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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Thu, 22 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

 



Ark and Beyond

Wed, 21 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Scores of wild species and ecosystems around the world face a variety of human-caused threats, from habitat destruction and fragmentation to rapid climate change. But there is hope, and it, too, comes in a most human form: zoos and aquariums. Gathering a diverse, multi-institutional collection of leading zoo and aquarium scientists as well as historians, philosophers, biologists, and social scientists, The Ark and Beyond traces the history and underscores the present role of these organizations as essential conservation actors. It also offers a framework for their future course, reaffirming that if zoos and aquariums make biodiversity conservation a top priority, these institutions can play a vital role in tackling conservation challenges of global magnitude. While early menageries were anything but the centers of conservation that many zoos are today, a concern with wildlife preservation has been an integral component of the modern, professionally run zoo since the nineteenth century. From captive breeding initiatives to rewilding programs, zoos and aquariums have long been at the cutting edge of research and conservation science, sites of impressive new genetic and reproductive techniques. Today, their efforts reach even further beyond recreation, with educational programs, community-based conservation initiatives, and international, collaborative programs designed to combat species extinction and protect habitats at a range of scales. Addressing related topics as diverse as zoo animal welfare, species reintroductions, amphibian extinctions, and whether zoos can truly be “wild,” this book explores the whole range of research and conservation practices that spring from zoos and aquariums while emphasizing the historical, scientific, and ethical traditions that shape these efforts. Also featuring an inspiring foreword by the late George Rabb, president emeritus of the Chicago Zoological Society / Brookfield Zoo, The Ark and Beyond illuminates these institutions’ growing significance to the preservation of global biodiversity in this century.


Media Files:
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Ark and Beyond

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Scores of wild species and ecosystems around the world face a variety of human-caused threats, from habitat destruction and fragmentation to rapid climate change. But there is hope, and it, too, comes in a most human form: zoos and aquariums. Gathering a diverse, multi-institutional collection of leading zoo and aquarium scientists as well as historians, philosophers, biologists, and social scientists, The Ark and Beyond traces the history and underscores the present role of these organizations as essential conservation actors. It also offers a framework for their future course, reaffirming that if zoos and aquariums make biodiversity conservation a top priority, these institutions can play a vital role in tackling conservation challenges of global magnitude. While early menageries were anything but the centers of conservation that many zoos are today, a concern with wildlife preservation has been an integral component of the modern, professionally run zoo since the nineteenth century. From captive breeding initiatives to rewilding programs, zoos and aquariums have long been at the cutting edge of research and conservation science, sites of impressive new genetic and reproductive techniques. Today, their efforts reach even further beyond recreation, with educational programs, community-based conservation initiatives, and international, collaborative programs designed to combat species extinction and protect habitats at a range of scales. Addressing related topics as diverse as zoo animal welfare, species reintroductions, amphibian extinctions, and whether zoos can truly be “wild,” this book explores the whole range of research and conservation practices that spring from zoos and aquariums while emphasizing the historical, scientific, and ethical traditions that shape these efforts. Also featuring an inspiring foreword by the late George Rabb, president emeritus of the Chicago Zoological Society / Brookfield Zoo, The Ark and Beyond illuminates these institutions’ growing significance to the preservation of global biodiversity in this century.


Media Files:
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Last Earth

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This is a history of modern Palestine like no other: built from the testimony of people who have lived through it. Ramzy Baroud here gathers accounts from countless Palestinians from all walks of life, and from throughout the decades, to tell the story of the nation and its struggle for independence and security. Challenging both academic and popular takes on Palestinian history, Baroud unearths here the deep commonalities within the story of Palestine, ones that draw the people together despite political divisions, geographical barriers and walls, factionalism, occupation, and exile. Through these firsthand reports—by turns inspiring and terrifying, triumphant and troubled—we see Palestine in all its complexity and contradictions, ever vibrant in the memories of the people who have fought, physically and otherwise, for its future. A remarkable book, The Last Earth will be essential to understanding the struggles in the contemporary Middle East.  


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Last Earth

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This is a history of modern Palestine like no other: built from the testimony of people who have lived through it. Ramzy Baroud here gathers accounts from countless Palestinians from all walks of life, and from throughout the decades, to tell the story of the nation and its struggle for independence and security. Challenging both academic and popular takes on Palestinian history, Baroud unearths here the deep commonalities within the story of Palestine, ones that draw the people together despite political divisions, geographical barriers and walls, factionalism, occupation, and exile. Through these firsthand reports—by turns inspiring and terrifying, triumphant and troubled—we see Palestine in all its complexity and contradictions, ever vibrant in the memories of the people who have fought, physically and otherwise, for its future. A remarkable book, The Last Earth will be essential to understanding the struggles in the contemporary Middle East.  


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Party with Socialists in It

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

For more than a hundred years, the British Labour Party has been the home of working-class organization and struggle. But has it ever truly been on the side of workers? Where do its interests really lie, and can it be relied on to provide a check on right-wing forces?             A Party with Socialists in It addresses those questions and more, telling the story of the Labour Party from its origins to today, showing how at every turn it has struggled with the tension between the rights and demands of workers and a more centrist position. As Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership attempts to revitalize the party after the initial success of the Blair years turned into disappointment and disenchantment, this clear-eyed history could not be more timely.  


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Party with Socialists in It

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

For more than a hundred years, the British Labour Party has been the home of working-class organization and struggle. But has it ever truly been on the side of workers? Where do its interests really lie, and can it be relied on to provide a check on right-wing forces?             A Party with Socialists in It addresses those questions and more, telling the story of the Labour Party from its origins to today, showing how at every turn it has struggled with the tension between the rights and demands of workers and a more centrist position. As Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership attempts to revitalize the party after the initial success of the Blair years turned into disappointment and disenchantment, this clear-eyed history could not be more timely.  


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Burning Country

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

In 2011, many Syrians took to the streets of Damascus to demand the overthrow of the government of Bashar al-Assad. Seven years later, Syria is a warzone, and there seems to be no end in sight. Burning Country explores the complicated reality of life in present-day Syria with unprecedented detail and sophistication, drawing on new firsthand testimonies from opposition fighters, exiles lost in an archipelago of refugee camps, and courageous human rights activists. Robin Yassin-Kassab and Leila Al-Shami expertly interweave these stories with an incisive analysis of the militarization of the uprising, the rise of the Islamists and sectarian warfare, and the role of Syria’s government in exacerbating the brutalization of the conflict. Through these accounts and a broad range of secondary source material, the authors persuasively argue that the international community has failed in its stated commitments to support the Syrian opposition movements. This new edition brings the story up to the present, with a new chapter that covers the internationalization of the conflict, including interventions by the United States, Russia, and Iran; the rollback of ISIS; the fall of Daraya and Aleppo; the crushing of local democracy; sectarian cleansing; and the forced exile of millions of Syrians.  


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Digital Demagogue

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

We’re all familiar by now with the ways that Donald Trump uses digital media to communicate, from the ridiculous to the terrifying. This book digs deeper into the use of those tools in politics to show how they have facilitated the rise of authoritarianism, nationalism, and right-wing ideologies around the world. Christian Fuchs here applies an updated Marxist frame, along with insights drawn from the Frankfurt School, to show the pernicious role of social media in the hands of nationalist politicians, and the ways in which it has been used to spread right-wing ideology far and wide, and make it seem like an ordinary part of contemporary political discourse. Fuchs diagnoses this problem in stark terms, but he doesn’t stop there: he also lays out ways to fight it, and analyzes the prospects for pushing past capitalism and renewing the left.


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Digital Demagogue

Tue, 20 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

We’re all familiar by now with the ways that Donald Trump uses digital media to communicate, from the ridiculous to the terrifying. This book digs deeper into the use of those tools in politics to show how they have facilitated the rise of authoritarianism, nationalism, and right-wing ideologies around the world. Christian Fuchs here applies an updated Marxist frame, along with insights drawn from the Frankfurt School, to show the pernicious role of social media in the hands of nationalist politicians, and the ways in which it has been used to spread right-wing ideology far and wide, and make it seem like an ordinary part of contemporary political discourse. Fuchs diagnoses this problem in stark terms, but he doesn’t stop there: he also lays out ways to fight it, and analyzes the prospects for pushing past capitalism and renewing the left.


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Book of Seeds

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Seeds are nature’s consummate survivors. The next time you admire a field of waving green grassland or a stunning grove of acacia, stop to consider how it got that way—often against incredible odds. Seeds can survive freezing temperatures and drought. They can pass through our digestive systems without damage and weather a trip across the ocean, hitching a ride on marine debris. They can even endure complete desiccation, a feat taken to extraordinary lengths by the date palm, a seed from which was recovered from the palace of Herod the Great was germinated after some two thousand years.The Book of Seeds takes readers through six hundred of the world’s seed species, revealing their extraordinary beauty and rich diversity. Each page pairs a beautifully composed photo of a seed—life-size, and, in some cases, enlarged to display fine detail—with a short description, a map showing distribution, and information on conservation status. The whole spectrum of seeds is covered here. There are prolific species like corn and less widely distributed species, like the brilliant blue seeds of the traveler’s palm or the bird of paradise flower, aptly named for its distinctive orange coiffure. There are tiny seeds and seeds weighing up to forty pounds. And while seeds in all their shapes, sizes, and colors grant us sustenance, there are even some we would be wise to treat with caution, such as the rosary pea, whose seeds are considered more toxic than ricin. The essential guide to these complex plant creations, The Book of Seeds offers readers a rare, up-close look that will inspire scientists and nature lovers alike.  


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Building the Prison State

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The United States incarcerates more people per capita than any other industrialized nation in the world—about 1 in 100 adults, or more than 2 million people—while national spending on prisons has catapulted 400 percent. Given the vast racial disparities in incarceration, the prison system also reinforces race and class divisions. How and why did we become the world’s leading jailer? And what can we, as a society, do about it? Reframing the story of mass incarceration, Heather Schoenfeld illustrates how the unfinished task of full equality for African Americans led to a series of policy choices that expanded the government’s power to punish, even as they were designed to protect individuals from arbitrary state violence. Examining civil rights protests, prison condition lawsuits, sentencing reforms, the War on Drugs, and the rise of conservative Tea Party politics, Schoenfeld explains why politicians veered from skepticism of prisons to an embrace of incarceration as the appropriate response to crime. To reduce the number of people behind bars, Schoenfeld argues that we must transform the political incentives for imprisonment and develop a new ideological basis for punishment.


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Building the Prison State

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The United States incarcerates more people per capita than any other industrialized nation in the world—about 1 in 100 adults, or more than 2 million people—while national spending on prisons has catapulted 400 percent. Given the vast racial disparities in incarceration, the prison system also reinforces race and class divisions. How and why did we become the world’s leading jailer? And what can we, as a society, do about it? Reframing the story of mass incarceration, Heather Schoenfeld illustrates how the unfinished task of full equality for African Americans led to a series of policy choices that expanded the government’s power to punish, even as they were designed to protect individuals from arbitrary state violence. Examining civil rights protests, prison condition lawsuits, sentencing reforms, the War on Drugs, and the rise of conservative Tea Party politics, Schoenfeld explains why politicians veered from skepticism of prisons to an embrace of incarceration as the appropriate response to crime. To reduce the number of people behind bars, Schoenfeld argues that we must transform the political incentives for imprisonment and develop a new ideological basis for punishment.


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Yearbook 2016

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Every year, ETH Zurich publishes the best work in architectural design, technology, and visual design by students, teachers, and researchers in the university’s Department of Architecture. All the work gathered in the 2016 yearbook was produced during the previous school year, some of it through exchange programs with other universities in Europe and beyond.  


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Destruction and Sorrow beneath the Heavens

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Known for his brilliantly dark fictional visions, László Krasznahorkai is one of the most respected European writers of his generation and the winner of the 2015 Man Booker International Prize. Here, he brings us on a journey through China at the dawn of the new millennium. On the precipice of its emergence as a global power, China is experiencing cataclysms of modernity as its harsh Maoist strictures meet the chaotic flux of globalism. What remains of the Middle Kingdom’s ancient cultural riches? And can a Westerner truly understand China’s past and present—or the murky waters where the two meet?Destruction and Sorrow beneath the Heavens is both a travel memoir and the chronicle of a distinct intellectual shift as one of the most captivating contemporary writers and thinkers begins to engage with the cultures of Asia and the legacies of its interactions with Europe in a newly globalized society. Rendered in English by award-winning translator Ottilie Mulzet, Destruction and Sorrow beneath the Heavens is an important work, marking the emergence of Krasznahorkai as a truly global novelist.



Directly Elected Mayors in Urban Governance

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT




Danish Studio Ceramics 1950 - 2010

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This expansive catalog showcases Designmuseum Denmark's collection of unique ceramic works from a sixty-year period leading up to the present day. Covering over 600 different works by 133 ceramicists and artists, it highlights the diversity and high quality of Danish ceramics though a collection that has only previously been exhibited on a limited scale. Lavishly illustrated with more than three hundred ceramic items, this volume is a treasure trove for collectors and scholars alike.



Dead-End Lives

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT




Dead-End Lives

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT




Defence of Constitutionalism

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

More than a century after the publication of Czech politician Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk’s study The Czech Question, Czech politics—instead of the nation’s historical struggle for survival and independence—has become a pragmatic question of democratic constitutionalism and civility. Originally published in major Czech newspapers, these essays on contemporary European politics demonstrate that this new understanding involves both technical questions of power making and critical questions of its meaning. Democracy, Přibáň shows, is the process of permanent self-correction. It possesses both the capacity to respond to unexpected problems and crises and intrinsic tensions between principled arguments and everyday administrative processes. Defending constitutionalism, therefore, draws on principles of civil rights and freedoms, limited government, and representative democracy, the validity and persuasive force of which are at stake not only in the Czech Republic, but also in the post-national European Union and our global society at large.


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Dispersal

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

In the run up to the 2012 Summer Olympics, Stratford, East London, underwent major redevelopments, including the construction of the Olympic Park. To make room, many small businesses were forced to move.  Dispersal is both a stunning visual record of a neighborhood that has transformed beyond recognition and a commentary on the impact of these changes. Although it was often maligned as a postindustrial “wasteland,” Stratford was a melting pot of more than two hundred trades and industries. Photographers Marion Davies and Debra Rapp documented sixty small businesses—from belt makers to kebab makers, zinc galavanizers, and salmon smokers—before they were forced to move from the area in 2007. The unique photographs appear alongside a short account of the history of each business. While the photographs provide an impression of Stratford on the cusp of change, they also suggest a landscape shaped over time. How this landscape developed and evolved from the mid-nineteenth century is explored by urban planning and architectural historian Juliet Davis.   


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Brazil

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

With the sixth largest economy in the world, Brazil has played a key international role for decades. It was one of the first “pink wave” administrations in Latin America. In 1994, it was responsible for shutting down the US-sponsored proposal for a Free Trade Area of the Americas. Notably, it is also one of the few large countries where social spending has risen and the distribution of income has improved over the last thirty years. As we saw during the 2014 World Cup protests, however, the country still remains highly unequal, with vast unmet social welfare needs and a precarious infrastructure.   In Brazil: Neoliberalism Versus Democracy, Alfredo Saad-Filho and Lecio Morais review the complex paradox that is modern Brazil. Focusing on 1980 to the present, they analyze the tensions between the two dominant systemic political transitions from military rule to first democracy, then neoliberalism. A groundbreaking interpretation of this intricate relationship, Brazil examines how the contradictory dynamics of these transitions eventually became symbiotic as they unfolded and intertwined.   


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Burhan Dogançay

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Picture a city. You may be bringing to mind a skyline of tall buildings, steel slices of train tracks, a swarm of buses, cars, and trucks, and a flurry of pedestrians hustling to work. But if you imagine a city through the eyes of artist Burhan Doğançay, a completely different world opens up: a world of walls and insignia, of rough brickwork covered in half-ripped posters, graffiti, scribblings, messages, signs, and stickers. As this book shows, the wall was Doğançay’s passion. Doğançay (1929–2013) was born in Istanbul and settled in New York in 1964, where he moved within the art scene around Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns. Taking inspiration from the visual perception of texture, place, and memory, Doğançay became famous for his wall fragments serial, “Urban Walls,” in which he recorded house walls and facades from all over the world in a variety of media, using a wide range of materials and techniques such as photography, collage, and painting. Uniting techniques of photorealism, abstraction, pop art, collage, and montage in one oeuvre, Doğançay’s works serve as archives of past decades that capture the spirit of their time.


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Blood Barrios

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Welcome to a country that has a higher casualty rate than Iraq. Wander streets considered the deadliest in the world. Wake up each morning to another batch of corpses—sometimes bound, often mutilated—lining the roads. Witness the screeching blue light of police sirens and the huddles of “red journalists” who make a living chasing after the bloodshed. They are scenes that conjure up a war zone, but Honduras is, at least officially, not at war. Ignored by the outside world, this Central American country is ravaged by ultraviolent drug cartels and an equally ruthless, militarized law force. Corruption is rife and the justice system is woefully ineffective. Prisons are full to bursting and barrios are flooded with drugs from South America en route to the United States. Cursed by geography, the people are trapped here, caught in a system of poverty and cruelty with no means of escape. For many years, Alberto Arce was the only foreign correspondent in Tegucigalpa, Honduras’s beleaguered capital. He has seen first-hand the country’s descent into anarchy. In Blood Barrios he shares his experiences in a series of gripping and atmospheric dispatches: from earnest conversations with narcos, taxi drivers, and soldiers, to exposés of state corruption and harrowing accounts of the aftermath of violence. Provocative, revelatory, and heart-rending, Blood Barrios shines a light on the suffering and stoicism of the Honduran people, and demands action from a complacent international community.


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Blinding Polyphemus

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Today, we believe that the map is a copy of the Earth, without realizing that the opposite is true: in our culture the Earth has assumed the form of a map. In Blinding Polyphemus, Franco Farinelli elucidates the philosophical correlation between cultural evolution and shifting cartographies of modern society, giving readers an interdisciplinary study that attempts to understand and redefine the fundamental structures of cartography, architecture, and the notion of “space.” Following the lessons of nineteenth-century critical German geography, this is a manual of geography without any map. To indicate where things are means already responding, in implicit and unreflective ways, to prior questions about their nature. Blinding Polyphemus not only takes account of the present state of the Earth and of human geography, it redefines the principal models we possess for the description of the world: the map, above all, as well as the landscape, subject, place, city, and space.


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Brexit and the British

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Whatever the eventual outcome of Britain’s negotiations to leave the European Union, the critical questions remain: what does the Referendum vote tell us about British society? As with the election of Donald Trump in the United States, why did so few people in Britain see the result coming? Why was there such a fundamental misunderstanding about divisions in society that had existed for years? In this short but powerful book, Stephen Green argues that it is time to acknowledge that underlying all the sound and fury of the Brexit debate were fundamental questions—whether or not fully recognized—about British identity. Are the British different, special, and capable of finding their own way in the world? Who are they, those who call themselves British? Is it all too easy to blame Brexit on post-industrial decline in the traditional heartlands of the Labor Party, or scaremongering by a band of deluded “Little Englanders”? Or is British identity more complex, deep-rooted—and perhaps, in some sense, troubling—than those of other European nations?  


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Biography of an Industrial Landscape

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Europe has been urbanized for so long that there are few undeveloped sites available for new development. That has led cities to turn to abandoned former industrial sites, a decision that raises a number of questions about preservation and reuse. Biography of an Industrial Landscape addresses how industrial sites are reworked in the present and shows what deeper questions about values and cultural imaginaries lie behind our decisions. This book is based on a deep case study of the Carlsberg brewery site in Copenhagen – one of the most discussed European urban redevelopment projects at the turn of the 21st century.             Landscape biography, Svava Riesto shows here, can be a useful scope for deepening our knowledge about an aspect of industrial sites that often escapes attention; its open spaces. The study reappraises the industrial open spaces of Carlsberg and unfolds how they have emerged by interrelated transformations ranging from yeasting, transportation networks to daily walks and changing aesthetics. Further, the book unravels how contemporary urban redevelopment is linked to cultural imaginaries and inherited myths that influence how we think about what is possible.  


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Bellevue

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Robert Zünd (1827–1909) is Switzerland’s “Master of the Beech Leaf,” revered for his light-flooded paintings of bucolic landscapes. Tobias Madörin has achieved wide critical acclaim for his photographic tableaus that depict the interactions between people and their surrounding environment. Embedded in both artists’ work is a fascination with observation, or the intensity of the gaze, and so their works form a stylistically consistent pairing, the subject of an upcoming exhibition at Kunstmuseum Luzern.Bellevue juxtaposes Zünd’s paintings with photographs by Madörin, some of which show the same views. Zünd’s paintings of sunlit paradises are so precisely rendered that, rather than enjoying their beauty, viewers feel compelled to look more closely. Madörin achieves a similar intensity in his photographs, working with a large-format analogue camera that lends an unusual slowness and attention to detail to the photographic process. The book provides a new way of approaching the work of both artists and their perception of the landscape at the heart of Switzerland. A wealth of illustrations is complemented by essays by curators Fanni Fetzer and Dominik Müller and American art historian Jonathan Steinberg.  


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Architecture of Counterrevolution

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The Algerian Revolution (1954–1962), the war to gain independence from the French colonization that began in 1830, was particularly hard fought. Using every weapon in its arsenal, the French government and army altered Algeria’s very infrastructure in its intention to maintain colonial rule. Architecture of Counterrevolution turns to this lesser known facet of war, giving a vivid account of architectural strategies conceived of and executed by the French civil and military authorities to prolong its colonial presence in Algeria, defend its politico-economic interests in Algeria, and oversee the Algerian Revolution and populations. This book focuses on the politics of three interrelated spatial counterrevolutionary measures: the massive forced resettlement of Algerian farmers; the mass-housing programs designed for the Algerian population as part of General Charles de Gaulle’s Plan de Constantine; and the fortified administrative new town planned for the protection of the French authorities during the last months of the Algerian Revolution.


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Across the Art/Life Divide

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Martin Patrick explores the ways in which contemporary artists across media continue to reinvent art that straddles both public and private spheres. Examining the impact of various art movements on notions of performance, authorship, and identity, Across the Art/Life Divide argues that the most defining feature of contemporary art is the ongoing interest of artists in the problematic relationship between art and life. Looking at underexamined forms, such as stand-up comedy and sketch shows, alongside more traditional artistic media, he situates the work of a wide range of contemporary artists to ask: To what extent are artists presenting themselves? And does the portrayal of the “self” in art necessarily constitute authenticity? By dissecting the meta-conditions and contexts surrounding the production of art, Across the Art/Life Divide examines how ordinary, everyday life is transformed into art.


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Assemble

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The eighteen members of the London-based architecture collective Assemble began collaborating in 2010, following their graduation from Cambridge University. In the years since, they have built projects across a wide range of style and function, including a temporary cinema at a former gas station, affordable workspaces for artists, the foundation of social enterprises, the revitalization of a former working-class neighborhood, and designing a new art gallery for Goldsmiths, University of London. To all of their projects they bring an awareness of the social, economic, and political conditions of a society, with the aim of changing the status quo through enabling community action. That work culminated in Assemble’s selection as the winner of the 2015 Turner Prize—the first time the prize, Europe’s most distinguished for contemporary art, had been awarded to architects. Assemble: How we Build offers the first illustrated look at the work of the collective, presenting a closer look at ten selected projects, along with essays that present background information and reflections on Assemble’s objectives and philosophy.  


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ALLY

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

When invited to create a retrospective of her sculptural works, the artist Janine Antoni preferred to ask herself what her works would look like when interpreted by other artists and translated into movement. Together with the choreographers Anna Halprin and Stephen Petronio, Antoni created unique performance artworks whose main focus is corporeality, revealing the enormous potential that lies in the combination of sculpture and dance. Published in cooperation with the Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia, and featuring critical essays by a diverse array of writers and art theorists—including feminist philosopher Hélène Cixous—ALLY shows how these artists have worked together to create a new pictorial language.  


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Arts of the East

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The Bruschettini Foundation is world-renowned for its collection of Islamic and Asian art. This exquisite volume reproduces a fascinating selection of  carpets, textiles, wares, paintings, and precious inlaid metalwork from the thirteenth to the seventeenth century, chosen from the collection. Handpicked by Alessandro Bruschettini in conversation with Aga Khan Museum curator Filiz Çakır Phillip, this impressive array of works, each equally astonishing in vibrancy and technical perfection, has origins spanning the Islamic world from China to Spain. Presenting one of the most important private collections in Europe, this volume reveals the enduring allure of Islamic masterpieces from the early modern period. 


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Amazonia Imagined

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Bringing together the work of Brazilian artist Kim Poor and the text of art historian Edward Lucie-Smith, Amazonia Imagined is an important and beautiful work that captures the vital link that Amazonian people share with the past.   The Amazon has captured the public imagination for its barely touched and natural sublime, and Poor's artwork encapsulates the magic and colors of that extraordinary region. Her work also creates images inspired by Amazonian mythology, and it offers a window into the world of the indigenous peoples of the Amazon. Smith’s text insightfully contextualizes Poor’s work and draws out its mythological and anthropological connections. The result is an elegantly conceived and executed tribute to these indigenous peoples and Poor’s powerful technique.  


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Agony of Belgium

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

At the start of World War I, King Albert of Belgium refused the German army safe passage through Belgium to France, a defiance that was a key moment in the beginning of the war. Albert then took command of the relatively new and untested Belgian Army, and The Agony of Belgium recounts the army’s bravery and resilience in the face of the challenges to come.  The Agony of Belgium reveals the courageous and noble qualities of King Albert, whether at the Front as an active Commander-in-Chief; with his people during Zeppelin raids and artillery bombardments at Antwerp; declining refuge in France after the retreat from Ostend; or rallying his troops. This unique account of a part of the war often overlooked will be of significant interest to military scholars and historians.   


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Australian Film Theory and Criticism

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The third part of a three-volume work devoted to mapping the transnational history of Australian film studies, Volume 3: Documents concludes the project by gathering together the documents that were produced during the rise of film studies in Australian academia from 1975–85. Through these sources we see the development of the particularities of Australian film theory and criticism, its relationship to its international counterparts, and the establishment of key positions and the directions in which they develop. Editors Deane Williams and Constantine Verevis here collect key articles, including the works of Paul Willemen, Sam Rohdie, Ross Gibson, and Meaghan Morris, among many others, in order to conclude this pioneering historiographic account of Australian film studies.


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Acting for Others

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

For the Ankave of Papua New Guinea, men, unlike women, do not reach adulthood and become fathers simply by growing up and reproducing. What fathers—and by extension, men—actually are is a result of a series of relational transformations, operated in and by rituals in which men and women both perform complementary actions in separate spaces. Acting for Others is a tour de force in Melanesian ethnography, gender studies, and theories of ritual. Based on years of fieldwork conducted by the author and her husband and co-ethnographer, this book’s “double view” of the Ankave ritual cycle—from women in the village and from the men in the forest—is novel, provocative, and one of the most incisive analyses of the emergence of ideas of gender in Papua New Guinea since Marilyn Strathern’s The Gender of the Gift. At the heart of Pascale Bonnemère’s argument is the idea that it is possible for genders to act for and upon one another, and to do so almost paradoxically, by limiting action through the obeying of taboos and other restrictions. With this first English translation by acclaimed French translator Nora Scott, accompanied by a foreword from Marilyn Strathern, Acting for Others brings the Ankave ritual world to new theoretical life, challenging how we think about mutual action, mutual being, and mutual life.


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Architecture / Machine

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

What is the nature of the interaction between architecture and machines as key objects in human design, and how does this interplay work? The contributors to this book explore this multifaceted interchange in its broad thematic manifestations and historical depth, focusing above all on three aspects: machines that assist in the design and construction of buildings, those that perform their tasks inside the walls and structures of buildings, and—in particular—machines that act as models and images of architectural thought. What emerges is that the subject of machines within the architectural framework has been rooted not simply in concrete technical questions, but rather to a far greater extent in general programs, processes, and performances, and thus in fundamental categories of built space. As the first issue of gta papers, Architecture / Machine forms the basis of a new publication format of gta Verlag. The gta papers will, at regular intervals, encompass and present current and selected research findings from ETH Zurich’s Institute for the History and Theory of Architecture.  


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American Folk Music as Tactical Media

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

American folk music has long presented a problematic conception of authenticity, but the reality of the folk scene, and its relationship to media, is far more complicated. This book draws on the fields of media archaeology, performance studies, and sound studies to explore the various modes of communication that can be uncovered from the long American folk revival. From Alan Lomax's cybernetic visions to Bob Dylan's noisy writing machines, this book retrieves a subterranean discourse on the concept of media that might help us to reimagine the potential of the networks in which we work, play, and sing.  


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Fatwa in Indonesia

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This book looks at fatwa in Indonesia during the period following the fall of President Suharto. It takes a close look at three fatwa-making agencies—Majelis Ulama Indonesia, Lajnah Bahth al-Masail Nahdlatul Ulama, and Majelis Tarjih Muhammadiyah—all of which are highly influential in shaping religious thought and the lives of Muslims in Indonesia. Rather than look at all the fatwa that have emerged in the period, Pradana Boy ZTF looks solely at those that have strong repercussions for intra-community relations and the development of Indonesian Muslims more generally, including fatwa pertaining to sectarianism, pluralism, secularism, and liberalism.


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Frederick Gibberd

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

With Frederick Gibberd, Christine Hui Lan Manley has written a comprehensive account of the works of the architect and planner Frederick Gibberd (1908–84), a pioneer of modern architecture in Britain. At the beginning of his career, Gibberd designed Pullman Court, one of the first international style buildings in the country. His publications and association with the Modern Architectural Research Group put him at the forefront of the establishment of modern architecture in Britain. During the 1940s, however, Gibberd’s diaries reveal a belief that archictects should consider the visual rather than the functional qualities of materials used. After World War II, his plans for Harlow New Town conveyed his growing interest in visual planning. His late-career projects, including Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral and Regent’s Park Mosque, also reflected his aesthetic approach, prompting many to question his role as a key figure in the history of modern British architecture. With more than one hundred illustrations including many in color, Manley reassesses Gibberd’s work and demonstrates that, with his visual approach to the design of buildings, spaces, and landscapes, Gibberd was at the forefront of the development of a softer, distinctly English form of modern architecture.    


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For Valour

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

For Valour: The Complete History of the Victoria Cross is the first definitive reference on every winner of the Victoria Cross, the highest award in the British military honor system, awarded for gallantry in the face of the enemy.  This is the first of eight volumes to be published in association with the Victoria Cross Trust.   Each volume is divided into two parts. Part one, “Wars, Battles & Deeds,” contains descriptions of each war and battle or engagement that involved deeds resulting in the awarding of a Victoria Cross. The deeds are described within the context of the war and battle during which they occurred. Part two, “Portraits of Valour,” presents a biography of each recipient of the Victoria Cross. This volume also includes a foreword by Lord Ashcroft, who owns the largest collection of Victoria Crosses.  


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Futurist Cinema

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Futurism and early cinema shared a fascination with dynamic movement and speed, presenting both as harbingers of an emerging new way of life and new aesthetic criteria. And the Futurists quickly latched on to cinema as a device with great potential to manipulate our perceptions in order to create a new world. In the edited collection Futurist Cinema, the contributors explore that conjunction, bringing in avant-garde artists and their manifestos to show how painters and other artists turned to cinema as a model for overcoming the inherently static nature of painting in order to rethink it for a new era.  


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Fossil Crustacea of Lebanon

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The late Cretaceous Konservat-Lagerstätten geological deposits of Lebanon are famous for their exceptionally preserved fishes and crustaceans. This book provides the first review of fossil crustaceans in the Cenomanian outcrops (Hakel, Hadjoula, En Nammoura) and the Santonian outcrop (Sahel Alma). The fossils found in these outcrops offer a unique overview of the paleobiodiversity of crustaceans that helps us to better understand the evolution of crustacean clades and the timing of their appearance. Organized by taxonomy and illustrated throughout with species photographs and reproductions of historical illustrations, Fossil Crustacea of Lebanon presents detailed species descriptions of nearly 900 specimens and includes formal descriptions of thirteen new genera and twenty new species across a range of crustacean groups, including Decapoda, Isopoda, Lophogastrida, Stomatopoda, and Cirripedia.



Richard Serra

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Richard Serra experimented at an early age with industrial materials like rubber, neon, lead, and steel to create powerful sculptures, canvases, films, and drawings that demonstrate an intelligent and exquisitely surreal spatial sensibility. This volume concentrates on Serra’s early films and his so-called “Prop Pieces,” created between the late 1960s and the early 1970s. In both media, Serra’s main focus is on the artistic action; the positioning, leaning, and adjustment of a lead sheet, and the simple actions recorded on film produce in both cases a strangely gravity-defying sense of both massiveness and fragility, demonstrating power and sensitivity at the same time. One of the most admired sculptors working today, Richard Serra also occupies an important place in the art of the past fifty years, where he is already counted among the classics. This publication juxtaposes the current exhibition with an array of historic photographs from his first shows.


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Researching Sex and Sexualities

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Sexuality is a complex and multifaceted domain, encompassing bodily, cultural, and subjective experiences that resist easy categorization. To claim the sexual as a viable research object therefore raises a number of important methodological questions: What is it possible to know about experiences, practices, and perceptions of sex and sexualities? What approaches might help or hinder our efforts to probe such experiences? This collection explores the creative, personal, and contextual parameters involved in researching sexuality, cutting across disciplinary boundaries and drawing on case studies from a variety of countries and contexts. Representing a wide range of expertise, its contributors address such key areas as pornography, sex work, intersectionality, and LGBT perspectives. The contributors also share their own experiences of researching sexuality within contrasting disciplines, as well as interrogating how the sexual identities of researchers themselves can relate to, and inform, their work. The result is a unique and diverse collection that combines practical insights on field work with novel theoretical reflections.


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Researching Sex and Sexualities

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Sexuality is a complex and multifaceted domain, encompassing bodily, cultural, and subjective experiences that resist easy categorization. To claim the sexual as a viable research object therefore raises a number of important methodological questions: What is it possible to know about experiences, practices, and perceptions of sex and sexualities? What approaches might help or hinder our efforts to probe such experiences? This collection explores the creative, personal, and contextual parameters involved in researching sexuality, cutting across disciplinary boundaries and drawing on case studies from a variety of countries and contexts. Representing a wide range of expertise, its contributors address such key areas as pornography, sex work, intersectionality, and LGBT perspectives. The contributors also share their own experiences of researching sexuality within contrasting disciplines, as well as interrogating how the sexual identities of researchers themselves can relate to, and inform, their work. The result is a unique and diverse collection that combines practical insights on field work with novel theoretical reflections.


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Reconstructing Retirement

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT




Via Ypres

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Originally published in 1934, Via Ypres told the story of the 39th Divisional Field Ambulances, a unit that would face grave danger as it provided vital services to soldiers fighting across the Western Front throughout World War I. The book covers the unit from its founding in 1915 through the end of the war, detailing the many ways that field medicine changed and improved in the crucible of war. Allan Jobson also gives us a close-up, frequently moving portrait of the young men who made up the 39th, from their training through their first sobering experience of the danger and misery that were constant companions on the battlefields of the Great War. An unforgettable document of bravery and care in impossible conditions, Via Ypres offers a new way to see the action, drama, and tragedy of the war.  


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Passage of Tears

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Djibouti, a hot, impoverished little country on the Horn of Africa, is a place of great strategic importance, for off its coast lies a crucial passage for the world’s oil. In this novel by Abdourahman A. Waberi, Djibril, a young Djiboutian voluntarily exiled in Montreal, returns to his native land to prepare a report for an American economic intelligence firm. Meanwhile, a shadowy, threatening figure imprisoned in an island cell seems to know Djibril’s every move. He takes dictation from his preaching cellmate known as his “Venerable Master,” but as the words are put on the page, a completely different text appears—the life of Walter Benjamin, Djibril’s favorite author. Passage of Tears cleverly mixes many genres and forms of writing—spy novel, political thriller, diary (replete with childhood memories), travel notebook, legends, parables, incantations, and prayers. Djibril’s reminiscences provide a sense of Djibouti’s past and its people, while a satire of Muslim fundamentalism is unwittingly delivered through the other Djiboutian voice. Waberi’s inventive parody is a lesson in tolerance, while his poetic observations reveal his love and concern for his homeland. Praise for the French Edition “Disguised as a political thriller, Passage of Tears is above all a great novel of childhood, murderous identities, and exile.”—Le Monde des Livres “A gripping book, burning with urgency and tension.”—Télérama.


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One Hundred Years of Futurism

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

More than one hundred years after Futurism exploded onto the European stage with its unique brand of art and literature, there is a need to reassess the whole movement, from its Italian roots to its international ramifications. In wide-ranging essays based on fresh research, the contributors to this collection examine both the original context and the cultural legacy of Futurism. Chapters touch on topics such as Futurism and Fascism, the geopolitics of Futurism, the Futurist woman, and translating Futurist texts. A large portion of the book is devoted to the practical aspects of performing Futurist theatrical ideas in the twenty-first century.  


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On Life, Death, and This and That of the Rest

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The Lectures on Poetics Series at the University of Frankfurt VI has hosted many illustrious speakers at its lectern, including Ingeborg Bachmann, Theodor Adorno, and Heinrich Böll. At the beginning of 2007, Urs Widmer—described by the Independent as “one of the living greats of Swiss literature”—spoke to more than twelve hundred students and enthusiasts, sharing the sum of his understandings of poets and their timeless creations.In On Life, Death, and This and That of the Rest, English language readers will gain access to Widmer’s historic talks for the first time through Donal McLaughlin’s excellent translation. Here, Widmer imparts his views on the poet as deviant and as sufferer, and as the conduit for the dream of singing to the imagination in the nameless voice of the people. Here, one of our finest living writers shares his experience of life as an author and as a devotee of the printed word with a new and enthusiastic readership.


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Maria Theresa and the Arts

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Empress Maria Theresa pursued a singular approach when it came to cultural policy. She sought reform not only in education, but also in the field of art, and commissioned a wealth of works from painters, sculptors, and other artists in Austria and abroad. These reform efforts brought about an upswing in portrait and landscape painting, ceiling frescoes, allegorical works, and sculpture, leading to the international consolidation of the newly formed House of Habsburg-Lorraine, as well as a plethora of baroque masterpieces. This lavishly illustrated volume celebrates the three-hundredth anniversary of Maria Theresa’s birth and her life’s passion for the fine arts, the traces of which persist to this day in the countries of the former Habsburg Monarchy.


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My Mother’s Lover

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

It’s Switzerland in the 1920s when the two lovers first meet. She is young, beautiful, and rich. In contrast, he can barely support himself and is interested only in music. By the end of their lives, he is a famous conductor and the richest man in the country, but she is penniless. And most important of all, no one knows of her love for him; it is a secret he took to his grave. Here begins Urs Widmer’s novel My Mother’s Lover. Based on a real-life affair, My Mother’s Lover is the story of a lifelong and unspoken love for a man—recorded by the woman’s son, who begins this novel on the day his mother’s lover dies.  Set against the backdrop of the Depression and World War II, it is a story of sacrifice and betrayal, passionate devotion, and inevitable suffering. Yet in Widmer’s hands, it is always entertaining and surprisingly comic—a unique kind of fairy tale.



My Father's Book

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

In this companion to Urs Widmer’s novel My Mother’s Lover, the narrator is again the son who pieces together the fragments of his parents’ stories. Since the age of twelve, Karl, the father, has observed the family tradition of recording his life in a single notebook, but when his book is lost soon after his death, his son resolves to rewrite it. Here, we get to know Karl’s friends—a collection of anti-fascist painters and architects known as Group 33. We learn of the early years of Karl’s marriage and follow his military service as the Swiss fear a German invasion during World War II, his political activity for the Communist Party, and his brief career as a teacher.  ​ Widmer brilliantly combines family history and historical events to tell the story of a man more at home in the world of the imagination than in the real world, a father who grows on the reader, just as he grows on his son.



Mostly Books

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Anne Hoffmann, born in Copenhagen, runs her own graphic design studio in Zurich and works mainly in the fields of art and culture, collaborating with international artists and museums. Over three decades she has designed a wide range of materials, including posters, flyers, cards, and CD booklets. She is best known, however, for her striking designs for books. She has had her own studio since 1986, now in Zurich, where she has worked closely with Swiss and international artists such as Silvia Bächli, Richard Hamilton, and Karim Noureldin. ​In Mostly Books, designed by Anne Hoffmann Graphic Design, Hoffmann reviews thirty years of work. The selection comprises some 120 objects, featured in an annotated book diary. In addition to that panorama, the book explores the topic of graphic design from a variety of perspectives through statements by artists Chris B¸nter, Miriam Cahn, and Claudio Moser; architect Kana Ueda Thoma; author and curator Peter Suter; jewelry designer Torben Hardenberg; museum director and curator Beat Wismer; musician Jörg Halter; and scholar Etienne Lullin, who all offer reflections on the importance of the book as an object and its design.


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Medieval Saints and Modern Screens

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This ground-breaking book brings theoretical perspectives from twenty-first century media, film, and cultural studies to medieval hagiography. Medieval Saints and Modern Screens stakes the claim for a provocative new methodological intervention: consideration of hagiography as media. More precisely, hagiography is most productively understood as cinematic media. Medieval mystical episodes are made intelligible to modern audiences through reference to the filmic – the language, form, and lived experience of cinema. Similarly, reference to the realm of the mystical affords a means to express the disconcerting physical and emotional effects of watching cinema. Moreover, cinematic spectatorship affords, at times, a (more or less) secular experience of visionary transcendence: an ‘agape-ic encounter’. The medieval saint’s visions of God are but one pole of a spectrum of visual experience which extends into our present multi-media moment. We too conjure godly visions: on our smartphones, on the silver screen, and on our TVs and laptops. This book places contemporary pop-culture media – such as blockbuster movie The Dark Knight, Kim Kardashian West’s social media feeds, and the outputs of online role-players in "Second Life"--in dialogue with a corpus of thirteenth-century Latin biographies, Holy Women of Liège. In these texts, holy women see God, and see God often. Their experiences fundamentally orient their life, and offer the women new routes to knowledge, agency, and belonging. For the holy visionaries of Liège, as with us modern ‘seers’, visions are physically intimate, ideologically overloaded spaces. Through theoretically informed close readings, Medieval Saints and Modern Screens reveals the interconnection of decidedly "old" media--medieval textualities--and artefacts of our "new media" ecology, which all serve as spaces in which altogether human concerns are brought before the contemporary culture’s eyes. The thirteenth-century Latin hagiographic works known as the Holy Women of Liège corpus presents biographies filled with dramatic visions of God and intense physical unions with Christ. The texts that make up the collection demonstrate the problematic division of body and soul in the period and also reveal the potential of text to transmit visual experiences. This book explores those qualities of the texts using the latest developments in film theory, taking up such topics as the relationship of film to mortality, embodied spectatorship, celebrity studies, a[...]


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Missions du Musée de l’Homme en Estonie

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This French-language book explores the history of two field missions carried out in 1937 and 1938 by Boris Vildé and Léonide Zouroff to Setomaa, a region that today lies on both sides of the border between Estonia and Russia. Historically, Setomaa was a zone of contact between two distinct Orthodox populations: Setos, of Fennic origin, and Russians, or Eastern Slavs. Highlighting documents, object collections, and unique photographs from the expeditions, and featuring contributions from French, Estonian, and Russian researchers—whose perspectives, while sometimes divergent, are always complementary—the book places the scientific contributions of Vildé and Zouroff in context. A journey back in time, it evokes both the history of the creation of the Musée de l’Homme, with its dynamic field research activities, and that of the people and cultures of Setomaa.



Music And Musicians In Early Nineteenth-Century Cornwall

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Taken from Africa into slavery by the Portuguese, kidnapped by the British Navy and held captive aboard ship during the French wars of the 1790s before being abandoned in Falmouth, the stranger-than-fiction story of Joseph Emidy deserves telling in its own right. What makes it more remarkable is that Emidy - a violinist and composer - became a prominent figure in the musical scene in Cornwall for the remaining thirty years of his life.The richly varied pattern of local activity is illustrated by accounts in local newspapers, as well as by personal memoirs; many of the anecdotes are amusing and always enlightening in the view they offer of a provincial society at a time of great and hitherto unsuspected activity and change.


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Fascism and Modernist Literature in Norway

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This book illuminates the convergence of literature and politics in interwar Norway by focusing on Nobel laureate Knut Hamsun and poets Åsmund Sveen and Rolf Jacobsen—all of whom collaborated with the Nazi occupiers—alongside anti-fascist writer Sigurd Hoel. Dean Krouk shows that for Hamsun, Sveen, and Jacobsen, fascism played into their countercultural leanings and discontent with modernity. In contrast, Hoel’s opposition to Nazism grew into a wider anti-authoritarian inquiry. Krouk’s book is a timely reminder of the perennial value of clear-eyed intellectual practice in the face of fascism.


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G.H.Q. (Montreuil-sur-Mer)

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

A General Headquarters (GHQ) was formed by the British for each theater of World War I, often when the build-up of British forces became too complex for the local forces to retain command. This book offers an account of the GHQ run by Field Marshall Douglas Haig, who commanded the British Expeditionary Force on the Western Front from 1915 to the end of the war. Fox takes us inside Haig’s GHQ located at Montreuil-sur-Mer and shows the complexity of the planning that led to the ultimate defeat of the German Army.   Originally published in 1920 and updated here with statistical summaries of casualties, ammunition, and supplies as well as photographs, this book offers a unique and balanced look at life in the GHQ and fills an important gap in the understanding of the administration of the war.   


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Ground Down by Growth

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Why has India’s astonishing economic growth not reached the people at the bottom of its social and economic hierarchy? Traveling the length and breadth of the subcontinent, this book shows how India’s “untouchables” and “tribals” fit into the global economy.             India’s Dalit and Adivasi communities make up a staggering one in twenty-five people across the globe and yet they remain among the most oppressed. Conceived in dialogue with economists, Ground Down by Growth reveals the lived impact of global capitalism on the people of these communities. Through anthropological studies of how the oppressions of caste, tribe, region, and gender impact the working poor and migrant labor in India, this startling new anthology illuminates the relationship between global capital and social inequality in the Indian context. Collectively, the chapters of this volume expose how capitalism entrenches social difference, transforming traditional forms of identity-based discrimination into new mechanisms of exploitation and oppression. 



Garden

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Edelaar Mosayebi Inderbitzin Architects was founded in Zurich in 2005 by Ron Edelaar, Elli Mosayebi, and Christian Inderbitzin. Their work encompasses design and realization of building projects, urban planning, exhibitions, and publications, and the garden has long been a recurring motif, featuring prominently in many of their architectural projects as idea, vision, or built space. In their exhibition Garden at Architektur Galerie Berlin in 2016, the architects foregrounded that theme and, in collaboration with Swiss landscape designer Daniel Ganz, transformed the gallery space into a living garden. This book presents that installation and offers insight into its creation through striking photographs. Essays by the architects and Stephen Bates, and a conversation with the trio conducted by Martin Steinmann explore the meaning of the garden in a selection of their projects also from a historical and theoretical perspective.  


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Gerhard Richter

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Gerhard Richter is an exceptional personality—not only because his pictures are world famous, but also because he has demonstrated a new approach to painting. His pictures neither cultivate a modest interplay of colors and forms nor deliver an intact picture of reality, but rather move between abstraction and representation, sensuousness and denial. Richter is a skeptical artist who questions the reality of his art even when the prime subject of his paintings is tangibility itself.             This volume sheds new light on Richter’s early creative years, which offer insight into the ambivalent attitudes that persist throughout his oeuvre. His door, curtain, and window pictures of the 1960s form the central focus of this volume, staging as they do a playful examination of the illusory nature of art, which always questions what painting shows or conceals. Outstanding pieces of the last 15 years complement this overview of Richter’s early oeuvre. Celebrating the master artist’s eighty-fifth birthday, this beautifully illustrated volume showcases key works from one of the most famous personalities in the world of painting.


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Gurlitt

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

When more than one thousand lost artworks by artists such as Paul Cézanne, Emil Nolde, Claude Monet, and Wassily Kandinsky turned up in the collection of Cornelius Gurlitt in 2012, the find was celebrated as a sensation. But the accusation that the collection was the product of wartime looting also hovered, unspoken, in the air. Now, for the first time, the works from the Gurlitt estate on view in Bonn and Bern are introduced in a comprehensive book that unfolds their turbulent history. This volume presents the artworks found at Gurlitt’s estate in their historical context, investigating the provenance of the works, which in some cases had been vilified by the National Socialist regime as “degenerate art,” and probing which works were looted, which purchased legally, and which acquired in forced sales. Additionally, contributors to the volume explore the biographies of Jewish collectors and artists who were the victims of art theft and the Holocaust, and retrace how stolen works were returned to museums and private collections after 1945. The official catalog to the exhibition from the Kunstmuseum Bern and the Bundeskunsthalle in Bonn, Gurlitt displays these artworks to the public for the first time and offers a nuanced account of this unique case in the postwar history of Germany.   


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London Map of Days

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The brainchild of Canadian-born, London-based artist Mychael Barratt, London Map of Days is a miscellany of facts and fictions arranged around the events and characters of its eponymous city. Based upon an eight-plate etching by Barratt, which was shown at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition in 2015, the book features 366-date specific references to events or people throughout London’s history. Highlights include: December 17, 1849, when the first bowler hat was created by Thomas and William Bowlers; December 3, 1976, when Pink Floyd’s inflatable pig broke free from Battersea Power Station; and November 11, 1920, when the Cenotaph on Whitehall designed by Edwin Lutyens was unveiled on Armistice Day.   This fun and beautifully produced book includes a fold-out print of the entire map.  


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Labour Exploitation and Work-based Harm

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT




Kind of Magic

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The euphoria that swept Europe and America in the wake of World War I was breathtaking. War was over, perhaps forever, technology was rapidly shrinking the world and improving our lives within it, and, all over, people seemed to be making easy fortunes in business and the stock market. Few material objects epitomize the excitement and glamour of that moment like the vanity case, the ultimate jeweled fashion accessory for women. Primarily designed and created in Paris by craftspeople who understood the modern woman’s need for a case to hold her lipstick, compact, keys, cigarettes, and more, they quickly became de rigeur among the fashionable. Accompanied by images and vivid descriptions that evoke the era when they were made, the forty-eight cases shown in this captivating book tell the story of the 1920s, and provide a suitably glittering insight into the history, fashion, and style of the golden age of glamour. They all come from an exceptional private collection formed by Freddie Mercury’s sister, Kashmira, as a special tribute to his love of beautiful things. Examples of other contemporary jewelry and fashion items round out the selection, making for the perfect gift for any fashionista or fan of the Jazz Age.


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Landscape And Townscape In The South West

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This book examines recent views on the emerging settlement patterns of early medieval Britain and their relation to land use, drawing on both archaeological and documentary sources.  Simon Esmonde Cleary takes the study from the later Romano-British into the post-Roman period. Christopher Holdsworth examines the re-emergence of Christianity in sixth-century England, the location of minsters and their role in the economy. The problematic theme of continuity or dislocation recurs in a number of chapters and is closely investigated by Peter Rose and Ann Preston Jones in their chapter on Cornwall, a region marginal to the main thrust of Anglo-Saxon cultural influence. Ethnicity as a factor for change is challenged, and Colleen Batey, looking at Northern Britain, finds that archaeology fails to identify with any degree of certainty the specific Scandinavian house type in the uplands.  Della Hooke presents a more general summary of the period across England, noting the evidence for the emerging landscape regions which were characterized by particular settlement types and field systems and, in a case study of the Failand ridge in North Somerset, James Bond sets the evidence within a much broader time scale, revealing the gaps which still caracterize our knowledge of the early medieval period.


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Jolted Images

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Jolted Images brings together a large cast of mainstream and avant-garde cineastes, artists, photographers, comics creators, poets, and more, to reflect on a wide range of phenomena from the realms of cinema and visual culture in the Yugoslav region, broader Europe, and North America. Far from a staid monograph, the book takes a cue from filmmaker Dušan Makavejev, who once wrote that there are times when it is necessary "to jolt art, no matter what the outcome"; to that end, the book infuses its analysis with playful, creative transfiguration of the material at hand.  


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Jeanne Mammen The Observer

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The painter and graphic artist Jeanne Mammen (1890–1976) is one of the most awkward and colorful figures of recent German art history. Chronicling the glittering life of 1920s Berlin, from “degenerate” experiments to magical-poetic abstractions, and from New Objectivity to Cubism as resistance to National Socialism, Mammen’s oeuvre critically reflects on the political and aesthetic upheavals of the twentieth century. Her productive output mirrors the extreme circumstances she experienced, from poverty and destruction to her emergence from the ruins of World War II. Delving into the 1920s and beyond through the artworks of an indomitable loner, this wide-ranging and beautifully illustrated book shows the complete work of a Berlin artist on the threshold of the modern age.


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Historical Population Atlas of the Czech Lands

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This bilingual, English-Czech atlas of Czechoslovakia is one of the first to use statistical data to evaluate spatial aspects of population development over time. Its twelve chapters present various themes relating directly to population from a historical perspective, such as demographic structures and processes, migration, economic structure, cultural structure, social status, crime, and elections. Drawing on census results from 1921 to 2011, including population registers from the postwar years, more than three hundred maps present time series of these basic population statistical indicators from the beginnings of the independent Czechoslovak state up to the present. Uniquely, the atlas shows the development of each indicator over time within a single map sheet through a series of maps with a cohesive legend.


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Howell, Killick, Partridge & Amis

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The Alton Estate is widely acclaimed as one of the seminal works of the modern architecture in Britain. Yet few know its creators, four ambitious young architects in the employ of the London County Council: Bill Howell, John Killick, John Partridge, and Stan Amis.  Howell Killick Partridge & Amis tells the story of these four architects who launched their firm with a maverick design for Churchill College, Cambridge. Deriving a distinct design language from revealed structures and highly modeled surfaces, Howell Killick Partridge & Amis (HKPA) developed a rich architecture that they applied to a range of projects—from additions to Oxford and Cambridge Colleges to theaters, houses, and government buildings. Although a mastery of precast concrete and a preference for raw finishes earned them an early reputation as brutalists, their sensitivity to context, refined sense of light and materials, and eye for the qualities of historic buildings transcends any single style. Geraint Franklin has combined interviews with archival research to tell the story behind HPKA’s built and unrealized projects. Lavishly illustrated with new photography by James O. Davies and images from the archive, the book is a must for students and architects wanting to discover this key practice in British postwar architecture.  


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Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

How can we measure poverty in the United Kingdom today, and which measures are most reliable? Is poverty related to other problems and disadvantages? Based on the largest research study on UK poverty ever commissioned, these fascinating volumes answer these questions and more, providing the most authoritative and up-to-date picture ever assembled of poverty throughout the four countries of the United Kingdom. Using state-of-the-art measurement methods, Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK looks across geography, time, and key domains like health, employment, and housing to make enlightening—and sometimes shocking—comparisons. In the second volume, contributors consider different aspects of disadvantage, from access to local services, the world of work, the quality of housing and neighborhoods, and physical and mental health. They also look at wider aspects of social and community life, as well as participation in civic and political activities.


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Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

How can we measure poverty in the United Kingdom today, and which measures are most reliable? Is poverty related to other problems and disadvantages? Based on the largest research study on UK poverty ever commissioned, these fascinating volumes answer these questions and more, providing the most authoritative and up-to-date picture ever assembled of poverty throughout the four countries of the United Kingdom. Using state-of-the-art measurement methods, Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK looks across geography, time, and key domains like health, employment, and housing to make enlightening—and sometimes shocking—comparisons. In the second volume, contributors consider different aspects of disadvantage, from access to local services, the world of work, the quality of housing and neighborhoods, and physical and mental health. They also look at wider aspects of social and community life, as well as participation in civic and political activities.


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Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

How can we measure poverty in the United Kingdom today, and which measures are most reliable? Is poverty related to other problems and disadvantages? Based on the largest research study on UK poverty ever commissioned, these fascinating volumes answer these questions and more, providing the most authoritative and up-to-date picture ever assembled of poverty throughout the four countries of the United Kingdom. Using state-of-the-art measurement methods, Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK looks across geography, time, and key domains like health, employment, and housing to make enlightening—and sometimes shocking—comparisons. Volume One focuses on assessing poverty through the lens of a wide range of groups, reporting on the living standards of older and younger people, parents and children, ethnic groups, and disabled people—as well as on the differing impacts of political intervention.


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Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

How can we measure poverty in the United Kingdom today, and which measures are most reliable? Is poverty related to other problems and disadvantages? Based on the largest research study on UK poverty ever commissioned, these fascinating volumes answer these questions and more, providing the most authoritative and up-to-date picture ever assembled of poverty throughout the four countries of the United Kingdom. Using state-of-the-art measurement methods, Poverty and Social Exclusion in the UK looks across geography, time, and key domains like health, employment, and housing to make enlightening—and sometimes shocking—comparisons. Volume One focuses on assessing poverty through the lens of a wide range of groups, reporting on the living standards of older and younger people, parents and children, ethnic groups, and disabled people—as well as on the differing impacts of political intervention.


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Prosperity without Greed

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

It is time to leave capitalism behind. In Prosperity without Greed, Sahra Wagenknecht shows that we live in a system of economic feudalism that has nothing to do with a free market economy, where the innovations we require to solve myriad important societal problems are not forthcoming. How can it be, Wagenknecht asks, that technological developments financed by the taxpayer end up enriching private companies even if those companies’ activities violate public interests? Through clear analysis and concrete proposals, Wagenknecht suggestss new forms of ownership and sketches the outlines of an innovative and just economy that instead promotes and rewards talent, real performance, and start-ups with groundbreaking ideas.


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Resilience and the Localisation of Trauma in Aceh, Indonesia

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Aceh is a region that is no stranger to violent conflict and tragedy. This special territory of Indonesia has faced occupation, fallen into civil war, and was brutalized by the deadly 2004 tsunami. While these forces have altered the lives of the Aceh people, their very experiences of suffering and recovery have changed thanks to the globalization of psychiatry. In this book, Catherine Smith examines the global reach of the contested, yet compelling, concept of trauma. She explores how what is considered “trauma” has expanded well beyond the bounds of therapeutic practice to become a powerful cultural idiom shaping the ways people understand the effects of violence and imagine possible responses to suffering. In Aceh, conflict survivors have incorporated the ideas of trauma into their local languages, healing practices, and political imaginaries. The appearance of this idiom of distress into the Acehnese medical-moral landscape provides an ethnographic perspective on suffering and recovery, and contributes to our contemporary debates about the international reach of psychiatry and the cultural consequences as it spreads beyond the domain of medicine.


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Rudolf Schwarz and the Monumental Order of Things

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The work of Rudolf Schwarz (1897–1961) allows a deeper understanding of post-war German architecture, representing the product of a continuous European architectural and intellectual practice that bridged the Second World War. Known especially for his churches, Schwarz is perhaps best remembered for his significant contributions to the reconstruction of Cologne. This book examines nine of his religious and secular buildings in the Rhineland, which are presented through new survey drawings and photographs. These are accompanied by Schwarz’s project descriptions and his lecture “Architecture of Our Times” from 1958, which contextualizes his approach. Essays by Wolfgang Pehnt and an interview with Schwarz’s wife, the architect Maria Schwarz, provide further insight into this complex oeuvre.  


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Rembrandt and His Circle

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This collection brings together art historians, museum professionals, conservators, and conservation scientists whose work involves Rembrandt van Rijn and associated artists such as Gerrit Dou, Jan Lievens, and Ferdinand Bol. The range of subjects considered is wide: from the presentation of convincing evidence that Rembrandt and his contemporary Frans Hals rubbed elbows in the Amsterdam workshop of Hendrick Uylenburgh to critical reassessments of the role of printmaking in Rembrandt's studio, his competition with Lievens as a landscape painter, his reputation as a collector, and much more. Developed from a series of international conferences devoted to charting new directions in Rembrandt research, these essays illuminate the current state of Rembrandt studies and suggest avenues for future inquiry.  


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Posthuman Gothic

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

An edited collection of thirteen chapters, Posthuman Gothic explores the various ways in which posthuman thought intersects with Gothic textuality and mediality. The texts and media under discussion—from I am Legend to In the Flesh; from Star Trek to The Truman Show—transgress the boundaries of genre and move beyond the traditional scope of the Gothic. These texts, the contributors argue, destabilize our conception of what it means to be human. Drawing on key texts of both Gothic and posthumanist theory, the contributors analyze varied themes: posthuman vampire and zombie narratives; genetically modified posthumans; the posthuman in video games, film, and television; the posthuman as a return to nature; the posthuman’s relation to classic monster narratives; and posthuman biohorror and theories of prometheanism and accelerationism. In its entirety, this book is the first attempt to address the complex intersections of the posthuman and the Gothic in contemporary literature and media.  


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Praised and Ridiculed

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Romanticism, realism, impressionism—today these are the most important stylistic labels for French painting during the nineteenth century. Though celebrated today as precursors to modernism, Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, and many others were highly controversial figures in their time for their departures from neoclassical methods. On the other hand, salon painters who were highly regarded during the nineteenth century—like Meissonier, Cabanel, and Bouguereau—have been consigned to the fringes of art history today.             This unique volume juxtaposes these reformers of painting and their more traditional counterparts, offering a discriminating look at the controversial styles in French painting between 1820 and 1880, as well as the developments within more conventional genres. Exploring the parallels, diversity, and contradictions in the practice and reception of French painting, Praised and Ridiculed shows the outstanding role played by both experimental and neoclassical painters during the nineteenth century.


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Practice-based Research in Children's Play

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This original book brings together the findings of twelve research projects into children’s play and adults’ relationship, carried out by experienced practitioners in the field from the United States and the United Kingdom. Deploying a wide range of research methods, the studies consider adults’ memories of play, the co-production of spaces where children can play, therapeutic approaches to playwork and well-being, how to support the play of severely disabled children and young people, play and contemporary art practice, and children's use of technology in playgrounds. Moving well beyond the dominant singular voice of developmental psychology, this book will be essential reading for anyone studying or working with children at play.  



Protest Camps in International Context

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT




Entangled Landscapes

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

China and Europe have had a storied, and at times stormy, relationship. Yet their relationship is hardly one of a simple, binary exchange. Instead, their roles are best described as entangled. This exchange has a physical manifestation in the world of garden design, as artists on both continents engaged in complex processes of appropriation, crossover, and transformation.Entangled Landscapes focuses on the exchange of ideas of landscape practice between Europe and China in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Yue Zhuang and Andrea M. Riemenschnitter explore this through three themes—empire-building, mediators’ constraints, and aesthetic negotiations. They challenge our assumptions about how China and Europe influenced one another and go beyond well-documented outcomes like the jardin anglo-chinois and Européenerie styles. Interdisciplinary and revisionist, this brings the critical spirit of postcolonial studies to art history and will appeal to scholars in fields such as comparative literature and visual culture, history, and human geography.


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Enraptured by Color

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

In late nineteenth-century France, more than a century after the introduction of color in printmaking, color became a major factor in the market success of lithography and other printmaking techniques. Published to accompany a major exhibition at the Musée Jenisch Vevey, Enraptured by Color offers a comprehensive compendium of color printmaking, with examples from all aspects of the trade. In a detailed introduction, curator Laurence Schmidlin takes readers through the process of producing a color engraving and explains the differences between color engravings and color prints. Additional essays, illustrated with rare documents and representative examples from the period, expand on the technical processes behind polychromy, or the use of several colors, and its effect on artistic production in France around 1890. Finally, the book explores, through a wealth of color illustrations, how color was exploited by important artists of the period, such as Pierre Bonnard, Paul Gauguin, Odilon Redon, Paul Signac, Édouard Vuillard, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.  


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Engagement in Twenty-First-Century French and Francophone Culture

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Composed of eleven essays and a contextualizing introduction, Engagement in 21st Century French and Francophone Culture reassesses the relationships between different types of cultural production and society as they play out in the twenty-first century. Together, the contributors demonstrate how French and Francophone writers, artists, intellectuals, and filmmakers have used their work to confront unforeseen and unprecedented challenges in a politically uncertain post-9/11 world. With a focus on both the development of different cultural forms and on the particular crises that have attracted the attention of cultural practitioners, this volume maps and analyzes the ways in which cultural texts of all kinds are being used to respond to, engage with, and challenge crises in the contemporary Francophone world.  


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Elke Härtel: Rapunzel

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

As familiar as it is, it’s easy to forget how disquieting the story of Rapunzel really is: a young girl escapes imprisonment by allowing her suitor to climb her own hair all the way up into her tower. In this volume, sculptor Elke Härtel—whose work reimagines mythical female figures in abject yet stoic poses—restores the story of Rapunzel to its exquisitely creepy origins. This evocative, pictorial book documents Härtel’s fascinating process of recreating Rapunzel, tracing the genesis of her artwork from the first study to the casting to the installation. Featuring lavish illustrations, this book offers a glimpse into contemporary sculpture as well as the sinister beauty of a timeless fairy tale.


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Encounters with Art

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

People who know something about art also know how irritating talking about art can be. In this book, the art connoisseur Wolfgang Felten undertakes to reveal artworks as areas of experience outside of language. From a Khmer Buddha statue or an African mask to a drawing by Alberto Giacometti or a photograph by Dorothea Lange, the artist’s commitment is to explain a phenomenon non-verbally: inviting us to experience how inanimate material can bring forth something that is alive. The artist appeals to our willingness to see: independently, intensively, and in a way that remains open to new experiences.              In this unique and beautifully illustrated volume, Felten joins ranks with photographer Hubertus Hamm to show how great art refuses to surrender the visual to the argumentative. In a nutshell, as Ad Reinhardt once succinctly put it, “Art is art and everything else is everything else.”


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Eurotopians

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

How do we want to inhabit the spaces we live in? How can we build homes that match our ideals and meet the demands of a changing world? Where can we find ideas for the houses and cities of the future? During the 1960s and 1970s, visionary architecture in Europe began to raise these fundamental questions about the homes we inhabit. Journalist Niklas Maak has visited the buildings of this era—many of which are now in ruins—and curates here an “archaeology of the utopian,” founding ideas for future architectures in the buildings of the past. Featuring works by Antti Lovag, Yona Friedman, Claude Parent, Dante Bini, Cini Boeri, Hans-Walter Müller, Renée Gailhoustet, and Jean Renaudie, all impressively photographed by Johanna Diehl, this intelligent new volume explores inspiring revolutionary forms of living through the utopian architectures of the past.


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El Lissitzky

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Unquestionably one of Russian modernism’s best-known artists, El Lissitzky created artworks—in a staggering variety of media—that have entranced collectors and inspired other artists for decades. The subject of numerous monographs and exhibitions, his mature abstract paintings, drawings, photographs, and graphic work can be found in abundance in public collections worldwide. In this book, however, Alexander Kantsedikas, one of the world’s leading experts on the artist, offers the first extended look at his earlier work, which was  more or less exclusively devoted to Jewish subjects, reflecting his religious education and family’s heritage. While a handful of these works are well known and widely published, this phase of his work will be far less familiar even to an audience well versed in El Lissitzky’s oeuvre. Featuring more than five hundred works, lavishly reproduced in color and black and white, the book tracks his evolution from an expressionist style to one that is increasingly more abstract and nonobjective. It also includes rare photographic material of the artist’s family, as well as little-known correspondence from his father and details about his relationship with his first wife, who has heretofore been entirely obscured in the artist’s biography.


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Early Modern Prayer

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

What was the place of prayer in the early modern world? What did it look and sound like in those centuries? How did the activities, expressions, and texts of prayer bind disparate peoples together or create friction within communities? What roles did prayer play in intercultural contact, including violence, conquest, and resistance?   These crucial questions—and many more—are answered in Early Modern Prayer. This volume of essays shows how we can we use prayers of the early modern era, roughly 1500 to1800, to more deeply analyze and understand the people, politics, and cultures of the time.  


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Christmas and the Qur'an

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The story of Christmas—familiar and heart-warming, a story of hope and peace encapsulated by the birth of the infant Jesus—is also a story that unites two faiths often at odds with one another. Luke and Matthew’s accounts of the Nativity in the Bible find their detailed parallels in Surah 19 and Surah 3 of the Qur’an. From this starting point, Karl-Josef Kuschel begins to look for Christmas in the Qur’an; a challenge for both Christians and Muslims to engage in a deeper dialogue about the fundamental questions of their faiths. By going back to the word, this detailed analysis of the original texts in both the New Testament and the Qur’an provides a revealing—and timely—new perspective for interreligious dialogue.  


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Charles II

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660 led to a resurgence of the arts in England, and Charles II became a leading patron and collector throughout the mid- and late seventeenth century. Fine and decorative arts served not only as furnishings for the royal residences but also as a means of glorifying the restored monarchy and reinforcing the position of Charles II as the rightful king.   Sumptuously illustrated, Charles II: Art & Power looks at the art and culture of the court of Charles II, as well as James II, who followed his brother as a liberal patron. It includes an exploration of the theme of power throughout the reigns of these monarchs, and looks at ritual and decorative uses of art and the development of a distinct "English Baroque." Among the many works of art showcased here are the replacement Crown Jewels made for the coronation of Charles II in 1661, John Michael Wright’s monumental portrait of Charles II in his coronation robes, the glittering gilt plate that adorned the altar of Westminster Abbey during the coronation, Charles II’s collection of Italian Old Master paintings and drawings, including by Leonardo da Vinci, and many spectacular furnishings from the Palace of Whitehall and St James’s Palace.   Published to accompany a major exhibition at the Queen’s Gallery, Buckingham Palace, Charles II: Art & Power matches an explanatory text with more than 400 lavish full-color illustrations that reveal the remarkable scope of Charles II [...]


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Capability-Promoting Policies

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Most current social welfare policies aim to ameliorate immediate problems or injustices, but they do little to foster human development or support the potential of people within marginalized communities. How can we more effectively use public policy to foster human development? How can we overcome the injustice of contemporary society and give people across the social and class spectrum equal opportunities to flourish? Capability-Promoting Policies offers case studies and analyses of a number of different existing approaches to these questions, presenting newly conceptualized strategies for developing and implementing effective policies for fostering human development at the local, national, and international levels.


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Counterpoints

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Multimedia experiments are everywhere in contemporary art, but the collaboration and conflict associated with multimedia is not a new phenomenon. From opera to the symphonic poem to paintings inspired by music, many attempts have been made to pair sounds with pictures and to combine the arts of time and space. Counterpoints explores this artistic evolution from ancient times to the present day. The book’s main focus is music and its relationship with painting, sculpture, and architecture. Philippe Junod draws on theoretical and practical examples to show how different art movements throughout history have embraced or rejected creative combinations. He explains how the Renaissance, neoclassicism, and certain brands of modernism tried to claim the purity of each mode of expression, while other movements such as romanticism, symbolism, and surrealism called for a fusion of the arts. Counterpoints is a unique cultural history, one that provides a critical understanding of a popular but previously unheralded art form.


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Communist Party of Great Britain and the National Question in Wales, 1920-1991

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This book draws on substantial new archival research to present the first in-depth study of the Communist Party's attitude to devolution in Wales, to Welsh nationhood, and Welsh identity, and the party's relationship with labor and nationalist movements as they related to these issues. Douglas Jones sets the inquiry in context of the rapid changes in twentieth-century Welsh society, debates on devolution and identity within the British left, the role of nationalism within the communist movement, and more.


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Communist Party of Great Britain and the National Question in Wales, 1920-1991

Thu, 15 Feb 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This book draws on substantial new archival research to present the first in-depth study of the Communist Party's attitude to devolution in Wales, to Welsh nationhood, and Welsh identity, and the party's relationship with labor and nationalist movements as they related to these issues. Douglas Jones sets the inquiry in context of the rapid changes in twentieth-century Welsh society, debates on devolution and identity within the British left, the role of nationalism within the communist movement, and more.


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