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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

 



We Were a Handful

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

A favorite work of Czech humor, We Were a Handful depicts the adventures of five boys from a small Czech town through the diary of Petr Bajza, the grocer’s son. Written by Karel Poláček at the height of World War II before his deportation to Auschwitz in 1944, this book draws on the happier years of Poláček’s own childhood as inspiration. As we look upon the world through Petr’s eyes, we, too, marvel at the incomprehensible world of grownups; join in fights between gangs of neighborhood kids; and laugh at the charming language of boys, a major source of the book’s humor. This translation at last offers English-language readers the opportunity to share in Petr’s (and Poláček’s) childhood and reminds us that joy and laughter are possible even in the darkest times.


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Inferences with Ignorance

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Inferences with Ignorance focuses on two formal logic systems that employ the type of inferences in which questions are used in addition to statements. Not merely capturing questions as part of a logical apparatus, Michal Peliš also emphasizes the role of question-asking in communication. The book presents options for formalizing questions using sets of “direct answers,” demonstrates where questions are used in inferences, and explores asking questions and seeking answers as important components of everyday communication, proposing ways of using questions within a formal system that can capture a change in knowledge during this simple communication.


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Mogadishu: Lost Moderns

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The true story of a city is often best told through its architecture. The story of Mogadishu—frequently reduced to one of conflict and destruction—is beautifully revealed in Mogadishu: Lost Moderns. In this book, Somali-British architect Rashid Ali and British photographer Andrew Cross present a fresh and uncommon portrait of the Somalian city, revealing how its architecture has reshaped and defined it—from colonization to independence and from antiquity to modernism—as one of the most important cities in the Horn of Africa. Richly illustrated with both archival and specially commissioned photos of the city, this book highlights a Mogadishu never before seen—at least not quite like this.  


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Drawing in the Design Process

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In the early days of the digital revolution in graphic design, many designers and teachers of design were convinced that the era of drawing on paper was over—that there would soon no longer be a place for craft-based drawing at any stage of the design process.             It soon became apparent, however, that technological progress had not obviated the inherent value of drawing, and that, in fact, it opened up new avenues for convergent and hybrid drawing practices. This book traces the evolution of design-based drawing through analysis of a series of research projects from the 1980s to recent years that have sought to characterize the changing practices of design within various industries. Built on more than three hundred  interviews with designers, academics, and design students, and an exhaustive analysis of thousands of drawings, it aims to generate discussion around historical and contemporary models of the design process.  


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Wherever You Find People

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Wherever There Is People tells the unusual story of the Integrated Centres of Public Education (CIEP), a radical but relatively unstudied public architecture initiative in Rio de Janeiro in 1982. Conceived by the world-renowned architect Oscar Niemeyer, the intellectual and politican Darcy Ribeiro, and state governor Leonel Brizola, the program addressed the massive urban migration that Rio de Janeiro was experiencing at that time, which spurred demand for new schools. As a result of the experimental program, over five hundred CIEP schools were built using a standardized system of simple concrete parts. Based upon extensive interviews with key people associated with the project past and present, including Architect Jair Valera, Niemeyer’s primary collaborator, and Claudia Costin, the Rio city secretary of education, Wherever There Is People tells the story of this unprecedented project. Alongside candid conversations, the book features never-before-seen photography and drawings, as well as essays that examine the CIEP’s story as a guide to how architecture can embrace the constraints and conditions of the modern world. The result is a vivid documentary of a unique but relatively unknown piece of socially driven public architecture, with valuable lessons for the future.  


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Islamophobia

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Muslims living in Western nations are increasingly facing overt hostility and even hate crimes, both in everyday life and in online interactions. This book examines the experience and effects of those hate crimes on the victims, their families, and their communities. Built on the first national study in the United Kingdom to examine the nature, extent, and determinants of hate crime against Muslims in the physical and virtual worlds, it highlights the relationship between online and offline attacks, especially in the globalized world. It prominently features the voices of victims themselves, which lend nuance to the accounts and make the reality of these attacks and their consequences palpable.


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Working from Life

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

A self-taught Moroccan artist inspired by the natural world, Abderrahim Yamou creates paintings that offer an original interpretation of the use of organic forms traditionally found in Islamic art and design. Yamou’s work explores organic processes, continuity and change, the tensions and instabilities of boundaries and the spaces in between. Beneath the surface of these beautiful paintings, both large and small scale, there is an underlying sense of disquiet. Stunningly illustrated with Yamou’s elegant, abstract, and stylised paintings, Working from Life will bring this unusual artist’s works to a larger audience.  



Digital Sociologies

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This handbook offers a much-needed overview of the rapidly growing field of digital sociology. Rooted in a critical understanding of inequality as foundational to digital sociology, it connects digital media technologies to traditional areas of study in sociology, such as labor, culture, education, race, class, and gender. It covers a wide variety of topics, including web analytics, wearable technologies, social media analysis, and digital labor. The result is a benchmark volume that places the digital squarely at the forefront of contemporary investigations of the social.


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David Birkin: Mouths at the Invisible Event

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Mouths at the Invisible Event celebrates an exhibition of the same name by British artist David Birkin. Birkin’s multimedia work centers around censorship, spectatorship, and the legal and linguistic frameworks underpinning war. He reflects on not only the failure of images, but also the failure of truth and the manipulation of legislative language for political means. Uniquely designed to emulate the appearance of a classified document, the book is richly illustrated with full-color images of Birkin’s work. In addition, it features essays by cultural critic Emily Apter and the artist that examine the contrived ambiguity of political and military rhetoric, providing a contemporary commentary on language, aesthetics, and the ethos of modern warfare.  


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First Prince of Wales?

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Bleddyn ap Cynfyn was a Welsh king who ruled over Gwynedd and Powys in the eleventh century. He was at the heart of the events that forged Britain before, during, and after the Norman Conquest of 1066, one of its most significant historical periods. The First Prince of Wales? offers important new context for those events through which Bleddyn strove to recreate the kingdom of Wales—though outside pressures and internal intrigues meant his successors would compete, ultimately, to rule only a principality. By exploring Bleddyn’s ambitions, Sean Davies gives a new, wider perspective on one of the most tumultuous and formative periods in English history.  


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Future Rewound and the Cabinet of Souls

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Now a gallery space and bookshop, the Mosaic Rooms in London resides in a building which, more than a century ago, served as a home to Imre Kiralfy, a Hugarian well-known for staging large, theatrical spectacles for such celebrations as the World’s Columbian Exhibition in Chicago. In his later life, Kiralfy brought curiosities from all parts of the British Empire to London, where the Victorian public was eager to view them. The Future Rewound and the Cabinet of Souls records an exhibition of the same name by artist Nadia Kaabi-Linke held at the Mosaic rooms. The art in the exhibition was inspired by Kiralfy, and it reflects on the structures of power that thread colonialism and capitalism and the observed and observer. In addition to documenting Kaabi-Linke’s site-specific works, the book features a dialogue between Kaabi-Linke, curator and art critic Timo Kaabi-Linke, and cultural scientist Falko Schmieder, which puts the work in context and offers fascinating insight into research-based artistic practices.  


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Intervening Space

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Intervening Space is a companion publication for an exhibition of six contemporary Algerian artists, held at the Mosaic Rooms. The exhibition, curated by Ali MacGilp and Yasmina Reggad featured newly commissioned and reimagined works from Fayçal Baghriche, Amina Menia, Atef Berredjem, Hanan Benammar, Massinissa Selmani, and Sadek Rahim.  Though the six artists represent a wide-range of media, their work is united by its exploration of time and space. In addition to reproducing the art from the exhibition, the book features an engaging dialogue between the curators, which explores Algeria’s relationship to contemporary art practices and the role of the curator in working with artists to develop new works. The catalog also includes biographies of the artists and access to a special soundtrack by Zineb Sedira via a QR code.  


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Iraq

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Half a decade after Barack Obama withdrew ground troops from Iraq, the world is still picking up the pieces. Iraqi artist Hanaa Malallah and London artist duo kennardphillipps have been working with these very literal pieces since the United States invasion and occupation of the country began. In their  exhibition Iraq: How, Where, for Whom?, the artists use and modify found objects, archival press images, and digital print technology to grapple with the difficult questions of Iraqi freedom, democracy, and the role of mass media in global perceptions of the conflict.  Featuring an essay on art and the Iraq war by Alan Ingram, this catalog continues the conversation started by Malallah and kennardphillips about how we perceive and engage with the aftermath of devastation.  



My Sister Who Travels

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

My Sister Who Travels commemorates an exhibition curated by Martina Caruso, a group show that featured the work of six internationally acclaimed contemporary women artists: Noor Abed, Jananne Al-Ani, Halida Boughriet, Ursula Schulz-Dornburg, Corinne Silva, Esther Boise Van Deman, and Paola Yacoub. In her own way, each artist offers a challenge to the canonical representa­tions of landscape photography. Often straying from conventional tropes, the landscapes presented in this lush catalog articulate places of memory, conflict, colonisation, migration, emptiness, and expanse. The book, beautifully designed to look like a travel journal, also features biographies of the artists and an essay by the curator exploring the role of women in lens-based depictions of landscape.  


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40 Days

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In Israel, Palestinian-Christian burial sites are often found vandalized and desecrated by members of other religious groups. Artist Dor Guez, founder of the Christian Palestinian Archive, has used his work to tell the stories of this minority group, their religious practices, and the discrimination waged against them for their heritage and beliefs. Hisexhibition 40 Days featured photographs from the Archive as well as video installations to narrate the losses of the Christian-minority families affected by this violence. Featuring a conversation between Guez and Mitra Abbaspour, associate curator in the Department of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, 40 Days illuminates the pain and endurance of Palestinian Christians living in a hostile land.  



Gathering the Ashes

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Most discussions of India’s First War of Independence from British colonial rule in 1857 have centered on the role played by the Mughal emperor, the nawab of Awadh, and other sundry members of mostly urban nobility. What has remained missing from this coverage is how ordinary people across the countryside experienced the rebellion and how they passed their stories down to the following generations. In 1957, eminent Hindi writer Amritlal Nagar set out to correct this, travelling through villages and towns scattered across India’s heartland and painstakingly gathering reminiscences and popular ballads about the revolt—its celebrated and unsung heroes, its survivors and martyrs, and where and how various battles were fought. Aging courtesans, bedridden octogenarians, and nameless singers poured their hearts out to Nagar, and the substantial volume he put together made it clear, even to the lay reader, that nothing can stop the spread of a revolution whose time has come. Translated from Hindi for the first time by Mrinal Pande, Gathering the Ashes is a poignant look into history, enriched by Pande’s useful afterword and a reminiscence by Nagar’s son.


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God's Rainbow

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This is a book about collective guilt, individual fate, and repentance, a tale that explores how we can come to be responsible for crimes we neither directly commit nor have the power to prevent. Set in the Czechoslovakian borderland shortly after WWII amid the sometimes violent expulsion of the region’s German population, Jaroslav Durych’s poetic, deeply symbolic novel is a literary touchstone for coming to terms with the Czech Republic’s difficult and taboo past of state-sanctioned violence. A leading Catholic intellectual of the early twentieth century, Durych became a literary and political throwback to the prewar Czechoslovak Republic and faced censorship under the Stalinist regime of the 1950s. As such, he was a man not unfamiliar with the ramifications of a changing society in which the minority becomes the rule-making political authority, only to end up condemned as criminals. Though Durych finished writing God’s Rainbow in 1955, he could not have hoped to see it published in his lifetime. Released in a still-censored form in 1969, God’s Rainbow is available here in full for the first time in English.


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Sea King

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Sabine Moritz, famed German artist and wife of Gerhard Richter, has studied military aircraft with fascination for years, brilliantly translating her observations through her artistic perspective. Moritz’s enthrallment with the subject arose from an awareness of a distinct shift in the symbolic meaning of air travel since the events of 9/11. Highly evocative and originally derived from one simple black and white sketch, reproduced and painted over, this book comprises forty-one individual works focusing on the global presence of the Sea King, the anti-submarine warfare helicopter, which gives the series its name.  Sea King is a companion to an exhibition of the series to be shown at the Serpentine Galleries in London. Featuring a foreword by Joe Hage, this catalog also offers a further exploration of the themes of memory, collective history, and time that are present in all of Moritz’s intriguing works. 


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Saturnin

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

On its initial publication in Czech in 1942, Saturnin was a best seller, its gentle satire offering an unexpected—if temporary—reprieve from the grim reality of the German occupation. In the years since, the novel has been hailed as a classic of Czech literature, and this translation makes it available to English-language readers for the first time—which is entirely appropriate, for author Zdeněk Jirotka clearly modeled his light comedy on the English masters Jerome K. Jerome and P. G. Wodehouse. The novel’s main character, Saturnin, a “gentleman’s gentleman” who obviously owes a debt to Wodehouse’s beloved Jeeves, wages a constant battle to protect his master from romantic disaster and intrusive relatives, such as Aunt Catherine, the “Prancing Dictionary of Slavic Proverbs.” Saturnin will warm the heart of any fan of literary comedy.


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Swedish Porn Scene

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This book presents a close look at the golden age of Swedish pornography in the 1970s, with a specific focus on pornographic films screened in Malmö between 1971 and 1976. How, Mariah Larsson asks, was that one small city’s embrace of the era’s sexual liberation both representative and unique in relation to the rest of Sweden?             Combining contemporary case studies with comprehensive analyses of advertisements, critical responses, and censorship records, Larsson deconstructs the complexities and paradoxes of the Swedish porn scene. Looking as closely at the exhibition spaces where porn was seen as at the productions themselves and their audiences, Larsson reveals the conditions and social changes that allowed pornography in Sweden to flourish in the period.  


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Sick Man of Europe: The Painter

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Sick Man of Europe by artist Dor Guez presents his ambitious and moving work “The Painter,” which is part of an ongoing project telling the story of a painter-turned-soldier, a Jewish Tunisian who immigrated to Israel. Conscripted into the Yom Kippur War as a reservist soldier in 1973, in recent years, the subject of Guez’s art has also undergone psychiatric treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder, part of which manifests as him repeatedly recording his memories of the war. These recordings are central to Guez’s work. The Sick Man of Europe includes selections from the films, photographs, original source materials, texts, and scanograms that make up the overall project, alongside an interview between the artist and “the painter” himself in addition to an essay by Achim Borchardt-Hume, head of exhibitions at Tate Modern.  



Summer of Caprice

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Summer of Caprice, a captivating comic novel first published in 1926, is a classic of Czech literature, yet it is little known elsewhere. Commonly considered untranslatable due to the complexities of the text, which is characterized by a playful narrative and an exceptional mastery of language, and its profound cultural context, it is rendered here in English that beautifully captures Vladislav Vančura’s experimental style—or, as the author himself called it, his “poetism in prose.” Mixing the archaic with the innovative, raw colloquialisms with biblical quotations, Summer of Caprice opens an uproarious window onto the Czech spirit, humor, and way of life.


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International Horror Film Directors

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Horror films have for decades commanded major global audiences, tapping into deep-rooted fears that cross national and cultural boundaries in their ability to spark terror. This book brings together a group of scholars to explore the ways that this fear is utilized and played upon by a wide range of filmmakers. Contributors take up such major figures as Guillermo del Toro, Lars Von Trier, and David Cronenberg, and they also offer introductions to lesser-known talents such as Richard Franklin, Kiyoshi Kurosawa, Juan López Moctezuma, and Alexandre Aja. Scholars and fans alike dipping into this collection will discover plenty of insight into what chills us.  


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Italomodern 2

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

 Vienna-based architect Martin Feiersinger and his brother, artist and photographer Werner Feiersinger have extensively travelled across Northern Italy in order to document the region’s modern architecture after World War II. Italomodern 1 and 2 is the result of their travels, the most authoritative survey of Northern Italy’s architecture between 1946 and 1976.  In their study, they have focused exclusively on distinctive buildings rather than entire urban structures, and they have selected the projects included as exemplary representations of neorealism, rationalism, brutalism, and organic.Italomodern 1 features 84 buildings and Italomodern 2 contains an additional 132 buildings. All of the buildings are represented with photographs, a concise text, the exact address, as well as with selected floor plans, sections, or elevations. The images present a subjective point of view, showing each building in its present state. An appendix provides rich information on the architects and selected other buildings and further reading for each firm. The book offers a glimpse into an era when society’s aspirations found expression in the built environment. Each volume is self-contained and also makes an insightful and useful guide for architecture lovers and travelers.  


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Masterpieces

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Kunstmuseum Bern is home to one of the most important art collections in Switzerland, with more than three thousand paintings and sculptures and some forty-eight thousand additional works on paper. Since the founding of the State Museum more than two hundred years ago, the Kunstmuseum Bern’s collection has continuously grown, as has its world renown. For Masterpieces: Kunstmuseum Bern, Matthias Frehner and Valentina Locatelli have assembled two hundred extraordinary examples from among the museum’s vast collection. The works in this book range from the late-thirteenth century to the present day. Among them are masterpieces by Duccio di Buoninsegna, Paul Cézanne, Salvador Dalí, Ferdinand Hodler, Ludwig Kirchner, Paul Klee, Franz Marc, Henri Matisse, Méret Oppenheim, Pablo Picasso, and Félix Valloton, and many others. For each work, the book includes a full-page illustration and a reexamination of the work by one of seventy international experts. An essay describing the development of the museum and its collection introduces the book.


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Night Orchids

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

For nearly three years, Brian Clarke has drawn and painted one thing—night orchids. Most nights between seven pm and midnight, Clarke can be found in his West London home, endlessly working on portrayals of this evocative flower, a uniquely nocturnal species discovered in 2011. Beginning on a visit to Thailand in 2013 and continuing in France, these works—generally all the same size and proportion—vary wildly in their medium. From white line drawings on black card to intricate stained glass, these depictions display the full, impressive beauty of one of the world’s most exquisite creations. This luxurious and elegantly bound edition showcases over two hundred gorgeous color images, making it a fascinating, intimate study, perfect for art lovers and horticulturists alike. 


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National Identity Politics and Postcolonial Sovereignty Games

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Though it’s many miles away from tiny Denmark, Greenland is administered as an autonomous country within the Danish Realm. It’s a relationship that at first glance appears unusual, and, as Ulrik Pram Gad shows, that relationship is quietly predicated on a general assumption that Greenland is on a path toward eventual independence. In both nations, he shows, discussion of Greenland invokes the idea of the “community of the realm” while recognizing Greenland’s continuing reliance on aid as it moves toward independence. As climate change is beginning to open up new areas of Greenland to potentially profitable resource extraction, Greenland is increasingly imagining that sources other than Denmark can provide the assistance needed. Throw in the EU, which facilitates “sovereignty games” played to allow Greenland a surprising measure of independent agency, and the complexity of the overall situation becomes quite clear. Gad explores the issue through four lenses: discourse analysis to determine the core concepts of Danish and Greenlandic identity; a reading of political debates as identity politics; interviews with key actors; and analysis of legal texts as a frozen outcome of various sovereignty games. The book concludes with a series of scenarios for the slow motion decolonization of Greenland.  


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Paulo Providência-Architectonica Percepta

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Paulo Providência is an architect who occupies a special place in contemporary Portuguese architecture, and he is recognized by many as one of the leaders of the generation following Eduardo Souto de Moura. His built work—the majority of which is located in Portugal—is based on his sound theoretical background and rooted in philosophical and anthropological research.Paulo Providência—Architectonica Percepta celebrates Providência’s influence on contemporary Portuguese architecture by looking closely at seven of his key buildings. The buildings are presented in striking duotone photographs taken by Alberto Plácido, and each building in the book is documented with selected plans and details about its design and construction. Rounding out the book are five essays by Providência, reflecting on his work and his influences, such as Peter Zumthor.  


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Plural Policing

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The police increasingly need to work with other government agencies, the third sector, community organizations, and the private sector—an approach known as plural policing. This book critically analyzes the rise of this approach in England and Wales over the past decade, drawing on examples of national and international practice. Written by an author with extensive experience in both academia and police practice, Plural Policing both discusses the consequences of this approach for the historical model of policing provision and challenges views on how policing should be delivered in the future. Filling a growing need for research incorporating evidence-based policing, this book will dovetail with a variety of important issues covered in all policing courses.


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Plural Policing

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The police increasingly need to work with other government agencies, the third sector, community organizations, and the private sector—an approach known as plural policing. This book critically analyzes the rise of this approach in England and Wales over the past decade, drawing on examples of national and international practice. Written by an author with extensive experience in both academia and police practice, Plural Policing both discusses the consequences of this approach for the historical model of policing provision and challenges views on how policing should be delivered in the future. Filling a growing need for research incorporating evidence-based policing, this book will dovetail with a variety of important issues covered in all policing courses.


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Push Back

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

After decades of conflict, the Sri Lankan government in 2009 proclaimed the decisive defeat of the Liberation Tamil Tigers of Elam. Since then, the state has proved resistant to attempts by the UN and other international bodies to promote postwar reconciliation. In this incisive new work, Judith Large investigates the ways in which the Sri Lankan government has been able to subvert international diplomatic efforts, and she explores the wider context of rising Sinhalese nationalism, the attendant growth of discrimination against Tamils, and efforts by both the Tamil diaspora and groups within Sri Lanka to lobby the international community. The implications of Large’s work also extend far beyond Sri Lanka to the larger conversation about the integral role the international community plays in negotiating an end to conflicts and supervising the rebuilding of post-conflict societies. Push Back will be vital reading not only for those interested in Sri Lanka, but for those interested in the wider implications of the conflict for human rights, peacemaking, and geopolitics.  


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Push Back

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

After decades of conflict, the Sri Lankan government in 2009 proclaimed the decisive defeat of the Liberation Tamil Tigers of Elam. Since then, the state has proved resistant to attempts by the UN and other international bodies to promote postwar reconciliation. In this incisive new work, Judith Large investigates the ways in which the Sri Lankan government has been able to subvert international diplomatic efforts, and she explores the wider context of rising Sinhalese nationalism, the attendant growth of discrimination against Tamils, and efforts by both the Tamil diaspora and groups within Sri Lanka to lobby the international community. The implications of Large’s work also extend far beyond Sri Lanka to the larger conversation about the integral role the international community plays in negotiating an end to conflicts and supervising the rebuilding of post-conflict societies. Push Back will be vital reading not only for those interested in Sri Lanka, but for those interested in the wider implications of the conflict for human rights, peacemaking, and geopolitics.  


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Pathways that Changed Myanmar

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In the midst of the political upheavals that engulfed Myanmar from 2010 to 2011, international attention was fixed upon the military regime and its dissident opponents. But away from the cameras, a very different set of struggles unfolded across the country, struggles that quietly but effectively transformed the status quo. Taxi drivers transported black market goods so that people could avoid buying from the state. Community organizers started schools. Farmers hid crop surpluses and business owners hid their profits. People brokered and paid bribes to gain favors from local officials. Pathways that Changed Myanmar gives voice to the stories of the ordinary Burmese citizens whose efforts were pivotal to shaping life on the margins of society.   Drawing on extensive fieldwork and hundreds of interviews with citizens across Myanmar, Matthew Mullen challenges the popular caricature of Myanmar as a society governed by fear and silence, and shows how people have been able to endure and effect meaningful change through subtle, everyday acts of resistance.  


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Pathways that Changed Myanmar

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In the midst of the political upheavals that engulfed Myanmar from 2010 to 2011, international attention was fixed upon the military regime and its dissident opponents. But away from the cameras, a very different set of struggles unfolded across the country, struggles that quietly but effectively transformed the status quo. Taxi drivers transported black market goods so that people could avoid buying from the state. Community organizers started schools. Farmers hid crop surpluses and business owners hid their profits. People brokered and paid bribes to gain favors from local officials. Pathways that Changed Myanmar gives voice to the stories of the ordinary Burmese citizens whose efforts were pivotal to shaping life on the margins of society.   Drawing on extensive fieldwork and hundreds of interviews with citizens across Myanmar, Matthew Mullen challenges the popular caricature of Myanmar as a society governed by fear and silence, and shows how people have been able to endure and effect meaningful change through subtle, everyday acts of resistance.  


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Using Gramsci

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The notebooks kept by Antonio Gramsci while he was in prison in fascist Italy in the 1920s have been an inspiration to Marxist political thinkers and activists around the world for decades. With Using Gramsci, Michele Filippini teases out a number of previously ignored aspects of Gramsci’s works to create a book that stands apart from previous analyses. While Filippini does examine the aspects of Gramsci’s thought that have long attracted scholars—including his thinking on hegemony, organic intellectuals, and civil society—she foregrounds new concepts, including the individual, crisis, and space and time. The result is a rethinking of Gramsci for our era  that offers a number of promising new ways forward.  


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Rust Red

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

A former coal and steel production plant in Duisburg, Germany, the Meiderich Ironworks left the area around it significantly polluted when it was abandoned in 1985. In 1991, Peter Latz’s firm was commissioned to design a public park on the site, but rather than turning the area into a classical garden with beautifying agricultural and forest patterns, Latz embraced the site’s industrial past, retaining many of its structures. Today the Landscape Park Duisburg Nord is one of the world’s most remarkable examples of dealing with the complex legacy of industry.             In Rust Red, Latz uses his firsthand knowledge of the project to present an in-depth account of the park’s development. Recounting twelve years of planning and realization, Latz describes how he focused on the multifaceted information system of urban infrastructure and industry to create the park. Essays by renowned collaborators complement his narrative, while three hundred color photographs, sketches, and plans provide additional insight. Revealing the intriguing world that follows industry, Rust Red tells the fascinating story of the park’s transformation on the occasion of its twenty-fifth anniversary.


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Rodolphe Brèsdin

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Rodolphe Brèsdin (1822-85) was a French draughtsman and engraver, whose fantastical works appealed to writers in the Paris bohemia circle, such as Théodore de Banville, Victor Hugo, and Charles Baudelaire. He was the mentor of Odilon Redon, who signed his work, “pupil of Brèsdin,” and he remained a lifelong advocate of the imaginative genius of his teacher. As Trevor Dance reveals in this book, the first English-language treatment of Brèsdin’s life and work, Brèsdin’s story is stranger and even more compelling than those of Gauguin and van Gogh. Penniless throughout his life, he was a country boy uneasy in Paris. And after an epic journey to southern France, he later embarked with his wife and six children on a disastrous voyage to Canada only to be financially rescued by Hugo and returned to France, where he eventually died in a garret. Brèsdin’s work has often been judged based upon his two most famous pictures, “The Good Samaritan” and ‘”The Comedy of Death,” however all Brèsdin’s oeuvre is distinguished by a fine sensitivity, depicting the natural world in a manner ranging from the delightfully sinister to a rampant elemental ferocity. Dance’s much-needed book provides a rigorous re-appraisal of the artist’s work and offers new insights into his biography.  


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Rambling On

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Novelist Bohumil Hrabal was born in Brno, Czechoslovakia, and he spent decades working at a variety of laboring jobs before turning to writing in his late forties. From that point, he quickly made his mark on the Czech literary scene; by the time of his death he was ranked with Jaroslav Hašek, Karel Čapek, and Milan Kundera as among the nation’s greatest twentieth-century writers. Hrabal’s fiction blends tragedy with humor and explores the anguish of intellectuals and ordinary people alike from a slightly surreal perspective. His work ranges from novels and poems to film scripts and essays. Rambling On is a collection of stories set in Hrabal’s Kersko. Several of the stories were written before the 1968 Soviet invasion of Prague but had to be reworked when they were rejected by Communist censorship during the 1970s. This edition features the original, uncensored versions of those stories.


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House of Switzerland

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The House of Switzerland is a mobile building that serves as the official visitors’ center for Switzerland at major international events. Following its debut at the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, the building went on to serve events in Zurich, Milan, and Rio de Janeiro.             This book takes a close look at the architectural and design challenges presented by a building that has to be mobile, accessible, and visually striking. Drawing on materials from the planning process conducted by Switzerland’s Federal Department of Foreign Affairs and the architectural firm Spillmann Echsle Architects, which built the house together with Ortreport, the book presents a dictionary of all elements in the building set for the house, illustrated with images and plans rendered with rich technical detail. A discussion between the key figures involved in the project rounds out the book, exploring the process of creating such an iconic representation of a nation abroad.


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Italomodern 1

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

 Vienna-based architect Martin Feiersinger and his brother, artist and photographer Werner Feiersinger have extensively travelled across Northern Italy in order to document the region’s modern architecture after World War II. Italomodern 1 and 2 is the result of their travels, the most authoritative survey of Northern Italy’s architecture between 1946 and 1976.  In their study, they have focused exclusively on distinctive buildings rather than entire urban structures, and they have selected the projects included as exemplary representations of neorealism, rationalism, brutalism, and organic.Italomodern 1 features 84 buildings and Italomodern 2 contains an additional 132 buildings. All of the buildings are represented with photographs, a concise text, the exact address, as well as with selected floor plans, sections, or elevations. The images present a subjective point of view, showing each building in its present state. An appendix provides rich information on the architects and selected other buildings and further reading for each firm. The book offers a glimpse into an era when society’s aspirations found expression in the built environment. Each volume is self-contained and also makes an insightful and useful guide for architecture lovers and travelers.  


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Secrets of Churchill's War Rooms

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

On May 10, 1940, Britain’s new prime minister strode purposefully down to the basement of an anonymous government building and entered a top secret command center. “This,” growled Winston Churchill, “is the room from which I will run the war.”   At the war’s end, Churchill and his colleagues left the chamber and locked the door behind them—and the War Rooms remained there, untouched and little known, until the early 1980s. Today, those historic chambers are on display as the Churchill War Rooms exhibit. With Secrets of Churchill’s War Rooms, you can go behind the glass partitions that separate the War Rooms from the visiting public, closer than ever before to where Churchill not only ran the war—but won it. This magnificent volume offers up-close photography of details in every room and provides access to sights unavailable on a simple tour of Churchill War Rooms. These are views that few people in the world have ever seen. Go behind closed doors to sit at Churchill’s desk, open up long-abandoned drawers and sift through seventy-year-old papers. See the anxious scratches on the arms of Sir Winston’s chair, pick up the phone that he used to speak to the president of the United States, and examine the map that loomed over his bed as he took his famous afternoon naps.   Including more than three hundred detailed images and firsthand memories of Churchill as a leader, boss, father, husband, and a man, Secrets of Churchill’s War Rooms tells the fascinating story of the work carried out in these underground offices.


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Identity Destabilised

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

We are living in a new epoch: the Anthropocene, where the world is overheated by human activity, driven too fast and filled too full, uneven and unequal. This collection explores the question of identity in this new world, looking at the consequences of rapidly accelerating change on social and personal identities and providing a concrete set of perspectives on how people conceive their selves and belonging in the twenty-first century. Featuring examinations of the Phiippines, Israel, Australia, the Cape Verde Islands, and Afghanistan, the book studies changes generated by rapid industrialization, forced return of migrants, sudden population growth, and the touristification of local cultures.  


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Ursa Major

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Yves Bonnefoy was one of the greatest living voices of contemporary French poetry. In this, his sixth book published by Seagull Books, he explores in profound new ways the mysteries of human consciousness. Readers find snatches of conversations—overheard, dropped without any possible conclusion—each pregnant with half-hidden, half-visible meaning. Limpid, punctuated with silences, the poems of Ursa Major are like stones picked up, turned over and set back down on the edge of life.“Countless voices traverse us; endless, almost, as the meanders of dreams or the starry scintillations of summer nights. Only listen, and a few words rise from the murmur, referring to precise things, making allusions one would like to understand, offering opinions perhaps worth mulling over.” With these words Bonnefoy introduces the collection, newly rendered into English by the master translator Beverly Bie Brahic. This deeply moving sequence of prose poems invites readers to attend to the multitudinous voices that carry on their conversations within us, to trust them—“just as on summer nights we would lie down in the grass of the meadow, behind our houses, to go forth among the millions of stars with a feeling of falling.”


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Exiles, Travellers and Vagabonds

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Migration, exile, expatriation, estrangement, nomadism, vagabondage, and travel conjure up different notions and perceptions of the mobile subject. How do we understand these terms, and how have women writers highlighted the blurring between such categories? Exiles, Travellers and Vagabonds analyzes Francophone literature from across the globe to nuance our understanding of women’s mobility.  Kate Averis and Isabel Hollis-Touré explore the distinctions among different types of mobility in a way that complicates our interpretations of different kinds of mobility, especially the implications of those interpretations for women around the world.  


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EVA & ADELE

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Eva and Adele are living works of art, as anyone who has encountered them on the streets of their home city of Berlin can attest. The radical artistic couple claims to have come here in a time machine from the future, and it’s true that they are like nothing else in our time. With the same striking bald heads and full theatrical makeup, they dress identically in bright clothing of their own design and are best known for their appearances since 1991 at principal events of the art world, from the documenta to the Venice Biennale.             EVA & ADELE: You Are my Biggest Inspiration. Early Works accompanies the first exhibition of the couple’s early work at the Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris. Beginning with their earliest work together, HELLAS—a seven-channel video installation that symbolizes the fusion of the two solo artists into a single, new artistic identity—the book takes readers through examples from among their early paintings, drawings, sculptures, and video installations with the aim of exploring the sort of synthesis that drives Eva and Adele’s undeniably unique body of artistic work. With more than one hundred full-color illustrations and a pull-out poster, the book brings much-deserved attention to one of the most name-dropped duos in contemporary art.  


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English and Their Country

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

We, Americans, can all agree, there’s something a bit peculiar about the English. For centuries, they have been a puzzle to the people of other countries. Originally produced for overseas forces stationed in England during World War II, The English and Their Country attempts to solve this puzzle, providing a helpful account of English characteristics for confused guests. This quirky facsimile helps clarify many peculiarities of our friends across the pond, such as: Why are English people so reserved and shy? Why do they talk about the weather so much? What is the difference between northerners and southerners?   Including everything from a description of England’s geography and climate to an explanation of the English class system, this book is a light-hearted and amusing take on English life and customs that will delight any modern-day Anglophile.  


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Effigies

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Syrian artist Lawand and British poet Pascale Petit had never met, nor known anything about each other’s work, before coming together to make Effigies. But seeing Lawand’s eerie paintings, and reading Petit’s darkly dreamy poetry, it is clear that the match was made in some hidden corner of heaven. Effigies is the result of their incredible collaboration and correspondence, with Petit responding to the drawings by Lawand that most moved her. Taken together, it is difficult to discern which—the poem or the drawing—was inspired by the other, so organically do Petit’s and Lawand’s styles cohere.  


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Cremator

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

“The devil’s neatest trick is to persuade us that he doesn’t exist.”—Giovanni Papini It is a maxim that both rings true in our contemporary world and pervades this tragicomic novel of anxiety and evil set amid the horrors of World War II. As a gay man living in a totalitarian, patriarchal society, noted Czech writer Ladislav Fuks identified with the tragic fate of his Jewish countrymen during the Holocaust. The Cremator arises from that shared experience. Fuks presents a grotesque, dystopian world in which a dutiful father, following the strict logic of his time, liberates the souls of his loved ones by destroying their bodies—first the dead, then the living. As we watch this very human character—a character who never ceases to believe that he is doing good—become possessed by an inhuman ideology, the evil that initially permeates the novel’s atmosphere concretizes in this familiar family man. A study of the totalitarian mindset with stunning resonance for today, The Cremator is a disturbing, powerful work of literary horror.


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Craft of the Lead Pencil

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

British writer and artist Mervyn Peake is not only well-known for his Gormenghast trilogy of novels, but also for his work as an illustrator, most notably for Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland. In the Craft of the Lead Pencil, Peake draws on his own experience as an illustrator to offer an unusual and charming guide for anyone looking to experiment with pencil drawing. Originally published in 1946, this little treatise on the simple art of drawing is more than just a how-to book, placing Peake’s own literary and artistic sensibilities alongside many of his beautiful line drawings, which clearly illustrate his instructions and showcase his love of the medium. This will be a charming gift book for anyone interested in drawing, sketching, and process of making art as well as a treasured token for the numerous Peake fans.  


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Cabinet's Finest Hour

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In May 1940, the British War Cabinet debated over the course of nine meetings a simple question: Should Britain fight on in the face of overwhelming odds, sacrificing hundreds of thousands of lives, or seek a negotiated peace? Using Cabinet papers from the United Kingdom’s National Archives, David Owen illuminates in fascinating detail this little-known, yet pivotal, chapter in the history of World War II. Eight months into the war, defeat seemed to many a certainty. With the United States still a year and half away from entering, Britain found itself in a perilous position, and foreign secretary Lord Halifax pushed prime minister Winston Churchill to explore the possibility of a negotiated peace with Hitler, using Mussolini as a conduit. Speaking for England is the story of Churchill’s triumph in the face of this pressure, but it is also about how collective debate and discussion won the day—had Churchill been alone, Owen argues, he would almost certainly have lost to Halifax, changing the course of history. Instead, the Cabinet system, all too often disparaged as messy and cumbersome, worked in Britain’s interests and ensured that a democracy on the brink of defeat had the courage to fight on.  


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Iran's Constitutional Revolution of 1906 and Narratives of the Enlightenment

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Constitutional Revolution of 1906 opened the way for enormous change in Persia, heralding the modern era and creating a model for later political and cultural movements in the region. Broad in its scope, this multidisciplinary volume brings together essays from leading scholars in Iranian Studies to explore the significance of this revolution, its origins, and the people who made it happen.             As the authors show, this period was one of unprecedented debate within Iran’s burgeoning press. Many different groups fought to shape the course of the Revolution, which opened up seemingly boundless possibilities for the country’s future and affected nearly every segment of its society. Exploring themes such as the role of women, the use of photography, and the uniqueness of the Revolution as an Iranian experience, the authors tell a story of immense transition, as the old order of the Shah subsided and was replaced by new institutions, new forms of expression, and a new social and political order.  


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China Sketchbook

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

A camera makes enemies; a sketchbook, friends. Firm in this belief, Irwin Allan Sealy carried to China just his pen and a book of blank pages. When the literary conference that took him there ended and his fellow writers returned to India, Sealy stayed on to travel the railroads of the north in search of a town reminiscent of his Himalayan hometown and a man who might resemble himself. Sign language, good will, and plain luck see him through, but in a northern mining town known for its ancient Buddhist cave sculptures, Sealy finally comes to the conclusion that his other was unreachable, his hometown was one of a kind, and his only hope was a pen, allowing him to record his memories, sketches, and adventures along the way. Sealy is known for both his fiction and his travelogue From Yukon to Yukatan: A Western Journey. This facsimile edition of The China Sketchbook, however, adds a special dimension to a travel narrative—the sketches and scribbles give readers a more immediate and unrestrained insight into the mind of a very fine writer and chart an unusual and quirky travel diary.


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Children of the Welfare State

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Children of the Welfare State uses the case of Denmark—employed as emblematic of the European state—to consider the ways in which children are “civilized” within child-focused institutions, such as schools, daycare, and the family unit, under the auspices of the welfare state. Through deep ethnographic studies, the authors build a clear account of children’s experiences at a variety of ages, different genders, and from differing ethnic and social backgrounds. Ultimately they show that even though Danish welfare institutions are marked by a strong egalitarian ideal, they nonetheless tend to reproduce dominant norms of social class and distinctions of ethnicity and religion.  


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Catalogue of Carl Nielsen's Works

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Catalogue of Carl Nielsen’s Works is the first ever thematic-bibliographic inventory of composer Carl Nielsen’s compositions of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It includes incipits (that is, the first couple of bars) for unambiguous identification of each piece or movement, in addition to information on different versions, the date of composition, first performance, and a survey of manuscript and printed sources from Nielsen’s lifetime.  



Cultivating the Heart

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In the past few years, interest has grown in the way human emotions have been experienced, stimulated, and expressed in languages throughout history. Cultivating the Heart studies the language of emotions in religious texts in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, focusing on sermons, saints’ lives, guidebooks for religious recluses, meditations, and lyrical poetry. It offers, as well, substantial commentary on church wall paintings, providing readers with a nuanced understanding of the ways in which the affective strategies of visual resources can be mapped onto texts. This is the first book-length study of affective language in the High Middle Ages, a period which has been previously neglected in work on the history of emotions.


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Footwork

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Footwork offers an original street-corner ethnography drawing on the themes of urban regeneration, lost space and the 24-hour city. It shows how urban modernisation, development and politics impact on the hidden lives of people living and working on the streets. From the rough sleeping homeless to street drinkers and sex workers, this book reveals the stories of the vulnerable and isolated - people living in the city we often choose to ignore.  Footwork follows the work of a team of outreach workers, tasked to look out for the homeless and others similarly vulnerable, harried and exposed. Tom Hall’s fieldwork study encompasses aspects of urban geography, care work and street-level poverty, violence and isolation, to provide a revealing and important account of lives so rarely acknowledged. 


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Fan Phenomena: The Twilight Saga

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

From the moment Stephenie Meyer published Twilight in 2005, the series has captivated readers. Through three subsequent novels and the blockbuster movie series, the Twilight Saga quickly became more than just a hit series—it’s now a cultural touchstone.             This new entry in the Fan Phenomena series brings together scholars and fans to explore the vibrant fan culture and lasting legacy of the saga. Contributors address such topics as the role of mythology in the appeal of the series; the distinct fan groups drawn in by the books and films; the vast world of Twilight fan fiction (including a discussion of Fifty Shades of Grey, the blockbuster novel that began as Twilight fan fiction); the role of gender in Twilight’s global acceptance; and much more. As with all the books in the series, the essays included here are sophisticated and richly analytic, yet aimed as much at fans as at scholars.             Whether you’re interested in analyzing its initial popularity or its impact on society more than a decade later, there’s no question you’ll find plenty in Fan Phenomena: The TwilightSaga to sink your teeth into.  


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Military, Inc.

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Pakistan occupies a paradoxical, even contradictory place in American foreign policy. Nominally a strategic ally in the war on terror, it is the third-largest recipient of US aid in the world. At the same time, it is run by its military and intelligence service—whose goals certainly do not always overlap with US priorities. This book offers a close look at what the rise of the military has meant for Pakistani society. Ayesha Siddiqa shows how entrenched the military has become, not just in day-to-day governance, but in the Pakistani corporate sector as well. What are the consequences of this unprecedented merging of the military and corporate sectors? What does it mean for Pakistan’s economic development—let alone for hopes of an eventual return to democracy and de-militarization? This new edition brings Siddiqa’s account fully up to date with a new preface and conclusion that emphasize the changing role of the media.


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Profit Doctrine

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The profession of economics has a lot to answer for. Since the late 1970s, the ideas of influential economists have justified policies that have made the world more prone to economic crisis, remarkably less equal, more polluted, and less secure than it might be. How did ideas and policies that have proved to be such an abject failure come to dominate the economic landscape?   By critically examining the work of the most famous economists of the neoliberal period including Alan Greenspan, Milton Friedman, and Robert Lucas, Robert Chernomas and Ian Hudson demonstrate that many of those who rose to prominence did so primarily because of their defense of, and contribution to, rising corporate profits, rather thantheir ability to predict or explain economic events.   An important and controversial book, The Profit Doctrine exposes the uses and abuses of mainstream economic canons, identifies those responsible, and reaffirms the primacy of political economy.  


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Twin Peaks

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Few contemporary television shows have been subjected to the critical scrutiny that has been brought to bear on David Lynch and Mark Frost’s Twin Peaks since its debut in 1990.Yet the series, and the subsequent film, Fire Walk With Me, are sufficiently rich that it’s always possible for a close analysis to offer something new—and that’s what Franck Boulègue has done with Twin Peaks: Unwrapping the Plastic. Through Boulègue’s eyes, we see for the first time the world of Twin Peaks as a coherent whole, one that draws on a wide range of cultural source material, including surrealism, transcendental meditation, Jungian psychoanalysis, mythology, fairy tales, and much, much more. The work of a scholar who is also a fan, the book should appeal to any hardcore Twin Peaks viewer.  


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Working the Phones

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Call centers have become a near-ubiquitous site of employment in our late capitalist world, with over a million people working there in the United Kingdom alone. The call center has become synonymous with low-paid, high-stress work under dictatorial supervision and precarious contracts. With Working the Phones, Jamie Woodcock draws on time spent employed in a non-unionized call center to take the public beyond anecdotal impressions to a true picture of what work is like there. Focusing in particular on methods of control and resistance within the highly regulated environment, Woodcock shows how call centers have become sadly emblematic of the post-industrial service economy.  


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Art, Trade, and Culture in the Islamic World and Beyond

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The essays in this book trace a rich continuum of artistic exchange that occurred between successive Islamic dynasties from the twelfth through nineteenth centuries—as well as the influence of Islamic art during that time on cultures as far away as China, Armenia, India, and Europe. Taking advantage of recent technologies that allow new ways of peering into the pasts of art objects, the authors break new ground in their exploration of the art and architecture of the Islamic world.             The essays range across a variety of topics. These include a look at tile production during the reign of the Qaytbay, the book bindings associated with Qansuh al-Ghuri, and the relationship between Mamluk metalwork and that found in Rasulid Yemen and Italy. Several essays examine inscriptions found on buildings of the Fatimid, Mamluk, and Ottoman periods, and others look at the debt of European lacquer works to Persian craftsmen, the Armenian patrons of eighteenth-century Chinese exports, and the influences of Islam on art and architecture found all across India. The result is a sweeping but deeply researched look at one of the richest networks of artistic traditions the world has ever known.    


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Nannies, Migration and Early Childhood Education and Care

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In recent years, changes in the labor market, including an increase in the number of young working mothers, has led to a rapid growth of employment for nannies throughout the Western world. That rapid growth, however, has come with an increase in long, nonstandard working hours and in the context of a lack of regulation or of affordable, flexible solutions to the demand for early childhood education and care. This book offers empirical research and comparative analysis of in-home childcare in Australia, the United Kingdom, and Canada, three nations where governments are actively recruiting migrant workers as an affordable childcare solution, showing how in-home childcare is ultimately, if indirectly, supported by government early childcare policy and migration policy.


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Pointillism

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Pointillism is one of the few artistic movements to achieved near-ubiquitous recognition. Works like Paul Signac’s Portrait of Felix Feneon or Georges Seurat’s A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte appear in almost every major museum, where we delight in examining the thousands of tiny, distinct dots before stepping back to watch them blend together, as if by magic, to form richly detailed masterpieces of exceptional brightness and color. In addition to their beauty, we are fascinated with pointillism because this pathbreaking method was among the see artists render figures and landscapes in a way that did not focus solely on the imitation of reality.             Pointillism: From End to Beginning: Seurat, van Gogh, Matisse and Picasso brings together more than one hundred paintings and drawings from the mid-1880s to 1930 that take readers through the movement, from the earliest works by Signac and Seurat through various later developments in pointillist technique to the late days of the movement, when Vincent van Gogh and other artists of the modern era began to free themselves from pointillism’s constraints. In addition to Signac, Seurat, and Van Gogh, Pointillism includes works by Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, and Paul Klee, among many others. The book shows how artists approached this method throughout the twentieth century. Critical texts additionally explore how this movement marked a major turning point—the beginning of modern painting. Drawing on masterpieces from around the world, Pointillism guides readers through this beloved branch of impressionism, bringing it to life with nearly two hundred full-color illustrations, including full and detail photographs.  


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Photography in Southeast Asia

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Photography in Southeast Asia: A Survey is a comprehensive attempt to map the emergence and trajectories of photographic practices in Southeast Asia. The narrative begins in the colonial era, at the point when the transfer of photographic technology occurred between visiting practitioners and local photographers. Illustrated with some 200 photographs, and with individual chapters dedicated to the countries of Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, The Philippines and Vietnam, the book ranges from the immediate postwar era to present day, focusing on photographers who demonstrate strong agency and autonomy in their practice. The relationship between art and photography, which has been defined very narrowly over the decades, is re-examined in the process. Photography also offers an entry point into the cultural and social practices of the region, and a prism into the personal desires and creative decisions of its practitioners.


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Southeast Asia in Ruins

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

British artists and commentators in the late 18th and early 19th century encoded the twin aspirations of progress and power in images and descriptions of Southeast Asia’s ruined Hindu and Buddhist candis, pagodas, wats and monuments. To the British eye, images of the remains of past civilisations allowed, indeed stimulated, philosophical meditations on the rise and decline of entire empires. Ruins were witnesses to the fall, humbling and disturbingly prophetic, (and so revealing more about British attitudes than they do about Southeast Asia’s cultural remains). This important study of a highly appealing but relatively neglected body of work adds multiple dimensions to the history of art and image production in Britain of the period, showing how the anxieties of empire were encoded in the genre of landscape paintings and prints.


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Titian

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Titian is best known for paintings that embodied the tradition of the Venetian Renaissance—but how Venetian was the artist himself? In this study, Tom Nichols probes the tensions between the individualism of Titian’s work and the conservative mores of the city, showing how his art undermined the traditional self-suppressing approach to painting in Venice and reflected his engagement with the individualistic cultures emerging in the courts of early modern Europe.             Ranging widely across Titian’s long career and varied works, Titian and the End of the Venetian Renaissance outlines his radical innovations to the traditional Venetian altarpiece; his transformation of portraits into artistic creations; and his meteoric breakout from the confines of artistic culture in Venice. Nichols explores how Titian challenged the city’s communal values with his competitive professional identity, contending that his intensely personalized way of painting resulted in a departure that effectively brought an end to the Renaissance tradition of painting. Packed with 170 illustrations, this groundbreaking book will change the way people look at Titian and Venetian art history. 


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William Kentridge and Vivienne Koorland

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

William Kentridge and Vivienne Koorland are two of South Africa’s foremost visual artists. Kentridge is a successful animator, opera director, performer, and draftsman, while Koorland has enjoyed widespread critical acclaim as a painter, printmaker, and maker of objects. They first met as university students in the mid-1970s, and ever since then their friendship has been mutually enriching, inspiring and informing their artworks in myriad ways. This book pays testament to that enduring friendship, bringing together a diverse selection of works from each artist to explore the formal and thematic links between their different practices. The authors explores a variety of facets that unite the works of Kentridge and Koorland, including the role of writing; the relationship between drawing, painting, and animation; their interest in film; their understanding of lines, alphabets, and letters; and the correlations between the iconic and the abstract and maps and mapping. Briony Fer, Joseph Leo Koerner, Ed Krčma, and Griselda Pollock provide insightful, fresh perspectives on the artists’ lives and their work, followed by a conversation between the Kentridge, Koorland, and curator Tamar Garb. The book features 120 color illustrations drawn from a wide selection of artworks by each artist, including works on paper, maps, and sketchbooks that have rarely been seen by the public before.  


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Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos 29

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

A major reservoir of species still unknown to science, the deep benthos of tropical seas is one of the final frontiers of biodiversity exploration. Growing out of an unprecedented series of marine expeditions undertaken by the French National Museum of Natural History and the Institute for Research and Development in the South and West Pacific, the Tropical Deep-Sea Benthos series draws on the findings of over five-thousand deep-water sampling stations in remote and seldom-visited island groups to showcase this extraordinary biodiversity. Focusing on mollusks, this volume is edited by three noted mollusk curators whose collective research with molluscan taxonomists worldwide has resulted in the discovery and description of over one-thousand new species of mollusks—139 new species and four new genera in the present volume alone.


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Before Publication

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

At some point before publication, a book assumes its final form, the form in which it is experienced by its audience. Naturally, this audience is often oblivious to the many, sometimes complex, decisions involved in constructing visual meaning through the montage of different ideas and elements. But, although these deliberate decisions are not normally communicated to the audience, the book is always to some extent a conception, or mediated presentation.             The contributors to Before Publication consider the construction of visual meaning through montage, with each essay taking as its starting point a particular artifact—from Ed Ruscha’s photobook, Every Building on the Sunset Strip to works by Sergei Eisenstein, Muriel Cooper, and Marshall McLuhan to Tristan Tzara’s unpublished Dadaglobe anthology. A common theme threading throughout the chapters is the relationship between privacy and publicity. A concise introductory chapter by the book’s editors, Nanni Baltzer and Martino Stierli places the chapters in conversation and discusses the broader subject of montage in art, architecture, and book design.  


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Background

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The disappearance of portraiture as an art form can be felt the world over, as photography has become more accessible and widespread and as artists have chosen to work in more popular, abstract forms. Perhaps nowhere is this loss more acutely felt than in the Middle East, where the death of the art form collides with cultural unrest and upheaval, especially in places like Syria. Syrian artist Hrair Sarkissian uses the photographs featured in Background to document and lament the fading of portraiture from the Syrian artistic tradition. This book features beautifully haunting images of portrait backgrounds absent of their subjects, symbolizing the vanishing point of not only these spaces, but of time and cultural identity.  


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Behind the Lines

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Jaroslav Hašek is a Czech writer most famous for his wickedly funny, widely read, yet incomplete novel The Good Soldier Schweik, a series of absurdist vignettes about a recalcitrant WWI soldier. Hašek—in spite of a life of buffoonery and debauchery—was remarkably prolific. He wrote hundreds of short stories that all display both his extraordinary gift for satire and his profound distrust of authority. Behind the Lines presents a series of nine short stories first published in the Prague Tribune and considered to be some of Hašek’s best. Based on his experiences as a Red Commissar in the Russian Civil War and his return to Czechoslovakia, Behind the Lines focuses on the Russian town of Bugulma, taking aim, with mordant wit, at the absurdities of a revolution. Providing important background and insight into The Good Soldier Schweik, this collection by a writer some call the Bolshevik Mark Twain is nevertheless much more than a tool for understanding his better-known novel; it is a significant work in its own right. A hidden gem remarkable for its modern, ribald sense of humor, Behind the Lines is an enjoyable, fast-paced anthology of great literary and historical value. 


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Tumult

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Hans Magnus Enzensberger, widely regarded as Germany’s greatest living poet, was already well known in the 1960s, the tempestuous decade of which Tumult is an autobiographical record. Derived from old papers, notes, jottings, photos, and letters that the poet stumbled upon years later in his attic, the volume is not so much about the man, but rather the many places he visited and people whom he met on his travels through the Soviet Union and Cuba during the 1960s.             The book is made up of four longform pieces written from 1963 to 1970, each episode concluding with a poem and postscript written in 2014. Tumult is based on Enzensberger’s personal experience as a left-wing sympathizer during that tumultuous decade and focuses on political events and their participants. Translated by Mike Mitchell, the book is a lively and deftly written travelogue offering a glimpse into the history of leftist thought. Dedicated to “those who disappeared,” Tumult is a document of that which remains one of humanity’s headiest times.   “Enzensberger is the most important postwar writer you have never read.”—London Review of Books


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Territory

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

From 2008 to 2014, ETH Studio Basel, under the guidance of Roger Diener and Marecl Meili, has been investigating the process of urbanization taking place outside cities. Territory brings together the results of their research in six significant locations: the Nile Valley; Rome-Adria, Italy; the Florida hinterlands; the Red River Delta in Vietnam;  northern Oman, and Belo Horizonte and Minas Gerais in Brazil. To describe the space surrounding cities, previously considered landscape, the contributors to this book use the term territory to denote both the surroundings that a city subsumes into its own structure and the core city itself, which is the center of this process of urbanization. And for each of the territories featured in the book, they investigate such key aspects of urbanization as water management, networks and infrastructure, agriculture, the role of mining and industrial production, and settlements.  


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Transforming Probation

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Written by an established author in the field, this book explores the politics of modernization and transformation of probation in the criminal justice system. It is unique in drawing upon innovative social theories and moral perspectives to analyze changes in the probation service by including data from quantitative and qualitative empirical research. This highlights the challenges to, but also support of, the platform of modernization that culminated in the transformative Rehabilitation Revolution. Providing critical tools for the reader to use in their own work and studies, it makes a timely contribution to criminal justice and probation theory and uniquely provides insights into what representatives of other organizations think about probation—from the outside looking in.


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Transforming Probation

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Written by an established author in the field, this book explores the politics of modernization and transformation of probation in the criminal justice system. It is unique in drawing upon innovative social theories and moral perspectives to analyze changes in the probation service by including data from quantitative and qualitative empirical research. This highlights the challenges to, but also support of, the platform of modernization that culminated in the transformative Rehabilitation Revolution. Providing critical tools for the reader to use in their own work and studies, it makes a timely contribution to criminal justice and probation theory and uniquely provides insights into what representatives of other organizations think about probation—from the outside looking in.


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Things That Happen

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Bhaskar Chakrabarti’s poetry is synonymous with the romantic melancholia inherent to Calcutta. His trenchant poetic voice was one of the most significant to emerge in the 1960s and ’70s—perhaps the most prolific period of modern Bengali poetry. Spanning the rise of militant leftism, the spread of crippling poverty across India, the war in Bangladesh, the influx of millions of refugees, the dark, dictatorial days of Indira Gandhi’s reign, and the disillusionment of communist rule in Bengal, Chakrabarti’s poems plumb the depths of urban angst, expressing the spirit of sadness and alienation in delicate metaphors wrapped in deceptively lucid language. In this first-ever comprehensive translation of Chakrabarti’s work, award-winning translator Arunava Sinha masterfully articulates that clarity of vision, retaining the unique cadence and idioms of the Bengali language. Presenting verses and prose poems from all of Chakrabarti’s life—from his first volume, When Will Winter Come, published in 1971, to his last, The Language of Giraffes, published just before his death in 2005, and collecting several unpublished works as well—Things That Happen and Other Poems introduces the world to a brilliant and universal poetic voice of urban life.


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BMW - 100 Masterpieces

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Premium automobiles. Dynamic driving experiences. Pioneering decisions in design and technology. The BMW brand stands for all this and more. From the company’s early aircraft engines to their motorcycles and today’s sleek hybrids, it has long defined the character of its brand with its slogan, “Sheer Driving Pleasure”—a promise delivered by BMW vehicles to the world and continually created anew by developers. As the company prepares to observe its centenary in 2016, this book travels back to its very first day, reflecting on one hundred years of production at the world’s leading manufacturer of top-quality automobiles and motorcycles.             Through text and images, BMW—100 Masterpieces details the company’s history, exploring the components of the BMW brand identity, selecting one hundred significant achievements, be they innovations in vehicles or the engineering process or world-renowned series and models like the famous BMW 328, the BMW Z series, or the motorcycle BMW K1. Special sections are devoted to the company’s racing program; its world records; and movie appearances, including the James Bond franchise. The book also discusses the company’s employment reforms and groundbreaking environmental decisions. Throughout the book, nearly three hundred vintage and new photographs show the evolution of this distinguished brand and the engines, motorcycles, and automobiles it produces.             Published with the aid of the BMW Museum in Munich and edited by the museum’s curator, Andreas Braun, BMW—100 Masterpieces celebrates a century of fine engineering and great automobiles while offering an absorbing look at how one of the world’s foremost vehicle manufacturers came to be.


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Staging History

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Throughout the late-eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, historical events were tremendously popular as adaptations for the stage. From the Revolutionary War to the French Revolution, stage dramas brought history vividly to life through powerful vocal performances and visual spectacle. The scale of the production was often ambitious, such as a Sadler’s Well staging of the Great Siege of Gibraltar, which featured a large water tank with floating vessels. Another production on the same topic added live cannons, which set fire to the vessels during the performance! Drawing on copious new research, Staging History reexamines extraordinary theatrical works of the period to show the role they played in shaping popular interpretations of history. Editors Michael Burden, Wendy Heller, Jonathan Hicks, and Ellen Lockhart are joined by other experts in the field in analyzing theatrical documents, including playbills, set designs, and musical scores, as well as paintings, prints, and other illustrations, in order to explore what counted as historical truth for the writers, performers, and audiences of these plays.  


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Science, Conservation, and National Parks

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

As the US National Park Service marks its centennial in 2016, parks and protected areas worldwide are under increasing threat from a variety of factors, including storms and fires of greater severity, plant and animal extinctions, the changing attitudes of a public that has become more urbanized, and the political pressures of narrow special interest groups. In the face of such rapid environmental and cultural changes, Science, Conservation, and National Parks gathers a group of renowned scholars—including Edward O. Wilson, Jane Lubchenco, Thomas Dietz, and Monica Turner, among many others—who seek to address these problems and, in so doing, to secure a future for protected areas that will push forward the frontiers of biological, physical, and social science in and for parks. Examining the major challenges of parks and protected areas throughout the world, contributors provide answers to a number of key conservation questions, such as: How should stewardship address climate change, urban encroachment and pollution, and invasive species? How can society, especially youth, become more engaged with nature and parks, and are there models to guide interactions between parks and their neighbors? What are appropriate conservation objectives for parks in the Anthropocene? Charting a course for the parks of the next century, Science, Conservation, and National Parks is certain not only to catalyze the continued evolution of US park conservation policy, but also to be an inspiration for parks, conservation, and management worldwide.


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Science, Conservation, and National Parks

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

As the US National Park Service marks its centennial in 2016, parks and protected areas worldwide are under increasing threat from a variety of factors, including storms and fires of greater severity, plant and animal extinctions, the changing attitudes of a public that has become more urbanized, and the political pressures of narrow special interest groups. In the face of such rapid environmental and cultural changes, Science, Conservation, and National Parks gathers a group of renowned scholars—including Edward O. Wilson, Jane Lubchenco, Thomas Dietz, and Monica Turner, among many others—who seek to address these problems and, in so doing, to secure a future for protected areas that will push forward the frontiers of biological, physical, and social science in and for parks. Examining the major challenges of parks and protected areas throughout the world, contributors provide answers to a number of key conservation questions, such as: How should stewardship address climate change, urban encroachment and pollution, and invasive species? How can society, especially youth, become more engaged with nature and parks, and are there models to guide interactions between parks and their neighbors? What are appropriate conservation objectives for parks in the Anthropocene? Charting a course for the parks of the next century, Science, Conservation, and National Parks is certain not only to catalyze the continued evolution of US park conservation policy, but also to be an inspiration for parks, conservation, and management worldwide.


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Oxford in Prints

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

For more than three centuries, Oxford has served as a source of inspiration for fine illustrated books and engraved prints. These works hold an important place in the historical record of the city, showing its identity to be deeply rooted in history while also chronicling Oxford’s development through the architecture of its most beautiful college and university buildings.             With Oxford in Prints, Peter Whitfield has assembled a rich selection of more than seventy illustrations and prints that offer a portrait of Oxford before it became the modern city it is today. Seventeenth-century prints by David Loggan show the medieval origins of Oxford University already overlaid by Tudor and Stuart buildings. Eighteenth-century editions of the Oxford Almanack depict a city dominated by neoclassical ideas. By the nineteenth-century, illustrations in the Almanack had an increasingly romantic feel, with buildings against a natural background of the river, trees, and sky. Each illustration or print is accompanied by an insightful description, including salient historical features.  


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Bodleianalia

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Which is the smallest book in the Bodleian Library? How many miles of shelving are there in its Book Storage Facility? What is fasciculing? Who complained when their secret pen name was revealed in the library’s catalog? Why did the library refuse to lend a book to King Charles I? The answers to these questions are just a few of the remarkable bits of bibliophile trivia uncovered by Claire Cock-Starkey and Violet Moller in this intriguing collection of curious facts about one of Britain’s oldest university library.                    With more than twelve million items and many priceless treasures, including the Gutenberg Bible, Shakespeare’s First Folio, five thirteenth-century copies of Magna Carta, and Tolkien’s original watercolors for The Hobbit, the Bodleian also boasts many strange events and eccentric characters through the ages that contributed to its world-class renown today. From deep within the archives, Cock-Starkey and Moller have compiled a great many lesser-known facts about the Bodleian Library’s fascinating history, organizing them into easily browsable lists, factoids, and statistics.  


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Mood, Aspect, Modality Revisited

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Over the past several decades, linguistic theorizing of tense, aspect, and mood (TAM), along with a strongly growing body of crosslinguistic studies, has revealed complexity in the data that challenges traditional distinctions and treatments of these categories. Mood, Aspect, Modality Revisited argues that it’s time to revisit our conventional assumptions and reconsider our foundational questions: What exactly is a linguistic category? What kinds of categories do labels such as “subjunctive,” “imperative,” “future,” and “modality” truly refer to? In short, how categorical are categories? Current literature assumes a straightforward link between grammatical category and semantic function, and descriptions of well-studied languages have cultivated a sense of predictability in patterns over time. As the editors and contributors of Mood, Aspect, Modality Revisited prove, however, this predictability and stability vanish in the study of lesser-known patterns and languages. The ten provocative essays gathered here present fascinating cutting-edge research demonstrating that the traditional grammatical distinctions are ultimately fluid—and perhaps even illusory. Developing groundbreaking and highly original theories, the contributors in this volume seek to unravel more general, fundamental principles of TAM that can help us better understand the nature of linguistic representations.  


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Monkeytalk

Wed, 04 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Monkey see, monkey do—or does she? Can the behavior of non-human primates—their sociality, their intelligence, their communication—really be chalked up to simple mimicry? Emphatically, absolutely: no. And as famed primatologist Julia Fischer reveals, the human bias inherent in this oft-uttered adage is our loss, for it is only through the study of our primate brethren that we may begin to understand ourselves. An eye-opening blend of storytelling, memoir, and science, Monkeytalk takes us into the field and the world’s primate labs to investigate the intricacies of primate social mores through the lens of communication. After first detailing the social interactions of key species from her fieldwork—from baby-wielding male Barbary macaques, who use infants as social accessories in a variety of interactions, to aggression among the chacma baboons of southern Africa and male-male tolerance among the Guinea baboons of Senegal—Fischer explores the role of social living in the rise of primate intelligence and communication, ultimately asking what the ways in which other primates communicate can teach us about the evolution of human language. Funny and fascinating, Fischer’s tale roams from a dinner in the field shared with lionesses to insights gleaned from Rico, a border collie with an astonishing vocabulary, but its message is clear: it is humans who are the evolutionary mimics. The primate heritage visible in our species is far more striking than the reverse, and it is the monkeys who deserve to be seen. “The social life of macaques and baboons is a magnificent opera,” Fischer writes. “Permit me now to raise the curtain on it.”


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Liquid Crystals

Mon, 02 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

While it is responsible for today’s abundance of flat screens—on televisions, computers, and mobile devices—most of us have only heard of it in the ubiquitous acronym, LCD, with little thought as to exactly what it is: liquid crystal. In this book, Esther Leslie enlightens us, offering an accessible and fascinating look at—not a substance, not a technology—but a wholly different phase of matter.             As she explains, liquid crystal is a curious material phase that organizes a substance’s molecules in a crystalline form yet allows them to move fluidly like water. Observed since the nineteenth century, this phase has been a deep curiosity to science and, in more recent times, the key to a new era of media technology. In between that time, as Leslie shows, it has figured in cultural forms from Romantic landscape painting to snow globes, from mountaineering to eco-disasters, and from touchscreen devices to DNA. Expertly written but accessible, Liquid Crystals recounts the unheralded but hugely significant emergence of this unique form of matter.  


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Cuba and Revolutionary Latin America

Sun, 01 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Providing the definitive oral history of the Cuban revolution, Cuba and Revolutionary Latin America tells the powerful story of Cuba’s struggle for liberation from the Batista dictatorship, its transition to socialism, and its evolving relationship with the rest of Latin American and the Caribbean. Drawing on a vast array of original testimonies, including interviews with more than seventy Cuban officials and former combatants, Dirk Kruijt examines the pivotal role of veterans and the post-revolution fidelista generation in shaping Cuba. He also reveals the untold story of the Departamento América, a clandestine and largely undocumented organization that was instrumental in exercising Cuban influence abroad. As the relationship between the United States and Cuba continues to thaw, the leftist history of the Cuban revolution is in danger of being lost. However, Cuba and Revolutionary Latin America will give voice to many veterans of the revolution and assert the great influence that its rallying cry had—and still has—on people across Latin America.  


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Cuba and Revolutionary Latin America

Sun, 01 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Providing the definitive oral history of the Cuban revolution, Cuba and Revolutionary Latin America tells the powerful story of Cuba’s struggle for liberation from the Batista dictatorship, its transition to socialism, and its evolving relationship with the rest of Latin American and the Caribbean. Drawing on a vast array of original testimonies, including interviews with more than seventy Cuban officials and former combatants, Dirk Kruijt examines the pivotal role of veterans and the post-revolution fidelista generation in shaping Cuba. He also reveals the untold story of the Departamento América, a clandestine and largely undocumented organization that was instrumental in exercising Cuban influence abroad. As the relationship between the United States and Cuba continues to thaw, the leftist history of the Cuban revolution is in danger of being lost. However, Cuba and Revolutionary Latin America will give voice to many veterans of the revolution and assert the great influence that its rallying cry had—and still has—on people across Latin America.  


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Before Nature

Sun, 01 Jan 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In the modern West, we take for granted that what we call the “natural world” confronts us all and always has—but Before Nature explores that almost unimaginable time when there was no such conception of “nature”—no word, reference, or sense for it.   Before the concept of nature formed over the long history of European philosophy and science, our ancestors in ancient Assyria and Babylonia developed an inquiry into the world in a way that is kindred to our modern science. With Before Nature, Francesca Rochberg explores that Assyro-Babylonian knowledge tradition and shows how it relates to the entire history of science. From a modern, Western perspective, a world not conceived somehow within the framework of physical nature is difficult—if not impossible—to imagine. Yet, as Rochberg lays out, ancient investigations of regularity and irregularity, norms and anomalies clearly established an axis of knowledge between the knower and an intelligible, ordered world. Rochberg is the first scholar to make a case for how exactly we can understand cuneiform knowledge, observation, prediction, and explanation in relation to science—without recourse to later ideas of nature. Systematically examining the whole of Mesopotamian science with a distinctive historical and methodological approach, Before Nature will open up surprising new pathways for studying the history of science.


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Demolition Means Progress

Fri, 30 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

In 1997, after General Motors shuttered a massive complex of factories in the gritty industrial city of Flint, Michigan, signs were placed around the empty facility reading, “Demolition Means Progress,” suggesting that the struggling metropolis could not move forward to greatness until the old plants met the wrecking ball. Much more than a trite corporate slogan, the phrase encapsulates the operating ethos of the nation’s metropolitan leadership from at least the 1930s to the present. Throughout, the leaders of Flint and other municipalities repeatedly tried to revitalize their communities by demolishing outdated and inefficient structures and institutions and overseeing numerous urban renewal campaigns—many of which yielded only more impoverished and more divided metropolises. After decades of these efforts, the dawn of the twenty-first century found Flint one of the most racially segregated and economically polarized metropolitan areas in the nation. In one of the most comprehensive works yet written on the history of inequality and metropolitan development in modern America, Andrew R. Highsmith uses the case of Flint to explain how the perennial quest for urban renewal—even more than white flight, corporate abandonment, and other forces—contributed to mass suburbanization, racial and economic division, deindustrialization, and political fragmentation. Challenging much of the conventional wisdom about structural inequality and the roots of the nation’s “urban crisis,” Demolition Means Progress shows in vivid detail how public policies and programs designed to revit[...]


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Photography and Humour

Thu, 29 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Some photos are haunting, some breathtaking; some are illuminating, and some are beautiful. And some photos—as those of us who have ever been on the internet know—are downright hilarious. But humor has often been on the sidelines of photography scholarship. With this book, Louis Kaplan remedies this, gathering together over one hundred images in a revealing look at the way photographers—from the very beginning of photography in the nineteenth century—have found so much amusement at the ends of their lenses.             Kaplan introduces readers to a key set of genres in photographic humor, showing how humor is often tied to serious topics such as our identity, social situations, and—yes—death. He offers a fascinating range of examples, from stereographic domestic comedies to biting political satire, from conceptual artistic pratfalls to surrealist humour noir, and from trick photography to decisively hilarious moments in photojournalism. In doing so, he brings together works by renowned photographers—including Jacques Henri Lartigue, Elliott Erwitt, Weegee, Cindy Sherman, and Martin Parr—as well as those by your everyday photoshopper. The result is a rich collection of the witty, the absurd, and the uproarious.  


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Wittgenstein and Modernism

Thu, 29 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Ludwig Wittgenstein famously declared that philosophy “ought really to be written only as a form of poetry,” and he even described the Tractatus as “philosophical and, at the same time, literary.” But few books have really followed up on these claims, and fewer still have focused on their relation to the special literary and artistic period in which Wittgenstein worked. This book offers the first collection to address the rich, vexed, and often contradictory relationship between modernism—the twentieth century’s predominant cultural and artistic movement—and Wittgenstein, one of its preeminent and most enduring philosophers. In doing so it offers rich new understandings of both.             Michael LeMahieu Karen Zumhagen-Yekplé bring together scholars in both twentieth-century philosophy and modern literary studies to put Wittgenstein into dialogue with some of modernism’s most iconic figures, including Samuel Beckett, Saul Bellow, Walter Benjamin, Henry James, James Joyce, Franz Kafka, Adolf Loos, Robert Musil, Wallace Stevens, and Virginia Woolf. The contributors touch on two important aspects of Wittgenstein’s work and modernism itself: form and medium. They discuss issues ranging from Wittgenstein and poetics to his use of numbered propositions in the Tractatus as a virtuoso performance of modernist form; from Wittgenstein’s persistence metaphoric use of religion, music, and photography to an exploration of how he and Henry James both negotiated[...]


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Wittgenstein and Modernism

Thu, 29 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Ludwig Wittgenstein famously declared that philosophy “ought really to be written only as a form of poetry,” and he even described the Tractatus as “philosophical and, at the same time, literary.” But few books have really followed up on these claims, and fewer still have focused on their relation to the special literary and artistic period in which Wittgenstein worked. This book offers the first collection to address the rich, vexed, and often contradictory relationship between modernism—the twentieth century’s predominant cultural and artistic movement—and Wittgenstein, one of its preeminent and most enduring philosophers. In doing so it offers rich new understandings of both.             Michael LeMahieu Karen Zumhagen-Yekplé bring together scholars in both twentieth-century philosophy and modern literary studies to put Wittgenstein into dialogue with some of modernism’s most iconic figures, including Samuel Beckett, Saul Bellow, Walter Benjamin, Henry James, James Joyce, Franz Kafka, Adolf Loos, Robert Musil, Wallace Stevens, and Virginia Woolf. The contributors touch on two important aspects of Wittgenstein’s work and modernism itself: form and medium. They discuss issues ranging from Wittgenstein and poetics to his use of numbered propositions in the Tractatus as a virtuoso performance of modernist form; from Wittgenstein’s persistence metaphoric use of religion, music, and photography to an exploration of how he and [...]


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Beyond Resemblance

Thu, 29 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Art today may be global, Robert Linsley argues in this book, but it is the same everywhere you go: full of intentional meaning, statements, and even branded images that insist on a particular message. That is to say, art everywhere is conceptual. In this first critique of global conceptual art, Linsley looks back at an older genre, abstract art, to reclaim some of its lost value—not as an empty commodity to be traded by the wealthy but as a way for us to find perspective amid chaos.             Linsley shows how abstraction is a response to the world we live in, one that deliberately avoids moralizing, explanation, or overt polemic. He champions the work of lesser-known but important artists from India, China, and Latin and Central America, such as Vasudeo S. Gaitonde, Ding Yi and Gunther Gerzso as well as the more familiar names from history, such as Lucio Fontana, Frank Stella and Gerhard Richter, treating their work with equal seriousness. He also looks toward abstract art’s future, showing that it still has plenty of life and purpose as a genre that helps us find a clear space to make sense of the times we live in. Ultimately, Linsley demonstrates the unique, rich, and full experience that abstract art can give us. Richly illustrated, this book is a must-read for art historians and art lovers.  


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Experiencing Other Minds in the Courtroom

Mon, 26 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Sometimes the outcome of a lawsuit depends upon sensations known only to the person who experiences them, such as the buzzing sound heard by a plaintiff who suffers from tinnitus after an accident. Lawyers, litigants, and expert witnesses are now seeking to re-create these sensations in the courtroom, using digital technologies to simulate litigants’ subjective experiences and thus to help jurors know—not merely know about—what it is like to be inside a litigant’s mind. But with this novel type of evidence comes a host of questions: Can anyone really know what it is like to have another person’s sensory experiences? Why should courts allow jurors to see or hear these simulations? And how might this evidence alter the ways in which judges and jurors do justice? In Experiencing Other Minds in the Courtroom, Neal Feigenson turns the courtroom into a forum for exploring the profound philosophical, psychological, and legal ramifications of our efforts to know what other people’s conscious experiences are truly like. Drawing on disciplines ranging from cognitive psychology to psychophysics to media studies, Feigenson harnesses real examples of digitally simulated subjective perceptions to explain how the epistemological value of this evidence is affected by who creates it, how it is made, and how it is presented. Through his close scrutiny of the different kinds of simulations and the different knowledge claims they make, Feigenson is able to s[...]


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Pleasure's All Mine

Sun, 25 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Handcuffs, paddles, whips—the words alone are enough to make a person blush. Even by our society’s standards, the practice of things like BDSM is still very hush-hush, considered deviant sexual behavior that must be kept hidden. But the narrow view of what is thought of as “normal” sex—a vanilla act performed by one man and one woman—is more and more contested these days. And as Julie Peakman reveals, normal never really existed; for everyone, different kinds of sex have always offered myriad pleasures, and almost all sexual behaviors have traveled between acceptance and proscription. The Pleasure’s All Mine examines two millennia of letters, diaries, court records, erotic books, medical texts, and more to explore the gamut of “deviant” sexual activity. Delving into the specialized cultures of pain, necrophilia, and bestiality and the social world of plushies, furries, and life-size sex dolls, Peakman considers the changing attitudes toward these, as well as masturbation, “golden showers,” sadomasochism, homosexuals, transvestites, and transsexuals. She follows the history of each behavior through its original reception to its interpretation by sexologists and how it is viewed today, showing how previously acceptable behaviors now provoke social outrage, or vice versa. In addition, she questions why people have been and remain intolerant of other people’s sexual preferences. The first compr[...]


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Beastly London

Sun, 25 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

Horse-drawn cabs rattling down muddy roads, cattle herded through the streets to the Smithfield meat market for slaughter, roosters crowing at the break of dawn—London was once filled with a cacophony of animal noises (and smells). But over the last thirty years, the city seems to have banished animals from its streets. In Beastly London, Hannah Velten uses a wide range of primary sources to explore the complex and changing relationship between Londoners of all classes and their animal neighbors.             Velten travels back in history to describe a time when Londoners shared their homes with pets and livestock—along with a variety of other pests, vermin, and bedbugs; Londoners imported beasts from all corners of the globe for display in their homes, zoos, and parks; and ponies flying in hot air balloons and dancing fleas were considered entertainment. As she shows, London transformed from a city with a mainly exploitative relationship with animals to the birthplace of animal welfare societies and animal rights’ campaigns. Packed with over one hundred illustrations, Beastly London is a revealing look at how animals have been central to the city’s success. 


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Walter De Maria

Sun, 25 Dec 2016 06:00:00 GMT

As one of the most innovative artists of the last six decades, Walter De Maria challenged art in profound ways. He is known worldwide for his important sculptures such as Lightning Field, but his contributions to the practices of music, drawing, photography, and film have been largely forgotten. Featuring in-depth analysis of many previously unknown works and correspondence, this book offers the first major critical account of de Maria’s broader range of interests.             In a 1960 score, Walter De Maria called for “meaningless work:” art that does not “accomplish a conventional purpose.” He followed this call with a dizzying period of experimentation. The resulting work reflected shifts in how we understand the sites of art during an era of moon shots and road trips, of wars that moved from jungles into living rooms via electromagnetic waves. It helped us understand ourselves and how race, gender, and sexuality vie for space in the social realm. By bringing to light de Maria’s lesser-known works, this book challenges established histories and methodologies for the art of the 1960s and ’70s, while also exploring de Maria’s own obsessions with art’s uttermost possibilities.  


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