look closely at these transitions and the resulting rise of a new social, cultural, and economic order. The essays in this volume draw on original fieldwork and provide fresh analyses of topics such as the structures of power, the politics of territoriality, and new forms of sociability in emerging urban spaces.  


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Contemporary Indonesian Art

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Indonesia’s contemporary art scene is fast becoming a favorite among collectors and critics, taking its place alongside the growing interest in works from China, India, and Korea. Pieces by Indonesian artists are selling for record-breaking prices, and the country is preparing to open its first Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art this fall. After decades of struggling to find representation in international galleries and museums, Indonesia is staking its claim as a key player in the global art world. Contemporary Indonesian Art is a comprehensive introduction to the country’s key artists, curators, institutions, and collectors. It demonstrates how early artists broke from colonial and post-colonial power structures and shows how today’s artists grapple with issues of identity, globalization, and nation-building in Indonesia. The survey crosses ethnic, cultural, and religious boundaries, combining the traditional (batik, woodcut, dance, and Javanese shadow puppet theater) with the contemporary (comics and manga, graffiti, and advertising). Taken together, it is a powerful argument for why Indonesia is becoming a major force in the international art community.


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Celebrity Culture and the Entertainment Industry in Asia

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Offering rare insight into the world of celebrity and media in China and beyond, Celebrity Culture and the Entertainment Industry in Asia looks closely at the dynamics of stardom and celebrity endorsement in the region and examines its impact on marketing and media.   Through first-hand interviews with celebrities and entertainment industry practitioners, the authors discuss the social, cultural, and economic influences of celebrity. Dialogues with celebrities such as Kwok-Leung Kam, Bob Lam, Denise Ho, Hilary Tsui, and Francis Mak provide insider accounts of celebrity formation, management, and marketing in Hong Kong and Mainland China, as well as South Korea and Taiwan.  


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Can You Keep a Secret?

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Set in a rural town in South West France from 1940 to 1944, Can You Keep a Secret? examines the effect of the German occupation on the community, as seen through the eyes of a nine-year-old child. Living with a teenage brother and parents who own a café in the market square, the child regularly escapes to a secret world in the forests to play with friends. Meanwhile, the atmosphere in the town progressively darkens, and the café becomes central to the operation of the local black market and the growing resistance movement. The child’s curiosity is later aroused by the arrival of a mysterious female guest who takes a room above the café, and soon the adult world of a secret agent and the child’s world of secret hideouts become inextricably entangled.   Intended for young readers, the good vs. evil tale in this book illustrates the importance of honesty, reliability, and trustworthiness against the backdrop of wartime resistance in occupied France.


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Carlo Scarpa

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Venetian artist Carlo Scarpa (1906‒78) was one of the outstanding architects of the twentieth century, creating buildings for museums in Venice, Florence, and Verona, as well as many other major buildings. At the same time as he worked on these commissions, he viewed the role of architect as that of a lone wolf, seeing his discipline as a form of art based fundamentally on craftsmanship.             This book focuses on a work that shows that approach to unforgettable effect: a tomb for businessman Giuseppe Brion in Treviso. In designing the tomb, Scarpa had complete freedom, working across a vast space to fuse buildings of fair-faced concrete with the surrounding landscape to create a magnificent work the invites meditation. Munich photographer Klaus Kinold documented the remarkable tomb, and his carefully composed pictures, both black-and-white and subtly using color, depict an otherworldly place that translates our ideas of growth and decay in an expansively constructed symbolism.


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Neural Architects

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Neural Architects documents a unique collaboration between a leading architectural practice, Ian Ritchie Architects Ltd, and neuroscientists, which resulted in the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre at University College London, a state of the art research laboratory and new architectural icon.   In their work, Ian Ritchie and his architectural team swept away all preconceptions about how to design a laboratory. Instead, they visited neuroscientists around the world, gaining an intimate understanding of the way they use and construct the spaces around them. Through continuing dialogue, the design team imagined the new lab from the inside out and created adaptable, interconnected spaces to foster interactions between researchers from different disciplines.   Based on interviews with the architects and researchers involved and illustrated throughout with photographs and renderings, this book gives a rare inside view of the process of creating a highly specialized building.  


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New Intimacies, Old Desires

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the last fifteen years, great strides have been made in advancing the rights of queer people. In the same period that these victories have been secured by queer movements, we’ve seen the rise of crony capitalism, violent consequences of the war on terror, the hyper-juridification of politics, the financialization of social movements, and the medicalization of non-heteronormative identities and practices. But how do we critically read the celebratory global proliferation of queer rights in these neoliberal times?New Intimacies, Old Desires, edited by Oishik Sircar and Dipika Jain, collects answers to this question. The book analyzes laws, state policies, and cultures of activism to show how new intimacies between queer sexuality and a neoliberalism that celebrates modernity and the birth of the liberated sexual citizen, are in fact, reproducing the old colonial desire of civilizing the native. By paying particular attention to race, religion, and class, this volume engages in a rigorous, self-reflexive critique of global queer politics and its engagements, confrontations, and negotiations with modernity and its investments in liberalism, legalism, and militarism—all with the objective of queering the ethics of global politics.


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Nations of Wales: 1890-1914

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Certain simple and stereotypical images of Wales strike an immediate chord with the public, both in Wales itself and beyond its borders. The first monograph to explore this period in Welsh history, The Nations of Wales argues that several competing images of Welshness were put in circulation during the Victorian and Edwardian decades, and proceeds to examine several of the most influential of these as they took the form of literary texts. With this book, M. Wynn Thomas opens up a period in Welsh cultural history that has been almost completely overlooked.


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New Museums

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What is the role of the museum in society today? In this time of fundamental economic and social change, should museums be safe civic spaces or open a floor for challenge and change? Can museums contribute to the economic development of communities? If so, how best to guard against the effects of gentrification so that they do not further limit opportunity for low-income residents? How should museums respond to concerns about environmental sustainability? These are just a few of the questions museum professionals, planners, and architects must carefully consider when developing plans and choosing a location for a new museum.New Museums explores these questions by talking to the people behind twenty different museums on six continents, both realized projects and speculative design proposals. Among the museums discussed in the book are the Smithsonian Institute’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington, DC, by Adjaye Associates; the Guggenheim Helsinki by Moreau Kusunoki Architectes; the Comic and Animation Museum in Hangzhou by MVRDV; the Munch Museum in Oslo by Estudio Herreros, the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa in Cape Town by Heatherwick Studio; the Long Museum West Bund in Shanghai by Atelier Deshaus; and the recent extension of the Art Gallery of New South Wales in Sydney by SANAA. With more than 250 color illustrations and contributions by leading museum and architecture experts, the book sheds light on current trends and the state-of-the-art technological advances in architecture, while also providing insight into the careful thought and decision processes that go into the development of new museums.  


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Helene B. Grossmann

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Contemporary artist Helene B. Grossmann draws on the long tradition of light painting to create works of light and color. This book presents the first comprehensive overview of her work, showing how she arrives at her compositions. Her inspiration, we see, is nature in ever-changing light. Beginning with her sketchbook, she lays out a general sense of a composition using color plates and lines; that concept is then abstracted through the application of countless layers of paint that generate the distinct glow that marks her work, giving intimations of open spaces, landscapes, and tableaus. The result, while far from any representationalism, is powerfully affective, creating lasting emotional responses in viewers.  


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Janaina Tschäpe

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Sex, death, and the female body’s capacity for renewal and transformation are among the themes that emerge from the paintings, drawings, and photographs of German-born contemporary artist Janaina Tschäpe. Physically sensuous, with rich, layered colors and soft lines, Tschäpe’s works create the sensation of being underwater or suspended in air. This beautifully illustrated book—designed and produced in collaboration with the artist—is the first to offer a complete overview of Tschäpe’s full body of work. Tschäpe’s artistic process consciously mimics processes found in the natural world—the product of the artist’s time in Brazil, where the bounty of nature is such that living things must often emerge from something else, like a tree boring through a crack in the sidewalk or a plant breaking through a concrete wall. As such, the paintings themselves appear to be in the process of becoming made, palimpsests upon which each emphatic brushstroke partially occludes those made previously. In this way, Tschäpe gradually builds forms and finely calibrates color through layers of accumulation.             Tschäpe’s paintings and drawings are held in the collections of museums worldwide, including the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC; the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía in Madrid; and the Centre Pompidou, Paris; among others. Janaina Tschäpe will contribute to an understanding of how the artist’s distinct voice and style.  


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KiCo Collection

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book celebrates a major private collection of contemporary art built by a husband and wife over the course of the past fifteen years. Focusing in particular on art that engages with the dissolution of physical presence into light color, the KiCo Foundation has acquired not just a large number of individual works by major artists, but also complete groups or even room-sized groups of pieces designed to offer deep insight into an artist’s work. For nearly two decades, the collectors have been working closely with the Kunstmuseum Bonn and the Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus in Munich. This book honors that collaboration and support, offering stunning reproductions of artworks from a broad variety of artists represented in the collection, some seen here for the first time.  


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H-Bombs and Hula Girls

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

H-Bombs and Hula Girls tells the extraordinary tale of ten bright and cheerful young British midshipmen who were part of Operation Grapple, the top secret thermonuclear weapon tests at Christmas Island in 1957, the first successful test of a British nuclear weapon. Evoking the Cold War atmosphere of Britain in the 1950s as it raced to secure its place among the world’s thermonuclear powers, H-Bombs and Hula Girls follows these men on their remarkable journey.   Their trip begins on the aircraft carrier HMS Warrior. On it, they sail through an Atlantic hurricane, squeeze through the Panama Canal, and then head to Easter Island, where they arewitness to three megaton H-bomb explosions. Afterward, they tour Hawaii and the South Pacific and around the coast of South America, serving as goodwill ambassadors.   Compiled by crewmember Michael Johnston from journals, letters, and contemporary records, and with a foreword by HRH The Duke of Edinburgh, H-Bombs and Hula Girls concludes with a surprising revelation that Operation Grapple may not have been quite what it seemed.  


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Photographing Historic Buildings

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The goal when photographing historic buildings, whether an abandoned railway shed or a stunning and storied castle, is not just to capture a compelling image, but to create a lasting record of the building’s design and character. But much more goes into creating a successful photograph than is sometimes apparent. Behind the camera, the photographer must have a trained eye to distinguish a building’s character-defining features. To share what they see and feel, the photographer must also master the camera, composition, and light.             Steve Cole draws on more than forty years of experience photographing historic buildings, sites, and monuments. Unlike many photography manuals, Photographing Historic Buildings takes a simple and straightforward approach. Light is among the most important elements of the craft of photography, and Cole takes readers through the basics with advice on the best use of both natural and artificial light. With nearly five hundred illustrations, he also instructs readers in how to arrange elements of composition to create meaning in their photographs, as well how to apply the many technical components of photography to the best advantage.  


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Prague

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The design of Prague’s gardens and parks—especially the green spaces of its palaces, castles, and monastery complexes, both private and public—is inseparable from the millennium-long efflorescence of this exquisite Czech metropolis. Lushly illustrated with nearly one hundred and fifty original color photographs and archival images, Prague: Parks and Gardens not only shares the latest findings on these gardens’ historical foundation and stylistic transformations, but also takes us through the garden gates into individual gardens and parks—both Prague’s most visited and its undiscovered green gems. Meandering past flower-framed baroque statues to renaissance loggias, romantic pavilions, elegant stairways, and bubbling fountains, the book explores Prague’s gardens and parks by locality, offering novel insight into the city’s different sections that will delight all educated travelers and lovers of Prague. For gardeners, descriptions of some historical gardens also include explanations of their specific spatial relations, connecting them to the larger story of European urban garden design. Complemented with a glossary of terms and an index of important figures and locations, this beautiful celebration of Prague’s remarkable living botanical art, both past and present, sheds new light on the leafy corners of this adored European capital.


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Possessions and Family in the Writings of Luke

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Recent decades have seen substantial questioning of the unity of the books of Luke and Acts. With this volume, Stefan Nordgaard takes a close look at that question, with a specific eye toward Luke’s attitude toward possessions and family. He clearly maps out an ethics that is not set in stone, but changes over time, from a chiefly ascetic position in the gospel to a somewhat bourgeois position in Acts. Nordgaard goes on to offer a historical explanation for the change, built around the identity and activities of the person to whom Luke dedicated the books, “the most excellent Theophilus.” The result is a book that will push Lucan scholarship in a new direction and alter our understanding of the New Testament’s teachings.  


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Passionate Life

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay (1903-1988) was a remarkable woman of many passions and gifts.  She played an important role in the struggle for Indian independence and was similarly a key figure in the international socialist feminist movement.  She was India’s ambassador to Asia and Africa, an articulate and unflinching exponent of the idea of decolonization, and one of the earliest advocates of the idea of the global South. A staunch champion of women’s rights, she held views on women’s equality that continue to resonate in our times. Greatly disheartened by the partition of India in 1947, Kamaladevi became involved in the resettlement of refugees and appeared to withdraw from political life. Indeed, the Kamaladevi that most Indians are familiar with is a figure who, above all, revived Indian handicrafts, became the country’s most well-known expert on carpets, puppets and its thousands of craft traditions, and nurtured the greater majority of the country’s national institutions charged with the promotion of dance, drama, art, theatre, music and puppetry.  Throughout her life, however, she upheld with all the intellectual vigour and emotional force at her command the idea of the dignity of every human life.Kamaladevi wrote voluminously and her sojourns took her all over the world.  She travelled in China during World War II, lectured in Japan, visited Native American pueblos in New Mexico, and forged links with working women and anti-colonial activists in countries across Asia, Africa and Europe. Sadly, most of her writings have long been out of print. The editors of this comprehensive anthology, which is the first serious scholarly attempt to grapple with Kamaladevi’s life and body of work, have sought to represent the wide range of her interests.  The extensive selections, comprised largely of journal articles and excerpts from Kamaladevi’s books, are accompanied by a set of original essays by contemporary Indian and American scholars which analyse and contextualize her life and work.  This volume should provide the resources for further examination and appreciation of Kamaladevi Chattopadhyay’s unusual gifts and her place in modern Indian and world history.


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Paris Haussmann

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Throughout the nineteenth century, Paris underwent profound transformations that reached every part of the city. Georges Eugène Haussmann, prefect of France’s Département Seine, who was behind the master plan for this rebuilding of the capital, embodies this century of public works that continues to shape the city today.Paris Haussmann explores the characteristics of this homogenous yet polymorphous city, the result of the lengthy process of  “Haussmannization.” For the first time, editors Benoît Jallon, Umberto Napolitano, and Franck Boutté have conducted extensive research on roadways, public spaces, and buildings and blocks, among other aspects, in order to explore the capacity of the Haussmann model to contend with the challenges contemporary cities are faced with today. In addition to a wealth of new research, the book features nearly five hundred illustrations, including maps, photographs, plans, and axonometric projections.  


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Dumb Type Reader

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From the 1980s into the early 2000s, the Japanese group Dumb Type mounted multimedia performances that broke substantial new ground in new media dramaturgy and influenced countless performers to follow. This book gathers essays on the group’s work, achievement, and influence, analyzing such key works as S/N, which marked the first time a major Japanese artwork staged a debate around the politics of sexuality and difference. Other major works, including pH, OR, and memorandum, are discussed in detail, and contributors also attend to more recent works by individual dumb type artists. This is the most extensive exploration of dumb type to date, featuring leading Japanese and international authorities and will be essential reading for scholars of contemporary performance and new media art.


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Double Crossed

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the United States, the popular symbols of organized crime are still Depression-era figures such as Al Capone, Lucky Luciano, and Meyer Lansky—thought to be heads of giant, hierarchically organized mafias. In Double Crossed, Michael Woodiwiss challenges perpetuated myths to reveal a more disturbing reality of organized crime—one in which government officials and the wider establishment are deeply complicit.   Delving into attempts to implement policies to control organized crime in the United States, Italy, and the United Kingdom, Woodiwiss reveals little known manifestations of organized crime among the political and corporate establishment. A follow up to his 2005 Gangster Capitalism, Woodiwiss broadens and brings his argument up to the present by examining those who constructed and then benefitted from myth making. These include Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, opportunistic American politicians and officials, and, more recently, law enforcement bureaucracies led by the FBI. Organized crime control policies now tend to legitimize repression and cover up failure. They do little to control organized crime. While the U.S. continues to export its organized crime control template to the rest of the world, opportunities for successful criminal activity proliferate at local, national, and global levels, making successful prosecutions irrelevant.


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Dynamics of News and Indigenous Policy in Australia

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book offers rich insights into the news media’s role in the development of policy in Australia, and explores the complex and interactive relationship between news media and Australian Indigenous affairs.   Kerry McCallum and Lisa Waller critically examine how Indigenous health, bilingual education, and controversial legislation are portrayed through public media, and they look closely at how Indigenous people are both being excluded from policy and media discussion, as well as using the media to their advantage.


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Do I Belong?

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Beginning in childhood, one of our strongest and most fundamental human emotions is the desire to belong. This emotion extends beyond merely the self, affecting on a macro scale at a political level. Since its foundation in 1957, the European Union has encouraged people across its member states to feel a sense of belonging to one united international community—with very mixed results. Today, faced with the fracturing impact of the migration crisis, threats of terrorism, and rising tensions, governments within and outside the EU now seek to impose a different kind of belonging through policies of exclusion and border control.   In this collection of personal essays, a diverse group of novelists, journalists, and activists reflect on their own individual senses of citizen belonging. In creative and disarming ways, they confront the challenges of nationalism, populism, racism, and fundamentalism and offer fascinating insights into some of the most pressing questions of our day: Why do people fear growing diversity? Is there truly a European identity? Who determines who belongs? ​ Literary, accessible, and timely, Do I Belong? provides unique commentary on an insufficiently understood and defining phenomenon of our age.


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Do I Belong?

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Beginning in childhood, one of our strongest and most fundamental human emotions is the desire to belong. This emotion extends beyond merely the self, affecting on a macro scale at a political level. Since its foundation in 1957, the European Union has encouraged people across its member states to feel a sense of belonging to one united international community—with very mixed results. Today, faced with the fracturing impact of the migration crisis, threats of terrorism, and rising tensions, governments within and outside the EU now seek to impose a different kind of belonging through policies of exclusion and border control.   In this collection of personal essays, a diverse group of novelists, journalists, and activists reflect on their own individual senses of citizen belonging. In creative and disarming ways, they confront the challenges of nationalism, populism, racism, and fundamentalism and offer fascinating insights into some of the most pressing questions of our day: Why do people fear growing diversity? Is there truly a European identity? Who determines who belongs? ​ Literary, accessible, and timely, Do I Belong? provides unique commentary on an insufficiently understood and defining phenomenon of our age.


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Danish Neo-Antique Furniture

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT




Search for Justice

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

At the end of a quarter century of conflict, over 100,000 Sri Lankans have died and thousands of survivors have been victims of sexual violence. The subsequent cry for justice cannot be ignored. In The Search for Justice, a collection of writers and activists look to history and contemporary politics to examine the root causes of sexual violence in Sri Lanka. Offering an analysis of the polarizations created around ethnic and linguistic identities during the war years and an examination of the routine violence toward women, the authors argue powerfully that Sri Lankan women must not be treated only as victims, but as potential and actual agents of change.             Edited by Kumari Jayawardena and Kishali Pinto-Jayawardena, the volume points to a hitherto unaddressed aspect of sexual violence: that of the structures and systems that enable impunity on the part of perpetrators. Whether they are security personnel and paramilitary forces, members of armed groups and gangs, local politicians and police, or, often, ordinary citizens including close family members, perpetrators operate with impunity. The Search for Justice is a compelling new installment in the Zubaan Series on Sexual Violence and Impunity in South Asia.  


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Second World War in Colour

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For those of us who didn’t live through World War II, it appears in our mind’s eye in black and white. Images of the Blitz, of the D-Day landings at Normandy, the liberation of Paris, the fall of Berlin—all come to us in shadowy grays and blacks, the lack of color simultaneously heightening their drama and distancing them from us. Seen in black and white, World War II seems wholly of the past, a story that’s being told much more than an experienced that men and women actually lived through. ​This book will help change that. Reproducing seventy-eight rare full-color images from the archives of the Imperial War Museums, it shows us a new—or at least long-forgotten—World War II. In these pages, we see the vivid hues of flames, the richly colored fabrics of flags and uniforms, intense blue skies high over battlefields, faces of suntanned soldiers on the march, and the dizzyingly complicated color of the new art of military camouflage. The result is a World War II that has been rescued from the past and restored to us, powerful and unforgettable, so we can see for the first time what our parents, grandparents, and great-grandparents saw as they fought and sacrificed all those decades ago.


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Sophie Walbeoffe

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

British-born artist Sophie Walbeoffe is an established travel painter who has traveled or lived in such diverse locations as Dubai, Canada, Syria, Jordan, India, Spain, France, and Israel. For the last twenty-five years she has called Kenya home. Throughout the course of her career, the subjects of her paintings have included Jimmy John, Wilfred Thesiger, the Emir of Sharja on his deathbed, as well as many nomadic peoples.   Capturing the adventurous spirit of Walbeoffe’s work, this book presents images and anecdotes from her sojourns across four continents. From her first paintings as a teenager, through art school and her development of the method of painting with both hands, the book presents her long career. She discusses what it is like to paint on site in deserts surrounded by camels and other exotic beasts; to rear two young children in the African bush, and to experience the vibrancy of Europe, the color of India, and the history of Jerusalem. With an introduction by Edward Lucie-Smith, it is a book certain to appeal to both art and travel lovers.    


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Story of Conquest and Adventure

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

A Story of Conquest and Adventure: The Large Farāmarznāme presents a poem from the Persian epic cycle dated to the late eleventh century in an English prose translation for the first time. The story tells how Farāmarz, a son of the famous Shāhnāme hero Rostam, conquers several provinces of India, before setting off on an extensive voyage over sea and land, leading his troops through a number of hazardous situations in various fictional countries. Finding love and battling men, demons, and various ferocious animals, the epic hero comes to life in this riveting translation.  


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Singapore's Permanent Territorial Revolution

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Ever since Singapore became an independent nation in 1965, its government—the country’s sole landlord—has been intent on transforming the island’s environment. This has led to a nearly constant overhaul of the landscape, whether natural or man-made. No stone is left unturned, literally, and not a single cultural feature, be it a house, a factory, a road, or a cemetery, is safe from the constant modification. This atlas maps these changes in depth, vividly illustrating the shifts in Singapore’s spatial order. Taken together, these maps demonstrate how physical transformations have led to social changes and how the government has used land and property as a tool of social management. By constantly replanning the rules of access to space,  De Koninck argues, the Singaporean State is redefining territoriality, down to its minute details. Whether considered progress or politics, it is an unprecedented use of the physical to control an entire society.


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Sherrie Levine

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

American artist Sherrie Levine uses techniques of appropriation, repetition, and variation to create highly original art that could be no one’s work but hers. This book presents fifty of those works, which draw on originals by Duchamp, Cézanne, Degas, Van Gogh, Mondrian, and others, developing them in unexpected conceptual directions and making use of historical cliches; the result forces viewers to both reconsider the original works that have long been too familiar to provoke thought, and to think about the process and techniques of reproduction and adaptation that Levine deploys. In addition, art experts place her work in context with the international contemporary art scene.  


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St Vitus Cathedral at Prague Castle

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

St Vitus Cathedral at Prague Castle is one of the symbols of the Czech statehood; it is the coronation and burial site of Bohemian kings and to this day is a leading Christian cathedral, a residence of archbishops, the venue for state ceremonies and, last but not least, a much sought-after tourist attraction.  St Vitus Cathedral at Prague Castle, the first English-language book on this iconic structure, presents the cathedral’s history, inseparably linked to the history of the Czech lands. The authors present the circumstances of the cathedral’s foundating by Charles IV in the fourteenth century and the progression of the construction, including later alterations and additions. The book focuses particularly on a detailed description of the sculpted and artistic decoration and significant monuments including St Wenceslaus’ Chapel and the burial site of Bohemian kings. The text, set in the broader context of the developments of European architecture, is richly illustrated with contemporary photographs, historical images, reconstructions, and plans.


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Signs from Silence

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Royal Tombs of Ur, dating from approximately 3000–2700 BCE, are among the most famous and impressive archeological discoveries of the twentieth century. Excavated between 1922 and 1934 under the direction of Leonard Woolley, this site is one of the richest sources of information we have about ancient Sumer—however, many mysteries about the society that produced these tombs remain. Based on primary research with the Ur materials at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archeology and Anthropology, and paying particular attention to the iconography found in what Woolley referred to as the “Seal Impression Strata of Ur,” this book works to reconstruct the early history of Sumer. What was this society like? What social structures did this society build? What were its institutions of authority? The answers Petr Charvát proposes are of interest not only to archeologists, but to anyone fascinated by early human history.



Vasily Kandinsky

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Vasily Kandinsky was one of the first painters of abstract art and a founding member of the Blue Rider movement. Although he trained as a lawyer, Kandinsky abandoned this career path to devote himself to art, both as a creator and an influential teacher and theorist at the Bauhaus. Over time, Kandinsky’s works grew more abstract, and he is best known for large, expressive paintings that free color from form and line. The book covers the entire span of his career, focuses in particular on his time at the Bauhaus, where he collaborated with Lyonel Feininger and Paul Klee. Lively, accessible, and lavishly illustrated, this new book offers a concise introduction to the life and work of this great master of art.  


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Karimayi

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Chandrasekhar Kambar is one of the most accomplished Indian writers working today. In each of Kambar’s novels, the archetypical Mother, Karimayi, is at the center. The narrative of Karimayi moves through an astounding time span, beginning with the mythopoetic times of Goddess Karimayi’s birth and continuing through the historical and cultural shifts in the life of a small rural community called Shivapura during the British colonial era.Karimayi breaks the familiar narrative of an idyllic and traditional village community being destroyed by the incursion of modernity. Instead, the multilayered narrative of Karimayi weaves everything into itself—the story of the village’s past, the myth of Karimayi, the disorder that sets in with the invasion of colonial modernity and the lure of the city, and, most importantly, of the disruption of another form of “native” modernity that the village community has already begun to incorporate into its rhythms of life. Cleverly challenging colonial cartography, Kambar’s book plays with the idea of an eternal India that exists between myth and reality.


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Katharina Sieverding

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book presents an overview of the long career of German photographer Katharina Sieverding, celebrated internationally for her use of unusual pictorial invention and innovative media-based practice that helped to revive the artistic potential of photography. Designed largely by Sieverding herself, this book presents forty-two groups of works from 1967 to 2017, including her greatly enlarged portraits in film and photographs, large-format montages on the state of the world from the 1970s, installation photos, self-portraits, and more. The resulting book presents an artist of great range, sensitivity, and expression, always pushing the medium of photography in new directions and towards new discoveries.  


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Hans Josephsohn Sculptures

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As a boy, photographer and filmmaker Jürg Hassler passed the studio of sculptor Hans Josephsohn each day on his way to school. Captivated by watching the artist work, Hassler began working as Josephsohn’s assistant and apprentice once he had finished school, eventually becoming a sculptor himself. After taking up photography and filmmaking, he also began to capture countless images of Josephsohn’s sculptural work, as well as producing a short film, released in 1977. Produced in collaboration with the Kesselhaus Josephsohn, in St. Gallen, Switzerland, Hans Josephsohn Sculptures features more than one hundred of Hassler’s striking black-and-white photographs. Many of the photographs have a single sculpture as their focus, showcasing the singular expressiveness that characterized Josephsohn’s work. Others shed light on Josephsohn’s extraordinary life and artistic process. Rounding out the collection is an introduction by Ulrich Meinherz and an essay by Nina Keel that takes a closer look at the context of Hassler’s photographic studies of his teacher’s art.  


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Unofficial Roxelana

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

At a time when Turkey is struggling for its secular identity, resisting the influence of ISIS, and finding itself at the heart of the European refugee crisis, accomplished Turkish playwright Özen Yula offers a deep, artistic portrait of the country and its culture. Yula, whose work focuses on marginalized individuals within oppressive social systems, has a lot to say about the problems facing global democracies—issues like failures in the social contract, human rights conflicts, territorial security, religious strife, and nationalism.Unofficial Roxelana is a collection of Yula’s most significant work. It illustrates how problematic power structures emerge regardless of different governmental configurations, always resulting in the repression of marginalized members of society—in this case, from renowned Turkish historical figures, like Roxelana and Rumi, to the pariahs of modern Turkey. With a contextualizing introduction by Marvin Carlson and a lengthy interview with Yula, this first-of-its-kind anthology is an invaluable glimpse into the tempestuous and deeply artistic modern Turkey.


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Unbecoming Cinema

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Unbecoming Cinema explores the notion of cinema as a living, active agent, capable of unsettling and reconfiguring a person’s thoughts, senses, and ethics. Film, according to David H. Fleming, is a dynamic force, arming audiences with the ability to see and make a difference in the world. Drawing heavily on Deleuze’s philosophical insights, as well as those of Guattari and Badiou, the book critically examines unsettling and taboo footage, from suicide documentaries to art therapy films, from portrayals of mental health and autism to torture porn. In investigating the effect of film on the mind and body, Fleming’s shrewd analysis unites transgressive cinema with metaphysical concepts of the body and mind.


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Great Barn of 1425-27 at Harmondsworth, Middlesex

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The great barns built by landowners of medieval England are among England’s most important historic monuments. Impressive structurally and architecturally, they are not only beautiful but have much to tell us about the technology of the time. But, unlike homes, castles, and churches, barns were centers of production, where grain crops were stored and threshed, and they therefore offer a glimpse of a different side of medieval life—the ceaseless work of farming, on which the lives of both the rich and poor depended.  The Great Barn of 1425–7 at Harmondsworth, Middlesex explores one of the most impressive and interesting of the great barns, completed in 1427 for Winchester College and recently restored through a collaboration between English Heritage and Historic England. The book begins with an exploration of the estate to which it belonged and of its precursor buildings, then explores why, how, and when the barn was built; the ingenuity and oddities of its construction; and the trades, materials and people involved.  


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Aurelia

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In eighteenth-century London butterfly collectors weren’t known as lepidopterists—they were the Society of Aurelians, employing an old term that refers to that mysterious cask where beauty is divined: the chrysalis. As a twenty-first-century Aurelian, Carol Mavor, in this book, moves through the enchanted woods and flowered fields of our fairy-tale-telling history in pursuit of our most intricately laced and resplendently clad stories, in turn showing us how deeply fantasy, myth, nursery rhyme, and dream have influenced our wider art and culture.              Mavor reawakens us with new insights through the stories that we have known since childhood. For example, when Alice stumbles upon a Wonderland cake marked “EAT ME” or when the witch dangerously lures in Hansel and Gretel with her delicious gingerbread house, Mavor uncovers eating as curious and obsessional. Yet, she also unearths magical enchantment in more surprising places. She discovers a tragic candyland in the poetry of 1950s genius child-poet Minou Drouet. She showcases a subterranean fairytale from the Ice Age in the cave paintings of Lascaux. She shows how the brown fairies that flit among the poems of Langston Hughes become a lesson in civil rights. And, perhaps most dramatically, she holds aloft Miwa Yanagi’s photograph of Little Red Riding Hood and her Grandmother embracing within the cut-open belly of the wolf as a grisly allegorical work commemorating the victims of Hiroshima.             With the haunting, melancholic rhythm of nursery rhymes, Mavor reads us the world of the fairy tale as our own world, full of trouble and dangers, but yet also full of heroes and magic, showing us where fantasy, literature, and our own social and political histories meet in the depths of our shared imagination.  


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All Passion Spent

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the mid-nineties, Birjees Dawar Ali returns to Pakistan to seek out a history left unfinished long ago; one from which, nursing heartbreak and betrayal, she had previously fled home to partitioned India. Will she find the family that so generously gave her succor, the home that became her own, and the unquestioning love she found there? Or will these certainties have crumbled with the march of history? A deeply moving narrative of love and loss, All Passion Spent is set in the continuing aftermath of the 1947 partition of India and the subsequent emergence of India and Pakistan as two separate countries. Zaheda Hina’s richly layered narrative, brought alive in this lyrical and poetic translation by Neelam Hussain, touches on the many complexities that surround this painful history: a profound sense of grief and displacement in the subcontinent, the lives sundered midstream, lost friendships, and the quest for new roots and lands.


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All That Is Wales

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Wales is small geographically, but its rich and varied culture belies its size. This collection of essays focuses on English-language authors from Wales in order to offer a sample of the country's internal diversity. Contributors include Lynette Roberts, who is Argentinian by birth but of Welsh decent; Peggy Ann Whistler, who chose a new Welsh identity as Margiad Evans; Nigel Heseltine, whose bizarre stories of the decaying squirearchy of the Welsh border country remain sadly little known; and Utah-based poet Leslie Norris, whose Welsh-English translations bring out the bicultural character of Wales. Taken together, they present a Wales that is vibrant in its difference, a culture made of many disparate parts.


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Tin-Glazed Earthenware from the Netherlands, France and Germany, 1600–1800

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Designmuseum Denmark is home to a large collection of ceramic works that is quite unique in terms of size and width of representation, since the collection covers all known techniques within the main groups of earthenware, stoneware, tin-glazed earthenware, and porcelain as well as new hybrid materials and techniques. This catalogue covers an extremely important period in the history of European glazed ceramic ware from c. 1600 to 1800 when the technique enjoyed the widest distribution. Ulla Houkjær focuses on three central areas: the Netherlands, France, and Germany. This comprehensive and highly illustrated introduction to the history of tin-glazed earthenware in these three countries offers an overview of the history of important developments within the field during the period and highlights important changes in aesthetics and usage.


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Third Sector Delivering Public Services

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book offers a comprehensive overview of the role of the third sector—voluntary or nonprofit groups—in the delivery of public services in the United Kingdom. It details the historical development of the relationship between the government and the third sector, reviews major debates and controversies that have accompanied the increasing reliance on third-sector work in recent years, and explores the various fields in which third-sector activity is prominent.


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Tin-Glazed Earthenware, 1300-1750

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT




Toussaint Louverture

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“In overthrowing me, you have done no more than cut down the trunk of the tree of the black liberty in St. Domingue—it will spring back from the roots, for they are numerous and deep.”   These are Toussaint Louverture’s last words before being taken to prison in France. Heroic leader of the only successful slave revolt in history, Louverture is one of the greatest anti-imperialist fighters who ever lived. Born into slavery on a Caribbean plantation, he was able to break from his bondage to lead an army of freed African slaves to victory against the professional armies of France, Spain, and Britain in the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804.   In this lively narrative biography, Louverture’s fascinating life is explored through the prism of his radical politics. Charles Forsdick and Christian Høgsbjerg champion the “black Robespierre,” whose revolutionary legacy has inspired people and movements in the two centuries since his death. For anyone interested in the roots of modern resistance movements and black political radicalism, Louverture’s extraordinary life provides the perfect groundwork.  


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Phantom Africa

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

One of the towering classics of twentieth century French literature, Phantom Africa is a singular and ultimately unclassifiable work: a book composed of one man’s compulsive and constantly mutating daily travel journal—by turns melodramatic, self-deprecating, ecstatic, and morose—as well as an exhaustively detailed account of the first French state-sponsored anthropological expedition to visit sub-Saharan Africa. In 1930, Michel Leiris was an aspiring poet drifting away from the orbit of the Surrealist movement in Paris when the anthropologist Marcel Griaule invited him to serve as the “secretary-archivist” for the Mission Dakar-Djibouti, a major collecting and ethnographic journey that traversed the African continent between May 1931 and February 1933. Leiris, while maintaining the official records of the Mission, documenting the team’s acquisitions, and participating in the research, also kept a diary where he noted not only a given day’s activities and events but also his impressions, his states of mind, his anxieties, his dreams, and even his erotic fantasies. Upon returning to France, rather than compiling a more conventional report or ethnographic study, Leiris decided simply to publish his diary, almost entirely untouched aside from minor corrections and a smattering of footnotes. The result is an extraordinary book: a day-by-day record of one European writer’s experiences in an Africa inexorably shaded by his own exotic delusions and expectations, on the one hand, and an unparalleled depiction of the paradoxes and hypocrisies of conducting anthropological field research at the height of the colonial era on the other. Never before available in English translation, Phantom Africa is an invaluable document. If the book is “a stone marking a bend on a path that is entirely personal,” as Leiris himself described it years later, it is also a book whose broad canvas bears witness to the full range of social and political forces reshaping the African continent in the period between the World Wars.


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I Love XXX

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Since premiering his pioneering linguistic experiment I Love XXX in Beijing nearly twenty-five years ago, Meng Jinghui has been credited with revitalizing Chinese theater by popularizing the avant-garde. Mixing high culture with mass culture, his plays address China’s enduring revolutionary nostalgia and current social problems, challenging the artistic status quo from the mainstream rather than the margins. His creations range from new interpretations of canonical Western masters like Shakespeare and Genet to improvisational collaborations with actors on original works. This anthology from China’s most influential theater creator makes his plays available to an international readership in English for the first time.The collection, chosen by Meng and renowned Chinese theater scholar and translator Claire Conceison, represents the breadth of Meng’s work and illuminates late twentieth- and twenty-first-century creative practices that transcend the conventional category of playwright. I Love XXX includes the title piece, Longing for Worldly Pleasures, The Bedbug, Head Without Tail, and Two Dogs’ Opinions on Life, as well as a DVD featuring selected scenes from each of the plays.


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On Building Peace

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Only twenty five years after the end of the Cold War, the Western-dominated global order is fading and our hopes that liberal democracy would spread and bring world peace are evaporating.   While the West is increasingly preoccupied with its internal problems, threats to global peace have fundamentally changed: wars among nation-states and their alliances, once the dominant scourge of humankind, have almost disappeared and are replaced by a triple threat from intra-state armed conflicts, the failing of nation-states and the rise of belligerent non-state actors. The global peace we felt within our reach in 1991 is escaping us.  On Building Peace seeks the answers that the UN Charter can no longer provide. Once meant as a guarantor for peace, the Charter was never designed to deal with intra-state conflicts and today its core principles are eroded. The book makes two rather simple, but possibly unpopular, suggestions for preserving future peace: first, we must rescue the nation-state, not despite but because of globalization, and second, we must not further undermine the United Nations, but expand its Charter for dealing collectively with this triple threat.   The struggle for survival in a world of limited resources and environmental degradation will deepen intra-state conflicts. We must prevent slipping back into a new round of Cold War-type confrontations and focus on finding collective solutions for building peace. For the sake of billions of people of future generations, we cannot get this wrong.


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Obama's Welfare Legacy

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The election of Barack Obama during the 2008 economic downturn brought hope to millions and presented an opportunity for expanding socioeconomic rights. But the Obama administration was consistently constrained by the challenges of a divided government, and the now-threatened Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, remains the standout welfare reform of his presidency. In the first systematic assessment of Obama’s welfare and antipoverty programs, welfare reform specialist Anne Daguerre examines these legacies of his administration, focusing in particular on the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Programs. Drawing lessons from comparison with the Western European experience and its traditionally strong commitment to social welfare, Obama’s Welfare Legacy provides an up-to-date, vital account of the contemporary politics of poverty and public entitlements in the United States.


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Engravings of Charles & George Hunt

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the Victorian era, no middle-class home was complete without a couple of sporting prints hanging on its walls. These engravings of famous racehorse and races, hunting or coaching scenes were ubiquitous, and even today they instantly conjure up an image of Victorian sporting life.             Charles and George Hunt were two of the leading creators of sporting prints in the period. Working at the height of the form’s popularity, the brothers engraved and sold prints of the works of some of the leading artists and illustrators of the age. This book is the first major study and catalog of their work, copiously illustrated and carefully documented, making it valuable to both collectors and casual fans of this particularly English art form.  


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Employing the Enemy

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How would it feel to build homes for other people on land that had been taken from you? That bitter toil is the daily reality for the thousands of Palestinians who are working to build illegal Israeli settlements. It is a job that requires a disavowal of their legal rights and comes with little to no job security, low wages, and dangerous working conditions. Through a vivid and moving narrative, Matthew Vickery introduces us to the Palestinian workers who fill these harrowing positions.   Based on conversations with these workers and their families, the book explores the rationale, emotions, and consequences of such conflicted employment. In doing so, Vickery draws attention to a previously neglected aspect of the Palestinian experience and Israeli subjugation. This, coupled with an innovative and groundbreaking analysis of the Israeli government’s role in the settlement employment sector, exposes the true nature of these practices as a new, insidious form of state-sponsored forced labor.  Exploring ways that such practices might be challenged, Employing the Enemy paints a powerful picture of how and why people collude with their own oppression, and why a solution to the Israel/Palestine conflict that provides dignity and rights for all is urgently needed.  


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Employing the Enemy

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How would it feel to build homes for other people on land that had been taken from you? That bitter toil is the daily reality for the thousands of Palestinians who are working to build illegal Israeli settlements. It is a job that requires a disavowal of their legal rights and comes with little to no job security, low wages, and dangerous working conditions. Through a vivid and moving narrative, Matthew Vickery introduces us to the Palestinian workers who fill these harrowing positions.   Based on conversations with these workers and their families, the book explores the rationale, emotions, and consequences of such conflicted employment. In doing so, Vickery draws attention to a previously neglected aspect of the Palestinian experience and Israeli subjugation. This, coupled with an innovative and groundbreaking analysis of the Israeli government’s role in the settlement employment sector, exposes the true nature of these practices as a new, insidious form of state-sponsored forced labor.  Exploring ways that such practices might be challenged, Employing the Enemy paints a powerful picture of how and why people collude with their own oppression, and why a solution to the Israel/Palestine conflict that provides dignity and rights for all is urgently needed.  


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Ecofeminism as Politics

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Exploring the philosophical and political challenges of bridging feminist and ecological concerns, Ecofeminism as Politics argues that ecofeminism reaches beyond contemporary social movements as a political synthesis of four revolutions in one, taking in ecology, feminism, socialism, and postcolonial struggle. Informed by a critical postmodern reading of Marxism, Ecofeminism as Politics integrates discourses on science, the body, culture, nature, and political economy. Highlighting the importance of finding commonalities between ecofeminist and indigenous struggles, Salleh offers a groundbreaking discussion of deep ecology, social ecology, eco-socialism, and postmodern feminism through the lens of an ecofeminist deconstruction.  


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Ecofeminism as Politics

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Exploring the philosophical and political challenges of bridging feminist and ecological concerns, Ecofeminism as Politics argues that ecofeminism reaches beyond contemporary social movements as a political synthesis of four revolutions in one, taking in ecology, feminism, socialism, and postcolonial struggle. Informed by a critical postmodern reading of Marxism, Ecofeminism as Politics integrates discourses on science, the body, culture, nature, and political economy. Highlighting the importance of finding commonalities between ecofeminist and indigenous struggles, Salleh offers a groundbreaking discussion of deep ecology, social ecology, eco-socialism, and postmodern feminism through the lens of an ecofeminist deconstruction.  


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England's Maritime Heritage from the Air

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

England has a long and historic relationship with the sea. The source of a bountiful harvest of seafood that has sustained the population, it provides trade routes and a final line of defense against invasion. Throughout history, it was the link in the empire that saw Britain emerge as the world’s first great power. For some, the sea has also provided the last view of home as emigration took them to far-flung corners of the world, while, for others, perhaps fleeing religious or political persecution, the sea offered a route to safety.   For almost a century, Aerofilms recorded Britain from the air, and Peter Waller has delved through the Aerofilms archive held by Historic England to explore the country’s maritime heritage. Alongside the photographs taken of the great castles and abbeys of the country, Aerofilms also recorded industrial and commercial activity, including the docks and ports that were an essential part of maintaining Britain’s place in the world. He looks at how the docks and ports have evolved since the years immediately after World War I, how traditional patterns of trade have changed, how the Royal Navy has shrunk and how the leisure industry has come to dominate.  


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Ends of the Earth

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Ends of the Earth uses the landscape of Alaska as a testing ground for love and elegy. It is a poetry collection that contains both lyric responses to the urban Alaska environment and extended sequences that cycle between autobiography, mythic allusion, and the literary archive. In her work, Kate Partridge combines the fresh perspective of a newcomer with explorations of the landscape and lifestyles through allusions to classic literature. While the poems turn an inquisitive, contemporary lens to the subject of Alaska, elements throughout the book are influenced by twentieth-century writers like Elizabeth Bishop and Marianne Moore. The manuscript also combines personal experience with collaged material from the Epic of Gilgamesh, Walt Whitman's notebooks, and other classic sources, to investigate the ideas of love, isolation, and location. Through humor and observation, Partridge takes a new look at what it means to live in urban Alaska and the world at large.


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European Tapestries

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT




Berlin

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As Joseph Pearson poetically puts it in this rich look at one of Europe’s most fascinating cities: Berlin is a party in a graveyard. Europe’s youth capital, Berlin is also beset by sustained guilt for the atrocities that were ordered by its Nazi officers during the Third Reich. Built and rebuilt on the ruins of multiple regimes, Berlin in the twenty-first-century houses an extraordinary diversity of refugees, immigrants, and expats. Offering a comprehensive but concise history, Pearson tells the story of Berlin’s past over nine centuries while also painting a portrait of the vibrant German capital today.             Pearson describes the rise of Berlin from a small settlement surrounded by bog to one of the crucial economic and political centers of Europe. Berlin is a palimpsest of a cutting edge and dynamic modern culture over a troubled history, one that is visible in bombsites, museums, late-night clubs, and even a lake that allegedly hosts a man-eating monster. He ultimately shows how the city is imbued with an array of unnerving elements: emptiness, provincialism, ramshackle industrial eclecticism, lurid and lascivious counter-cultural expressions, and a tremendous history of violence—but also that these are precisely the sorts of things that give the city its unique charge. Posing one thought-provoking question after another, Pearson walks the city’s neighborhoods, peeling back layer upon layer of history in order to reveal a Berlin that few of us know.  


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Beijing Film Academy Yearbook 2016

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Beijing Film Academy Yearbook is a collection of specially selected articles chosen from issues of the Journal of Beijing Film Academy. This volume collates articles published in the journal throughout 2016, and are translated for an English-speaking readership. Due to the increased academic focus on Chinese cinema, the Beijing Film Academy Yearbook project aims to contribute to this research with a first-hand perspective in order to narrow the gap for cross-cultural scholarly dialogue.  


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Brighton's Secret Agents

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

During World War II, Winston Churchill authorized the creation of a new wartime secret service called the Special Operations Executive, whose order was to “set Europe ablaze.” In Brighton’s Secret Agents, Paul McCue tells a true story of heroism in extraordinary times, with a focus on four fantastic agents: Lieutenant Jacqueline Nearne, Captain Michael Trotobas, Captain Edward Zeff, and Captain Ronald Taylor.   In this book, McCue details the organization’s creation and postwar demise, its training methods, and the missions of the four chief subjects. He also covers three other agents, including a special duties RAF pilot who was the inspiration for Q from the James Bond stories.  As McCue shows, some agents enjoyed great success, while others were doomed to failure and death, but all displayed the volunteer spirit and courage that saw Britain through the darkest days of the war. Their stories, largely little known, are here finally told.  


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Balfour’s Shadow

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“His Majesty’s government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavours to facilitate the achievement of this object.”   This is the infamous Balfour Declaration, which began one hundred years of conflict with the Palestinian people. Penned in 1917 by British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour, these words had an immense impact on history that still emanates a century later. In the controversial, fast-paced Balfour’s Shadow, David Cronin traces the story of the rhetorical and practical assistance that Britain has given to the Zionist movement and the state of Israel since that day. Skillfully and engagingly written, Balfour’s Shadow uses previously unreleased sources and archives to reveal a new side to an old story. Cronin focuses on important historical events such as the Arab Revolt, the Nakba and establishment of the state, the ‘56 and ‘67 wars, the Cold War, and controversial public figures like Tony Blair. Marking the 100th anniversary of the Balfour Declaration, Cronin provides a fascinating take on this oft-maligned, important history.


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Unreal Objects

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

More than ever before, scientific and technological innovations are playing increasingly important roles in our lives. New products developing today will fundamentally shape the world around us and manipulate our lived experience in the future. In twenty years, we could be zooming on hoverboards to visit real-life Jurassic Parks or navigating with our optic-implanted GPS systems. In this age of blossoming innovation, however, many wonder: how and why are these important projects chosen? And what are the ultimate consequences of this process?   In Unreal Objects, Kate O’Riordan unpacks these crucial questions and fills a gap in the theorization of digital materialities. Through her investigation, she discovers that many objects—such as genomic projects, artificial meat, and re-creation of extinct species—cannot be granted scientific legitimacy and developed without extraordinary amounts of media, celebrity endorsements, and private investment. As a result of these filters, only certain projects take center stage when it comes to funding and political attention. O’Riordan calls these unreal objects; scientific projects and technologies whose utopian visions for the future are combined with investment and materialization in the here and now. By separating the media hype from the reality, O’Riordan shows how the huge amount of attention paid to these unreal objects hides more pressing social injustices and inequalities, while at the same time conjuring utopian visions for how life might be lived.  


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Computers in Education

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Described by the New York Times as a visionary “pioneer in computerized learning,” Patrick Suppes (1922-2014) and his many collaborators at Stanford University conducted research on the development, commercialization, and use of computers in education from 1963 to 2013. Computers in Education synthesizes this wealth of scholarship into a single succinct volume that highlights the profound interconnections of technology in education. By capturing the great breadth and depth of this research, this book offers an accessible introduction to Suppes’s striking work.


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Palestine-Israel Conflict

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Palestine-Israel conflict is the most notorious and ingrained conflict in living memory. Yet the way it is reported in the media is confusing and often misleading. In The Palestine-Israel Conflict, Gregory Harms and Todd M. Ferry provide an authoritative introduction to the topic. Balanced, accessible, and annotated, it covers the full history of the region from Biblical times up to the present. Perfect for both general readers and students, it offers a comprehensive yet lucid rendering of the conflict, setting it in historical context. This fourth edition brings us up to date with a new introduction, conclusion, and material covering recent events: Israel’s Operation Protective Edge, the Palestinian unity deal between Fatah and Hamas, and ongoing Palestinian resistance, America’s Middle East policy, and the election of Trump. ​Cutting through layers of confused and inconsistent information, this new edition of The Palestine-Israel Conflict will clarify the ongoing struggle for all readers.


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Robert Recorde

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Robert Recorde was an important sixteenth-century Welsh physician and mathematician and one of the most enigmatic figures of Tudor England. This book presents a richly detailed and fully rounded picture of Recorde as an academic, theologian, astronomer, antiquarian, inventor of the “equals” sign (=), and writer of widely used textbooks. He was also a scholar who found himself completely out of depth in surrounding political and religious dramas. Drawing from numerous extracts from Recorde’s own writings transcribed into modern English, Gordon Roberts offers the first full-length biography of an intellectual at the center of intrigue and turmoil.


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Space Invaders

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Under conditions of increasing global economic inequalities, we are witnessing the flourishing of grassroots people’s movements fighting for improved livelihoods. Whether it’s the flurry of Occupy protests that peppered the planet a few years ago or the current wave of anti-austerity mobilizations, there is a consistent geographical logic to all forms of protest. In Space Invaders, Paul Routledge draws upon his extensive experiences over the past thirty years working with various forms of protest in Europe, Asia, and Latin America to provide an account of how a radical geographical imagination can inform our understanding of social processes.   


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Storming Heaven

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The only comprehensive survey of Italian autonomist theory, Storming Heaven explores its origins in the anti-Stalinist left of the 1950s and traces it through its glory days twenty years later. Emphasizing the dynamic nature of class composition and struggle as the distinguishing feature of autonomist thought, Steve Wright documents how class politics developed alongside emerging social movements. A critical and historical exploration of autonomist Marxism in postwar Italy, Storming Heaven moves beyond traditional analytical frameworks and instead assesses the strengths and limitations of the theory and how it foreshadowed many of contemporary European social struggles, such as the refusal of work, self-organization, openness to non-militarized political violence, mass illegality, and the extension of revolutionary agency. This updated edition also offers a substantial new afterword looking at the recent debates around operaismo and autonomia in Italy.     


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Against Colonization and Rural Dispossession

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Against Colonizationand Rural Dispossession argues that many economic initiatives undertaken in the global South in the name of development are actually a form of continued colonization of these regions. Instead of creating stronger economic communities, this development has actually exacerbated poverty and led to the exploitation of labor across the global South.   As the contributors show, this process has been met with varied forms of rural resistance by local movements of displaced farm workers, landless peasants, and indigenous peoples. Combining local case studies with Marxist and anti-colonial analysis, the essays collected here demonstrate the ways in which these local struggles have attempted to resist colonization and dispossession. The result is a vital addition to the fields of critical development studies, political-sociology, agrarian studies, and the anthropology of resistance, particularly in overlooked areas of Asia-Pacific and Africa.  


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Against Colonization and Rural Dispossession

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Against Colonizationand Rural Dispossession argues that many economic initiatives undertaken in the global South in the name of development are actually a form of continued colonization of these regions. Instead of creating stronger economic communities, this development has actually exacerbated poverty and led to the exploitation of labor across the global South.   As the contributors show, this process has been met with varied forms of rural resistance by local movements of displaced farm workers, landless peasants, and indigenous peoples. Combining local case studies with Marxist and anti-colonial analysis, the essays collected here demonstrate the ways in which these local struggles have attempted to resist colonization and dispossession. The result is a vital addition to the fields of critical development studies, political-sociology, agrarian studies, and the anthropology of resistance, particularly in overlooked areas of Asia-Pacific and Africa.  


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Usurping Suicide

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How does an individual act of suicide become politically or socially significant? Does it depend upon the original intent, or does the influence of the act depend upon how it is discussed and shaped in the public imagination afterward? To answer these questions, Usurping Suicide takes a unique look at the political and cultural implications of suicides committed in places where, due to social or economic pressures, suicide has become an issue of significant public interest.   Looking closely at specific acts of suicide that bore wider political resonance, such as Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation during regime change in Tunisia to Dimitris Christoulas’s public shooting at a time of increased governmental austerity in Greece, this book focuses on the reception these acts have produced rather than the individual motivations. Exploring how a singular act can become endowed with collective significance, Usurping Suicide will be of interest to readers concerned with the intersection of public interests and private actions and the power of media in the framing of these events.    


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Usurping Suicide

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How does an individual act of suicide become politically or socially significant? Does it depend upon the original intent, or does the influence of the act depend upon how it is discussed and shaped in the public imagination afterward? To answer these questions, Usurping Suicide takes a unique look at the political and cultural implications of suicides committed in places where, due to social or economic pressures, suicide has become an issue of significant public interest.   Looking closely at specific acts of suicide that bore wider political resonance, such as Mohamed Bouazizi’s self-immolation during regime change in Tunisia to Dimitris Christoulas’s public shooting at a time of increased governmental austerity in Greece, this book focuses on the reception these acts have produced rather than the individual motivations. Exploring how a singular act can become endowed with collective significance, Usurping Suicide will be of interest to readers concerned with the intersection of public interests and private actions and the power of media in the framing of these events.    


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Weird War Two

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

A war as extensive and long-lasting as World War II produces an incalculable number of artifacts. And museums as big and well-stocked as the Imperial War Museums have plenty of the ones you’d expect to find: tanks, jets, helmets, guns, and the like. But there was a whole lot more to the war—and a surprising amount of it is, well, downright weird.​Weird War Two pulls the strangest items from deep within the IWM’s archives to offer a surprising new, wildly entertaining angle on the war. From wacky inventions such as flying jeeps and bat bombs to elusive secret agents, from wholly bizarre propaganda posters to a dummy whose role as a decoy enabled a daring escape, and from inflatable tanks to painted cows—really—Weird War Two reminds us that human ingenuity is boundless, yet at the same time that usually means that truth ends up stranger than fiction.


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What Is Islamophobia?

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As anti-Muslim undercurrents in the United States and other western societies become increasingly entrenched, the phenomenon of Islamophobia—and the need to understand what perpetuates it—has never been greater. Critiquing mainstream, conservative, and notionally left arguments, What Is Islamophobia? offers an original and necessary alternative to the existing literature by analyzing what the editors call the “five pillars of Islamophobia:” the institutions and machinery of the state, the counter-jihad movement, the neoconservative movement, the transnational Zionist movement, and assorted liberal groups, including the pro-war left and the new atheist movement.   Together, the contributors demonstrate that this emergent racism is not simply a product of ideology, but is driven by a combination of social, political, and cultural factors. What Is Islamophobia? concludes with reflections on existing strategies for tackling this growing issue and considers different approaches to countering anti-Muslim prejudice.  


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What Is Anthropology?

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

When it was first published, What Is Anthropology? immediately ignited the discipline, proving how anthropology can be a revolutionary way of thinking about the modern human world. In this fully updated second edition, Thomas Hylland Eriksen brings together examples from current events as well as within anthropological research in order to explain how to see the world from below and from within—emphasizing the importance of adopting an insider's perspective.   The first section of the book presents the history of anthropology, and the second discusses core issues in greater detail, covering economics, morals, human nature, ecology, cultural relativism, and much more. Throughout, he reveals how seemingly enormous cultural differences actually conceal the deep unity of humanity. Perfect not only for students, but also for those who have never encountered anthropology before, What is Anthropology? presents the discipline in an exciting and innovative way.


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World History - A Genealogy

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

World History—A Genealogy charts the history of the discipline through twenty-five in-depth conversations with historians whose work has shaped the field of world history in fundamental ways. These conversations, which took place over a period of twenty years for the world history journal Itinerario, cover these historians’ lives, work, and views of the academy in general and the field of world history in particular. An extensive introduction distills the most important developments in the field from these conversations, and sheds light on what these historians have in common, as well as—perhaps more importantly—what separates them.


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Why Wales Never Was

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Why Wales Never Was combines a devastating analysis of the historical failure of Welsh nationalism with an apocalyptic vision of a non-Welsh future. Simon Brooks mounts a powerful argument that Wales will never be free until modes of thought that have been dominant since the nineteenth century are overturned—and Wales and Welsh politics acknowledge the importance of language and culture rather than simply acquiescing to Britishness.  Deeply rooted in Welsh culture and European in scope, Why Wales Never Was brings together history, philosophy, and politics in a way never before attempted in Wales.


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Welsh Surnames

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This, the first full-scale study of Welsh surnames, is built on research in Welsh, Latin, and English texts, parish registers, local histories, and more. It traces the growth of a Welsh surnaming pattern in Wales and the Border region at the end of the Middle Ages, and it fleshes out that picture through evidence from contemporary sources such as electoral registers, newspapers, and telephone directories. It will be of use to historians, genealogists, geographers, sociologists, and more.


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Whiteout

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

When she was a toddler, Jessica Goodfellow’s twenty-two-year-old uncle, along with six other climbers from the 1967 Wilcox Expedition to Denali, was lost in an unprecedented ten-day storm blasting winds of up to three-hundred miles per hour. Just as North America’s highest peak is so massive that it has its own distinct weather system—changeable and perilous, subject to sudden whiteout conditions—a family whose loved one is irretrievably lost has a grief so blinding and vast that it also creates its own capricious internal weather, one that lasts for generations. Whiteout is Goodfellow’s account of growing up in this unnavigable and often unspoken-of climate of bereavement. Although her poems begin with a missing body, they are not an elegy. Instead, Goodfellow struggles with the absence of cultural ritual for the uncontainable loss of a beloved one whose body is never recovered and whose final story is unknowable. There is no solace here, no possible reconciliation. Instead, Whiteout is a defiant gaze into a storm that engulfs both the wildness of Alaska and of familial mourning.


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Werner Graeff

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Painter, graphic artist, typographer, photographer, and sculptor, Werner Graeff (1901–78) was a key figure in the Bauhaus and the Constructivism movements. Alongside reproductions of his major works, including pictograms, multiples, drawings, and other graphic works, this book presents the story of Graeff’s life—including, for the first time, the moving autobiography he wrote at the urging of his friend Mies van der Rohe, The Obstacle Race of the Twentieth Century. Through an analysis of Graeff’s work with the Bauhaus and the De Stijl group of Dutch artists, as well as the Ring Neue Werbegestalter founded by Kurt Schwitters, we see his prominent place in the vibrant life and culture of the German art world of the period.  


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Walruses and the Walrus Hunt in West and Northwest Greenland

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This volume presents the results of a survey of Greenland subsistence hunters, who hunt and catch walruses in West and Northwest Greenland, where the animals are still a part of the traditional subsistence hunting culture. However, the Greenland walrus hunting grounds have experienced marked environmental changes due to climate change, and quotas were introduced for the catch across all of Greenland in 2006. These interviews explore how such changes have affected the local communities. The main text summarizes the broad findings while more details are provided in the individual hunter statements in four appendices.


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War in the Blood

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

First published in 1998, Chris Beyrer’s ground-breaking work War in the Blood provides a vivid and eye-opening account of the HIV epidemic in Southeast Asia, drawing on the author’s extensive experience working and travelling throughout the region. Since its original publication, significant gains have been made in HIV prevention, but the region continues to face profound challenges in both the treatment and containment of the disease.   The new edition looks beyond Southeast Asia to compare the region’s experience of HIV with that of Russia, North Africa, and elsewhere, and broadens the analysis to include migration and the experiences of the trans community. The author is one of the leading experts on HIV prevention, with extensive experience both across Southeast Asia and around the world. Drawing on Beyer’s own experiences working to promote HIV prevention in Burma, the book provides a powerful look at the human impact of the virus, while charting significant recent developments and the challenges ahead.  


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War in the Blood

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

First published in 1998, Chris Beyrer’s ground-breaking work War in the Blood provides a vivid and eye-opening account of the HIV epidemic in Southeast Asia, drawing on the author’s extensive experience working and travelling throughout the region. Since its original publication, significant gains have been made in HIV prevention, but the region continues to face profound challenges in both the treatment and containment of the disease.   The new edition looks beyond Southeast Asia to compare the region’s experience of HIV with that of Russia, North Africa, and elsewhere, and broadens the analysis to include migration and the experiences of the trans community. The author is one of the leading experts on HIV prevention, with extensive experience both across Southeast Asia and around the world. Drawing on Beyer’s own experiences working to promote HIV prevention in Burma, the book provides a powerful look at the human impact of the virus, while charting significant recent developments and the challenges ahead.  


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Roland Fischer

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Few current political issues are as powerful or as emotionally charged as the question of refugees and their rights and status. That issue, and the varied ways that people and politicians have responded to it, inspired artist Roland Fischer, after working on his previous publications Façades and Tel Aviv, to create a collective portrait of refugees that simultaneously shows the massive scale of the issue and turns the abstract concept of “refugee” into images of actual people whose faces, and need, cannot be so easily ignored. The more than one thousand separate photographs of individual refugees that make up Fischer’s work are a stark reminder that each refugee is an individual, with a life, a story, and hopes and fears for the future. The publication reproduces the complete oversized art works, as well as a selection of the individual portraits. No one who confronts this artwork will be able to hear media reports on refugees in the same way ever again. This is a highly topical piece of contemporary art on an exciting topic of sociopolitical debate.  


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Riddle

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

First published in 1903, The Riddle of the Sands, by Erskine Childers, is one of the earliest examples of a spy novel in English, and it has been extremely influential on the genre since. It is also one of the best-known tales of yacht fighting. This unusual combination has always intrigued Maldwin Drummond, who explores in The Riddle the book’s two main themes: the life of the Victorian small boat sailor and the politics of defense prior to World War I.   In this book, Drummond includes details of Childers's own sailing experiences and offers a detailed account of the reception of the book in official circles at the time. Drummond does her own detective work to highlight Childers’s urgent message that Germany was preparing to invade England and that the British were not aware of any such plan. This new edition of the definitive study of the writing of The Riddle of the Sands is updated here with beautiful illustrations by Martin Mackrill.    


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Rubbish Theory

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How do objects that are worth little to nothing become valuable? Who is behind the creation of value, and which types of people find value and comfort in transient, durable, and rubbish objects?   When his highly influential Rubbish Theory, first published in 1979, Michael Thompson launched the discipline of waste studies. It remains the most comprehensive analysis on the culture of waste to date. Thompson argues that there are two mutually exclusive cultural categories that are socially imposed on the world of objects: a transient category and a durable category. However, he identifies a region of flexibility, wherein a transient object that declines in value and life span can linger in a valueless and timeless limbo of rubbish, until it is discovered by a creative individual and transferred into something deemed durable. He links stability and change on one hand, with materiality on the other, providing a rich analysis of social and cultural dynamics. His instrumental theory of rubbish draws on case studies and anthropological fieldwork to highlight the ever-changing subtleties of object value and our complex relationship to waste.   Bringing Rubbish Theory back into print, this updated edition includes a new introduction, preface, foreword, and afterword, thoroughly exploring how Thompson’s key theories have affected our world in the four decades since it was first published and placing it in a contemporary context that shines light on the continued relevance of the book today.   


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Restless Figure

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

At the end of the nineteenth century, Czech figural sculpture achieved an artistic quality comparable to that of contemporary artworks produced in the main artistic centers of Europe, including the sculptures of Auguste Rodin, Constantin Meunier, and Antoine Bourdelle. But while their counterparts across Europe achieved lasting international renown, Czech sculptors remain relatively unknown. Published to accompany an exhibition at the Prague City Gallery, The Restless Figure shapes a new understanding of these artists’ stories. Tracing the development and significance of Czech sculpture through period texts and images that illustrate the intellectual milieu of the times, the book shows that while Czech artists were directly influenced by the Prague exhibitions of world-famous sculptors, it was their own work that drove the development of Prague’s dynamic art. In particular, sculptor Josef Václav Myslbek—together with younger artists like František Bílek, Stanislav Sucharda, and others—helped to fashion the public space of a modernizing Prague thorough commissions. Featuring many photographs from the sculptors’ estates that offer a unique view of individual works through the eyes of their creators, this book opens a beautiful window onto the history of both a city and an art form.


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From Cork to Calcutta

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Imelda Connor is a classic Irish lass—a fiery, red-headed beauty, quick to anger, and fiercely protective of her younger siblings. Growing up on a small farm in the rolling hills of County Cork, she thinks she has her life completely mapped out. Here in Ireland she will live an enchanted life with the perfect Irish husband, devoting herself to her family and to her livestock. But Imelda soon finds that life doesn’t always go according to plan. Everything is turned upside-down when Imelda moves to England and happens to meet a dashing, rakish Bengali man named Shu Bose. Shu, whose knowledge of Ireland stops at James Joyce and W.B. Yeats, is captivated by Imelda’s natural beauty and vivacious charm, and the two quickly embark on a whirlwind romance. At the tender age of eighteen, in the spring of 1932, Imelda boards a ship bound for Calcutta—and a very different life to the one she had always imagined.From Cork to Calcutta by Milty Bose transports readers back to pre-Independence India, to London between the wars, and to the genteel life of bhadralok Bengali high society. It’s the intimate and true story of Bose’s parents and their unconventional love-story that crosses class, nationality, and cultural boundaries.


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Mushrooms

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Mushrooms hold a peculiar place in our culture: we love them and despise them, fear them and misunderstand them. They can be downright delicious or deadly poisonous, cute as buttons or utterly grotesque. These strange organisms hold great symbolism in our myths and legends. In this book, Nicholas P. Money tells the utterly fascinating story of mushrooms and the ways we have interacted with these fungi throughout history. Whether they have populated the landscapes of fairytales, lent splendid umami to our dishes, or steered us into deep hallucinations, mushrooms have affected humanity from the earliest beginnings of our species.             As Money explains, mushrooms are not self-contained organisms like animals and plants. Rather, they are the fruiting bodies of large—sometimes extremely large—colonies of mycelial threads that spread underground and permeate rotting vegetation. Because these colonies decompose organic matter, they are of extraordinary ecological value and have a huge effect on the health of the environment. From sustaining plant growth and spinning the carbon cycle to causing hay fever and affecting the weather, mushrooms affect just about everything we do. Money tells the stories of the eccentric pioneers of mycology, delights in culinary powerhouses like porcini and morels, and considers the value of medicinal mushrooms. This book takes us on a tour of the cultural and scientific impor[...]


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Magnús Eiríksson

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book is the first anthology of writings to be devoted to Icelandic theologian and religious writer Magnús Eiríksson (1806–81). A contemporary of Kierkegaard, Eiríksson made a name (and enemies) for himself by being an outspoken advocate of tolerance and freedom of thought and conscience in matters of religion.     This book aims to resurrect Eiríksson’s thought for a new era, with contributions covering the key topics of his writings and offering insight into his historical and cultural background. By explaining Eiríksson’s frequent disagreements with his contemporaries—including Kierkegaard—the contributors shed light on the period as a whole and offer a new perspective on religious thought in the Danish Golden Age.  


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Myanmar's Enemy Within

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For decades Myanmar has been portrayed as a case of good citizen versus bad regime – men in jackboots maintaining a suffocating rule over a majority Buddhist population beholden to the ideals of non-violence and tolerance. But in recent years this narrative has been upended.In June 2012, violence between Buddhists and Muslims erupted in western Myanmar, pointing to a growing divide between religious communities that before had received little attention from the outside world. Attacks on Muslims soon spread across the country, leaving hundreds dead, entire neighbourhoods turned to rubble, and tens of thousands of Muslims confined to internment camps. This violence, breaking out amid the passage to democracy, was spurred on by monks, pro-democracy activists, and even politicians.In this gripping and deeply reported account, Francis Wade explores how the manipulation of identities by an anxious ruling elite has laid the foundations for mass violence, and how, in Myanmar’s case, some of the most respected and articulate voices for democracy have turned on the Muslim population at a time when the majority of citizens are beginning to experience freedoms unseen for half a century.


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Myanmar's Enemy Within

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For decades Myanmar has been portrayed as a case of good citizen versus bad regime – men in jackboots maintaining a suffocating rule over a majority Buddhist population beholden to the ideals of non-violence and tolerance. But in recent years this narrative has been upended.In June 2012, violence between Buddhists and Muslims erupted in western Myanmar, pointing to a growing divide between religious communities that before had received little attention from the outside world. Attacks on Muslims soon spread across the country, leaving hundreds dead, entire neighbourhoods turned to rubble, and tens of thousands of Muslims confined to internment camps. This violence, breaking out amid the passage to democracy, was spurred on by monks, pro-democracy activists, and even politicians.In this gripping and deeply reported account, Francis Wade explores how the manipulation of identities by an anxious ruling elite has laid the foundations for mass violence, and how, in Myanmar’s case, some of the most respected and articulate voices for democracy have turned on the Muslim population at a time when the majority of citizens are beginning to experience freedoms unseen for half a century.


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Mobility between Africa, Asia and Latin America

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Trade and cultural exchange between Africa and the rest of the global South have existed for centuries, but after the end of the Cold War, these connections have expanded and diversified dramatically, with emerging economies such as China, India, and Brazil becoming increasingly important both as sources of trade and as a destination for African migrants. Though these trends have attracted growing scholarly attention, there has not been a close look at the breadth and variety of this exchange, or of its deeper social impact--until now.   This collection brings together a wide array of scholarly perspectives to explore the movement of people, commodities, and ideas between Africa and the wider global South. The contributors argue that this exchange represents a form of globalization from below, defying many prevailing Western assumptions about migration and development. Multidisciplinary in scope, Mobility between Africa, Asia and Latin America is essential reading for students and scholars across the social sciences interested in the interconnected economic and social make-up of the global South.    


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