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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Tue, 23 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

 



Under the Cover of Chaos

Sat, 20 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

One of the ways that people—voters, other politicians, and members of the media—have dealt with the rise of Donald Trump has been to dismiss him as an outlier, treating his irrationality, cruelty, and bombast as marks of his own character rather than signs of anything larger. Lawrence Grossberg’s Under the Cover of Chaos makes that argument impossible. In damning detail, Grossberg here lays bare the deep roots of Trumpism in the broader history of postwar US conservatism.             Rather than a break with some imagined pure, nuanced conservatism, Grossberg shows, Trump’s manic nonsense is actually a continuation, the result of a long struggle between the new right and the reactionary right. What is new, he shows, is that the reactionary right has been legitimated—and has brought its political strategy of sowing chaos into the heart of mainstream politics. From there, Grossberg goes on to analyze the national mood—and to explain how that plays out in the actions of both Trump supporters and opponents—and lays out a possible nightmare future: a vision of a political system controlled by corporate interests, built on a deliberate dismantling of modern politics. 


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/07/45/33/9780745337920.jpg




Under the Cover of Chaos

Sat, 20 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

One of the ways that people—voters, other politicians, and members of the media—have dealt with the rise of Donald Trump has been to dismiss him as an outlier, treating his irrationality, cruelty, and bombast as marks of his own character rather than signs of anything larger. Lawrence Grossberg’s Under the Cover of Chaos makes that argument impossible. In damning detail, Grossberg here lays bare the deep roots of Trumpism in the broader history of postwar US conservatism.             Rather than a break with some imagined pure, nuanced conservatism, Grossberg shows, Trump’s manic nonsense is actually a continuation, the result of a long struggle between the new right and the reactionary right. What is new, he shows, is that the reactionary right has been legitimated—and has brought its political strategy of sowing chaos into the heart of mainstream politics. From there, Grossberg goes on to analyze the national mood—and to explain how that plays out in the actions of both Trump supporters and opponents—and lays out a possible nightmare future: a vision of a political system controlled by corporate interests, built on a deliberate dismantling of modern politics. 


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/07/45/33/9780745337920.jpg




Poetic Justice

Sat, 20 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

When Plato set his dialogs, written texts were disseminated primarily by performance and recitation. He wrote them, however, when literacy was expanding. Jill Frank argues that there are unique insights to be gained from appreciating Plato’s dialogs as written texts to be read and reread. At the center of these insights are two distinct ways of learning to read in the dialogs. One approach that appears in the Statesman, Sophist, and Protagoras, treats learning to read as a top-down affair, in which authoritative teachers lead students to true beliefs. Another, recommended by Socrates, encourages trial and error and the formation of beliefs based on students’ own fallible experiences. In all of these dialogs, learning to read is likened to coming to know or understand something. Given Plato’s repeated presentation of the analogy between reading and coming to know, what can these two approaches tell us about his dialogs’ representations of philosophy and politics?            With Poetic Justice, Jill Frank overturns the conventional view that the Republic endorses a hierarchical ascent to knowledge and the authoritarian politics associated with that philosophy. When learning to read is understood as the passive absorption of a teacher’s beliefs, this reflects the account of Platonic philosophy as authoritative knowledge wielded by philosopher kings who ruled the ideal city. When we learn to read by way of the method Socrates introduces in the Republic, Frank argues, we are offered an education in ethical and political self-governance, one that prompts citizens to challenge all claims to authority, including those of philosophy.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/51/9780226515779.jpg




Poetic Justice

Sat, 20 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

When Plato set his dialogs, written texts were disseminated primarily by performance and recitation. He wrote them, however, when literacy was expanding. Jill Frank argues that there are unique insights to be gained from appreciating Plato’s dialogs as written texts to be read and reread. At the center of these insights are two distinct ways of learning to read in the dialogs. One approach that appears in the Statesman, Sophist, and Protagoras, treats learning to read as a top-down affair, in which authoritative teachers lead students to true beliefs. Another, recommended by Socrates, encourages trial and error and the formation of beliefs based on students’ own fallible experiences. In all of these dialogs, learning to read is likened to coming to know or understand something. Given Plato’s repeated presentation of the analogy between reading and coming to know, what can these two approaches tell us about his dialogs’ representations of philosophy and politics?            With Poetic Justice, Jill Frank overturns the conventional view that the Republic endorses a hierarchical ascent to knowledge and the authoritarian politics associated with that philosophy. When learning to read is understood as the passive absorption of a teacher’s beliefs, this reflects the account of Platonic philosophy as authoritative knowledge wielded by philosopher kings who ruled the ideal city. When we learn to read by way of the method Socrates introduces in the Republic, Frank argues, we are offered an education in ethical and political self-governance, one that prompts citizens to challenge all claims to authority, including those of philosophy.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/51/9780226515779.jpg




Visualizing Disease

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Visual anatomy books have been a staple of medical practice and study since the mid-sixteenth century. But the visual representation of diseased states followed a very different pattern from anatomy, one we are only now beginning to investigate and understand. With Visualizing Disease, Domenico Bertoloni Meli explores key questions in this domain, opening a new field of inquiry based on the analysis of a rich body of arresting and intellectually challenging images reproduced here both in black and white and in color.   Starting in the Renaissance, Bertoloni Meli delves into the wide range of figures involved in the early study and representation of disease, including not just men of medicine, like anatomists, physicians, surgeons, and pathologists, but also draftsmen and engravers. Pathological preparations proved difficult to preserve and represent, and as Bertoloni Meli takes us through a number of different cases from the Renaissance to the mid-nineteenth century, we gain a new understanding of how knowledge of disease, interactions among medical men and artists, and changes in the technologies of preservation and representation of specimens interacted to slowly bring illustration into the medical world.


Media Files:
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Visions of Cell Biology

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Although modern cell biology is often considered to have arisen following World War II in tandem with certain technological and methodological advances—in particular, the electron microscope and cell fractionation—its origins actually date to the 1830s and the development of cytology, the scientific study of cells. By 1924, with the publication of Edmund Vincent Cowdry’s General Cytology, the discipline had stretched beyond the bounds of purely microscopic observation to include the chemical, physical, and genetic analysis of cells. Inspired by Cowdry’s classic, watershed work, this book collects contributions from cell biologists, historians, and philosophers of science to explore the history and current status of cell biology. Despite extraordinary advances in describing both the structure and function of cells, cell biology tends to be overshadowed by molecular biology, a field that developed contemporaneously. This book remedies that unjust disparity through an investigation of cell biology’s evolution and its role in pushing forward the boundaries of biological understanding. Contributors show that modern concepts of cell organization, mechanistic explanations, epigenetics, molecular thinking, and even computational approaches all can be placed on the continuum of cell studies from cytology to cell biology and beyond. The first book in the series Convening Science: Discovery at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Visions of Cell Biology sheds new light on a century of cellular discovery.


Media Files:
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What a Philosopher Is

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The trajectory of Friedrich Nietzsche’s thought has long presented a difficulty for the study of his philosophy. How did the young Nietzsche—classicist and ardent advocate of Wagner’s cultural renewal—become the philosopher of Will to Power and the Eternal Return?   With this book, Laurence Lampert answers that question. He does so through his trademark technique of close readings of key works in Nietzsche’s journey to philosophy: The Birth of Tragedy, Schopenhauer as Educator, Richard Wagner in Bayreuth, Human All Too Human, and “Sanctus Januarius,” the final book of the 1882 Gay Science. Relying partly on how Nietzsche himself characterized his books in his many autobiographical guides to the trajectory of his thought, Lampert sets each in the context of Nietzsche’s writings as a whole, and looks at how they individually treat the question of what a philosopher is. Indispensable to his conclusions are the workbooks in which Nietzsche first recorded his advances, especially the 1881 workbook which shows him gradually gaining insights into the two foundations of his mature thinking. The result is the most complete picture we’ve had yet of the philosopher’s development, one that gives us a Promethean Nietzsche, gaining knowledge even as he was expanding his thought to create new worlds.  


Media Files:
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Telling It Like It Wasn’t

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Inventing counterfactual histories is a common pastime of modern day historians, both amateur and professional. We speculate about an America ruled by Jefferson Davis, a Europe that never threw off Hitler, or a second term for JFK. These narratives are often written off as politically inspired fantasy or as pop culture fodder, but in Telling It Like It Wasn’t, Catherine Gallagher takes the history of counterfactual history seriously, pinning it down as an object of dispassionate study. She doesn’t take a moral or normative stand on the practice, but focuses her attention on how it works and to what ends—a quest that takes readers on a fascinating tour of literary and historical criticism. Gallagher locates the origins of contemporary counterfactual history in eighteenth-century Europe, where the idea of other possible historical worlds first took hold in philosophical disputes about Providence before being repurposed by military theorists as a tool for improving the art of war. In the next century, counterfactualism became a legal device for deciding liability, and lengthy alternate-history fictions appeared, illustrating struggles for historical justice. These early motivations—for philosophical understanding, military improvement, and historical justice—are still evident today in our fondness for counterfactual tales. Alternate histories of the Civil War and WWII abound, but here, Gallagher shows how the counterfactual habit of replaying the recent past often shapes our understanding of the actual events themselves. The counterfactual mode lets us continue to envision our future by reconsidering the range of previous alternatives. Throughout this engaging and eye-opening book, Gallagher encourages readers to ask important questions about our obsession with counterfactual history and the roots of our tendency to ask “What if…?”


Media Files:
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Visions of Cell Biology

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Although modern cell biology is often considered to have arisen following World War II in tandem with certain technological and methodological advances—in particular, the electron microscope and cell fractionation—its origins actually date to the 1830s and the development of cytology, the scientific study of cells. By 1924, with the publication of Edmund Vincent Cowdry’s General Cytology, the discipline had stretched beyond the bounds of purely microscopic observation to include the chemical, physical, and genetic analysis of cells. Inspired by Cowdry’s classic, watershed work, this book collects contributions from cell biologists, historians, and philosophers of science to explore the history and current status of cell biology. Despite extraordinary advances in describing both the structure and function of cells, cell biology tends to be overshadowed by molecular biology, a field that developed contemporaneously. This book remedies that unjust disparity through an investigation of cell biology’s evolution and its role in pushing forward the boundaries of biological understanding. Contributors show that modern concepts of cell organization, mechanistic explanations, epigenetics, molecular thinking, and even computational approaches all can be placed on the continuum of cell studies from cytology to cell biology and beyond. The first book in the series Convening Science: Discovery at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Visions of Cell Biology sheds new light on a century of cellular discovery.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/52/9780226520513.jpg




Legislative Style

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Once elected, members of Congress face difficult decisions about how to allocate their time and effort. On which issues should they focus? What is the right balance between working in one’s district and on Capitol Hill? How much should they engage with the media to cultivate a national reputation? William Bernhard and Tracy Sulkin argue that these decisions and others define a “legislative style” that aligns with a legislator’s ambitions, experiences, and personal inclinations, as well as any significant electoral and institutional constraints. Bernhard and Sulkin have developed a systematic approach for looking at legislative style through a variety of criteria, including the number of the bills passed, number of speeches given, amount of money raised, and the percentage of time a legislator voted in line with his or her party. Applying this to ten congresses, representing twenty years of congressional data, from 1989 to 2009, they reveal that legislators’ activity falls within five predictable styles. These styles remain relatively consistent throughout legislators’ time in office, though a legislator’s style can change as career goals evolve, as well as with changes to individual or larger political interests, as in redistricting or a majority shift. Offering insight into a number of enduring questions in legislative politics, Legislative Style is a rich and nuanced account of legislators’ activity on Capitol Hill.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/51/9780226510286.jpg




Legislative Style

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Once elected, members of Congress face difficult decisions about how to allocate their time and effort. On which issues should they focus? What is the right balance between working in one’s district and on Capitol Hill? How much should they engage with the media to cultivate a national reputation? William Bernhard and Tracy Sulkin argue that these decisions and others define a “legislative style” that aligns with a legislator’s ambitions, experiences, and personal inclinations, as well as any significant electoral and institutional constraints. Bernhard and Sulkin have developed a systematic approach for looking at legislative style through a variety of criteria, including the number of the bills passed, number of speeches given, amount of money raised, and the percentage of time a legislator voted in line with his or her party. Applying this to ten congresses, representing twenty years of congressional data, from 1989 to 2009, they reveal that legislators’ activity falls within five predictable styles. These styles remain relatively consistent throughout legislators’ time in office, though a legislator’s style can change as career goals evolve, as well as with changes to individual or larger political interests, as in redistricting or a majority shift. Offering insight into a number of enduring questions in legislative politics, Legislative Style is a rich and nuanced account of legislators’ activity on Capitol Hill.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/51/9780226510286.jpg




Moral Conflict of Law and Neuroscience

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Law relies on a conception of human agency, the idea that humans are capable of making their own choices and are morally responsible for the consequences. But what if that is not the case? Over the past half century, the story of the law has been one of increased acuity concerning the human condition, especially the workings of the brain. The law already considers select cognitive realities in evaluating questions of agency and responsibility, such as age, sanity, and emotional distress. As new neuroscientific research comprehensively calls into question the very idea of free will, how should the law respond to this revised understanding?             Peter A. Alces considers where and how the law currently fails to appreciate the neuroscientific revelation that humans may in key ways lack normative free will—and therefore moral responsibility. The most accessible setting in which to consider the potential impact of neuroscience is criminal law, as certain aspects of criminal law already reveal the naiveté of most normative reasoning, such as the inconsistent treatment of people with equally disadvantageous cognitive deficits, whether congenital or acquired. But tort and contract law also assume a flawed conception of human agency and responsibility. Alces reveals the internal contradictions of extant legal doctrine and concludes by considering what would be involved in constructing novel legal regimes based on emerging neuroscientific insights.


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Making Time

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

What is time made of? We might balk at such a question, and reply that time is not made of anything—it is an abstract and universal phenomenon. In Making Time, Yulia Frumer upends this assumption, using changes in the conceptualization of time in Japan to show that humans perceive time as constructed and concrete. In the mid-sixteenth century, when the first mechanical clocks arrived in Japan from Europe, the Japanese found them interesting but useless, because they failed to display time in units that changed their length with the seasons, as was customary in Japan at the time. In 1873, however, the Japanese government adopted the Western equal-hour system as well as Western clocks. Given that Japan carried out this reform during a period of rapid industrial development, it would be easy to assume that time consciousness is inherent to the equal-hour system and a modern lifestyle, but Making Time suggests that punctuality and time-consciousness are equally possible in a society regulated by a variable-hour system, arguing that this reform occurred because the equal-hour system better reflected a new conception of time — as abstract and universal—which had been developed in Japan by a narrow circle of astronomers, who began seeing time differently as a result of their measurement and calculation practices. Over the course of a few short decades this new way of conceptualizing time spread, gradually becoming the only recognized way of treating time.     


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Transmedium

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

If you attend a contemporary art exhibition today, you’re unlikely to see much traditional painting or sculpture. Indeed, artists today are preoccupied with what happens when you leave behind assumptions about particular media—such as painting, or woodcuts—and instead focus on collisions between them, and the new forms and ideas that those collisions generate.   Garrett Stewart in Transmedium dubs this new approach Conceptualism 2.0, an allusion in part to the computer images that are so often addressed by these works. A successor to 1960s Conceptualism, which posited that a material medium was unnecessary to the making of art, Conceptualism 2.0 features artworks that are transmedial, that place the aesthetic experience itself deliberately at the boundary between often incommensurable media. The result, Stewart shows, is art whose forced convergences break open new possibilities that are wholly surprising, intellectually enlightening, and often uncanny.  


Media Files:
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Transmedium

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

If you attend a contemporary art exhibition today, you’re unlikely to see much traditional painting or sculpture. Indeed, artists today are preoccupied with what happens when you leave behind assumptions about particular media—such as painting, or woodcuts—and instead focus on collisions between them, and the new forms and ideas that those collisions generate.   Garrett Stewart in Transmedium dubs this new approach Conceptualism 2.0, an allusion in part to the computer images that are so often addressed by these works. A successor to 1960s Conceptualism, which posited that a material medium was unnecessary to the making of art, Conceptualism 2.0 features artworks that are transmedial, that place the aesthetic experience itself deliberately at the boundary between often incommensurable media. The result, Stewart shows, is art whose forced convergences break open new possibilities that are wholly surprising, intellectually enlightening, and often uncanny.  


Media Files:
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Building the American Republic, Volume 1

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Building the American Republic combines centuries of perspectives and voices into a fluid narrative of the United States. Throughout their respective volumes, Harry L. Watson and Jane Dailey take care to integrate varied scholarly perspectives and work to engage a diverse readership by addressing what we all share: membership in a democratic republic, with joint claims on its self-governing tradition. It will be one of the first peer-reviewed American history textbooks to be offered completely free in digital form. Visit buildingtheamericanrepublic.org for more information.  Volume 1 starts at sea and ends on the battlefield. Beginning with the earliest Americans and the arrival of strangers on the eastern shore, it then moves through colonial society to the fight for independence and the construction of a federalist republic. From there, it explains the renegotiations and refinements that took place as a new nation found its footing, and it traces the actions that eventually rippled into the Civil War. This volume goes beyond famous names and battles to incorporate politics, economics, science, arts, and culture. And it shows that issues that resonate today—immigration, race, labor, gender roles, and the power of technology—have been part of the American fabric since the very beginning.


Media Files:
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Building the American Republic, Volume 1

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Building the American Republic combines centuries of perspectives and voices into a fluid narrative of the United States. Throughout their respective volumes, Harry L. Watson and Jane Dailey take care to integrate varied scholarly perspectives and work to engage a diverse readership by addressing what we all share: membership in a democratic republic, with joint claims on its self-governing tradition. It will be one of the first peer-reviewed American history textbooks to be offered completely free in digital form. Visit buildingtheamericanrepublic.org for more information.  Volume 1 starts at sea and ends on the battlefield. Beginning with the earliest Americans and the arrival of strangers on the eastern shore, it then moves through colonial society to the fight for independence and the construction of a federalist republic. From there, it explains the renegotiations and refinements that took place as a new nation found its footing, and it traces the actions that eventually rippled into the Civil War. This volume goes beyond famous names and battles to incorporate politics, economics, science, arts, and culture. And it shows that issues that resonate today—immigration, race, labor, gender roles, and the power of technology—have been part of the American fabric since the very beginning.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/30/9780226300511.jpg




Building the American Republic, Volume 2

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Building the American Republic combines centuries of perspectives and voices into a fluid narrative of the United States. Throughout their respective volumes, Harry L. Watson and Jane Dailey take care to integrate varied scholarly perspectives and work to engage a diverse readership by addressing what we all share: membership in a democratic republic, with joint claims on its self-governing tradition. It will be one of the first peer-reviewed American history textbooks to be offered completely free in digital form. Visit buildingtheamericanrepublic.org for more information.  The American nation came apart in a violent civil war less than a century after ratification of the Constitution. When it was reborn five years later, both the republic and its Constitution were transformed. Volume 2 opens as America struggles to regain its footing, reeling from a presidential assassination and facing massive economic growth, rapid demographic change, and combustive politics. The next century and a half saw the United States enter and then dominate the world stage, even as the country struggled to live up to its own principles of liberty, justice, and equality. Volume 2 of Building the American Republic takes the reader from the Gilded Age to the present, as the nation becomes an imperial power, rethinks the Constitution, witnesses the rise of powerful new technologies, and navigates an always-shifting cultural landscape shaped by an increasingly diverse population. Ending with the 2016 election, this volume provides a needed reminder that the future of the American republic depends on a citizenry that understands—and can learn from—its history.  


Media Files:
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Building the American Republic, Volume 2

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Building the American Republic combines centuries of perspectives and voices into a fluid narrative of the United States. Throughout their respective volumes, Harry L. Watson and Jane Dailey take care to integrate varied scholarly perspectives and work to engage a diverse readership by addressing what we all share: membership in a democratic republic, with joint claims on its self-governing tradition. It will be one of the first peer-reviewed American history textbooks to be offered completely free in digital form. Visit buildingtheamericanrepublic.org for more information.  The American nation came apart in a violent civil war less than a century after ratification of the Constitution. When it was reborn five years later, both the republic and its Constitution were transformed. Volume 2 opens as America struggles to regain its footing, reeling from a presidential assassination and facing massive economic growth, rapid demographic change, and combustive politics. The next century and a half saw the United States enter and then dominate the world stage, even as the country struggled to live up to its own principles of liberty, justice, and equality. Volume 2 of Building the American Republic takes the reader from the Gilded Age to the present, as the nation becomes an imperial power, rethinks the Constitution, witnesses the rise of powerful new technologies, and navigates an always-shifting cultural landscape shaped by an increasingly diverse population. Ending with the 2016 election, this volume provides a needed reminder that the future of the American republic depends on a citizenry that understands—and can learn from—its history.  


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European Silver in the Collection of Her Majesty The Queen

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The Royal Collection contains one of the finest ensembles of pre-twentieth-century European silver in the world. More than 350 works are catalogued in this volume,  the majority being manufactured in France, Germany, Russia, and the Netherlands, with a smaller number of pieces from Italy, Spain, Portugal, Scandinavia, and the Austro-Hungarian Empire. An introduction on the history of collecting European silver is followed by catalogue entries on silver objects used for dining; serving and drinking tea, coffee, and chocolate; personal grooming; as well as desk accessories and church plates. Highlights include unusual German kunstkammer, (cabinet of curiosity') objects acquired by George IV, when their collection came into fashion with nobility across Europe in the seventeenth century.   A fascinating and beautifully illustrated survey, this is the first study of European silver in the Royal Collection for more than a hundred year, bringing together research and new information on the subject. It will be an invaluable resource for students and collectors alike.  


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Community Groups in Context

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

As austerity measures continue, accompanied by ongoing cuts in government services, the importance of community groups to social welfare and well-being becomes ever greater. This book offers a wide range of perspectives on the role and nature of those groups, specifically those that are operating outside the formal voluntary sector in the United Kingdom. These groups, which are unregulated, need more rigorous analysis than in the past as their role and scope continue to increase; this book represents a major step towards better understanding of how they work and what they do.


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Challenging the Politics of Early Intervention

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

So often, the ills of society are blamed on negligent parenting, leading to the development of social service policies built around the concept of early intervention. Interrogating this concept, this book explores the history of our understanding of children, family, and parenting, and its implications for society. With a particular focus on the intersection of brain science and social policy, the authors challenge our long-held consensus on early intervention. Accessibly written and highly topical, Challenging the Politics of Early Intervention is a comprehensive and critical assay of our contemporary belief that so-called bad parents raise substandard future citizens unfit for the new capitalism.


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Creating Memories in Late 8th-Century Byzantium

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Creating Memories in Late 8th-Century Byzantium is one of the key sources for our understanding of Byzantine history in the seventh and eighth century. This book offers a close look at that volume and its manner of representation of the past—Nikephoros's specific authorial method in the shaping of the image of Byzantine emperors and ecclesiastical topics linked with Iconoclasm. When seen through this lens, Creating Memories is revealed to be more engaged with and burdened by contemporary political and ecclesiastical strife than has previously been thought.  


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Cuba

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

As American-Cuban relations begin to warm, tourists are rushing to discover the throwback tropical paradise just eighty miles off of the American coast. But even as diplomatic relations are changing and the country opens up to the Western world, Cuba remains a rare and fascinating place.Cuba: A Cultural History tells the story of Cuba’s history through an exploration of its rich and vibrant culture. Rather than offer a timeline of Cuban history or a traditional genre-by-genre history of Cuban culture, Alan West-Durán invites readers to enter Cuban history from the perspective of the island’s uniquely creative cultural forms. He traces the restless island as it ebbs and flows with the power, beauty, and longings of its culture and history. In a world where revolutionary socialism is an almost quaint reminder of the decades-old Cold War, the island nation remains one of the few on the planet guided by a Communist party, still committed to fighting imperialism, opposed to the injustices of globalization, and wedded to the dream of one day building a classless society, albeit in a distant future. But as this book shows, Cuba is more than a struggling socialist country—it is a nation with a complex and turbulent history and a rich and varied culture.


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Christianization of Western Baetica

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The province of Baetica, in present-day Spain, was one of the most important areas in the Roman Empire in terms of politics, economics, and culture. And in the late medieval period, it was the center of a rich and powerful state, the Umayyad Caliphate. But the historical sources on the intervening years are limited, and we lack an accurate understanding of the evolution of the region. In recent years, however, archaeological research has begun to fill the gaps, and this book—built on more than a decade of fieldwork—provides an unprecedented overview of urban and rural development in the period.  


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Chasuble of Thomas Becket

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

One of the most magnificent medieval textiles in the Mediterranean region is the Chasuble of Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, who was murdered by the knights of King Henry II and canonized three years later by decree of the Roman Catholic Church. According to the Cathedral of Fermo, which holds the chasuble, the embroidered blue silk vestment was donated to Fermo by Bishop Presbitero in the twelfth century. But despite its importance, its outstanding preservation, and the presence of Arabic inscriptions, the chasuble has never been the subject of a comprehensive study.             With The Chasuble of Thomas Becket, art historian Avinoam Shalem is joined by an internationally renowned group of experts— Miriam Ali-de-Unzaga, Birgitt Borkopp-Restle, Ariane Dor, David Jacoby, Márta Járó, Germano Liberati, Ursula Nilgen, and Regula Schorta—in offering a new reading on this unique historical vestment. Contributions examine what we can determine about the chasuble’s manufacture; thoroughly assess its inscriptions, including with regard to the process or transculturation in a new Christian context in the Cathedral of Fermo; and reconsider its historical and mercantile context within the Mediterranean region, Muslim Spain, and Italy.    


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Aosenla's Story

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Seventy-year-old Temsula Ao is a pioneer of northeastern Indian literature, who was recognized with India’s highest civilian honor in 2007 for her work. The author of many volumes of poetry and short stories, Ao returns in this book to her beloved Nagaland homeland to bring readers the beautifully crafted story of Aosenla, a woman who is coming to terms with herself.             The novel opens on a typical summer afternoon that will soon turn into another oppressive evening. Aosenla sits listening to her children playing nearby and is seized by a great lethargy. As she casts a watchful gaze over the house she has called home for so many years, Aosenla wonders how an inanimate structure like a house can exercise such power over a human being. Looking down at a wedding invitation in her hands, Aosenla begins to recall her own wedding ceremony many years ago, initiating a deep and moving reflection on the parts of this life that were made for her, and the parts she has made for herself.  


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Gifts of the Gods

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

What do we think about when we think about Greek food? For many, it is the meze and the traditional plates of a Greek island taverna at the height of summer. In Gifts of the Gods, Andrew and Rachel Dalby take us into and beyond the taverna in our minds to offer us a unique and comprehensive history of the foods of Greece. Greek food is brimming with thousands of years of history, lore, and culture. The country has one of the most varied landscapes of Europe, where steep mountains, low-lying plains, rocky islands, and crystal-blue seas jostle one another and produce food and wine of immense quality and distinctive taste. The book discusses how the land was settled, what was grown in different regions, and how certain fruits, herbs, and vegetables became a part of local cuisines. Moving through history—from classical to modern—the book explores the country’s regional food identities as well as the export of Greek food to communities all over the world. The book culminates with a look at one of the most distinctive features of Greece’s food tradition—the country’s world renown hospitality. Illustrated throughout and featuring traditional recipes that blend historical and modern flavors, Gifts of the Gods is a mouth-watering account of a rich and ancient cuisine.


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Goths

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The Goths are truly a “lost civilization.” Sweeping down from the north, ancient Gothic tribes sacked the imperial city of Rome and set in motion the decline and fall of the western Roman empire. Ostrogothic and Visigothic kings ruled over Italy and Spain, dominating early medieval Europe. Yet after the last Gothic kingdom fell more than a thousand years ago, the Goths disappeared as an independent people. Over the centuries that followed, as traces of Gothic civilization vanished, its people came to be remembered as both barbaric destroyers and heroic champions of liberty. In this engaging history, David M. Gwynn brings together the interwoven stories of the original Goths and the diverse Gothic heritage, a heritage that continues to shape our modern world. From the ancient migrations to contemporary Goth culture, through debates over democratic freedom and European nationalism, and drawing on writers from Shakespeare to Bram Stoker, Gwynn explores the ever-widening gulf between the Goths of history and the popular imagination. Historians, students of architecture and literature, and general readers alike will learn something new about this great lost civilization.  


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Heinz Mack

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Throughout the many decades of his career, Heinz Mack has kept a singular focus on light. The search for new possibilities for visualizing light has kept him open to new ideas for more than half a century, providing inspiration for both new forms and new techniques. This book, compiled by Mack himself, draws on his entire oeuvre to reveal the multifaceted role of light within his work. Through Mack’s art, we see natural and artificial life anew, as it can only be seen through the vision of a mystic who nonetheless works confidently with the tools and information of our rational age.  


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Heinz Mack

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Heinz Mack is best known for his sculptures and reliefs. In the postwar years, however, Mack created a groundbreaking series of paintings that were built on radical reductions of color and a concentration on light and rhythm. The paintings of that period—now known as the ZERO years, gave way later in the 1950s to his Dynamic Structures, works in which a painting of light is set in contrast with traditional approaches to color and structure replaces composition. This catalogue raisonné offers an unprecedented look at Mack’s early work, showing it to be indispensable to an understanding of his whole career.  


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John Evelyn

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The great English writer and gardener John Evelyn (1620–1706) kept a diary all his life. Today, this diary is considered an invaluable source of information on more than fifty years of social, cultural, religious, and political life in seventeenth-century England. Evelyn’s work is often overshadowed by the literary contributions of his contemporary and friend, Samuel Pepys. This new biography changes that. John Dixon Hunt takes a fresh look at the life and work of one of England’s greatest diarists, focusing particularly on Evelyn’s “domesticity.” The book explores Evelyn’s life at home, and perhaps even more importantly, his domestication of foreign ideas and practices in England. During the English Civil Wars, Evelyn traveled extensively throughout Europe, taking in ideas on the management of estate design while abroad to apply them in England. Evelyn’s greatest accomplishment was the import of European garden art to the UK, a feat Hunt puts into context alongside a range of Evelyn’s social and ethical thinking. Illustrated with visual material from Evelyn’s time and from his own pen, the book is an ideal introduction to a hugely important figure in the shaping of early modern Britain.


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Wobblies of the World

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Founded in 1905, Chicago’s Industrial Workers of the World (IWW) is a union unlike any other. With members affectionately called “Wobblies” and an evolutionary and internationalist philosophy and tactics, it rapidly grew across the world. Considering the history of the IWW from an international perspective for the first time, Wobblies of the World brings together a group of leading scholars to present a lively collection of accounts from thirteen diverse countries, revealing a fascinating story of anarchism, syndicalism, and socialism.   Drawing on many important figures of the movement—Har Dayal, James Larkin, William D. “Big Bill” Haywood, Enrique Flores Magón, and more—the contributors describe how the IWW and its ideals spread, exploring the crucial role the IWW played in industries such as shipping, mining, and agriculture. Ultimately, the book illuminates Wobblie methods of organizing, forms of expression, practices, and transnational issues, offering a fascinating alternative history of the group.   


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Welsh Planning Law and Practice

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This book provides a comprehensive guide to the sources and structure of Welsh planning law. It looks at policies affecting land in Wales in the context of shared principles, concepts, and case law common to England and Wales. It is designed as a practical handbook for those working within planning and shaping development in Wales.


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Ormesby Psalter

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The Ormesby Psalter is one of the most well-known yet mysterious manuscripts to survive the Middle Ages. It was made in a series of campaigns over many decades, starting in the late-thirteenth century, and the main decorated pages were executed in the 1310s for a marriage that never took place. Likely meant for private devotion by its wealthy patrons, this exquisite book of psalms was left unfinished. Housed in Oxford’s Bodleian Library for over 150 years, this enigmatic masterpiece is perhaps the most magnificent yet enigmatic of the great Gothic psalters produced in East Anglia in the first half of the fourteenth century. Manuscript expert Frederica C. E. Law-Turner places the psalter within a wider historical context and then deciphers its lush illuminations—scenes that vary wildly in tone from the comic to the bawdy to the mythic. Full-color photographs illustrate the text’s many characters: falcons and hunting dogs at bay, kings and courtesans, and other animals dressed in human garb. Created over a period of decades by previously unrecognized scribes and artists, the Ormesby Psalter is an exceptional amalgam of medieval art and history. For scholars of medieval life, as well as art historians, this new study will be an invaluable resource.  


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Women's Emancipation and Civil Society Organisations

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Women are at the heart of civil society organizations (CSOs) that challenge oppressive practices at a local and global level and develop outstanding entrepreneurial activities. Yet CSO research tends to ignore considerations of gender, and the rich history of activist feminist organizations is rarely examined. This collection corrects that oversight, exploring the nexus between the emancipation of women and their roles in CSOs. Featuring contrasting, international studies from a wide range of contributors, it covers emerging issues such as the role of social media in organizing, the significance of religion in many cultural contexts, activism in Eastern Europe, and the impact of environmental degradation on women’s lives. Asking whether involvement in CSOs offers a potential source of emancipation for women or maintains the status quo, this book will have an impact on both equal-opportunity policy and practice.


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Women, Peace and Security in Northeast India

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

In recent decades, the states in the northeast of India have been home to a number of protracted violent conflicts. And while the role of women’s movements in responding to conflict and violence tend to be marginalized both by the media and by scholarship, they have played a crucial role in attempts to strengthen civil society and bring peace to the region. This collection offers a close look at the successes and failures of those efforts, adding important insight into ongoing debates on gender and political change in societies affected by conflict. At the same time, the book takes a fresh, critical look at universalist feminist and interventionist biases that have tended to see peace processes as windows of opportunity for women’s empowerment while ignoring the complexity of gender relations during conflict.  


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Worldviews of the Greenlanders

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Ninety years ago, Knud Rasmussen’s popular account of his scientific expeditions through Greenland and North America introduced readers to the culture and history of arctic Natives. In the intervening century, a robust field of ethnographic research has grown around the Inuit and Yupiit of North America—but, until now, English-language readers have had little access to the broad corpus of work on Greenlandic natives.Worldviews of the Greenlanders draws upon extensive Danish and Greenlandic research on Inuit arctic peoples—as well as Birgitte Sonne’s own decades of scholarship and fieldwork—to present in rich detail the key symbols and traditional beliefs of Greenlandic Natives, as well as the changes brought about by contact with colonial traders and Christian missionaries. It includes critical updates to our knowledge of the Greenlanders’ pre-colonial world and their ideas on space, time, and other worldly beings. This expansive work will be a touchstone of Arctic Native studies for academics who wish to expand their knowledge past the boundaries of North America.


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We Are Not Amused

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Have you ever cringed while hearing someone mispronounce a word—or, worse, been tripped up by a wily silent letter yourself? Consider yourself lucky that you do not live in Victorian England, when the way you pronounced a word was seen as a sometimes-damning index of who you were and how you should be treated. No wonder then that jokes about English usage provided one of Punch magazine’s most fruitful veins of humor for sixty years, from its first issue in 1841 to 1900. For We Are Not Amused, renowned English-language expert David Crystal has explored the most common pronunciation-related controversies during the reign of Queen Victoria and brought together the cartoons and articles that poked fun at them, adding insightful commentary on the context of the times. The collection brings to light a society where class distinctions ruled. Crystal explains why people felt so strongly about accents and identifies which accents were the main sources of jokes, from the dropped h’s of the Cockney working class to the upper-class tendency to drop the final g in words like “huntin’” and “fishin’.”             In this fascinating and highly entertaining book, Crystal shows that outrage over proper pronunciation is nothing new—our feelings today have their origins in the ways our Victorian predecessors thought about the subject.  


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What Is Round?

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The sun is round and hot and glowing. An orange is round on the tree where it’s growing.   Many things in the natural world are round—the sun, the moon, a bird’s nest with three bright baby birds. So are the turning wheels of a train and a hot air balloon high in the sky. So are cakes, pies, cookies, and many other delicious things to eat!             Page by brightly colored page, What is Round? invites young readers to pick out the shape in the world around them, from the smallest raindrop to a big spectacular carousel. Many of the objects can be found in our own homes, like the clock that tells the time or the colorful decorations on a Christmas tree. Others, like the portholes of a passing ship, require a watchful eye. Striking and vibrant illustrations by Vladimir Bobri accompany the playful rhymes of Blossom Budney in this lively look at this shape that can be found in the most unexpected places.             Originally published in 1954, What is Round? will make a wonderful addition to any child’s library, and it’s the perfect story to read aloud.  


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Trans-Himalayan Borderlands

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The societies in the Himalayan borderlands have undergone wide-ranging transformations, as the territorial reconfiguration of modern nation-states since the mid-twentieth century and the presently increasing trans-Himalayan movements of people, goods, and capital reshape the livelihoods of communities, pulling them into global trends of modernization and regional discourses of national belonging. This book explores the changes to native senses of place, the conception of border – simultaneously as limitations and opportunities – and what the authors call “affective boundaries,” “livelihood reconstruction,” and “trans-Himalayan modernities.” It addresses changing social, political, and environmental conditions that acknowledge growing external connectivity even as it emphasizes the importance of place.  


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Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 24

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Japanese and Korean are typologically similar, with linguistic phenomena in one often having counterparts in the other. The Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference provides a forum for research, particularly through comparative study, on both languages. The papers in this volume are from the twenty-fourth conference, which was held at the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics. They include essays on the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, historical linguistics, discourse analysis, prosody, and psycholinguistics of both languages. Such comparative studies deepen our understanding of both languages and will be a useful reference for students and scholars in either field.


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Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Volume 24

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Japanese and Korean are typologically similar, with linguistic phenomena in one often having counterparts in the other. The Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference provides a forum for research, particularly through comparative study, on both languages. The papers in this volume are from the twenty-fourth conference, which was held at the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics. They include essays on the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, historical linguistics, discourse analysis, prosody, and psycholinguistics of both languages. Such comparative studies deepen our understanding of both languages and will be a useful reference for students and scholars in either field.


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N Is for Nursery

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

A is for all of us—everyone. Playing, learning, having fun.   The letters of the alphabet are brilliantly brought to life in a bright nursery school, where the children learn and play. B is for building blocks . . . but also for blowing out the candles on a birthday cake! C is for the colorful chairs the children take when the teacher rings a chime. Lively pictures designed around each letter show the children dancing, singing, listening to stories, tickling one another, and even engaging in an exciting game of tug-of-war. The fun rhymes and imaginative words for each letter make N is for Nursery a great book for children just learning to read and to recognize letters and letter sounds. Originally published in 1956, N is for Nursery is the most recent addition to the Bodleian Library’s children’s book imprint and the perfect book for children to take with them on a new adventure like starting school.  


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Heath Robinson: How to be a Perfect Husband

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Heath Robinson (1872–1944) is Britain’s “Gadget King”—master of the art of creating madcap contraptions that made use of ropes, weights, and pulleys to perform relatively simple tasks. Although he trained as a painter and also worked as a book illustrator, Robinson developed his forte with drawings of gadgets that parodied the absurdities of modern life. A true cartoonist, Robinson had a way of getting at the heart of the matter while simultaneously satirizing it mercilessly. He became a household name in Britain, and his popularity continues today. The cartoons in Heath Robinson: How to be a Perfect Husband provide sage advice for how to succeed in almost all aspects of married life—and, of course, it often features a complicated Robinsonian gadget. The perfect husband, for example, will take advantage of two simple attachments to the garden roller to tend the lawn and entertain the baby simultaneously. Likewise, he can peel onions with no fear of tears using a mirror and construct a cost-effective vacuum cleaner using items found around the house. Most importantly, he will devise a device to help him climb the stairs silently after a late night out with the boys. A gently satirical collection, this book make a perfect gift for anyone looking to have a laugh at our complicated and increasingly mechanical modern life.  


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Healthcare in Transition

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

A call for change in healthcare thinking, Healthcare in Transition explores the fundamental currents and tensions behind recent trends in policy, such as shared decision making, coproduction, and personalization. While these trends are often discussed in connection with a transition in epidemiological thought, Alan Cribb argues that they instead embody a philosophical shift—a change in our conception of healthcare and of appropriate forms of knowledge and analysis. As clinical concerns are increasingly nested within social concerns, policy analysis must engage with the multiple philosophical tensions that are now at the heart of the healthcare debate. Cribb’s focus on these key, underlying ideas could not be more timely. Accessibly written and with international relevance, Healthcare in Transition will help fuel a shift from a delivery model of healthcare to a deliberative one.


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Healthcare in Transition

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

A call for change in healthcare thinking, Healthcare in Transition explores the fundamental currents and tensions behind recent trends in policy, such as shared decision making, coproduction, and personalization. While these trends are often discussed in connection with a transition in epidemiological thought, Alan Cribb argues that they instead embody a philosophical shift—a change in our conception of healthcare and of appropriate forms of knowledge and analysis. As clinical concerns are increasingly nested within social concerns, policy analysis must engage with the multiple philosophical tensions that are now at the heart of the healthcare debate. Cribb’s focus on these key, underlying ideas could not be more timely. Accessibly written and with international relevance, Healthcare in Transition will help fuel a shift from a delivery model of healthcare to a deliberative one.


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Book Lovers' Miscellany

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

How is ink made? What is the bestselling book of all time? What are the oldest known books in the world? And how does one make sense of the colors found on Penguin paperbacks? The answers to these questions and many more await readers in The Book Lovers’ Miscellany.The Book Lovers’ Miscellany is a cornucopia for bibliophiles. With customary wisdom and wit, Claire Cock-Starkey presents a brief illustrated history of paper, binding, printing, and dust jackets, with a wealth of arcane facts that even the most avid book lovers may be hard-pressed to answer: Which natural pigments were used to decorate medieval bibles? Which animal is needed for the making of vellum? Curious facts are drawn from throughout the history of books and publishing, including many more recent examples, such as a short history of the comic and the story behind the massively successful Harlequin romance imprint Mills and Boon. Readers can explore the output of the most prolific writers and marvel at the youth of the youngest published authors—or lament the decisions of the publishers who rejected books that later became colossal bestsellers. The book also includes a collection of lists, including unfinished novels, books that have faced bans, books printed with mistakes, the most influential academic books of all time, and the longest established literary families. The perfect gift for every bibliophile, The Book Lovers’ Miscellany is equally well suited to reading straight through or dipping into here and there.  


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Broken Benefits

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The United Kingdom is at a critical juncture in welfare policy, as the current government delivers on the previous regime’s austerity-driven reforms while simultaneously cutting an additional ₤38 billion from benefits spending over the next five years. Broken Benefits is a straightforward guide to the UK welfare system, correcting misunderstandings and exposing some of the less-understood problems. Sam Royston argues that the current government’s twin goals of cutting spending and creating work incentives will ultimately fail to deliver a better system. Drawing on original research and high-profile debates, this much-needed book offers solutions: pragmatic ideas about how the system should be reformed and put into practice, including real-life case studies, models of household budgets, projections of welfare budget spending, and a free online benefits calculator. Accessibly written and offering a blueprint for how welfare should work, Royston presents an alternative vision of a fair, effective, and coherent benefits system for the future.


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Did the MDGs Work?

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The Millennium Development Goals set by the United Nations were deliberately ambitious, and they’ve been the subject of much debate. Now, with the 2015 target date for many of the goals having passed, it’s time to assess the goals and attempt to determine whether they were effective. Gathering leading scholars from a range of backgrounds and regions, this book offers an in-depth exploration of that question, with the aim of better understanding the effects of the Millennium Development Goals and learning from them for future policy decisions.


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Datafied Society

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The ability to gather data that can be crunched by machines is valuable for studying society. The new methods needed to work it require new skills and new ways of thinking about best research practices. This book reflects on the role and usefulness of big data, challenging overly optimistic expectations about what it can reveal, introducing practices and methods for its analysis and visualization, and raising important political and ethical questions regarding its collection, handling, and presentation.  


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Last Country

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Winner of the 2015 Arno Reinfrank Literaturpreis“Ruven Preuk stands apart from the village, on an August day in 1911, and listens.” Thus begins an epic bildungsroman about the life of Ruven Preuk, son of the wainwright, child of a sleepy village in Germany’s north, where life is both simple and harsh. Ruven, though, is neither. He has the ability to see sounds, leading him to discover an uncanny gift for the violin. When he meets a talented teacher in the Jewish quarter, Ruven falls under the spell of a prodigious future. But as the twentieth century looms, Ruven’s pursuit of his craft takes a turn. In The Last Country, Svenja Leiber spins a tale that moves from the mansions of a disappearing aristocracy to a communist rebellion, from a joyous village wedding to a Nazi official’s threats, from the First World War to the Second. As the world Ruven knows disappears, the gifted musician must grapple with an important question: to what end has he devoted himself to his art?


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Palermo

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Palermo's heart lies hidden under its many outer layers. In this unusual guide to the beautiful Sicilian capital, Roberto Alajmo uncovers each stratum to reveal its true character. Although disguised as a tourist's handbook, Palermo has much more to offer than ordinary recommendations for the intrepid traveler. Alajmo gives an insight into the city from a lifelong resident's point of view, showcasing its hidden cultural and culinary jewels; portraying its people, and their secrets; touching on its politics and contentious mafia involvement. Seeing Palermo with one's own eyes is an ineffable experience, even for Alajmo; the essence of the city, its beauty, is the only aspect left to the reader to discover.


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Performing Utopia

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

In her landmark study Utopia in Performance: Finding Hope at the Theatre, Jill Dolan departed from historical writings on utopia, which suggest that social reorganization and the redistribution of wealth are utopian efforts, to argue instead that utopia occurs in fragmentary “utopian moments,” often found embedded within performance. While Dolan focused on the utopian performative within a theatrical context, this volume, edited by Rachel Bowditch and Pegge Vissicaro, expands her theories to encompass performance in public life—from diasporic hip-hop battles, Chilean military parades, commemorative processions, Blackfoot powwows, and post-Katrina Mardi Gras to the Philadelphia Mummers Parade, Festas Juninas in Brazil, the Renaissance Fairs in Arizona, and neoburlesque competitions. How do these performances rehearse and enact visions of a utopic world? What can the lens of utopia and dystopia illuminate about the potential of performing bodies to transform communities, identities, values, and beliefs across time? Performing Utopia not only answers these questions, but offers a diverse collection of case studies focusing on utopias, dystopias, and heterotopias enacted through the performing body.


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Prisoner No. 100

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

On February 6, 2003, Anjum Zamarud Habib, a young political activist from Kashmir, was arrested in Delhi, convicted under the Prevention of Terrorism Act, and sentenced to five years in Delhi’s notorious Tihar jail. Her crime? Being in the wrong place at the wrong time, as well as being the chairperson of the Muslim Khawateen Markaz and a member of the Hurriyat Conference, which disputes India’s claim to Jammu and Kashmir.   In this passionate and rare first-hand account by a Muslim woman in Tihar jail, Habib describes the shock and bewilderment of arrest; the pain of realizing that there would be no escape for years; the desperation for contact with the outside world; and the sense of deep betrayal at being abandoned by her political comrades.  Prisoner No. 100 provides an inside perspective on the impact of the Kashmir conflict on real people’s lives and offers a searing indictment of draconian state policies, while telling the courageous story of one woman’s extraordinary life.


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Pieter Bruegel

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Pieter Bruegel the Elder (c. 1525–1569) was the greatest Dutch draftsman of the sixteenth century, his drawings highly valued in his lifetime, sold both as originals and through copperplate prints. Though he drew on a long pictorial tradition, he invested his drawings with powerful new subjects and forms, presenting a complicated visual world that was humorous and earthy, yet also astute and deeply critical of the society around him.             This lavishly illustrated catalog examines Bruegel’s artistic origins and provides an overview of his entire body of work, setting him in the context of forebears such as Hieronymous Bosch while also making a strong case for Bruegel’s many innovations in genres as widely diverse as landscape art and social satire.  


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Blue Land and City Noise

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

“Are there still any surprises left to be had when it comes to German Expressionism?” asks the writer Michael Kumpfmüller. This beautifully produced volume demonstrates that there are, inviting readers on a stroll through the world of Expressionism with seldom considered artwork and literary excerpts that probe German Expressionism’s continued resonance today. Colorful, emotional, impulsive, and modern—it is hard to believe that German Expressionist works caused such a scandal when they first entered the scene in the early twentieth century. And yet, artists and writers were united in the vision of a new beginning combined with fundamental social criticism. Many targets of Expressionist critique—such as social inequality in the big city, the sleazy glamour of the entertainment world, and the disappointments of new technology—remain disquietingly topical to this day. The powerful images and texts of this collection explore how the Expressionist fascination with change and decay ramifies throughout the art and literature of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Featuring writers of world rank in dialogue with the crème de la crème of German Expressionism—including Wassily Kandinsky, Alfred Döblin, Robert Musil, Max Pechstein, Else Lasker-Schüler, Lyonel Feininger, Franz Kafka, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, and many more—this beautifully illustrated volume will be essential for lovers of art and literature.


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Miseducation

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Building upon Brian Jackson and Dennis Marsden’s classic text Education and the Working Class, a complex study of the working-class experience of social mobility, this book weaves together a number of interconnected strands of thought on education and social justice. Diane Reay’s analysis spans both the details of individual lives and broader questions of how and why the working classes fare so much worse in education than the middle and upper classes. Through more than five hundred vivid accounts of the emotional life of class—including interviews with Steve McQueen, Mickey Flanagan, Alan Bennett, and Melvyn Bragg—as well as Reay’s own reflections on life as a coal miner’s daughter turned Cambridge professor and authority on the intersection of education and social mobility, this book examines both the costs and benefits of education success by directly comparing working and middle class experiences. Highlighting the truly multifaceted nature of today’s working classes, and including the voices of those who have achieved class mobility as well as those left behind, Reay shines a revealing light on social mobility.


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Motherhood and Choice

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

As both the bedrock of human survival and an unchallenged part of the “normal” female life, motherhood expects and even compels women to be mothers—both symbolic and corporeal. Motherhood—and non-motherhood—is not just physiological. As the pivot to a web of institutions like marriage and family, motherhood bears an overwhelming and decisive influence on women’s lives. In the face of tradition and sociopolitical discourse and policies, Motherhood and Choice explores how women as embodiments of multiple identities can live stigma-free, authentic lives without having to abandon reproductive self-determination.             Amrita Nandy asks the difficult questions here: How can women live fully? If autonomy is a basic human right, why do many women have little or no choice when it comes to motherhood? Do women know they have a choice? Through remarkable research and searing analysis, Nandy brings an important addition to feminist debates on the conflation of woman and mother, political and personal.  


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Missing Persons, Animals, and Artists

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Elegant prose and imaginative ironies bring these compelling short stories to life in this first English-language collection from Mexican author Roberto Ransom. Each of the ten stories is filled with fascinating, yet enigmatic and sometimes elusive characters: an alligator in a bathtub, an invisible toad who appears only to a young boy, the beautiful redheaded daughter of a mushroom collector, a deceased journalist who communicates in code, and even Leonardo Da Vinci himself, meditating on The Last Supper. One of Mexico’s most original writers, Ransom explores these characters’ emotional depths as they move through their fantastical worlds that, while at times unfamiliar, offer brave and profound insights into our own.            Missing Persons, Animals, and Artists is the follow-up to Ransom’s highly acclaimed A Tale of Two Lions, praised by Ignacio Padilla as “the best Mexican literary work I have read in recent years. . . . [It] heralds a pen capable of that rarest of privileges in our letters: attaining the comic and profoundly human through a perfect simplicity.”  This collection of short stories has been translated with great care by Daniel Shapiro.  


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Goma

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

A city of more than one million people caught between volcanic eruptions and armed conflict, Goma has come to embody the tragedy that is the Democratic Republic of Congo. Often portrayed by outsiders as a living hell, Goma is seen as a city of promise for many inside the country. Drawing on a rich tapestry of personal narratives, from taxi drivers to market traders, doctors to local humanitarian workers, Goma provides an engaging and unconventional portrait of an African city. In contrast to the bleak pessimism that dominates much of the writing on Congo, Theodore Trefon and Noël Kabuyaya instead emphasize the resilience, pragmatism, and ingenuity that characterizes so much of daily life in Goma. Resigned and hardened by struggle, the protagonists of the book give the impression that life is neither beautiful nor ugly, but an unending skirmish with destiny. In doing so, they offer startling insights into the social, cultural, and political landscape of this unique African city.


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Goma

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

A city of more than one million people caught between volcanic eruptions and armed conflict, Goma has come to embody the tragedy that is the Democratic Republic of Congo. Often portrayed by outsiders as a living hell, Goma is seen as a city of promise for many inside the country. Drawing on a rich tapestry of personal narratives, from taxi drivers to market traders, doctors to local humanitarian workers, Goma provides an engaging and unconventional portrait of an African city. In contrast to the bleak pessimism that dominates much of the writing on Congo, Theodore Trefon and Noël Kabuyaya instead emphasize the resilience, pragmatism, and ingenuity that characterizes so much of daily life in Goma. Resigned and hardened by struggle, the protagonists of the book give the impression that life is neither beautiful nor ugly, but an unending skirmish with destiny. In doing so, they offer startling insights into the social, cultural, and political landscape of this unique African city.


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Kira O'Reilly

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The works of interdisciplinary artist Kira O’Reilly use the uncertain boundaries of bodies as the starting point for their enquiry. Specifically, O’Reilly asks what kind of societies become possible in collaborations across species, organisms, and bodies, and she explores these questions through sustained and experimental engagements with politics, biopolitics, change (social, corporeal, chemical, reactive), and the complex relations between the human and the non-human.   This book is the first to offer an in-depth engagement with her many works across diverse formats. Bringing together writings by major artists and thinkers, such as Marina Abramović, Shannon Bell, and Tracey Warr, alongside extensive documentation of the artist’s work from two decades of practice, the contributions engage with such topics as ideas of performance, feminist political aesthetics, biotechnical practices, image-making, and the intersections of humans and animals. The book also includes interviews, archive material, and O’Reilly’s own writings.  


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Displacement of Borders among Russian Koreans in Northeast Asia

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Since the nineteenth century, ethnic Koreans have represented a small yet significant portion of the population of the Russian Far East, but until now, the phenomenon has been largely understudied. Based on extensive historical and ethnographic research, this is the first book in English to chart the contemporary social life of Koreans in the complex borderland region. Dispelling the commonly held notion that Koreans were completely removed from the region during the country’s attempt to “cleanse” its borders in 1937, Hyun Gwi Park reveals timely new insights into the historical and current experiences of Koreans living along the Eurasian frontier.


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Elinor Ostrom's Rules for Radicals

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Elinor Ostrom was both a groundbreaking thinker and one of the foremost economists of our age. The first and only woman to win the Nobel Prize for Economics, her revolutionary theorizing of the commons opened the way for non-capitalist economic alternatives on a massive scale. And yet, astonishingly, most modern radicals know little about her.  Elinor Ostrom's Rules for Radicals fixes that injustice, revealing the indispensability of her work on green politics, alternative economics, and radical democracy. Derek Wall’s analysis of her theses addresses some of the common misconceptions of her work and reveals her strong commitment to a radical ideological framework. This helpful guide will engage scholars and activists across a range of disciplines, including political economy, political science, and ecology, as well as those keen to implement her work in practice. As activists continue to reject traditional models of centralized power, Ostrom’s theories will become even more crucial in creating economies that exist beyond markets and states.  


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Engineering the Future, Understanding the Past

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Technology today is often presented as our best hope of solving the world's social and sustainability problems. And that's nothing new: engineers have always sought to meet the big challenges of their times—even as those challenges have shaped their technology. This book offers a historical look at those interactions between engineering and social challenges, showing how engineers developed solutions to past problems, and looking at the ways that those solutions often bring with them unintended consequences that themselves require solving.  


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Brazil

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

With the sixth largest economy in the world, Brazil has played a key international role for decades. It was one of the first “pink wave” administrations in Latin America. In 1994, it was responsible for shutting down the US-sponsored proposal for a Free Trade Area of the Americas. Notably, it is also one of the few large countries where social spending has risen and the distribution of income has improved over the last thirty years. As we saw during the 2014 World Cup protests, however, the country still remains highly unequal, with vast unmet social welfare needs and a precarious infrastructure.   In Brazil: Neoliberalism Versus Democracy, Alfredo Saad-Filho and Lecio Morais review the complex paradox that is modern Brazil. Focusing on 1980 to the present, they analyze the tensions between the two dominant systemic political transitions from military rule to first democracy, then neoliberalism. A groundbreaking interpretation of this intricate relationship, Brazil examines how the contradictory dynamics of these transitions eventually became symbiotic as they unfolded and intertwined.   


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Pictures of the Floating Microcosm

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The success of any architectural project depends on the architect’s ability to depict it. Conveying architectural ideas as drawings, pictures, or models is both a critical part of the process and one that can tell us much about the design itself in a particular time or place. Over the past two decades, major new trends in architectural representation have emerged in Japan, which have gained widespread attention in the western world.Pictures of The Floating Microcosm considers these trends and takes readers through their development to the present day. Olivier Meystre undertakes a critique of the design tools and mediation techniques that have been employed and reveals the very special ways of conceiving an architectural project, drawing on a wealth of new research and interviews with contemporary Japanese architects. His book is a fascinating testimony of an entire generation of architects’ complex approach to a project, where all attributes of space are questioned and redefined while a strong undercurrent of tradition continues to have pivotal influence.  


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Search

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Twenty-five long years after the war that was supposed to liberate Bangladesh—and that instead, for far too many people, merely brought fear, violence, and loss—a young researcher arrives on the doorstep of one survivor in Dhaka, Mariam, armed with a set of questions that have no easy answers. How did Mariam and women like her—who lived through violence and rape—survive the war? How did the Pakistani army deal with women they found in homes, offices, or colleges? Why did Mariam send her brother away to keep him safe even as she stayed on? For Mariam, however, these questions are irrelevant—her demons are different. Could she have saved her brother, she wonders? And what happened to the other men in her life? What did the war do to them, and to her? A powerful novel of shattering war and its aftermath, The Search tells of the difficulty of picking up the pieces and moving on after personal—and national—trauma.


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Social Reproduction Theory

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Crystallizing the essential principles of social reproductive theory, this anthology provides long-overdue analysis of everyday life under capitalism. It focuses on issues such as childcare, healthcare, education, family life, and the roles of gender, race, and sexuality—all of which are central to understanding the relationship between exploitation and social oppression. Tithi Bhattacharya brings together some of the leading writers and theorists, including Lise Vogel, Nancy Fraser, and Susan Ferguson, in order for us to better understand social relations and how to improve them in the fight against structural oppression.


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Sports Criminology

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

From doping among professional athletes to crime prevention through sports, the discussion of crime in sports seems to be on the rise. This is the first book to provide a critical criminological perspective on sports and the myriad connections between sports and crime. Part of the New Horizons in Criminology series, it utilizes the interdisciplinary nature of criminology to incorporate emerging perspectives from diverse fields like the study of social harm, gender and sexuality studies, and green criminology. Written from an international perspective, Sports Criminology covers both a range of topics, from sports scandals to the possibility of crime prevention, and a range of sports disciplines. American football, boxing, soccer, and sumo are all examined, making this book an essential read for scholars of sports law and the sociology of sports alike.


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Troubles in Northern Ireland and Theories of Social Movements

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This volume focuses on a number of research questions, drawn from social movement scholarship: How does nonviolent mobilization emerge and persist in deeply divided societies? What are the trajectories of participation in violent groups in these societies? What is the relationship between overt mobilization, clandestine operations and protests among political prisoners? What is the role of media coverage and identity politics? Can there be non-sectarian collective mobilization in deeply divided societies? The answers to these questions do not merely try to explain contentious politics in Northern Ireland; instead, they inform future research on social movements beyond this case.  


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Shrimp

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

The small-but-mighty shrimp has lured diners to the table for centuries. Whether served as the featured protein in a main dish or as a savory flavor in snacks, shrimp are the world’s most popular seafood. These primordial-looking creatures spend their short lives out of sight, deep on the ocean floor, yet they have inspired an immense passion in cultures across the world. In this lively and entertaining book, Yvette Florio Lane embarks on a lively historical tour of the production and consumption of Earth’s beloved crustacean. Over the centuries, shrimp have been hailed as an indulgence, a luxury, and even an aphrodisiac. They have been served to show hospitality, demonstrate status, and celebrate special occasions. They can also be culinary ambassadors, inspiring novel cooking techniques and the introduction of new tastes around the world. Demand for the creatures, however, has now exceeded supply. Whether fished from the ocean with nets or deep-sea trawlers, or raised in modern aquaculture farms, the world produces and eats more (and cheaper) shrimp than ever before, but often at great cost. Shrimp is a delicious, fascinating, and troubling history of a culinary favorite.


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Swamp

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Throughout history, swamps have been idealized and demonized, purged and protected. Today, they are simultaneously considered metaphorical places of evil, pestilence, and death, and treasured as diverse biological ecosystems teeming with life. Covering not only swamps and bogs but also marshes and wetlands, Swamp ventures into the cultural and ecological histories of these mysterious, mythologized, and misunderstood landscapes. Anthony Wilson takes readers into swamps across the globe, from the freshwater marshes of Botswana’s tremendous Okavango delta, to the notable swamps between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, to the peat bogs in Russia, the British Isles, and Scandinavia, which have been used as energy sources for centuries. It explores ideas and representations of wetlands across centuries, cultures, and continents, considering legend and folklore, mythology, literature, film, and natural and cultural history. As it plumbs the murky depths of swamps from the distant past to an uncertain future, Swamps provides an engaging, accessible, informative, and lavishly illustrated journey into these fascinating landscapes.  


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Space Packed

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Alfred Neumann (1900–1968) was a Czech architect whose work was wrought in the context of postwar modernism and the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948. Today, his influence and impact have been largely forgotten, but, in their time, Neumann’s original designs received praise and elicited controversy in almost equal measure, offering exciting new possibilities to the modernist mainstream.Space Packed renews attention to this pioneering architect who made a vast contribution to modern architecture and had a lasting impact on Israel’s broader architectural culture. Drawing on Neumann’s writings and close study of both built and unbuilt projects, Rafi Segal discusses the development of Neumann’s architectural theory and methodology and documents his built works from the 1950s and ’60s against the backdrop of contemporary architectural discourse and the demands of the newly created State of Israel. The book also features a complete, chronological catalog of Neumann’s buildings and designs, fully illustrated, including many previously unpublished photographs, drawings, and sketches. The first book to provide a detailed account of Neumann’s work, Space Packed celebrates the career of this highly skilled and innovative architect, and it will be welcomed by architects and architectural historians.


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Simon Phipps Finding Brutalism

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Great Britain underwent a massive rebuilding effort in the aftermath of World War II, with a wealth of new construction that reached virtually all parts of the country and ranged from public and private housing to schools and universities, churches, museums, galleries, commercial buildings, and even entire new towns. Architects took the opportunity to experiment with innovative layouts and new materials and techniques, resulting in radical new forms and buildings of outstanding quality, which we now associate with brutalism.             For more than thirty years, photographer Simon Phipps has carried out a project to document the brutalist buildings of Great Britain, amassing an extraordinary collection of photographs and historic documents that make clear the enormous contribution of architects to the transformation of the country in the postwar period. Finding Brutalism brings together 150 of these photographs. The buildings pictured date from the 1950s to the 1980s, and are striking for how they juxtapose buildings and architectural fragments, evoking the distinct atmosphere of brutalism. Rounding out the book is an essay that situates brutalism within the context of British architecture and recognizes Phipps’s own contribution to its reception. Published to accompany a recent exhibition at the Museum im Bellpark near Lucerne, Switzerland, Finding Brutalism is a remarkable achievement of preservation that will appeal to anyone interested in the history of architecture, and the illustrated and detailed catalogue of featured buildings makes it a perfect travel book as well.  


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Subjective Objective

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

One of the most emotional of all photographic genres, socio-documentary photography established itself in the twentieth century with the goal of shining a light on the lives of socially disadvantaged people. Pioneers like Berenice Abbott, Max Alpert, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Alexander Rodchenko, and Weegee—to name but a few—used their powerful photos on behalf of people whom society largely ignores. This volume assembles iconic socio-documentary photographs, demonstrating how the genre developed in the United States, Europe, the Soviet Union, and elsewhere, and considering new directions for the genre under the influence of social media today. A beautifully illustrated survey of photography in the social sphere, Subjective Objective shows the passion of the photographer to bring about political and social change.   Exhibtion: Zimmerli Art Museu, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ September 5, 2017 – January 1, 2018


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Translation

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Martin Kay’s Translation is concerned with the fundamental underpinnings of the titular subject. Kay argues that the primary responsibility of the translator is to the referents of words themselves. He shows how a pair of sentences that might have widely different meanings in isolation could have similar meanings in some contexts. Exploring such key subjects as how to recognize when a pair of texts might be translations of each other, Kay attempts to answer the essential question: What is translation anyway?


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Towards an Aesthetics of Production

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Throughout the twentieth century, art history has been too narrowly focused on formalism. As a result, analyses regularly reduced works of art to their materials, texture, and composition. By contrast, art historian Sebastian Egenhofer takes Gilles Deleuze’s readings of Spinoza, Nietzsche, and Bergson as the basis for a new resistance to the overly reductive account of art history.              After laying out his argument for a new aesthetics of production in introductory chapters that discuss the work of Spinoza, Nietzsche, and Bergson, as well as Heidegger and Kant, Egenhofer applies this theoretical framework to case studies on Michael Asher, Marcel Duchamp, Thomas Hirschhorn, and Piet Mondrian. An aesthetics of production does not, he argues, imply a nostalgia for the artisanal or for a work of art’s singularity, but a way to bring together elements of critical materialism with a thorough reevaluation of the modern art and abstraction.  


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Ernst Ludwig Kirchner

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (1880–1938) was one of the most important and colorful artistic personalities of the twentieth century, an icon of German Expressionism. To mark the hundredth anniversary of “Kirchner in Davos,” Thorsten Sadowsky presents here a compact artist monograph with rare archival material from throughout Kirchner’s career. Touching on Kirchner’s myriad struggles, works, and milestones—from the radicalism of the artists’ association “Die Brücke” (The Bridge), which Kirchner cofounded, and the restless expressiveness of his Berlin and Davos years, to his struggles with mental instability and anxiety, and the reviews of his own works he published under the pseudonym Louis de Marsalle—Sadowsky lucidly retraces the artist’s turbulent trajectory. This erudite monograph shows how Kirchner, though vacillating between self-doubt and egocentricity, created an incomparably multi-faceted oeuvre with a remarkable instinct for the trends and imbalances of his time. 


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Francophonie en Orient

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

This book offers a pioneering study of Asian cultures that officially escaped from French colonization but nonetheless were steeped in French civilization in the colonial era and had heavily French-influenced, largely francophone literatures. It raises a number of provocative questions, including whether colonization is the ultimate requirement for a culture's being defined as francophone, or how to think about francophone literatures that emerge from Asian nations that were historically free from French domination. The ultimate result is a redefining of the Asian francophone heritage according to new, transnational paradigms.  


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Film History as Media Archaeology

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Since cinema has entered the digital era, its very nature has come under renewed scrutiny. Countering the "death of cinema" debate, Film History as Media Archaeology​ presents a robust argument for cinema's current status as a new epistemological object of interest to philosophers, while also examining the presence of moving images in museum and art spaces as a challenge for art history. The study is the fruit of twenty years of research and writing at the interface of film history, media theory, and media archaeology by one of the acknowledged pioneers of new film history and media archaeology. It joins the efforts of other media scholars to locate cinema's historical emergence and subsequent transformations within the broader field of media change and interaction as we experience them today.


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From Midnight to Glorious Morning?

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Mihir Bose was born in January 1947. Eight months later, India became a modern, free nation. The country he knew growing up in the 1960s has undergone vast and radical change. India today exports food, sends space probes to Mars, and, all too often, Indian businesses rescue their ailing competitors in the West. In From Midnight to Glorious Morning?, Bose travels the length and breadth of India to explore how a country that many doubted would survive has been transformed into one capable of rivaling China as the world’s preeminent economic superpower. Multifarious challenges still continue to plague the country: although inequality and corruption are issues not unique to India, such a rapid ascent to global prominence creates a precarious position. However, as Bose outlines, this rapid ascent provides evidence that India is ever capable of making great strides in the face of great adversity. Bose’s penetrating analysis of the last seventy years asks what is yet to be done for India in order to fulfill the destiny with which it has been imbued. The predictions of doom in August 1947 have proved to be unfounded; the growth of the nation in population and capital has been exponential, and there is much to celebrate. But Bose’s nuanced, personal, and trenchant book shows that it is naïve to pretend the hoped-for bright morning has yet dawned.  


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Filmmaker's View

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

In 1917, August Arnold and Robert Richter rented a small store, formerly that of a shoemaker, in Munich and set up shop as a film technology firm, named, from the first two letters of each surname, ARRI. They began with one product: a copying machine they built on a lathe that Richter had received as a Christmas present from his parents.             This beautifully illustrated volume celebrates the firm’s first century, showing how it evolved from an equipment rental shop into the manufacturer of the world-renowned ARRI camera. While ARRI’s history lies predominantly in the celluloid age, the company remains a force in the digital era, with more employees, more products, and a larger market share than ever before. And one thing hasn’t changed: the firm’s emphasis on listening to filmmakers and working to provide what they need remains the driving force behind the business. On the occasion of the one-hundredth anniversary of ARRI, they have spoken to about two hundred filmmakers, directors, cameramen, gaffers, historians, producers, technicians, innovators and inventors from around the globe and asked them about their view on the film industry, technology, and art, as well as their stories about this world-renowned manufacturer. With this book, they tell the story of ARRI as a collection of experiences and short anecdotes. It is a kaleidoscopic history of the company, its people, and technical achievements.  


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Film Studies in China

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Film Studies in China is a collection of selected articles chosen from issues of the journal Contemporary Cinema published throughout the year and translated for an English-speaking audience. As one of the most prestigious academic film studies journals in China, Contemporary Cinema has been active not only in publishing Chinese scholarship for Chinese readers but also in reaching out to academics from across the globe. This anthology hopes to encourage a cross-cultural academic conversation on the fields of Chinese cinema and media studies.  


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Fascism, Liberalism and Europeanism in the Political Thought of Bertrand de Jouvenel and Alfred Fabre-Luce

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Despite the recent rise in studies that approach fascism as a transnational phenomenon, the links between fascism and internationalist intellectual currents have only received scant attention. This book explores the political thought of Bertrand de Jouvenel and Alfred Fabre-Luce, two French intellectuals, journalists and political writers who, from 1930 to the mid-1950s, moved between liberalism, fascism and Europeanism. Daniel Knegt argues that their longing for a united Europe was the driving force behind this ideological transformation—and that we can see in their thought the earliest stages of what would become neoliberalism.  


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Films of Bill Morrison

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Avant-garde filmmaker Bill Morrison has been making films that combine archival footage and contemporary music for decades, and he has recently begun to receive substantial recognition: he was the subject of a retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art, and his 2002 film Decasia was selected for the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. This is the first book-length study of Morrison's work, covering the whole of his career. It gathers specialists throughout film studies to explore Morrison's "aesthetics of the archive"—his creative play with archival footage and his focus on the materiality of the medium of film.  


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Well at Morning

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Springtide   A chaffinch in a tree of cherry sings merrily spring’s introit.   Its blazing bobble dwells in leaves, alive, and swells in scarlet.   The flowers are flares of white. The chaffinch has gone quiet and turned sky-gazer.   My eyes close on the day: an orb revolves in grey and red and azure.   Poet and artist Bohuslav Reynek spent most of his life in the relative obscurity of the Czech-Moravian Highlands; although he suffered at the hands of the Communist regime, he cannot be numbered among the dissident poets of Eastern Europe who won acclaim for their political poetry in the second half of the twentieth century. Rather, Reynek belongs to an older pastoral-devotional tradition—a kindred spirit to the likes of English-language poets Gerard Manley Hopkins, William Wordsworth, Robert Frost, and Edward Thomas. The first book of Reynek’s poetry to be published in English, The Well at Morning presents a selection of poems from across his life and is illustrated with twenty-five of his own color etchings. Also featuring three essays by leading scholars that place Reynek’s life and work alongside those of his better-known peers, this book presents a noted Czech artist to the wider world, reshaping and amplifying our understanding of modern European poetry.


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Making Workers

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

As neoliberalist logic sinks deeper into our society with each passing year, its impact on the education system increases. In Making Workers, Katharyne Mitchell argues that education, in a context of shifting spaces, narratives, actors, and values, plays a critical role in the social and political formation of youth. She argues that education is undergoing an imperative shift towards individual choice—in schools, faculty, technology, and curricula—that if unchecked will only further entrench the position of the private sector. Through a vibrant analysis of the effects of neoliberalism on education systems in the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada, Mitchell presents us with an in-depth look at the possibilities and challenges for resistance.   


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Introducing a New Economics

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Students and lecturers worldwide increasingly reject the narrow curricula and lack of intellectual diversity that characterize mainstream economics. They demand that the real world should be brought back into the classroom in order to most effectively confront current crises. Introducing a New Economics is a groundbreaking textbook that heralds this revolution in the teaching of economics. With a firm commitment to theoretical, methodological, and disciplinary pluralism, the authors challenge the institutional education hegemony head on. This unique textbook reflects a new ethos of economics teaching that highlights sustainability and justice through its discussion of work, employment, power, capital, markets, money, and debt. A progressive work, it will set the standard for the growing heterodox economics movement for years to come.  


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Red International and Black Caribbean

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Too often grouped together, the black radicalism movement has a history wholly separate from the international communist movement of the early twentieth century. In Red International and Black Caribbean Margaret Stevens sets out to correct this enduring misconception. Focusing on the period 1919-39, Stevens explores the political roots of a dozen Communist organizations and parties that were headquartered in New York City, Mexico, and the Caribbean. She describes the inner workings of the Red International—the revolutionary global political network established under the Communist International—in relation to struggles against racial and colonial oppression. In doing so, she also highlights how the significant victories and setbacks of black people fighting against racial oppression developed within the context of the global Communist movement.   Challenging dominant accounts, Red International and Black Caribbean debunks the “great men” narrative, emphasizes the role of women in their capacity as laborers, and paints the true struggles of black peasants and workers in Communist parties.   


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Raphael

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Few artists come close to the renown of Raphael—perhaps only his High Renaissance contemporaries Leonardo and Michelangelo—and the range of his artistic achievement, from painting to architecture, is staggering. This book focuses on his drawings and paintings, bringing together more than one hundred and fifty of his works, representing all his major projects in those forms and offering an overview of the various periods of his career, from his early years in Umbria through his move to Florence and on to Rome. In addition to full-color reproductions of Raphael’s work, the book details his design methods, as well as his process of preparing canvas or panel paintings and frescoes and explores the widely varied materials he employed, including silverpoint, pen, ink, charcoal, and red chalk. The result will enchant any fan of this Renaissance genius.  


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Rubens

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Even in his lifetime, Peter Paul Rubens (1577–1640) was renowned throughout Europe, and today he is justly celebrated as the greatest painter of the Flemish Baroque. This book draws on the large number of paintings from Rubens and his workshop owned by the Kunsthistorisches Museum, which include both exuberantly colored, multi-figured masterpieces—such as the huge altarpieces he produced for the Jesuit church at Antwerp—and intimate compositions like The Fur, Head of Medusa, or his late Self-Portrait. Those extensive holdings are augmented for this volume, which accompanies a major exhibition, by loans from numerous international institutions to offer a powerfully rich depiction of Rubens’s work in a wide range of media, including drawings, oil sketches, panel paintings, and large-scale canvases. In addition, the book features work by the painter’s contemporaries, enabling us to see how he was inspired by, and built on, the work of others, including Titian and Caravaggio. The result is perhaps the most complete account we’ve had of Rubens’s artistic achievement, a celebration of a true master.  


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Rebels with a Cause

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Every age has had its rebels: socialists, peace activists, sexual reformers, fundamentalists, and more. The collections of the International Institute of Social History (IISH) in Amsterdam are full of them. The IISH is the world’s largest documentation centre in the field of social history and emancipation movements. This book looks back on seventy-five years of the IISH and its collections, with a focus on creative ideas and people who fought for radical change, from Karl Marx to Aung San Suu Kyi, the French Revolution to the Chinese student revolt of 1989, from the early modern world explorers to today’s anti-globalists.  


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Rembrandt's Holland

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Rembrandt van Rijn and the Netherlands grew up together. The artist, born in Leiden in 1606, lived during the tumultuous period of the Dutch Revolt and the establishment of the independent Dutch Republic. He later moved to Amsterdam, a cosmopolitan center of world trade, and became the city’s most fashionable portraitist. His attempts to establish himself with the powerful court at The Hague failed, however, and the final decade of his life was marked by personal tragedy and financial hardship.Rembrandt’s Holland considers the life and work of this celebrated painter anew, as it charts his career alongside the visual culture of urban Amsterdam and the new Dutch Republic. In the book, Larry Silver brings to light Rembrandt’s problematic relationship with the ruling court at The Hague and reexamines how his art developed from large-scale, detailed religious imagery to more personal drawings and etchings, moving self-portraits, and heartfelt close-ups of saintly figures. Ultimately, this readable biography shows how both Rembrandt and the Dutch Golden Age ripened together. Featuring up-to-date scholarship and in-depth analysis of Rembrandt’s major works, and illustrated beautifully throughout, it is essential reading for art students and anyone who enjoys the work of the Dutch Masters.


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Ukraine and the Empire of Capital

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

From the Orange Revolution to Euromaidan, Ukraine has been in turmoil for decades. With Russia now threatening its borders and with simmering civil unrest, the country’s stability hangs by a thread. In Ukraine and the Empire of Capital, Yuliya Yurchenko analyzes these dramatic events through the lens of the country’s post-Soviet past. Providing distinctive and unexplored reflections on the origins of the conflict, Yurchenko challenges the four central myths that underlie Ukraine’s post-Soviet reality: the myth of transition, the myth of democracy, the myth of two Ukraines, and the myth of the other. With a particular focus on Ukraine’s relations with the United States, European Union, and Russia, Yurchenko provides the first deep study of contemporary Ukrainian political economy from a Marxist perspective.   


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Anticipating Sin in Medieval Society

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Composed between the sixth and ninth centuries, penitentials were little books of penance that address a wide range of human fallibility. But they are far more than mere registers of sin and penance: rather, by revealing the multiple contexts in which their authors anticipated various sins, they reveal much about the ways those authors and, presumably, their audiences understood a variety of social phenomena. Offering new, more accurate translations of the penitentials than what have previously been available, this book delves into these manuals for clues about less tangible aspects of early medieval history, including the innocence and vulnerability of young children and the relationship between speech and culpability; the links among puberty, autonomy, and moral accountability; early medieval efforts to regulate sexual relationships; and much more.  


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African-Asian Encounters

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

In recent decades, ties between Africa and Asia have greatly increased. And while most of the scholarly attention to the phenomenon has focused on China, often with an emphasis on asymmetric power relations in both politics and economics, this book takes a much broader view, looking at various small and medium-sized actors in Asia and Africa in a wide range of fields. It will be essential for scholars working on Asian-African studies and will also offer insights for policymakers working in this fast-changing field.  


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Homer, Troy and the Turks

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Homer's stories of Troy are part of the foundations of Western culture. What's less well known is that they also inspired Ottoman-Turkish cultural traditions. Yet even with all the historical and archaeological research into Homer and Troy, most scholars today rely heavily on Western sources, giving Ottoman work in the field short shrift. This book helps right that balance, exploring Ottoman-Turkish involvement and interest in the subject between 1870, when Heinrich Schliemann began his excavations in search of Troy on Ottoman soil, and the battle of Gallipoli in 1915, which gave the Turks their own version of the heroic epic of Troy.  


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Narrative Worlds of Paul the Deacon

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 06:00:00 GMT

Written as the Lombard kingdom was on the cusp of downfall at the hands of the Carolingian empire, the works of Paul the Deacon (c. 720–799) are vital to understanding the history of Italy and Western Europe in the Middle Ages. But until now, scholars have tended to neglect the narrative structure of his texts, which reflect in important ways his personal responses to the events of his time. This study presents fresh interpretations of Paul’s Historia Romana, Vita Sancti Gregorii Magni, Gesta Episcopum Mettensium, and Historia Langobardorum by focusing on him as an individual and on his strategies of argumentation, ultimately advancing a new conception of Paul as a dynamic author whose development of multiple lines of thought deserves closer examination.


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