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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Sat, 23 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

 



Extra! Weegee

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

No photographer came close to capturing the sensations, scandals, and catastrophes of 1930s and ’40s New York like Weegee (1899–1968). His striking images—captured through his uncanny ability to be on the spot and ready to shoot when things happened—have become part of the visual vocabulary through which we understand the period. This book, however, offers something new: drawing on an NEA archive that was only discovered in 2012, it presents countless never-before-seen Weegee photos. We see new angles on many of his familiar subjects—from the hardened police officer to the loud-mouthed crook; the midnight boozer to the dancing jazz musician; a dramatic conflagration to the celebrations at the end of World War II—but we also get a glimpse of an unknown side of Weegee through surprising photographs of happy people enjoying themselves. The works are complemented by a fascinating account of the rediscovery of the archive, which had been missing for decades.  


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Children with Enemies

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

There is a gentleness in the midst of savagery in Stuart Dischell’s fifth full-length collection of poetry. These poems are ever aware of the momentary grace of the present and the fleeting histories that precede the instants of time. Part elegist, part fabulist, part absurdist, Dischell writes at the edges of imagination, memory, and experience. By turns outwardly social and inwardly reflective, comic and remorseful, the beautifully crafted poems of Children with Enemies transfigure dread with a reluctant wisdom and come alive to the confusions and implications of what it means to be human.


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Measuring Entrepreneurial Businesses

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Start-ups and other entrepreneurial ventures make a significant contribution to the US economy, particularly in the tech sector, where they comprise some of the largest and most influential companies. Yet for every high-profile, high-growth company like Apple, Facebook, Microsoft, and Google, many more fail. This enormous heterogeneity poses conceptual and measurement challenges for economists concerned with understanding their precise impact on economic growth.            Measuring Entrepreneurial Businesses brings together economists and data analysts to discuss the most recent research covering three broad themes. The first chapters isolate high- and low-performing entrepreneurial ventures and analyze their roles in creating jobs and driving innovation and productivity. The next chapters turn the focus on specific challenges entrepreneurs face and how they have varied over time, including over business cycles. The final chapters explore core measurement issues, with a focus on new data projects under development that may improve our understanding of this dynamic part of the economy.  


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Teachers of the People

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

2016 witnessed an unprecedented shock to political elites in both Europe and America. Populism was on the march, fueled by a substantial ignorance of, or contempt for, the norms, practices, and institutions of liberal democracy. It is not surprising that observers on the left and right have called for renewed efforts at civic education. For liberal democracy to survive, they argue, a form of political education aimed at “the people” is clearly imperative. In Teachers of the People, Dana Villa takes us back to the moment in history when “the people” first appeared on the stage of modern European politics. That moment—the era just before and after the French Revolution—led many major thinkers to celebrate the dawning of a new epoch. Yet these same thinkers also worried intensely about the people’s seemingly evident lack of political knowledge, experience, and judgment. Focusing on Rousseau, Hegel, Tocqueville, and Mill, Villa shows how reformist and progressive sentiments were often undercut by skepticism concerning the political capacity of ordinary people. They therefore felt that “the people” needed to be restrained, educated, and guided—by laws and institutions and a skilled political elite. The result, Villa argues, was less the taming of democracy’s wilder impulses than a pervasive paternalism culminating in new forms of the tutorial state. Ironically, it is the reliance upon the distinction between “teachers” and “taught” in the work of these theorists which generates civic passivity and ignorance. And this, in turn, creates conditions favorable to the emergence of an undemocratic and illiberal populism.  


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Isa Genzken

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The work of German sculptor Isa Genzken is brilliantly receptive to the ever-shifting conditions of modern life. In this first book devoted to the artist, Lisa Lee reflects on Genzken’s tendency to think across media, attending to sculptures, photographs, drawings, and films from the entire span of her four-decade career, from student projects in the mid-1970s to recent works seen in Genzken’s studio.             Through penetrating analyses of individual works as well as archival and interview material from the artist herself, Lee establishes four major themes in Genzken’s oeuvre: embodied perception, architecture and built space, the commodity, and the body. Contextualizing the sculptor’s engagement with fellow artists, such as Joseph Beuys and Bruce Nauman, Lee situates Genzken within a critical and historical framework that begins in politically fraught 1960s West Germany and extends to the globalized present. Here we see how Genzken tests the relevance of the utopian aspirations and formal innovations of the early twentieth century by submitting them to homage and travesty. Sure to set the standard for future studies of Genzken’s work, Isa Genzken is essential for anyone interested in contemporary art.


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Thinking About History

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What distinguishes history as a discipline from other fields of study? That's the animating question of Sarah Maza’s Thinking About History, a general introduction to the field of history that revels in its eclecticism and highlights the inherent tensions and controversies that shape it. Designed for the classroom, Thinking About History is organized around big questions: Whose history do we write, and how does that affect what stories get told and how they are told? How did we come to view the nation as the inevitable context for history, and what happens when we move outside those boundaries? What is the relation among popular, academic, and public history, and how should we evaluate sources? What is the difference between description and interpretation, and how do we balance them? Maza provides choice examples in place of definitive answers, and the result is a book that will spark classroom discussion and offer students a view of history as a vibrant, ever-changing field of inquiry that is thoroughly relevant to our daily lives.


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Thinking About History

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What distinguishes history as a discipline from other fields of study? That's the animating question of Sarah Maza’s Thinking About History, a general introduction to the field of history that revels in its eclecticism and highlights the inherent tensions and controversies that shape it. Designed for the classroom, Thinking About History is organized around big questions: Whose history do we write, and how does that affect what stories get told and how they are told? How did we come to view the nation as the inevitable context for history, and what happens when we move outside those boundaries? What is the relation among popular, academic, and public history, and how should we evaluate sources? What is the difference between description and interpretation, and how do we balance them? Maza provides choice examples in place of definitive answers, and the result is a book that will spark classroom discussion and offer students a view of history as a vibrant, ever-changing field of inquiry that is thoroughly relevant to our daily lives.


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Building Better Societies

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From environmental decline to growing economic inequality, things are getting worse for the majority of the human race and will continue to worsen until determined action is taken. Starting from this vantage point, Building Better Societies looks to social scientists to identify what is needed to solve the problems that are leading to a collapse of civil society. This is the first book to collect the ideas of those whose research on social conditions is at the forefront of our biggest societal problems. Challenging fellow social scientists to cast aside their commitment to the established order and its ideological support systems, Building Better Societies argues that social researchers must, as objectively as possible, use their skills to look ahead, identify the likely outcomes of various forms of intervention, and move to the forefront of informed political debate. Bringing together expert contributors researching the many aspects of our social condition, this book channels the energy of social scientists into a more normative and engaged voice; it asks them what mechanisms, interventions, and evidence we might draw on as we make a better world.


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Building Better Societies

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From environmental decline to growing economic inequality, things are getting worse for the majority of the human race and will continue to worsen until determined action is taken. Starting from this vantage point, Building Better Societies looks to social scientists to identify what is needed to solve the problems that are leading to a collapse of civil society. This is the first book to collect the ideas of those whose research on social conditions is at the forefront of our biggest societal problems. Challenging fellow social scientists to cast aside their commitment to the established order and its ideological support systems, Building Better Societies argues that social researchers must, as objectively as possible, use their skills to look ahead, identify the likely outcomes of various forms of intervention, and move to the forefront of informed political debate. Bringing together expert contributors researching the many aspects of our social condition, this book channels the energy of social scientists into a more normative and engaged voice; it asks them what mechanisms, interventions, and evidence we might draw on as we make a better world.


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Intimacy and Ageing

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As people live longer around the world, remaining healthy into old age, the phenomenon of new intimate relationships in later life is rapidly growing. This book, part of the Ageing in a Global Context series, looks closely at how these relationships have developed within the current cohort of elderly, with particular attention to the ways in which new relationships at older ages are simultaneously rooted in older cultures of intimacy and partake in changes in social relations and behavior that have emerged more recently. What do new intimate relationships offer older men and women, and what do they expect or hope for from them?


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Indigeneity: A Politics of Potential

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book presents the first comprehensive use of political theory to explain indigenous politics, assessing the ways in which indigenous and liberal political theories interact in order to consider the practical policy implications of the indigenous right to self-determination. Dominic O’Sullivan here reveals indigeneity’s concern for political relationships, agendas, and ideas beyond ethnic minorities’ basic claim to liberal recognition, and he draws out the ways that indigeneity’s local geopolitical focus, underpinned by global developments in law and political theory, can make it a movement of forward-looking, transformational politics.


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Memoir and Identity in Welsh Patagonia

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This investigation of identity construction in twentieth-century Welsh Patagonia breaks new ground by looking at the Welsh community in Chubut not as a quaint anomaly, but in its proper context as an integral part of contemporary Argentina. Addressing the implications of the settler colonialism of the foundational myth of Chubut and its place in the larger question of settler colonialism throughout Argentina, it draws on the literature of the under-studied period immediately preceding the turn-of-the-twentieth-century revitalization of the Welsh community in Patagonia. Ultimately, it presents a newly broad, much richer panorama of what it means to be Welsh in Argentina, free from old stereotypes and fully part of the contemporary nation.


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Medical Aphorisms

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Celebrated medieval rabbi Moses Maimonides wrote many philosophical, legal, and medical works. Of these, Medical Aphorisms is among his best-known. Consisting of approximately fifteen hundred maxims compiled from the works of the ancient Greek physician Galen, it is arranged as twenty-five treatises organized according to traditional medieval subspecialties such as gynecology, hygiene, and diet. Because the source texts no longer survive, Maimonides’s version provides vital clues about Galen’s thought that would otherwise remain unknown. This fifth volume of Gerrit Bos’s critical edition includes both the definitive Arabic text and a masterly English translation.


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Procurement 4.0

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Although digitalization or smart manufacturing might be considered a driving factor behind Procurement 4.0—the latest conceptualization of how modern companies procure goods and services—it is far too shortsighted to view Procurement 4.0 as simply a digitalized function. In Procurement 4.0, four leading experts on this revolutionary concept offer the first comprehensive framework to identify the interrelated opportunities and challenges it provides. As the authors show, dynamic, interconnected value chains are key factors of sustainable business success, with procurement managed and steered by strategic purchasers in their new role as value chain managers. This evolving environment will be influenced by a variety of digitalization forces, including Industry 4.0, the Internet of Things, smart data and clouds, Enterprise 2.0, social media, and mobile computing. Integrating all network levels of procurement—from intra-company and inter-company relationships to global connectivity along value chains—and drawing on interviews with corporate heads of BMW, Lufthansa, Maersk, BP, and Allianz, the authors explore four dimensions of procurement that will address the business needs of the future: competing value chains, co-creation, leadership, and digital transformation.


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Preventing Intimate Partner Violence

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book brings together an international collection of researchers and practitioners from a range of fields—including sociology, social work, psychology, law, public health and medicine, and victims services and advocacy—to examine promising, innovative strategies and programs for preventing intimate partner violence (IPV). The interdisciplinary contributions both discuss findings from evaluations of current IPV prevention programs and identify gaps in knowledge, paying particular attention to the needs of underserved groups like racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants and refugees, and members of LGBTQ communities. Among the many issues addressed are primary prevention programs that target adolescents and young adults, strategies specifically designed to engage men and boys in IPV prevention, IPV screening in various settings, the impact of the criminalization of IPV on minority populations, restorative justice programs, interventions for women who use violence, and innovative shelter programming to prevent revictimization. Uniting the major themes examined throughout the book, the concluding chapter delineates paths to more effective prevention strategies by highlighting ways that all stakeholders can work more effectively toward reducing violence.


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Preventing Intimate Partner Violence

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book brings together an international collection of researchers and practitioners from a range of fields—including sociology, social work, psychology, law, public health and medicine, and victims services and advocacy—to examine promising, innovative strategies and programs for preventing intimate partner violence (IPV). The interdisciplinary contributions both discuss findings from evaluations of current IPV prevention programs and identify gaps in knowledge, paying particular attention to the needs of underserved groups like racial and ethnic minorities, immigrants and refugees, and members of LGBTQ communities. Among the many issues addressed are primary prevention programs that target adolescents and young adults, strategies specifically designed to engage men and boys in IPV prevention, IPV screening in various settings, the impact of the criminalization of IPV on minority populations, restorative justice programs, interventions for women who use violence, and innovative shelter programming to prevent revictimization. Uniting the major themes examined throughout the book, the concluding chapter delineates paths to more effective prevention strategies by highlighting ways that all stakeholders can work more effectively toward reducing violence.


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Paul Gauguin

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Paul Gauguin’s story is nearly as dramatic and seductive as his art. In 1883, he walked away from a successful career in banking in order to paint every day. In 1891, he went a step further, leaving his family behind and setting sail for the South Seas, financing his trip by selling thirty paintings; the works that he created once he arrived were like nothing the art world had ever seen before. This book brings together beautiful reproductions of Gauguin’s most famous works with the story of his life, excerpts from his letters and diaries, and an introduction setting his work in context.  


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Paying for the Welfare State in the 21st Century

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As governments around the world embrace austerity, one of the key arguments they use is that the welfare state is unaffordable. Paying for the Welfare State in the 21st Century shows that argument to be specious, relating current debates about taxation and welfare to a deeper understanding, informed by political economy, of the relationship between taxation and spending on social services. Only by understanding the critical functions of welfare in post-industrial society can we legitimately consider what levels of taxation and support are reasonable.


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Playwriting and Young Audiences

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From the success of Matilda on Broadway to the 2015 revival of Annie in movie theaters, it’s clear that theater with and for young people has widespread and enduring appeal. Despite this, there is no contemporary guide designed for playwriting for youth in professional and educational contexts. In Playwriting and Young Audiences, Matt Omasta and Nicole B. Adkins put this right. Providing a range of perspectives, the book collects the practical advice and wisdom of seventy-five artists and practitioners. It is a deeply poignant account of those who have dedicated their lives to work that applauds the dignity and depth of young people.


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Paris

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

It is one of the world’s most iconic cities, the center of romance, cuisine, and high culture, a place we are all implored to visit in spring and then forever hold in our hearts: Paris. But behind these familiar notions lies a bustling and deeply complex metropolis, one that offers visitors an unending array of surprises. This book takes readers and travelers to this other Paris, a city of love and danger alike, a city imbued with over 2,000 years of history, which Adam Roberts lovingly recounts alongside an expert tour of the city’s sights, sounds, and flavors.             Roberts tells the story of how a provincial backwater rose up to become one of the richest, most powerful, and most visited cities in Europe, a world leader in fashion, the arts, and gastronomy. He takes us back two millennia to when roaming Celtic tribes first set up camp on the banks of the Seine, and from there moves through turbulent centuries full of the fates and fortunes of kings, marked by invasions, revolutions, and magnificent buildings constructed one after the other. He explores the city’s renowned gothic architecture, the urban planning that has been revised throughout history, the mammoth museums that have been erected to preserve its artistic legacy, and the vibrant street culture that hosts markets, performers, and Paris’s own flâneurs every single day. Along the way, he points out countless hidden gems travelers rarely make it to: from a vintage candy shop to a museum of romantic life, from a hidden garden inside a hospital to a converted hair salon that hosts—of all things—table tennis tournaments. And of course he shows readers where to eat, catch a show, and go for gorgeous sunset strolls.             Offering a comprehensive but easily digestible overview, Paris is the perfect book for anyone planning a visit to the city or anyone who simply loves it from afar.  


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Korean Art from the 19th Century to the Present

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Walk the galleries of any major contemporary art museum and you are sure to see a work by a Korean artist. Interest in modern and contemporary art from South—as well as North—Korea has grown in recent decades, and museums and individual collectors have been eager to tap into this rising market. But few books have helped us understand Korean art and its significance in the art world, and even fewer have told the story of the formation of Korea’s contemporary cultural scene and the role artists have played in it. This richly illustrated history tackles these issues, exploring Korean art from the late-nineteenth century to the present day—a period that has seen enormous political, social, and economic change. Charlotte Horlyck covers the critical and revolutionary period that stretches from Korean artists’ first encounters with oil paintings in the late nineteenth century to the varied and vibrant creative outputs of the twenty-first. She explores artists’ interpretations of new and traditional art forms ranging from oil and ink paintings to video art, multi-media installations, ready-mades, and performance art, showing how artists at every turn have questioned the role of art and artists within society. Opening up this fascinating world to general audiences, this book will appeal to anyone wanting to explore this rich and fascinating era in Korea’s cultural history.  


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Violence of Austerity

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the aftermath of the global financial crisis in 2008, Britain’s government put into effect a hotly contested series of major cuts in public expenditure with the stated aim of restoring economic security. Since then, this reign of austerity continues to devastate contemporary Britain through a disconnected and unaffected political elite.   In The Violence of Austerity, David Whyte and Vickie Cooper bring together the passionate voices of campaigners and academics to show that rather than stimulating economic growth, austerity policies have led to a dismantling of the social systems that operated as a buffer against economic hardship. Chapters from major contributors—including Danny Dorling, Mary O’Hara and Rizwaan Sabir—show how austerity is a form of institutional violence more socially harmful and far-reaching than other more politicized and publicized forms of violence, such as terrorism or gun violence. Contributors expose highly significant cases of this institutional violence driven by public sector cuts: police attacks on the homeless, violent evictions of the rented sector, risks faced by people on workfare, and more. The Violence of Austerity is a devastating, authoritative study of the myriad ways austerity policies harm people in Britain that will resonate with anyone concerned with the increasing power of the political elite and the future of social welfare.


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Last of the Light

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Neither day nor night, twilight has long exerted a fascination for Western artists, thinkers, and writers, while haunting the Romantics and intriguing philosophers and scientists. In The Last of the Light, Peter Davidson takes readers through our culture’s long engagement with the concept of twilight—from the melancholy of smoky English autumn evenings to the midnight sun of northern European summers and beyond. Taking in poets and painters, Victorians and Romans, city and countryside, and deftly combining memoir, literature, philosophy, and art history, Davidson shows how the atmospheric shadows and the in-between nature of twilight has fired the imagination and generated works of incredible beauty, mystery, and romance. Ambitious and brilliantly executed, this is the perfect book for the bedside table, richly rewarding and endlessly thought-provoking.


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Living on the Margins

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As debates over immigration policy rage in the United States and around the globe, Living on the Margins offers profound insight into the working lives of undocumented migrants themselves. Focusing on London-based migrants and their employers, Alice Bloch and Sonia McKay expose the contradictions in policy and interactions among class, immigration hierarchies, and gender that operate within the ethnic enclave economy, marginalizing and criminalizing these migrants while promoting exploitative labor markets. But the authors also offer hope, revealing how migrants can be active agents in shaping their lives within the constraints of their undocumented status. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, this book places migrant research in a global context, providing theoretical, policy, and empirical analyses that travel across borders.


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Llama

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Known for their woolly charm, sure-footed strength, and a propensity to spit at you if you bother them too much, llamas have had a rich and diverse history. Since their domestication high in the Andes, they have been farmed, smuggled, sacrificed, and sometimes kept around just to be petted. They have functioned at different times as luxury commodities, literary muses, and national symbols, and they have served by turns as beasts of burden, circus performers, and even golf caddies. In this book, Helen Cowie charts the fascinating history of llamas and their close relatives, alpacas, guanacos, and vicuñas. Cowie illustrates how deeply the Incas venerated llamas and shows how the animals are still cherished in their native lands in Peru and Bolivia, remaining central to Andean culture. She also tells the story of attempts to introduce llamas and alpacas to Britain, the United States, and Australia, where they are used today for trekking, wool production, and even as therapy animals. Packed with llama drama and alpaca facts, this book will delight animal lovers, fans of natural history, and anyone who just can’t resist these inimitable animals’ off-the-charts cuteness factor.


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Liberalism and the Postcolony

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Philippines entered the twentieth century newly free of Spanish rule and faced with the task of building a nation. Due in part to American control of the country for the first half of the twentieth century, liberalism played a dynamic role in shaping the government and philosophy of the Philippines. Through the biographies of four Filipino scholar-bureaucrats—Camilo Osias, Salvador Araneta, Carlos P. Romulo, and Salvador P. Lopez—Lisandro E. Claudio argues that liberal thought served as the grammar of Filipino democracy in the twentieth century. Melding political philosophy and narrative history, he takes us through various articulations of liberalism in pedagogy, international affairs, economics, and literature. In this first book on Filipino liberals in the twentieth century, Claudio brings to light an obscured history of the Philippine state and also argues for a new liberalism rooted in the postcolonial experience, a timely intervention in light of the ascent of President Rodrigo Duterte and the current developments in Southeast Asian politics.


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Reimagining the Nation

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Reimagining the Nation presents a clear look at the current state of critical nationalism studies, highlighting contemporary debates and offering paths for future work in the field. Accessible yet theoretically rich, it shows how we can think about nationhood beyond binary or even broader cosmopolitan ideals, drawing on cutting-edge critical research in citizenship, urban studies, and cultural studies, and drawing examples and theoretical inspiration from Southeast Asian studies. Above all, it sets out to resist the all-pervading ethno-nationalist assumptions that continue to underpin a world system organized into nation-states.


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Revolutions and Counter-Revolutions

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Unquestionably a watershed year in world history, 1917 not only saw the Russian Revolution and the US entry into World War I, it also marked a foundational moment in determining global political structures for the remaining twentieth century. Yet while contemporaries were cognizant of these global connections, historiography has been largely limited to analysis of the nation-state. A century later, this book discusses the transnational dimension of the numerous upheavals, rebellions, and violent reactions on a global level that began with 1917. Experts from different continents contribute findings that go beyond the well-known European and transatlantic narratives, making for a uniquely global study of this crucial period in history.


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Recovering the Past

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Though nearly a century has passed since the signing of the Armistice to end World War I, the scale of the unexploded ammunition from the war is still not fully known. Recovering the Past is a photographic documentary project of twenty-five thought-provoking images that explore this legacy of war. The images were produced to coincide with an exhibition in Ypres, Belgium, and this accompanying postcard book contains all the images from the exhibition and describes their origins and backstory. The book also comes with twelve detachable postcards.   The photographs here examine the operations of the Belgian Army’s bomb disposal unit and commemorate the Australian Imperial Force’s (AIF) significant contribution to the fighting in Flanders. Through the use of both historic and modern photographs, Recovering the Past visually acknowledges the AIF’s role in the successful outcome of the war in Flanders and offers a new look at the legacy of the war.  


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Rhododendron

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Has ever a plant inspired such love and such hatred as the rhododendron? Its beauty is inarguable; it can clothe whole hillsides and gardens with a blanket of vibrant color. The rhododendron has a propensity towards sexual infidelity, making it very popular with horticultural breeding programs. And it can also be used as an herbal remedy for an astonishing range of ailments. But there is a darker side to these gorgeous flowers. Daphne du Maurier used the red rhododendron as a symbol of blood in her best-selling novel Rebecca, and numerous Chinese folktales link the plant with tragedy and death. It can poison livestock and intoxicate humans, and its narcotic honey has been used as a weapon of war. Rhododendron ponticum has run riot across the British countryside, but the full story of this implacable invader contains many fascinating surprises. In this beautifully illustrated volume, Richard Milne explores the many ways in which the rhododendron has influenced human societies, relating this to the extraordinary story of the plant’s evolution. Over one thousand species of the plant exist, ranging from rugged trees on Himalayan slopes to rock-hugging alpines, and delicate plants perched on rainforest branches. Milne relays tales of mythical figures, intrepid collectors, and eccentric plant breeders. However much you may think you know about the rhododendron, this charming book will offer something new.


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Wild Boar

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Ancestors of domestic pigs, wild boars are tough, resourceful omnivores that have presented humans since prehistoric times with a tricky situation: they make for a delicious food source, but they are formidable animals with long tusks that can inflict serious harm. Wild Boar traces the interaction of humans and boars in fascinating detail, showing how our relationship has evolved over time and how it can be seen today as fundamentally representative of the questions at the heart of ecological preservation and restoration.            Dorothy Yamamoto takes us from the dense streets of Tokyo to the Forest of Dean in England to show how wild boars have survived in a variety of settings. She also explores the ways that they have figured in our imaginations, whether as the iconic Calydonian Boar from Ancient Greece, the White Boar of Richard III, or any of the other forms it has taken in mythology and lore. As she shows, the boar has been an especially prominent figure in hunting culture, and as such it has often been construed as a larger-than-life monster that only the most heroic of us can take down, a misperception that has threatened the boar’s survival in many parts of the world. With an illuminating combination of natural with cultural history, this book paints a vibrant portrait of a unique and often misunderstood animal. 


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What Kind of Democracy Is This?

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Has there ever been a period in modern history when democratic politics seemed more unpredictable or unruly? In the face of a set of global challenges almost beyond control or comprehension, the old rules by which politics were once both ordered and understood have waned. Very few voices exist to help us comprehend these challenges—commentators who can run the gamut from democracy to disgust, from the micro to the macro, and from love to loathing. And yet this is exactly what Matt Flinders delivers in this book, expertly ranging across topics as diverse as architecture, art, mountain running, and fairy tales in his attempt to understand the emerging democratic landscape. Refreshing and stimulating, What Kind of Democracy Is This? is an engagingly written melding of political scholarship and popular culture that both informs and provokes.


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History of the Silk Road

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Silk Road is not a place, but a journey, a route from the edges of the Mediterranean to the central plains of China, through high mountains and inhospitable deserts. For thousands of years its history has been a traveler’s history, of brief encounters in desert towns, snowbound passes and nameless forts. It was the conduit that first brought Buddhism, Christianity and Islam into China, and the site of much of the “Great Game” between 19th-century empires. Today, its central section encompasses several former Soviet republics, and the Chinese Autonomous Region of Xinjiang. The ancient trade route controversially crosses the sites of several forgotten kingdoms, buried in sand and only now revealing their secrets.A History of the Silk Road not only offers the reader a chronological outline of the region’s development, but also provides an invaluable introduction to its languages, literature, and arts. It takes a comprehensive and illuminating look at the rich history of this dynamic and little known region, and provides an easy-to-use reference source. Jonathan Clements pays particular attention to the fascinating historical sites which feature on any visitor’s itinerary and also gives special emphasis to the writings and reactions of travelers through the centuries.  


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American Tianxia

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

After a meteoric rise, China’s once inexorable growth has come to a screeching halt, ending the Chinese dream of establishing a new tianxia (“harmonious order”) in Asia with China at its center. In this book, Salvatore Babones provides an up-to-date assessment of China’s economic problems and how they are undermining China’s challenge to a Western-dominated world. As China’s neighbors and many of its own most talented people look to the United States to ensure their security and prosperity, global power is slowly but surely consolidating in a twenty-first-century American tianxia. A closely argued antidote to defeatist accounts of Western decline, American Tianxia explores how liberal individualism has become the leitmotif of an emerging order in which people of all nationalities seek a share in the economic, cultural, and political system that is America writ large.


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All That Is Wales

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Wales is small geographically, but its rich and varied culture belies its size. This collection of essays focuses on English-language authors from Wales in order to offer a sample of the country's internal diversity. Contributors include Lynette Roberts, who is Argentinian by birth but of Welsh decent; Peggy Ann Whistler, who chose a new Welsh identity as Margiad Evans; Nigel Heseltine, whose bizarre stories of the decaying squirearchy of the Welsh border country remain sadly little known; and Utah-based poet Leslie Norris, whose Welsh-English translations bring out the bicultural character of Wales. Taken together, they present a Wales that is vibrant in its difference, a culture made of many disparate parts.


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Towards a Praxis-based Media and Journalism Research

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This volume brings together current scholarly debates about how to bridge the gap between theory and practice in media and journalism research. Drawing on work from media scholars and media practitioners that focuses on how both sides can work together for the good of society, Towards a Praxis-based Media and Journalism Research is the first collection to examine how theory and practice can be combined for positive effect. The result will lay important groundwork for scholarship on this new and increasingly important idea in media and communication studies.


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Transformations

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The contributors to Transformations explore the interactions between people and their urban surroundings through site-specific art and creative practices, tracing the ways in which people inhabit, imagine, and shape their cities. Drawing on the work of global artists, from Cambodia to Australia, New Zealand to the United States, this collection investigates the politics and democratization of space through an examination of art, education, justice, and the role of the citizen in the city. The essays explore how creative practices can work in tandem with ever-changing urban technologies and ecologies to both disrupt and shape urban public spaces.


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Thomas Gainsborough

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Thomas Gainsborough (1727–88) was a prominent English portrait and landscape painter, and he became one of the founding members of the Royal Academy. Born in Sudbury, Suffolk, the youngest son of a wool manufacturer, Gainsborough left home at the age of twenty-three in order to study art in London. He set up his first practice in Ipswich in 1752; seven years later he moved to the newly fashionable spa town Bath before finally settling in London in 1774, where he lived until his death in 1788. Today, his paintings are still beloved, commanding significant attention in art markets around the world.   Originally published in 1915, this biography is still the most authoritative text on the life and career of Gainsborough. Back in print, it offers a new chance for readers and art collectors to get the full story of this key figure in eighteenth-century art.  


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Watercolours

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

A Czechoslovakian Jew who was imprisoned at Auschwitz, Dina Gottliebova-Babbitt (1923–2009) was saved by her artistic abilities. Gottliebova painted the walls of the children’s barracks with images of the Disney film Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. When Josef Mengele discovered her talent, he commissioned her to paint watercolor portraits of Roma prisoners. After the war, Gottliebova worked as an animator for Warner Brothers for many years, eventually marrying Walt Disney animator Art Babbitt. Many years later, Gottliebova’s Auschwitz paintings were recovered and displayed at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum. When the artist requested that her paintings be returned, her request was denied. The dispute escalated into an international scandal with the American and Polish governments becoming involved. Gottliebova passed away in 2009 without having her works returned.             Watercolours is Gottliebova’s story. Journalist Lidia Ostałowska reconstructs Gottliebova’s time in Auschwitz, with an eye to broader issues of historical memory, trauma, racism, and the relationship between torturer and victim. Drawing on hundreds of accounts of the hellish camp, Ostałowska tells the story of one remarkable woman’s incarceration and battle for survival.  


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Winds of Change

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

While twentieth-century Welsh Nonconformity and the Anglican Church in Wales have both received substantial historical attention, there is no similar treatment of the Roman Catholic Church. This study redresses that imbalance, charting and accounting for the remarkable growth of the Roman Catholic Church in Wales between the formation of its Province of Wales in 1916 and the commencement of the Second Vatican Council in 1962. This growth was at a time, Trystan Owain Hughes shows, when Nonconformity, until that point predominant in Welsh religion, began a spectacular decline. This new edition  book includes a fully updated bibliography and a new chapter exploring progress in the field since the book’s original publication.


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Cookbook Notebook

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

A relic of the war years, this charming facsimile recalls a time when the housewives of Britain were still mak­ing do and keeping a nation “fighting fit.” Back-in-print for the first time in seventy years, The Cookbook Notebook contains a diverse collection of recipes, from a classic fish pie to a gooey ginger cake, and each one illustrates how even during war rationing, food could still be adventurous and tasty.   Illustrated with drawings by Edward Bawden (1903–1989) this is a fun and nostalgic collection that offers a unique way to savor the past.  


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Designing Interdisciplinary Education

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Now, more than ever, higher education faces the challenge of educating students to see beyond the limits of their own discipline and to come up with innovative integrated solutions to our contemporary problems. Designing Interdisciplinary Education serves as a foothold for interdisciplinary initiatives in higher education, whether it be programmes, minors, courses or extra-curricular activities. It offers accessible guidance and practical advice for university teachers and curriculum leaders who aim to develop, implement and sustain a successful interdisciplinary approach to their teaching at the classroom, course or programme level.  The book’s "how to" approach addresses several important topics such as formulating and assessing interdisciplinary learning outcomes, embedding integration in the programme design, the features of an interdisciplinary teacher, interdisciplinary teaching in practice, and didactic methods that nurture interdisciplinary understanding. This handbook incorporates numerous case studies, key advices, and exercises from a variety of interdisciplinary programmes in diverse countries. The ideas elaborated in this handbook are based on the theories and practices used at the Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies, the University of Amsterdam’s knowledge centre for interdisciplinary learning and teaching.


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Experiment

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For many, the Russian revolution of 1917 was a symbol of hope and offered proof that another way of envisioning the world was indeed possible. But Soviet authoritarianism and the horrors of the gulags have since led to the revolution becoming synonymous with oppression, forever tainting socialism in the eyes of its critics. However, the often over-looked experience of Georgia, which declared its independence from Russia in 1918, shows there was another way. In The Experiment, historian Eric Lee brings this little-known story of  Georgia’s experiment in democratic socialism to light, detailing the turbulent events of this chapter in revolutionary history. Along the way, Lee introduces us to a remarkable set of ideas and policies, among them the men and women who strove for a vision of socialism that featured universal suffrage, a people’s militia in place of a standing army, and a civil society grounded in trade unions and cooperatives. Though the Georgian Democratic Republic lasted for just three years before it was brutally crushed on the orders of Stalin, in that short time it was able to offer a glimpse of a more humane alternative to the Communist nightmare that was to come.The Experiment is the first authoritative English-language history of this forgotten episode, and it will appeal to those interested in Soviet history as well as those seeking inspiration for a democratic socialist alternative today.  


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Experiment

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For many, the Russian revolution of 1917 was a symbol of hope and offered proof that another way of envisioning the world was indeed possible. But Soviet authoritarianism and the horrors of the gulags have since led to the revolution becoming synonymous with oppression, forever tainting socialism in the eyes of its critics. However, the often over-looked experience of Georgia, which declared its independence from Russia in 1918, shows there was another way. In The Experiment, historian Eric Lee brings this little-known story of  Georgia’s experiment in democratic socialism to light, detailing the turbulent events of this chapter in revolutionary history. Along the way, Lee introduces us to a remarkable set of ideas and policies, among them the men and women who strove for a vision of socialism that featured universal suffrage, a people’s militia in place of a standing army, and a civil society grounded in trade unions and cooperatives. Though the Georgian Democratic Republic lasted for just three years before it was brutally crushed on the orders of Stalin, in that short time it was able to offer a glimpse of a more humane alternative to the Communist nightmare that was to come.The Experiment is the first authoritative English-language history of this forgotten episode, and it will appeal to those interested in Soviet history as well as those seeking inspiration for a democratic socialist alternative today.  


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Essays of the Sadat Era

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

When Naguib Mahfouz quit his job as a civil servant in 1971, a Nobel Prize in literature was still off on the horizon, as was his global recognition as the central figure of Arab literature. He was just beginning his post on the editorial staff of the Egyptian newspaper Al-Ahram, and elsewhere in Cairo, Anwar Sadat was just beginning his hugely transformative Egyptian presidency, which would span eleven years and come to be known as the Sadat era. This book offers English-language readers the first glimpse of the Sadat era through Mahfouz’s eyes, a collection of pieces that captures one of Egypt’s most important decades in the prose of one of the Middle East’s most important writers.              This volume stitches together a fascinating and vivid account of the dramatic events of Sadat’s era, from his break with the Soviet Union to the Yom Kippur War with Israel and eventual peace accord and up to his assassination by Islamic extremists in 1981. Through this tumultuous history, Mahfouz takes on a diverse array of political topics—including socioeconomic stratification, democracy and dictatorship, and Islam and extremism—which are still of crucial relevance to Egypt today. Clear-eyed and direct, the works illuminate Mahfouz’s personal and political convictions that were more often hidden in his novels, enriching his better-known corpus with social, political, and ideological context.             These writings are a rare treasure, a story of a time of tremendous social and political change in the Middle East told by one if its most iconic authors. 


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Understanding the Cost of Welfare

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the wake of the global financial crash, there is possibly no more pressing question for social policy than what forms of welfare are affordable and how. Clear and accessible, Howard Glennerster’s Understanding the Cost of Welfare is unique in offering an authoritative, levelheaded, and nontechnical survey of how economic priorities and pressures affect social policies and what the mechanics of funding services mean in real terms. An updated edition of Glennerster’s Understanding the Finance of Welfare, featuring a strengthened comparative dimension in its investigation of these vital services, this book provides more relevant institutional detail than any other text on this topic. Understanding the Cost of Welfare is an important, substantial contribution at a time when neoliberal arguments for reducing the burden of welfare are more dominant than ever before.


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Understanding the Cost of Welfare

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the wake of the global financial crash, there is possibly no more pressing question for social policy than what forms of welfare are affordable and how. Clear and accessible, Howard Glennerster’s Understanding the Cost of Welfare is unique in offering an authoritative, levelheaded, and nontechnical survey of how economic priorities and pressures affect social policies and what the mechanics of funding services mean in real terms. An updated edition of Glennerster’s Understanding the Finance of Welfare, featuring a strengthened comparative dimension in its investigation of these vital services, this book provides more relevant institutional detail than any other text on this topic. Understanding the Cost of Welfare is an important, substantial contribution at a time when neoliberal arguments for reducing the burden of welfare are more dominant than ever before.


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Eighteenth Century Women Artists

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The eighteenth century was an age when not only the aristocracy, but also a burgeoning middle class, had the opportunity to pursue their interest in the arts. But these opportunities were generally open only to men; any woman who wished to succeed as an artist still had to overcome numerous obstacles. In a society in which women were expected to marry, become mothers, and conform to rigid social conventions, becoming a professional artist was a controversial choice. Nevertheless, if a woman possessed charm and ambition, and united her talent with hard work, success was possible.  Eighteenth-Century Women Artists celebrates the work of women who had the tenacity and skill (and sometimes the necessary dash of luck) to succeed against the odds. Caroline Chapman examines the careers and working lives of celebrated artists like Angelica Kauffman and Elisabeth Vigée Le Brun as well as the equally interesting work of artists who have now mostly been forgotten. In addition to discussing their varied artworks, Chapman considers artists’ studios, the functioning of the print market, how art was sold, the role of patrons, and the rise of the lady amateur. It is enriched by over fifty color images, which offer a rich selection of art from the time.  


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Young People, Welfare and Crime

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Widespread youth unemployment is rapidly becoming a major—and seemingly endemic—problem around the world. And, increasingly, young people themselves are being blamed, their nonparticipation in the workforce criminalized. Ross Fergusson here mounts a powerful critique of current approaches to youth unemployment, reexamining its causes and consequences from a wide range of perspectives and revealing the structural and cultural problems that underlie it. It will be essential for anyone working with or trying to address the problems of youth today.


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Graciliano Ramos and the Making of Modern Brazil

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Brazilian writer Graciliano Ramos (1892–1953) is a key figure in understanding the making of modern Brazil, and this collection gathers the most up-to-date criticism and analysis of his work. Contributors consider issues such as Ramos's dialogue with literary tradition, his legacy for contemporary writers, and his treatment of racial discrimination and gender inequality. The book also addresses his involvement in politics, offering fresh perspectives on what can be gleaned of his political thinking from his work and engagement.


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Colonising, Decolonising, and Globalising Kolkata

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Colonising, Decolonising, and Globalising Kolkata offers an extended analysis of the architecture of Kolkata from the earliest days of colonialism through independence and on into the twenty-first century, all set in the larger context of Indian cities and architecture. What Siddhartha Sen shows is the transformation of a colonial city into a Marxist one—and ongoing attempts to further transform it into a global city. Richly illustrated, the book carefully situates architecture, design, and urban planning within Kolkata’s political economy and social milieu.


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Companion to the History of Crime and Criminal Justice

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This companion addresses the history of crime and punishment through entries by expert contributors that select and define the central vocabulary and terminology for the study of the history of crime and punishment. Organized alphabetically, with useful cross-references and bibliographies, it goes beyond mere definitions to offer rigorous critical analysis of the terms and their use within the field, both now and in the past. It will be essential to students, researchers, and teachers in the field.


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Companion to the History of Crime and Criminal Justice

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This companion addresses the history of crime and punishment through entries by expert contributors that select and define the central vocabulary and terminology for the study of the history of crime and punishment. Organized alphabetically, with useful cross-references and bibliographies, it goes beyond mere definitions to offer rigorous critical analysis of the terms and their use within the field, both now and in the past. It will be essential to students, researchers, and teachers in the field.


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Crime and Justice, Volume 46

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Justice Futures: Reinventing American Criminal Justice is the forty-sixth volume in the Crime and Justice series. Contributors include Francis Cullen and Daniel Mears on community corrections; Peter Reuter and Jonathan Caulkins on drug abuse policy; Harold Pollack on drug treatment; David Hemenway on guns and violence; Edward Mulvey on mental health and crime; Edward Rhine, Joan Petersilia, and Kevin Reitz on parole policies; Daniel Nagin and Cynthia Lum on policing; Craig Haney on prisons and incarceration; Ronald Wright on prosecution; and Michael Tonry on sentencing policies.  


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Choreographies

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Choreographer Jacky Lansley has been practicing and performing for more than four decades. In Choreographies, she offers unique insight into the processes behind independent choreography and paints a vivid portrait of a rigorous practice that combines dance, performance art, visuals, and a close attention to space and site.Choreographies is both autobiography and archive—documenting production through rehearsal and performance photographs, illustrations, scores, process notes, reviews, audience feedback, and interviews with both dancers and choreographers. Covering the author’s practice from 1975 to 2017, the book delves into an important period of change in contemporary British dance—exploring British New Dance, postmodern dance, and experimental dance outside of a canonical US context. A critically engaged reflection that focuses on artistic process over finished product, Choreographies is a much-needed resource in the fields of dance and choreographic art making.


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Perspectives on Commoning

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the wake of socialism’s demise and liberalism’s loss of direction, new ideas are needed for the next major realignment of the social and political domain. Making a unique contribution to the idea of the commons, this book offers a radical new model for direct democracy. In contrast to current scholarship that has looked at the commons from the perspective of governance, this book instead focuses on the idea of commoning as social practice. Perspectives on Commoning argues that the commons are not just resources external to us, but are a function of what we do.   Covering everything from biopolitics to communication technologies, urban spaces to agricultural sovereignty, the contributors to this volume address the commons as both theory and history, providing a useful review of current conceptions as well as practical proposals for the future. A unique consolidation of political philosophy, sociology and economics, the book shows how a new understanding of the commons as practice will help to achieve its full emancipatory potential.    


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Perspectives on Commoning

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the wake of socialism’s demise and liberalism’s loss of direction, new ideas are needed for the next major realignment of the social and political domain. Making a unique contribution to the idea of the commons, this book offers a radical new model for direct democracy. In contrast to current scholarship that has looked at the commons from the perspective of governance, this book instead focuses on the idea of commoning as social practice. Perspectives on Commoning argues that the commons are not just resources external to us, but are a function of what we do.   Covering everything from biopolitics to communication technologies, urban spaces to agricultural sovereignty, the contributors to this volume address the commons as both theory and history, providing a useful review of current conceptions as well as practical proposals for the future. A unique consolidation of political philosophy, sociology and economics, the book shows how a new understanding of the commons as practice will help to achieve its full emancipatory potential.    


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Development Against Democracy

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Today, US policies towards newly independent states striving for democracy have evolved in a radically different political environment with seemingly little in common with the post-WWII period. Development Against Democracy, however, reveals a surprising continuity in US foreign policy, including in justifications of humanitarian intervention that echo those of counterinsurgency decades earlier in Latin America, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. Irene L. Gendzier argues that the fundamental ideas on which theories of modernization and development rest have been resurrected in contemporary policy and its theories. Our world has been permanently altered by globalization, the proliferation of so-called failed states, the unprecedented exodus of refugees, and Washington’s permanent war against terrorism. One of the most controversial and groundbreaking books of development studies and US foreign policy, the new updated edition of Development Against Democracy is a critical guide to postwar studies of modernization and development.  


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In Their Place

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The alleged failings of low-income neighborhoods attracts a great deal of academic and political scrutiny and research. However, the realities of localized spaces—such as family home front doors, bedrooms, street corners, and local schools—have not received nearly as much attention. With In Their Place, Stephen Crossley highlights how these spaces are represented from afar by politicians who exaggerate stories for political gain and how these fabrications actively manipulate media coverage of these British individuals and communities. A devastating critique of the Conservative government’s approach to tackling inequality, In Their Place will reorient those interested in human geography away from the large scale transnational policies back to the physical spaces that show the realities of life for Britain’s low-income neighborhoods.  


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Private Oceans

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As the era of thriving small-scale fishing communities continues to wane, Fiona McCormack opens a window into contemporary fisheries quota systems and explores how neoliberalism has become entangled with our approach to environmental management. Grounded in fieldwork and participant observation in New Zealand, Iceland, Ireland, and Hawaii, Private Oceans offers a comparative analysis of the processes of privatization in ecosystem services and traces how value has been repositioned in the market away from productive activities, ultimately causing broad collapse of fishing communities worldwide.  


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Luther!

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Five hundred years after Martin Luther nailed his 95 Theses to the door of Wittenberg Castle Church, this book offers readers a chance to explore his work, his journey of faith and questioning, and his legacy. The first part of the book presents ninety-five precious objects that trace the footsteps of the young monk on his route towards the Reformation. The second part shifts focus from things to people, offering accounts of ninety-five people—composers, artists, filmmakers, and more like Martin Luther King Jr., Astrid Lindgren, Sophie Scholl, Pier Paolo Pasolini, and Edward Snowden, to name a few—who over the past five centuries have made art that refers to the work or life of the great reformer. The whole package is a brilliant reminder of a singular life—one that changed the world forever.  


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Barometer of Fear

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The LIBOR affair has been described as the biggest banking scandal in history, a deception affecting not only banks but also corporations, pension funds and ordinary people. But was this just the tip of the iceberg? Was the scandal the work of a few bad apples or an inevitable result of a financial system rotten to its core? Labelled “one of the world's most infamous rogue traders” in the wake of a mis-marking scandal, Alexis Stenfors went on to rebuild his life and now guides us through the shadowy world of modern banking, providing an insider’s account of the secret practices—including the manipulation of foreign exchange rates—that have allowed banks to profit from systematic deception. Containing remarkable and often shocking insights derived from Stenfor’s own experiences in the dealing room, as well as his spectacular fall from grace at Merrill Lynch, Barometer of Fear draws back the curtain on a realm that for too long has remained hidden from public view.  


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Zika

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Zika virus has devastated lives and countless communities, leaving children across the Americas with severe disabilities as a result of the epidemic. Nowhere has this devastation been more deeply felt than in Alagoas, a small rural province in northeast Brazil. It was here that the most recent outbreak was first identified before spreading across the continent and beyond, with the region’s poverty providing fertile ground for the Zika-bearing mosquitoes. In this thought-provoking and poignant work, anthropologist and filmmaker Debora Diniz travels throughout northeastern Brazil, tracing the virus’s origin and spread while observing its powerful impact on local communities. By interviewing doctors and listening to expectant mothers in waiting rooms, Diniz paints a vivid picture of the Zika epidemic as experienced by ordinary Brazilians. In this frontline account, Diniz exposes the Brazilian government’s complicity in allowing the virus to spread through their inaction and denial, and she champions the efforts of local doctors and mothers who, working together, have made great strides in raising awareness of the virus, and in fighting for the rights of children affected by Zika. The result is a timely and provocative look at an epidemic that continues to threaten many families and communities.    


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Zika

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Zika virus has devastated lives and countless communities, leaving children across the Americas with severe disabilities as a result of the epidemic. Nowhere has this devastation been more deeply felt than in Alagoas, a small rural province in northeast Brazil. It was here that the most recent outbreak was first identified before spreading across the continent and beyond, with the region’s poverty providing fertile ground for the Zika-bearing mosquitoes. In this thought-provoking and poignant work, anthropologist and filmmaker Debora Diniz travels throughout northeastern Brazil, tracing the virus’s origin and spread while observing its powerful impact on local communities. By interviewing doctors and listening to expectant mothers in waiting rooms, Diniz paints a vivid picture of the Zika epidemic as experienced by ordinary Brazilians. In this frontline account, Diniz exposes the Brazilian government’s complicity in allowing the virus to spread through their inaction and denial, and she champions the efforts of local doctors and mothers who, working together, have made great strides in raising awareness of the virus, and in fighting for the rights of children affected by Zika. The result is a timely and provocative look at an epidemic that continues to threaten many families and communities.    


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Consuming Religion

Tue, 12 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What are you drawn to like, to watch, or even to binge? What are you free to consume, and what do you become through consumption? These questions of desire and value, Kathryn Lofton argues, are questions for the study of religion. In eleven essays exploring soap and office cubicles, Britney Spears and the Kardashians, corporate culture and Goldman Sachs, Lofton shows the conceptual levers of religion in thinking about social modes of encounter, use, and longing. Wherever we see people articulate their dreams of and for the world, wherever we see those dreams organized into protocols, images, manuals, and contracts, we glimpse what the word “religion” allows us to describe and understand. With great style and analytical acumen, Lofton offers the ultimate guide to religion and consumption in our capitalizing times.  


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Consuming Religion

Tue, 12 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What are you drawn to like, to watch, or even to binge? What are you free to consume, and what do you become through consumption? These questions of desire and value, Kathryn Lofton argues, are questions for the study of religion. In eleven essays exploring soap and office cubicles, Britney Spears and the Kardashians, corporate culture and Goldman Sachs, Lofton shows the conceptual levers of religion in thinking about social modes of encounter, use, and longing. Wherever we see people articulate their dreams of and for the world, wherever we see those dreams organized into protocols, images, manuals, and contracts, we glimpse what the word “religion” allows us to describe and understand. With great style and analytical acumen, Lofton offers the ultimate guide to religion and consumption in our capitalizing times.  


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Breakout

Fri, 08 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Together at last. Under the pseudonym Richard Stark, Donald E. Westlake, one of the greats of crime fiction, wrote twenty-four fast-paced, hard-boiled novels featuring Parker, a shrewd career criminal with a talent for heists and a code all his own. With the publication of the last four Parker novels Westlake wrote—Breakout, Nobody Runs Forever, Ask the Parrot, and Dirty Money—the University of Chicago Press pulls the ultimate score: for the first time ever, the entire Parker series will be available from a single publisher. With Parker locked up and about to be unmasked, Breakout follows his Houdini-like escape from prison with a team of convicts. But when a new heist and new dangers—con artists, snitches, busybodies, eccentrics, and cops—loom among the dark alleys and old stone buildings of the big city to which they’ve fled, Parker soon learns that not all prisons have bars. Featuring new forewords by Chris Holm, Duane Swierczynski, and Laura Lippman—celebrated crime writers, all—these masterworks of noir are the capstone to an extraordinary literary run that will leave you craving more. Written over the course of fifty years, the Parker novels are pure artistry, adrenaline, and logic both brutal and brilliant. Join Parker on his jobs and read them all again or for the first time. But don’t talk to the law.


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Ask the Parrot

Fri, 08 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Together at last. Under the pseudonym Richard Stark, Donald E. Westlake, one of the greats of crime fiction, wrote twenty-four fast-paced, hard-boiled novels featuring Parker, a shrewd career criminal with a talent for heists and a code all his own. With the publication of the last four Parker novels Westlake wrote—Breakout, Nobody Runs Forever, Ask the Parrot, and Dirty Money—the University of Chicago Press pulls the ultimate score: for the first time ever, the entire Parker series will be available from a single publisher. In Ask the Parrot, Parker’s back on the run, dodging dogs, cops, and even a helicopter. Forced to work with a small-town recluse and a group of fools at a gun club in rural Massachusetts, Parker focuses on getting the cash and getting out. It'll be a deadly day at the races. Featuring new forewords by Chris Holm, Duane Swierczynski, and Laura Lippman—celebrated crime writers, all—these masterworks of noir are the capstone to an extraordinary literary run that will leave you craving more. Written over the course of fifty years, the Parker novels are pure artistry, adrenaline, and logic both brutal and brilliant. Join Parker on his jobs and read them all again or for the first time. But don’t talk to the law.


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Nobody Runs Forever

Fri, 08 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Together at last. Under the pseudonym Richard Stark, Donald E. Westlake, one of the greats of crime fiction, wrote twenty-four fast-paced, hard-boiled novels featuring Parker, a shrewd career criminal with a talent for heists and a code all his own. With the publication of the last four Parker novels Westlake wrote—Breakout, Nobody Runs Forever, Ask the Parrot, and Dirty Money—the University of Chicago Press pulls the ultimate score: for the first time ever, the entire Parker series will be available from a single publisher.Nobody Runs Forever opens a three-part saga with a job at a poker game that sours into a necktie party. When Parker goes in on a messy scam—stealing an armored car—with someone he barely knows, as usual the amateurs get in the way of the job. Featuring new forewords by Chris Holm, Duane Swierczynski, and Laura Lippman—celebrated crime writers, all—these masterworks of noir are the capstone to an extraordinary literary run that will leave you craving more. Written over the course of fifty years, the Parker novels are pure artistry, adrenaline, and logic both brutal and brilliant. Join Parker on his jobs and read them all again or for the first time. But don’t talk to the law.


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Dirty Money

Fri, 08 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Together at last. Under the pseudonym Richard Stark, Donald E. Westlake, one of the greats of crime fiction, wrote twenty-four fast-paced, hard-boiled novels featuring Parker, a shrewd career criminal with a talent for heists and a code all his own. With the publication of the last four Parker novels Westlake wrote—Breakout, Nobody Runs Forever, Ask the Parrot, and Dirty Money—the University of Chicago Press pulls the ultimate score: for the first time ever, the entire Parker series will be available from a single publisher. Parker’s got a new fence and a new plan to get the loot back from a botched job in Dirty Money, but a bounty hunter, the FBI, and the local cops are on his tail. Only his brains, his cool, and the help of his lone longtime dame, Claire, can keep him one step ahead of the cars and the guns. Featuring new forewords by Chris Holm, Duane Swierczynski, and Laura Lippman—celebrated crime writers, all—these masterworks of noir are the capstone to an extraordinary literary run that will leave you craving more. Written over the course of fifty years, the Parker novels are pure artistry, adrenaline, and logic both brutal and brilliant. Join Parker on his jobs and read them all again or for the first time. But don’t talk to the law.


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Fama Portfolio

Thu, 07 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Few scholars have been as influential in finance and economics as University of Chicago professor Eugene F. Fama. Over the course of a brilliant and productive career, Fama has published more than one hundred papers, filled with diverse, highly innovative contributions. Published soon after the fiftieth anniversary of Fama’s appointment to the University of Chicago and his receipt of the Nobel Prize in Economics, The Fama Portfolio offers an authoritative compilation of Fama’s central papers. Many are classics, including his now-famous essay on efficient capital markets. Others, though less famous, are even better statements of the central ideas. Fama’s research considers key questions in finance, both as an academic field and an industry: How is information reflected in asset prices? What is the nature of risk that scares people away from larger returns? Does lots of buying and selling by active managers produce value for their clients? The Fama Portfolio provides for the first time a comprehensive collection of his work and includes introductions and commentary by the book’s editors, John H. Cochrane and Tobias Moskowitz, as well as by Fama’s colleagues, themselves top scholars and successful practitioners in finance. These essays emphasize how the ideas presented in Fama’s papers have influenced later thinking in financial economics, often for decades.  


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Montesquieu and the Despotic Ideas of Europe

Tue, 05 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Montesquieu is rightly famous as a tireless critic of despotism, which he associates in his writings overtly with Asia and the Middle East and not with the apparently more moderate Western models of governance found throughout Europe. However, a careful reading of Montesquieu reveals that he recognizes a susceptibility to despotic practices in the West—and that the threat emanates not from the East, but from certain despotic ideas that inform such Western institutions as the French monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church.             Nowhere is Montesquieu’s critique of the despotic ideas of Europe more powerful than in his enormously influential The Spirit of the Laws, and Vickie B. Sullivan guides readers through Montesquieu’s sometimes veiled, yet sharply critical accounts of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Aristotle, and Plato, as well as various Christian thinkers. He finds deleterious consequences, for example, in brutal Machiavellianism, in Hobbes’s justifications for the rule of one, in Plato’s reasoning that denied slaves the right of natural defense, and in the Christian teachings that equated heresy with treason and informed the Inquisition. In this new reading of Montesquieu’s masterwork, Sullivan corrects the misconception that it offers simple, objective observations, showing it instead to be a powerful critique of European politics that would become remarkably and regrettably prescient after Montesquieu’s death when despotism wound its way through Europe.  


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Chicago Manual of Style, 17th Edition

Tue, 05 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Technologies may change, but the need for clear and accurate communication never goes out of style. That is why for more than one hundred years The Chicago Manual of Style has remained the definitive guide for anyone who works with words. In the seven years since the previous edition debuted, we have seen an extraordinary evolution in the way we create and share knowledge. This seventeenth edition of The Chicago Manual of Style has been prepared with an eye toward how we find, create, and cite information that readers are as likely to access from their pockets as from a bookshelf. It offers updated guidelines on electronic workflows and publication formats, tools for PDF annotation and citation management, web accessibility standards, and effective use of metadata, abstracts, and keywords. It recognizes the needs of those who are self-publishing or following open access or Creative Commons publishing models. The citation chapters reflect the ever-expanding universe of electronic sources—including social media posts and comments, private messages, and app content—and also offer updated guidelines on such issues as DOIs, time stamps, and e-book locators. Other improvements are independent of technological change. The chapter on grammar and usage includes an expanded glossary of problematic words and phrases and a new section on syntax as well as updated guidance on gender-neutral pronouns and bias-free language. Key sections on punctuation and basic citation style have been reorganized and clarified. To facilitate navigation, headings and paragraph titles have been revised and clarified throughout. And the bibliography has been updated and expanded to include the latest and best resources available. This edition continues to reflect expert insights gathered from Chicago’s own staff and from an advisory board of publishing experts from across the profession. It also includes suggestions inspired by emails, calls, and even tweets from readers. No matter how much the means of communication change, The Chicago Manual of Style remains the ultimate resource for those who care about getting the [...]


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Truth in Painting

Tue, 05 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

"The four essays in this volume constitute Derrida's most explicit and sustained reflection on the art work as pictorial artifact, a reflection partly by way of philosophical aesthetics (Kant, Heidegger), partly by way of a commentary on art works and art scholarship (Van Gogh, Adami, Titus-Carmel). The illustrations are excellent, and the translators, who clearly see their work as both a rendering and a transformation, add yet another dimension to this richly layered composition. Indispensable to collections emphasizing art criticism and aesthetics."—Alexander Gelley, Library Journal


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Dinner with Darwin

Tue, 05 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What do eggs, flour, and milk have in common? They form the basis of waffles, of course, but these staples of breakfast bounty also share an evolutionary function: eggs, seeds (from which we derive flour by grinding), and milk have each evolved to nourish offspring. Indeed, ponder the genesis of your breakfast, lunch, or dinner, and you’ll soon realize that everything we eat and drink has an evolutionary history. In Dinner with Darwin, join Jonathan Silvertown for a multicourse meal of evolutionary gastronomy, a tantalizing tour of human taste that helps us to understand the origins of our diets and the foods that have been central to them for millennia—from spices to spirits. A delectable concoction of coevolution and cookery, gut microbiomes and microherbs, and both the chicken and its egg, Dinner with Darwin reveals that our shopping lists, recipe cards, and restaurant menus don’t just contain the ingredients for culinary delight. They also tell a fascinating story about natural selection and its influence on our plates—and palates. Digging deeper, Silvertown’s repast includes entrées into GMOs and hybrids, and looks at the science of our sensory interactions with foods and cooking—the sights, aromas, and tastes we experience in our kitchens and dining rooms. As is the wont of any true chef, Silvertown packs his menu with eclectic components, dishing on everything from Charles Darwin’s intestinal maladies to taste bud anatomy and turducken. Our evolutionary relationship with food and drink stretches from the days of cooking cave dwellers to contemporary crêperies and beyond, and Dinner with Darwin serves up scintillating insight into the entire, awesome span. This feast of soup, science, and human society is one to savor. With a wit as dry as a fine pinot noir and a cache of evolutionary knowledge as vast as the most discerning connoisseur’s wine cellar, Silvertown whets our appetites—and leaves us hungry for more.


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Herzog by Ebert

Mon, 04 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Roger Ebert was the most influential film critic in the United States, the first to win a Pulitzer Prize. For almost fifty years, he wrote with plainspoken eloquence about the films he loved for the Chicago Sun-Times, his vast cinematic knowledge matched by a sheer love of life that bolstered his appreciation of films. Ebert had particular admiration for the work of director Werner Herzog, whom he first encountered at the New York Film Festival in 1968, the start of a long and productive relationship between the filmmaker and the film critic.Herzog by Ebert is a comprehensive collection of Ebert’s writings about the legendary director, featuring all of his reviews of individual films, as well as longer essays he wrote for his Great Movies series. The book also brings together other essays, letters, and interviews, including a letter Ebert wrote Herzog upon learning of the dedication to him of “Encounters at the End of the World;” a multifaceted profile written at the 1982 Cannes Film Festival; and an interview with Herzog at Facet’s Multimedia in 1979 that has previously been available only in a difficult-to-obtain pamphlet. Herzog himself contributes a foreword in which he discusses his relationship with Ebert. Brimming with insights from both filmmaker and film critic, Herzog by Ebert will be essential for fans of either of their prolific bodies of work.  


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Given Time

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Is giving possible? Is it possible to give without immediately entering into a circle of exchange that turns the gift into a debt to be returned? This question leads Jacques Derrida to make out an irresolvable paradox at what seems the most fundamental level of the gift's meaning: for the gift to be received as a gift, it must not appear as such, since its mere appearance as gift puts it in the cycle of repayment and debt.Derrida reads the relation of time to gift through a number of texts: Heidegger's Time and Being, Mauss's The Gift, as well as essays by Benveniste and Levi-Strauss that assume Mauss's legacy. It is, however, a short tale by Baudelaire, "Counterfeit Money," that guides Derrida's analyses throughout. At stake in his reading of the tale, to which the second half of this book is devoted, are the conditions of gift and forgiveness as essentially bound up with the movement of dissemination, a concept that Derrida has been working out for many years. For both readers of Baudelaire and students of literary theory, this work will prove indispensable.


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Dissemination

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

"The English version of Dissemination [is] an able translation by Barbara Johnson . . . . Derrida's central contention is that language is haunted by dispersal, absence, loss, the risk of unmeaning, a risk which is starkly embodied in all writing. The distinction between philosophy and literature therefore becomes of secondary importance. Philosophy vainly attempts to control the irrecoverable dissemination of its own meaning, it strives—against the grain of language—to offer a sober revelation of truth. Literature—on the other hand—flaunts its own meretriciousness, abandons itself to the Dionysiac play of language. In Dissemination—more than any previous work—Derrida joins in the revelry, weaving a complex pattern of puns, verbal echoes and allusions, intended to 'deconstruct' both the pretension of criticism to tell the truth about literature, and the pretension of philosophy to the literature of truth."—Peter Dews, New Statesman


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Work of Mourning

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Jacques Derrida is, in the words of the New York Times, "perhaps the world's most famous philosopher—if not the only famous philosopher." He often provokes controversy as soon as his name is mentioned. But he also inspires the respect that comes from an illustrious career, and, among many who were his colleagues and peers, he inspired friendship. The Work of Mourning is a collection that honors those friendships in the wake of passing.Gathered here are texts—letters of condolence, memorial essays, eulogies, funeral orations—written after the deaths of well-known figures: Roland Barthes, Paul de Man, Michel Foucault, Louis Althusser, Edmond Jabès, Louis Marin, Sarah Kofman, Gilles Deleuze, Emmanuel Levinas, Jean-François Lyotard, Max Loreau, Jean-Marie Benoist, Joseph Riddel, and Michel Servière. With his words, Derrida bears witness to the singularity of a friendship and to the absolute uniqueness of each relationship. In each case, he is acutely aware of the questions of tact, taste, and ethical responsibility involved in speaking of the dead—the risks of using the occasion for one's own purposes, political calculation, personal vendetta, and the expiation of guilt. More than a collection of memorial addresses, this volume sheds light not only on Derrida's relation to some of the most prominent French thinkers of the past quarter century but also on some of the most important themes of Derrida's entire oeuvre-mourning, the "gift of death," time, memory, and friendship itself."In his rapt attention to his subjects' work and their influence upon him, the book also offers a hesitant and tangential retelling of Derrida's own life in French philosophical history. There are illuminating and playful anecdotes—how Lyotard led Derrida to begin using a word-processor; how Paul de Man talked knowledgeably of jazz with Derrida's son. Anyone who still thinks that Derrida is a facetious punster [...]


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Richard Gerstl

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Richard Gerstl (1883–1908) painted for just four years, but the work he produced in that short period is widely seen as well ahead of his time, including Self Portrait Against a Blue Background and The Fey Sisters. Although Gerstl never exhibited during his lifetime and his innovative work was largely ignored by both the academy and the art world, his portraits and landscapes are today regarded as some of the most important representatives of Austrian Expressionism.             With Richard Gerstl, Diethard Leopold takes readers skillfully through the artist’s life and work. Gerstl trained at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, but his rejection of the Vienna Secession made it difficult for him to find acceptance there, and he ultimately continued painting without formal guidance. While he felt marginalized by the art world, Gerstl forged a meaningful friendship with the musician Arnold Schönberg. Later, his affair with Schönberg’s wife would lead to the loss of both his lover and his friend, causing him to tragically take his life at the age of twenty-five. Working with in cooperation with the Leopold Museum in Vienna, Leopold has written a detailed, accessible portrait of Gerstl, illustrated with selected works, that will enhance our understanding of this important artist.  


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Spurs

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Nietzsche has recently enjoyed much scrutiny from the nouveaux critiques. Jacques Derrida, the leader of that movement, here combines in his strikingly original and incisive fashion questions of sexuality, politics, writing, judgment, procreation, death, and even the weather into a far-reaching analysis of the challenges bequeathed to the modern world by Nietzsche. Spurs, then, is aptly titled, for Derrida's "deconstructions" of Nietzsche's meanings will surely act as spurs to further thought and controversy. This dual-language edition offers the English-speaking reader who has some knowledge of French an opportunity to examine the stylistic virtuosity of Derrida's writing—of particular significance for his analysis of "the question of style."


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Talking to Action

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas is the first publication to bring together scholarship, critical essays, and documentation of collaborative community-based art making by researchers from across the American hemisphere.  The comprehensive volume is a compendium of texts, analysis, and research documents from the Talking to Action research and exhibition platform, part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles.  While the field of social practice has had an increasingly high profile within contemporary art discourse, this book documents artists who have been under-recognized because they do not show in traditional gallery or museum contexts and are often studied by specialists in other disciplines, particularly within the Latin American context. Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas addresses the absence of a publication documenting scholarly exchange between research sites throughout the hemisphere and is intended for those interested in community-based practices operating within the intersection of art, activism, and the social sciences.  


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Talking to Action

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas is the first publication to bring together scholarship, critical essays, and documentation of collaborative community-based art making by researchers from across the American hemisphere.  The comprehensive volume is a compendium of texts, analysis, and research documents from the Talking to Action research and exhibition platform, part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative, a far-reaching and ambitious exploration of Latin American and Latino art in dialogue with Los Angeles.  While the field of Social Practice has had an increasingly high profile within contemporary art discourse, this book documents artists who have been under-recognized because they do not show in traditional gallery or museum contexts and are often studied by specialists in other disciplines, particularly within the Latin American context. Talking to Action: Art, Pedagogy, and Activism in the Americas, addresses the absence of a publication documenting scholarly exchange between research sites throughout the hemisphere and is intended for those interested in community-based practices operating within the intersection of art, activism, and the social sciences. This is the Spanish language edition.  


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Of Spirit

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

"I shall speak of ghost, of flame, and of ashes." These are the first words of Jacques Derrida's lecture on Heidegger. It is again a question of Nazism—of what remains to be thought through of Nazism in general and of Heidegger's Nazism in particular. It is also "politics of spirit" which at the time people thought—they still want to today—to oppose to the inhuman."Derrida's ruminations should intrigue anyone interested in Post-Structuralism. . . . . This study of Heidegger is a fine example of how Derrida can make readers of philosophical texts notice difficult problems in almost imperceptible details of those texts."—David Hoy, London Review of Books"Will a more important book on Heidegger appear in our time? No, not unless Derrida continues to think and write in his spirit. . . . Let there be no mistake: this is not merely a brilliant book on Heidegger, it is thinking in the grand style."—David Farrell Krell, Research in Phenomenology"The analysis of Heidegger is brilliant, provocative, elusive."—Peter C. Hodgson, Religious Studies Review


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Rule Breaking and Political Imagination

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“Imagination may be thought of as a ‘work-around.’ It is a resourceful tactic to ‘undo’ a rule by creating a path around it without necessarily defying it. . . . Transgression, on the other hand, is rule breaking. There is no pretense of reinterpretation; it is defiance pure and simple. Whether imagination or disobedience is the source, constraints need not constrain, ties need not bind.”             So writes Kenneth A. Shepsle in his introduction to Rule Breaking and Political Imagination. Institutions are thought to channel the choices of individual actors. But what about when they do not? Throughout history, leaders and politicians have used imagination and transgression to break with constraints upon their agency. Shepsle ranges from ancient Rome to the United States Senate, and from Lyndon B. Johnson to the British House of Commons. He also explores rule breaking in less formal contexts, such as vigilantism in the Old West and the CIA’s actions in the wake of 9/11. Entertaining and thought-provoking, Rule Breaking and Political Imagination will prompt a reassessment of the nature of institutions and remind us of the critical role of political mavericks.  


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Rule Breaking and Political Imagination

Fri, 01 Sep 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“Imagination may be thought of as a ‘work-around.’ It is a resourceful tactic to ‘undo’ a rule by creating a path around it without necessarily defying it. . . . Transgression, on the other hand, is rule breaking. There is no pretense of reinterpretation; it is defiance pure and simple. Whether imagination or disobedience is the source, constraints need not constrain, ties need not bind.”             So writes Kenneth A. Shepsle in his introduction to Rule Breaking and Political Imagination. Institutions are thought to channel the choices of individual actors. But what about when they do not? Throughout history, leaders and politicians have used imagination and transgression to break with constraints upon their agency. Shepsle ranges from ancient Rome to the United States Senate, and from Lyndon B. Johnson to the British House of Commons. He also explores rule breaking in less formal contexts, such as vigilantism in the Old West and the CIA’s actions in the wake of 9/11. Entertaining and thought-provoking, Rule Breaking and Political Imagination will prompt a reassessment of the nature of institutions and remind us of the critical role of political mavericks.  


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Testing Charade

Thu, 31 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

  For decades we’ve been studying, experimenting with, and wrangling over different approaches to improving public education, and there’s still little consensus on what works, and what to do. The one thing people seem to agree on, however, is that schools need to be held accountable—we need to know whether what they’re doing is actually working. But what does that mean in practice?   High-stakes tests. Lots of them. And that has become a major problem. Daniel Koretz, one of the nation’s foremost experts on educational testing, argues in The Testing Charade that the whole idea of test-based accountability has failed—it has increasingly become an end in itself, harming students and corrupting the very ideals of teaching. In this powerful polemic, built on unimpeachable evidence and rooted in decades of experience with educational testing, Koretz calls out high-stakes testing as a sham, a false idol that is ripe for manipulation and shows little evidence of leading to educational improvement. Rather than setting up incentives to divert instructional time to pointless test prep, he argues, we need to measure what matters, and measure it in multiple ways—not just via standardized tests.Right now, we’re lying to ourselves about whether our children are learning. And the longer we accept that lie, the more damage we do. It’s time to end our blind reliance on high-stakes tests. With The Testing Charade, Daniel Koretz insists that we face the facts and change course, and he gives us a blueprint for doing better.  


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Once a Peacock, Once an Actress

Wed, 30 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Written in Kashmir around 400 CE, Haribhatta’s Jåtakamåla is a remarkable example of classical Sanskrit literature in a mixture of prose and verse that for centuries was known only in its Tibetan translation. But between 1973 and 2004 a large portion of the Sanskrit original was rediscovered in a number of anonymous manuscripts. With this volume Peter Khoroche offers the most complete translation to date, making almost 80 percent of the work available in English.   Haribhatta’s Jåtakamålå is a sophisticated and personal adaptation of popular stories, mostly non-Buddhist in origin, all illustrating the future Buddha’s single-minded devotion to the good of all creatures, and his desire, no matter what his incarnation—man, woman, peacock, elephant, merchant, or king—to assist others on the path to nirvana. Haribhatta’s insight into human and animal behavior, his astonishing eye for the details of landscape, and his fine descriptive powers together make this a unique record of everyday life in ancient India as well as a powerful statement of Buddhist ethics. This translation will be a landmark in the study of Buddhism and of the culture of ancient India.  


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Once a Peacock, Once an Actress

Wed, 30 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Written in Kashmir around 400 CE, Haribhatta’s Jåtakamåla is a remarkable example of classical Sanskrit literature in a mixture of prose and verse that for centuries was known only in its Tibetan translation. But between 1973 and 2004 a large portion of the Sanskrit original was rediscovered in a number of anonymous manuscripts. With this volume Peter Khoroche offers the most complete translation to date, making almost 80 percent of the work available in English.   Haribhatta’s Jåtakamålå is a sophisticated and personal adaptation of popular stories, mostly non-Buddhist in origin, all illustrating the future Buddha’s single-minded devotion to the good of all creatures, and his desire, no matter what his incarnation—man, woman, peacock, elephant, merchant, or king—to assist others on the path to nirvana. Haribhatta’s insight into human and animal behavior, his astonishing eye for the details of landscape, and his fine descriptive powers together make this a unique record of everyday life in ancient India as well as a powerful statement of Buddhist ethics. This translation will be a landmark in the study of Buddhism and of the culture of ancient India.  


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Representing Talent

Tue, 29 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Audiences love the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, but beyond the red carpet and behind the velvet curtain exists a legion of individuals who make showbiz work: agents. Whether literary, talent, or indie film, agents are behind the scenes brokering power, handling mediation, and doing the deal-making that keeps Hollywood spinning. In Representing Talent, Violaine Roussel explores the little-known but decisive work of agents, turning the spotlight on how they help produce popular culture. The book takes readers behind the scenes to observe the day-to-day activities of agents, revealing their influence on artistic careers and the prospects of Hollywood’s forthcoming projects. Agents are crucial to understanding how creative and economic power are intertwined in Hollywood today. They play a key role in the process by which artistic worth and economic value are evaluated and attributed to people and projects. Roussel’s fieldwork examines what “having relationships” really means for agents, and how they perform the relationship work that’s at the heart of their professional existence and success. Representing Talent helps us to understand the players behind the definition of entertainment itself, as well as behind its current transformations.


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Our Oldest Task

Mon, 28 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“This is a book about nature and culture,” Eric T. Freyfogle writes, “about our place and plight on earth, and the nagging challenges we face in living on it in ways that might endure.” Challenges, he says, we are clearly failing to meet. Harking back to a key phrase from the essays of eminent American conservationist Aldo Leopold, Our Oldest Task spins together lessons from history and philosophy, the life sciences and politics, economics and cultural studies in a personal, erudite quest to understand how we might live on—and in accord with—the land. Passionate and pragmatic, extraordinarily well read and eloquent, Freyfogle details a host of forces that have produced our self-defeating ethos of human exceptionalism. It is this outlook, he argues, not a lack of scientific knowledge or inadequate technology, that is the primary cause of our ecological predicament. Seeking to comprehend both the multifaceted complexity of contemporary environmental problems and the zeitgeist as it unfolds, Freyfogle explores such diverse topics as morality, the nature of reality (and the reality of nature), animal welfare, social justice movements, and market politics. The result is a learned and inspiring rallying cry to achieve balance, a call to use our knowledge to more accurately identify the dividing line between living in and on the world and destruction. “To use nature,” Freyfogle writes, “but not to abuse it.”


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Uncomfortable Situations

Mon, 28 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What is a hostile environment? How exactly can feelings be mixed? What on earth might it mean when someone writes that he was “happily situated” as a slave? The answers, of course, depend upon whom you ask. Science and the humanities typically offer two different paradigms for thinking about emotion—the first rooted in brain and biology, the second in a social world. With rhetoric as a field guide, Uncomfortable Situations establishes common ground between these two paradigms, focusing on a theory of situated emotion. Daniel M. Gross anchors the argument in Charles Darwin, whose work on emotion has been misunderstood across the disciplines as it has been shoehorned into the perceived science-humanities divide. Then Gross turns to sentimental literature as the single best domain for studying emotional situations. There’s lost composure (Sterne), bearing up (Equiano), environmental hostility (Radcliffe), and feeling mixed (Austen). Rounding out the book, an epilogue written with ecological neuroscientist Stephanie Preston provides a different kind of cross-disciplinary collaboration. Uncomfortable Situations is a conciliatory work across science and the humanities—a groundbreaking model for future studies.


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Representing Talent

Mon, 28 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Audiences love the glitz and glamour of Hollywood, but beyond the red carpet and behind the velvet curtain exists a legion of individuals who make showbiz work: agents. Whether literary, talent, or indie film, agents are behind the scenes brokering power, handling mediation, and doing the deal-making that keeps Hollywood spinning. In Representing Talent, Violaine Roussel explores the little-known but decisive work of agents, turning the spotlight on how they help produce popular culture. The book takes readers behind the scenes to observe the day-to-day activities of agents, revealing their influence on artistic careers and the prospects of Hollywood’s forthcoming projects. Agents are crucial to understanding how creative and economic power are intertwined in Hollywood today. They play a key role in the process by which artistic worth and economic value are evaluated and attributed to people and projects. Roussel’s fieldwork examines what “having relationships” really means for agents, and how they perform the relationship work that’s at the heart of their professional existence and success. Representing Talent helps us to understand the players behind the definition of entertainment itself, as well as behind its current transformations.


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Gift of Death, Second Edition & Literature in Secret

Fri, 25 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Gift of Death, Jacques Derrida’s most sustained consideration of religion, explores questions first introduced in his book Given Time about the limits of the rational and responsible that one reaches in granting or accepting death, whether by sacrifice, murder, execution, or suicide. Derrida analyzes Czech philosopher Jan Patocka’s Heretical Essays in the Philosophy of History and develops and compares his ideas to the works of Heidegger, Lévinas, and Kierkegaard. One of Derrida’s major works, The Gift of Death resonates with much of his earlier writing, and this highly anticipated second edition is greatly enhanced by David Wills’s updated translation.   This new edition also features the first-ever English translation of Derrida’s Literature in Secret. In it, Derrida continues his discussion of the sacrifice of Isaac, which leads to bracing meditations on secrecy, forgiveness, literature, and democracy. He also offers a reading of Kafka’s Letter to His Father and uses the story of the flood in Genesis as an embarkation point for a consideration of divine sovereignty.   “An important contribution to the critical study of ethics that commends itself to philosophers, social scientists, scholars of religion . . . [and those] made curious by the controversy that so often attends Derrida.”—Booklist, on the first edition


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Archive Fever

Fri, 25 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In Archive Fever, Jacques Derrida deftly guides us through an extended meditation on remembrance, religion, time, and technology—fruitfully occasioned by a deconstructive analysis of the notion of archiving. Intrigued by the evocative relationship between technologies of inscription and psychic processes, Derrida offers for the first time a major statement on the pervasive impact of electronic media, particularly e-mail, which threaten to transform the entire public and private space of humanity. Plying this rich material with characteristic virtuosity, Derrida constructs a synergistic reading of archives and archiving, both provocative and compelling. "Judaic mythos, Freudian psychoanalysis, and e-mail all get fused into another staggeringly dense, brilliant slab of scholarship and suggestion."—The Guardian "[Derrida] convincingly argues that, although the archive is a public entity, it nevertheless is the repository of the private and personal, including even intimate details."—Choice "Beautifully written and clear."—Jeremy Barris, Philosophy in Review "Translator Prenowitz has managed valiantly to bring into English a difficult but inspiring text that relies on Greek, German, and their translations into French."—Library Journal


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Writing and Difference

Fri, 25 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

First published in 1967, Writing and Difference, a collection of Jacques Derrida's essays written between 1959 and 1966, has become a landmark of contemporary French thought. In it we find Derrida at work on his systematic deconstruction of Western metaphysics. The book's first half, which includes the celebrated essay on Descartes and Foucault, shows the development of Derrida's method of deconstruction. In these essays, Derrida demonstrates the traditional nature of some purportedly nontraditional currents of modern thought—one of his main targets being the way in which "structuralism" unwittingly repeats metaphysical concepts in its use of linguistic models. The second half of the book contains some of Derrida's most compelling analyses of why and how metaphysical thinking must exclude writing from its conception of language, finally showing metaphysics to be constituted by this exclusion. These essays on Artaud, Freud, Bataille, Hegel, and Lévi-Strauss have served as introductions to Derrida's notions of writing and différence—the untranslatable formulation of a nonmetaphysical "concept" that does not exclude writing—for almost a generation of students of literature, philosophy, and psychoanalysis. Writing and Difference reveals the unacknowledged program that makes thought itself possible. In analyzing the contradictions inherent in this program, Derrida goes on to develop new ways of thinking, reading, and writing,—new ways bas[...]


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Unlikely Designs

Thu, 24 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

A collection intent on worrying the boundaries between natural and unnatural, human and not, Unlikely Designs draws far-ranging source material from the back channels of knowledge making: the talk pages of Wikipedia, the personal writings of Charles Darwin, the love advice doled out by chatbots, and the eclectic inclusions on the Golden Record time capsule. It is here we discover the allure of the index, what pleasure there is in bending it to our own devices. At the same time, these poems also remind us that logic is often reckless, held together by nothing more than syntactical short circuits—well, I mean, sorry, yes—prone to cracking under closer scrutiny. Returning us again and again to these gaps, Katie Willingham reveals how any act of preservation is inevitably an act of curation, an outcry against the arbitrary, by attempting to make what is precious also what survives.


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What Do You Think, Mr. Ramirez?

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Geoffrey Galt Harpham’s book takes its title from a telling anecdote. A few years ago Harpham met a Cuban immigrant on a college campus, who told of arriving, penniless and undocumented, in the 1960s and eventually earning a GED and making his way to a community college. In a literature course one day, the professor asked him, “Mr. Ramirez, what do you think?” The question, said Ramirez, changed his life because “it was the first time anyone had asked me that.” Realizing that his opinion had value set him on a course that led to his becoming a distinguished professor.             That, says Harpham, was the midcentury promise of American education, the deep current of commitment and aspiration that undergirded the educational system that was built in the postwar years, and is under extended assault today. The United States was founded, he argues, on the idea that interpreting its foundational documents was the highest calling of opinion, and for a brief moment at midcentury, the country turned to English teachers as the people best positioned to train students to thrive as interpreters—which is to say as citizens of a democracy. Tracing the roots of that belief in the humanities through American history, Harpham builds a strong case that, even in very different contemporary circumstances, the emphasis on social and cultural knowledge that animated the midcen[...]


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What Do You Think, Mr. Ramirez?

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Geoffrey Galt Harpham’s book takes its title from a telling anecdote. A few years ago Harpham met a Cuban immigrant on a college campus, who told of arriving, penniless and undocumented, in the 1960s and eventually earning a GED and making his way to a community college. In a literature course one day, the professor asked him, “Mr. Ramirez, what do you think?” The question, said Ramirez, changed his life because “it was the first time anyone had asked me that.” Realizing that his opinion had value set him on a course that led to his becoming a distinguished professor.             That, says Harpham, was the midcentury promise of American education, the deep current of commitment and aspiration that undergirded the educational system that was built in the postwar years, and is under extended assault today. The United States was founded, he argues, on the idea that interpreting its foundational documents was the highest calling of opinion, and for a brief moment at midcentury, the country turned to English teachers as the people best positioned to train students to thrive as interpreters—which is to say as citizens of a democracy. Tracing the roots of that belief in the humanities through American history, Harpham builds a strong case that, even in very different contemporary circumstances, the emphasis on social and cultural knowle[...]


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Nietzsche's Final Teaching

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the seven and a half years before his collapse into madness, Nietzsche completed Thus Spoke Zarathustra, the best-selling and most widely read philosophical work of all time, as well as six additional works that are today considered required reading for Western intellectuals. Together, these works mark the final period of Nietzsche’s thought, when he developed a new, more profound, and more systematic teaching rooted in the idea of the eternal recurrence, which he considered his deepest thought. Cutting against the grain of most current Nietzsche scholarship, Michael Allen Gillespie presents the thought of the late Nietzsche as Nietzsche himself intended, drawing not only on his published works but on the plans for the works he was unable to complete, which can be found throughout his notes and correspondence. Gillespie argues that the idea of the eternal recurrence transformed Nietzsche’s thinking from 1881 to 1889. It provided both the basis for his rejection of traditional metaphysics and the grounding for the new logic, ontology, theology, and anthropology he intended to create with the aim of a fundamental transformation of European civilization, a “revaluation of all values.” Nietzsche first broached the idea of the eternal recurrence in Thus Spoke Zarathustra, but its failure to gain attention or public acceptance led him to present the idea again thr[...]


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