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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

 



Fixers

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Stories of Newark’s postwar decline are easy to find. But in The Fixers, Julia Rabig supplements these tales of misery with the story of the many imaginative challenges to the city’s decline mounted by Newark’s residents and suburban neighbors. In these pages, we meet the black nationalists whose dynamic organizing elected African American candidates in unprecedented numbers. There are tenants who mounted a historic rent strike to transform public housing and renegade white Catholic priests who joined black laywomen to pioneer the construction of low-income housing and influence housing policy. These are just a few of the “fixers” we meet—people who devised ways to work with limited resources and pull together the threads of a patchwork welfare state. Rabig argues that fixers play dual roles. They support resistance, but also mediation; they fight for reform, but also more radical and far-reaching alternatives; they rally others to a collective cause, but sometimes they broker factions. Fixers reflect longer traditions of organizing while responding to the demands of their times. In so doing, they end up fixing (like a fixative) a new and enduring pattern of activist strategies, reforms, and institutional expectations—a pattern we continue to see today.


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African Successes, Volume IV

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Studies of African economic development frequently focus on the daunting challenges the continent faces. From recurrent crises to ethnic conflicts and long-standing corruption, a raft of deep-rooted problems has led many to regard the continent as facing many hurdles to raise living standards. Yet Africa has made considerable progress in the past decade, with a GDP growth rate exceeding five percent in some regions. The African Successes series looks at recent improvements in living standards and other measures of development in many African countries with an eye toward identifying what shaped them and the extent to which lessons learned are transferable and can guide policy in other nations and at the international level.             The fourth volume in the series, African Successes: Sustainable Growth combines informative case studies with careful empirical analysis to consider the prospects for future African growth.


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Great Movies IV

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

No film critic has ever been as influential—or as beloved— as Roger Ebert. Over more than four decades, he built a reputation writing reviews for the Chicago Sun-Times and, later, arguing onscreen with rival Chicago Tribune critic Gene Siskel and later Richard Roeper about the movies they loved and loathed. But Ebert went well beyond a mere “thumbs up” or “thumbs down.” Readers could always sense the man behind the words, a man with interests beyond film and a lifetime’s distilled wisdom about the larger world. Although the world lost one of its most important critics far too early, Ebert lives on in the minds of moviegoers today, who continually find themselves debating what he might have thought about a current movie.The Great Movies IV is the fourth—and final—collection of Roger Ebert’s essays, comprising sixty-two reviews of films ranging from the silent era to the recent past. From films like The Cabinet of Caligari and Viridiana that have been considered canonical for decades to movies only recently recognized as masterpieces to Superman, The Big Lebowski, and Pink Floyd: The Wall, the pieces gathered here demonstrate the critical acumen seen in Ebert’s daily reviews and the more reflective and wide-ranging considerations that the longer format allowed him to offer. Ebert’s essays are joined here by an insightful foreword by film critic Matt Zoller Seitz, the current editor-in-chief of the official Roger Ebert website, and a touching introduction by Chaz Ebert. A fitting capstone to a truly remarkable career, The Great Movies IV will introduce newcomers to some of the most exceptional movies ever made, while revealing new insights to connoisseurs as well.  


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Maimonides' "Guide of the Perplexed"

Tue, 27 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

A classic of medieval Jewish philosophy, Maimonides’s Guide of the Perplexed is as influential as it is difficult and demanding. Not only does the work contain contrary—even contradictory—statements, but Maimonides deliberately wrote in a guarded and dissembling manner in order to convey different meanings to different readers, with the knowledge that many would resist his bold reformulations of God and his relation to mankind. As a result, for all the acclaim the Guide has received, comprehension of it has been unattainable to all but a few in every generation. Drawing on a lifetime of study, Alfred L. Ivry has written the definitive guide to the Guide—one that makes it comprehensible and exciting to even those relatively unacquainted with Maimonides’ thought, while also offering an original and provocative interpretation that will command the interest of scholars. Ivry offers a chapter-by-chapter exposition of the widely accepted Shlomo Pines translation of the text along with a clear paraphrase that clarifies the key terms and concepts. Corresponding analyses take readers more deeply into the text, exploring the philosophical issues it raises, many dealing with metaphysics in both its ontological and epistemic aspects.  


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African Successes, Volume I

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Studies of African economic development frequently focus on the daunting challenges the continent faces. From recurrent crises to ethnic conflicts and long-standing corruption, a raft of deep-rooted problems has led many to regard the continent as facing many hurdles to raise living standards. Yet Africa has made considerable progress in the past decade, with a GDP growth rate exceeding five percent in some regions. The African Successes series looks at recent improvements in living standards and other measures of development in many African countries with an eye toward identifying what shaped them and the extent to which lessons learned are transferable and can guide policy in other nations and at the international level.             The first volume in the series, African Successes: Governments and Institutions considers the role governments and institutions have played in recent developments and identifies the factors that enable economists to predict the way institutions will function.


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African Successes, Volume II

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Studies of African economic development frequently focus on the daunting challenges the continent faces. From recurrent crises to ethnic conflicts and long-standing corruption, a raft of deep-rooted problems has led many to regard the continent as facing many hurdles to raise living standards. Yet Africa has made considerable progress in the past decade, with a GDP growth rate exceeding five percent in some regions. The African Successes series looks at recent improvements in living standards and other measures of development in many African countries with an eye toward identifying what shaped them and the extent to which lessons learned are transferable and can guide policy in other nations and at the international level.             The second volume in the series, African Successes: Human Capital turns the focus toward Africa’s human capital deficit, measured in terms of health and schooling. It offers a close look at the continent’s biggest challenges, including tropical disease and the spread of HIV.          


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African Successes, Volume III

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Studies of African economic development frequently focus on the daunting challenges the continent faces. From recurrent crises to ethnic conflicts and long-standing corruption, a raft of deep-rooted problems has led many to regard the continent as facing many hurdles to raise living standards. Yet Africa has made considerable progress in the past decade, with a GDP growth rate exceeding five percent in some regions. The African Successes series looks at recent improvements in living standards and other measures of development in many African countries with an eye toward identifying what shaped them and the extent to which lessons learned are transferable and can guide policy in other nations and at the international level.             The third volume in the series, African Successes: Modernization and Development looks at the rise in private production in spite of difficult institutional and physical environments. The volume emphasizes the ways that technologies, including mobile phones, have made growth in some areas especially dynamic.        


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Evolutionary Theory

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

The natural world is infinitely complex and hierarchically structured, with smaller units forming the components of progressively larger systems: molecules make up cells, cells comprise tissues and organs that are, in turn, parts of individual organisms, which are united into populations and integrated into yet more encompassing ecosystems. In the face of such awe-inspiring complexity, there is a need for a comprehensive, non-reductionist evolutionary theory. Having emerged at the crossroads of paleobiology, genetics, and developmental biology, the hierarchical approach to evolution provides a unifying perspective on the natural world and offers an operational framework for scientists seeking to understand the way complex biological systems work and evolve. Coedited by one of the founders of hierarchy theory and featuring a diverse and renowned group of contributors, this volume provides an integrated, comprehensive, cutting-edge introduction to the hierarchy theory of evolution. From sweeping historical reviews to philosophical pieces, theoretical essays, and strictly empirical chapters, it reveals hierarchy theory as a vibrant field of scientific enterprise that holds promise for unification across the life sciences and offers new venues of empirical and theoretical research. Stretching from molecules to the biosphere, hierarchy theory aims to provide an all-encompassing understanding of evolution and—with this first collection devoted entirely to the concept—will help make transparent the fundamental patterns that propel living systems.


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Evolutionary Theory

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

The natural world is infinitely complex and hierarchically structured, with smaller units forming the components of progressively larger systems: molecules make up cells, cells comprise tissues and organs that are, in turn, parts of individual organisms, which are united into populations and integrated into yet more encompassing ecosystems. In the face of such awe-inspiring complexity, there is a need for a comprehensive, non-reductionist evolutionary theory. Having emerged at the crossroads of paleobiology, genetics, and developmental biology, the hierarchical approach to evolution provides a unifying perspective on the natural world and offers an operational framework for scientists seeking to understand the way complex biological systems work and evolve. Coedited by one of the founders of hierarchy theory and featuring a diverse and renowned group of contributors, this volume provides an integrated, comprehensive, cutting-edge introduction to the hierarchy theory of evolution. From sweeping historical reviews to philosophical pieces, theoretical essays, and strictly empirical chapters, it reveals hierarchy theory as a vibrant field of scientific enterprise that holds promise for unification across the life sciences and offers new venues of empirical and theoretical research. Stretching from molecules to the biosphere, hierarchy theory aims to provide an all-encompassing understanding of evolution and—with this first collection devoted entirely to the concept—will help make transparent the fundamental patterns that propel living systems.


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Looking for The Outsider

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

The Outsider is a rite of passage for readers around the world. Since its publication in France in 1942, Camus’s novel has been translated into sixty languages and sold more than six million copies. It’s the rare novel that’s as at likely to be found in a teen’s backpack as in a graduate philosophy seminar. If the twentieth century produced a novel that could be called ubiquitous, The Outsider is it.   How did a young man in his twenties who had never written a novel turn out a masterpiece that still grips readers more than seventy years later? With Looking for “The Outsider”, Alice Kaplan tells that story. In the process, she reveals Camus’s achievement to have been even more impressive—and more unlikely—than even his most devoted readers knew.   Born in poverty in colonial Algeria, Camus started out as a journalist covering the criminal courts. The murder trials he attended, Kaplan shows, would be a major influence on the development and themes of The Outsider. She follows Camus to France, and, making deft use of his diaries and letters, re-creates his lonely struggle with the novel in Montmartre, where he finally hit upon the unforgettable first-person voice that enabled him to break through and complete The Outsider.   Even then, the book’s publication was far from certain. France was straining under German occupation, Camus’s closest mentor was unsure of the book’s merit, and Camus himself was suffering from near-fatal tuberculosis. Yet the book did appear, thanks in part to a resourceful publisher, Gaston Gallimard, who was undeterred by paper shortages and Nazi censorship.     The initial critical reception of The Outsider was mixed, and it wasn’t until after liberation that The Outsider began its meteoric rise. As France and the rest of the world began to move out of the shadow of war, Kaplan shows, Camus’s book— with the help of an aggressive marketing campaign by Knopf for their 1946 publication of the first English translation—became a critical and commercial success, and Camus found himself one of the most famous writers in the world. Suddenly, his seemingly modest tale of alienation was being seen for what it really was: a powerful parable of the absurd, an existentialist masterpiece.   Few books inspire devotion and excitement the way The Outsider does. And it couldn’t have a better biographer than Alice Kaplan, whose books about twentieth-century French culture and history have won her legions of fans. No reader of Camus will want to miss this brilliant exploration.  



Philanthropy in Democratic Societies

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Philanthropy is everywhere. In 2013, in the United States alone, some $330 billion was recorded in giving, from large donations by the wealthy all the way down to informal giving circles. We tend to think of philanthropy as unequivocally good, but as the contributors to this book show, philanthropy is also an exercise of power. And like all forms of power, especially in a democratic society, it deserves scrutiny. Yet it rarely has been given serious attention. This book fills that gap, bringing together expert philosophers, sociologists, political scientists, historians, and legal scholars to ask fundamental and pressing questions about philanthropy’s role in democratic societies.             The contributors balance empirical and normative approaches, exploring both the roles philanthropy has actually played in societies and the roles it should play. They ask a multitude of questions: When is philanthropy good or bad for democracy? How does, and should, philanthropic power interact with expectations of equal citizenship and democratic political voice? What makes the exercise of philanthropic power legitimate? What forms of private activity in the public interest should democracy promote, and what forms should it resist? Examining these and many other topics, the contributors offer a vital assessment of philanthropy at a time when its power to affect public outcomes has never been greater. 


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Landscapes of Accumulation

Wed, 21 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Over the past few decades, India has experienced a sudden and spectacular urban transformation. Gleaming business complexes encroach on fields and villages. Giant condominium communities offer gated security, indoor gyms, and pristine pools. Spacious, air-conditioned malls have sprung up alongside open-air markets.   In Landscapes of Accumulation, Llerena Guiu Searle examines India’s booming developments and offers a nuanced ethnographic treatment of late capitalism. India’s land, she shows, is rapidly transforming from a site of agricultural and industrial production to an international financial resource. Drawing on intensive fieldwork with investors, developers, real estate agents, and others, Searle documents the new private sector partnerships and practices that are transforming India’s built environment, as well as widely shared stories of growth and development that themselves create self-fulfilling prophecies of success. As a result, India’s cities are becoming ever more inaccessible to the country’s poor. Landscapes of Accumulation will be a welcome contribution to the international study of neoliberalism, finance, and urban development and will be of particular interest to those studying rapid—and perhaps unsustainable—development across the Global South.


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Philanthropy in Democratic Societies

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Philanthropy is everywhere. In 2013, in the United States alone, some $330 billion was recorded in giving, from large donations by the wealthy all the way down to informal giving circles. We tend to think of philanthropy as unequivocally good, but as the contributors to this book show, philanthropy is also an exercise of power. And like all forms of power, especially in a democratic society, it deserves scrutiny. Yet it rarely has been given serious attention. This book fills that gap, bringing together expert philosophers, sociologists, political scientists, historians, and legal scholars to ask fundamental and pressing questions about philanthropy’s role in democratic societies.             The contributors balance empirical and normative approaches, exploring both the roles philanthropy has actually played in societies and the roles it should play. They ask a multitude of questions: When is philanthropy good or bad for democracy? How does, and should, philanthropic power interact with expectations of equal citizenship and democratic political voice? What makes the exercise of philanthropic power legitimate? What forms of private activity in the public interest should democracy promote, and what forms should it resist? Examining these and many other topics, the contributors offer a vital assessment of philanthropy at a time when its power to affect public outcomes has never been greater. 


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/33/9780226335643.jpg




Landscapes of Accumulation

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Over the past few decades, India has experienced a sudden and spectacular urban transformation. Gleaming business complexes encroach on fields and villages. Giant condominium communities offer gated security, indoor gyms, and pristine pools. Spacious, air-conditioned malls have sprung up alongside open-air markets.   In Landscapes of Accumulation, Llerena Guiu Searle examines India’s booming developments and offers a nuanced ethnographic treatment of late capitalism. India’s land, she shows, is rapidly transforming from a site of agricultural and industrial production to an international financial resource. Drawing on intensive fieldwork with investors, developers, real estate agents, and others, Searle documents the new private sector partnerships and practices that are transforming India’s built environment, as well as widely shared stories of growth and development that themselves create self-fulfilling prophecies of success. As a result, India’s cities are becoming ever more inaccessible to the country’s poor. Landscapes of Accumulation will be a welcome contribution to the international study of neoliberalism, finance, and urban development and will be of particular interest to those studying rapid—and perhaps unsustainable—development across the Global South.


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Law and the Economy in Colonial India

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Since the economic reforms of the 1990s, India’s economy has grown rapidly. To sustain growth and foreign investment over the long run requires a well-developed legal infrastructure for conducting business, including cheap and reliable contract enforcement and secure property rights. But it’s widely acknowledged that India’s legal infrastructure is in urgent need of reform, plagued by problems, including slow enforcement of contracts and land laws that differ from state to state. How has this situation arisen, and what can boost business confidence and encourage long-run economic growth?             Tirthankar Roy and Anand V. Swamy trace the beginnings of the current Indian legal system to the years of British colonial rule. They show how India inherited an elaborate legal system from the British colonial administration, which incorporated elements from both British Common Law and indigenous institutions. In the case of property law, especially as it applied to agricultural land, indigenous laws and local political expediency were more influential in law-making than concepts borrowed from European legal theory. Conversely, with commercial law, there was considerable borrowing from Europe. In all cases, the British struggled with limited capacity to enforce their laws and an insufficient knowledge of the enormous diversity and differentiation within Indian society. A disorderly body of laws, not conducive to production and trade, evolved over time. Roy and Swamy’s careful analysis not only sheds new light on the development of legal institutions in India, but also offers insights for India and other emerging countries through a look at what fosters the types of institutions that are key to economic growth.


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Anthropologists in the Stock Exchange

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Uncovering strange plots by early British anthropologists to use scientific status to manipulate the stock market, Anthropologists in the Stock Exchange tells a provocative story that marries the birth of the social sciences with the exploits of global finance. Marc Flandreau tracks a group of Victorian gentleman-swindlers as they shuffled between the corridors of the London Stock Exchange and the meeting rooms of learned society, showing that anthropological studies were integral to investment and speculation in foreign government debt, and, inversely, that finance played a crucial role in shaping the contours of human knowledge.             Flandreau argues that finance and science were at the heart of a new brand of imperialism born during Benjamin Disraeli’s first term as Britain’s prime minister in the 1860s. As anthropologists advocated the study of Miskito Indians or stated their views on a Jamaican rebellion, they were in fact catering to the impulses of the stock exchange—for their own benefit. In this way the very development of the field of anthropology was deeply tied to issues relevant to the financial market—from trust to corruption. Moreover, this book shows how the interplay between anthropology and finance formed the foundational structures of late nineteenth-century British imperialism and helped produce essential technologies of globalization as we know it today. 


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Anthropologists in the Stock Exchange

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Uncovering strange plots by early British anthropologists to use scientific status to manipulate the stock market, Anthropologists in the Stock Exchange tells a provocative story that marries the birth of the social sciences with the exploits of global finance. Marc Flandreau tracks a group of Victorian gentleman-swindlers as they shuffled between the corridors of the London Stock Exchange and the meeting rooms of learned society, showing that anthropological studies were integral to investment and speculation in foreign government debt, and, inversely, that finance played a crucial role in shaping the contours of human knowledge.             Flandreau argues that finance and science were at the heart of a new brand of imperialism born during Benjamin Disraeli’s first term as Britain’s prime minister in the 1860s. As anthropologists advocated the study of Miskito Indians or stated their views on a Jamaican rebellion, they were in fact catering to the impulses of the stock exchange—for their own benefit. In this way the very development of the field of anthropology was deeply tied to issues relevant to the financial market—from trust to corruption. Moreover, this book shows how the interplay between anthropology and finance formed the foundational structures of late nineteenth-century British imperialism and helped produce essential technologies of globalization as we know it today. 


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Man Who Stole Himself

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

The island nation of Iceland is known for many things—majestic landscapes, volcanic eruptions, distinctive seafood—but racial diversity is not one of them. So the little-known story of Hans Jonathan, a free black man who lived and raised a family in early nineteenth-century Iceland, is improbable and compelling, the stuff of novels.             In The Man Who Stole Himself, Gisli Palsson lays out the story of Hans Jonathan (also known as Hans Jónatan) in stunning detail. Born into slavery in St. Croix in 1784, Hans was taken as a slave to Denmark, where he eventually enlisted in the navy and fought on behalf of the country in the 1801 Battle of Copenhagen. After the war, he declared himself a free man, believing that he was due freedom not only because of his patriotic service, but because while slavery remained legal in the colonies, it was outlawed in Denmark itself. He thus became the subject of one of the most notorious slavery cases in European history, which he lost. Then Hans ran away—never to be heard from in Denmark again, his fate unknown for more than two hundred years. It’s now known that Hans fled to Iceland, where he became a merchant and peasant farmer, married, and raised two children. Today, he has become something of an Icelandic icon, claimed as a proud and daring ancestor both there and among his descendants in America.             The Man Who Stole Himself brilliantly intertwines Hans Jonathan’s adventurous travels with a portrait of the Danish slave trade, legal arguments over slavery, and the state of nineteenth-century race relations in the Northern Atlantic world. Throughout the book, Palsson traces themes of imperial dreams, colonialism, human rights, and globalization, which all come together in the life of a single, remarkable man. Hans literally led a life like no other. His is the story of a man who had the temerity—the courage—to steal himself.


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Looking for The Stranger

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

The Stranger is a rite of passage for readers around the world. Since its publication in France in 1942, Camus’s novel has been translated into sixty languages and sold more than six million copies. It’s the rare novel that’s as at likely to be found in a teen’s backpack as in a graduate philosophy seminar. If the twentieth century produced a novel that could be called ubiquitous, The Stranger is it.   How did a young man in his twenties who had never written a novel turn out a masterpiece that still grips readers more than seventy years later? With Looking for “The Stranger”, Alice Kaplan tells that story. In the process, she reveals Camus’s achievement to have been even more impressive—and more unlikely—than even his most devoted readers knew.   Born in poverty in colonial Algeria, Camus started out as a journalist covering the criminal courts. The murder trials he attended, Kaplan shows, would be a major influence on the development and themes of The Stranger. She follows Camus to France, and, making deft use of his diaries and letters, re-creates his lonely struggle with the novel in Montmartre, where he finally hit upon the unforgettable first-person voice that enabled him to break through and complete The Stranger.   Even then, the book’s publication was far from certain. France was straining under German occupation, Camus’s closest mentor was unsure of the book’s merit, and Camus himself was suffering from near-fatal tuberculosis. Yet the book did appear, thanks in part to a resourceful publisher, Gaston Gallimard, who was undeterred by paper shortages and Nazi censorship.     The initial critical reception of The Stranger was mixed, and it wasn’t until after liberation that The Stranger began its meteoric rise. As France and the rest of the world began to move out of the shadow of war, Kaplan shows, Camus’s book— with the help of an aggressive marketing campaign by Knopf for their 1946 publication of the first English translation—became a critical and commercial success, and Camus found himself one of the most famous writers in the world. Suddenly, his seemingly modest tale of alienation was being seen for what it really was: a powerful parable of the absurd, an existentialist masterpiece.   Few books inspire devotion and excitement the way The Stranger does. And it couldn’t have a better biographer than Alice Kaplan, whose books about twentieth-century French culture and history have won her legions of fans. No reader of Camus will want to miss this brilliant exploration.  


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Myth of the Litigious Society

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Why do Americans seem to sue at the slightest provocation? The answer may surprise you: we don’t! For every “Whiplash Charlie” who sees a car accident as a chance to make millions, for every McDonald’s customer to pursue a claim over a too-hot cup of coffee, many more Americans suffer injuries but make no claims against those responsible or their insurance companies. The question is not why Americans sue but why we don’t sue more often, and the answer can be found in how we think about injury and personal responsibility.             With this book, David M. Engel demolishes the myth that America is a litigious society. The sobering reality is that the vast majority of injury victims—more than nine out of ten—rely on their own resources, family and friends, and government programs to cover their losses. When real people experience serious injuries, they don’t respond as rational actors. Trauma and pain disrupt their thoughts, and potential claims are discouraged by negative stereotypes that pervade American television and popular culture. (Think Saul Goodman in Breaking Bad, who keeps a box of neck braces in his office to help clients exaggerate their injuries.) Cultural norms make preventable injuries appear inevitable—or the victim’s fault. We’re taught to accept setbacks stoically and not blame someone else. But this tendency to “lump it” doesn’t just hurt the victims; it hurts us all. As politicians continue to push reforms that miss the real problem, we risk losing these claims as a way to quickly identify unsafe products and practices. Because injuries disproportionately fall on people with fewer resources, the existing framework creates a social underclass whose needs must be met by government programs all citizens shoulder while shielding those who cause the harm. It’s time for America to have a more responsible, blame-free discussion about injuries and the law. With The Myth of the Litigious Society, Engel takes readers clearly and powerfully through what we really know about injury victims and concludes with recommendations for how we might improve the situation.  


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Zombie XI

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Leonard is on the bench. In the dead zone. Stuck there like a zombie. And it’s not as if his soccer team is even any good without him! They lose all the time—until lightning strikes. When his team plays near a nuclear power plant, a weird energy passes through Leonard, and that night he is visited by zombies. During a ghostly conversation with the entire 1966 England World Cup soccer team, the players tell him that if he follows their instructions, he’ll finally make the school team and start winning. Leonard obeys and the team’s prospects surge, but at what price? What pound of flesh will the zombies demand? The newest young-adult novel by celebrated writer Pete Kalu, Zombie XI is a multicultural tale of not just zombies, but also friendship, family, and the at times fraught world of teen relationships.


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Quest for Stable Money

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Caught up in the costly Napoleonic wars, Austria went into sovereign default in 1811. Five years later, the public authorities founded a national bank to be financed and run by private shareholders, the idea being that an independent bank would help rebuild trust in money. During the two hundred years that followed, the Oesterreichische Nationalbank grew from the treasury’s banker-of-choice into a central bank, and from a private stock corporation into a public institution. Yet the challenges facing today’s Nationalbank are a surprising echo of the past: How can it provide stable money? How far must central bank independence go? How does monetary policy making work in a multinational monetary union? Stretching from the Nationalbank’s predecessor, the Wiener Stadtbanco, to Austria’s integration into the European Union today, this engaging book provides the first extensive overview of Austria’s monetary history.



Philosophy Scare

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

From the rise of formalist novels that championed the heroism of the individual to the proliferation of abstract art as a counter to socialist realism, the years of the Cold War had a profound impact on American intellectual life. As John McCumber shows in this fascinating account, philosophy, too, was hit hard by the Red Scare. Detailing the immense political pressures that reshaped philosophy departments in midcentury America, he shows just how radically politics can alter the course of intellectual history.               McCumber begins with the story of Max Otto, whose appointment to the UCLA Philosophy Department in 1947 was met with widespread protest charging him as an atheist. Drawing on Otto’s case, McCumber details the hugely successful conservative efforts that, by 1960, had all but banished the existentialist and pragmatist paradigms—not to mention Marxism—from philosophy departments all across the country, replacing them with an approach that valorized scientific objectivity and free markets and which downplayed the anti-theistic implications of modern thought. As he shows, while there have since been many instances of definitive and even explosive rejection of this conservative trend, its effects can still be seen at American universities today.


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Hunayn Ibn Ishaq on His Galen Translations

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Hunayn Ibn Ishaq (809–73), one of the most prolific early medieval translators of classical works, rendered hundreds of Greek volumes into Syriac and Arabic. This treatise on his Galen translations illuminates Ishaq’s efforts and their ninth-century context while recognizing that the translation movement had actually begun centuries earlier with Christians, Jews, and others. Offering the definitive Arabic text with a modern English translation and apparatus, this volume will be essential for anyone interested in the transmission of knowledge in the Late Antique and early Islamic Middle East.


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Hollywood Is Everywhere

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Hollywood has a long tradition of bringing in emigre directors from around the world, dating back to the silent era. And today, as the film industry is ever more global, the people who make blockbuster movies reflect that, hailing from many countries across the world. But that fact hides a fundamental difference, one that Melis Behlil examines in Hollywood is Everywhere: today’s Hollywood studios are themselves transnational, with ownership structures and financial arrangements that stretch far beyond the borders of the United States. Seen in that context, today’s international directors are less analogous to the emigre talent of the past than to ordinary transnational employees of other major global corporations.  


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Reflections

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

“The historian,” wrote E. L. Doctorow, “will tell you what happened. The novelist will tell you what it felt like.” This book sees Peter Hennessy and Robert Shepard combine both approaches with the art of the interviewer, a craft at once sensitive and probing.Reflections collects transcripts of the best interviews from the BBC Radio 4 series Reflections with Peter Hennessy, a show on which the British political elite have spoken candidly about their careers and the moments that came to define their political lives. Supplementing the interviews are short biographies and profiles of the interviewees, allowing readers a fuller picture of each speaker’s background and professional trajectory. This revealing book includes conversations with political heavyweights such as former prime minister John Major; former foreign secretaries Margaret Beckett, David Owen, and Jack Straw; Labour Party leader Neil Kinnock; Liberal Party leader David Steel; and chancellor of exchequer Nigel Lawson. In addition, Reflections presents interviews with leading women, including Shirley Williams and Clare Short, who spent years at the forefront of their parties in Westminster. The latest volume in the popular Haus Curiosities series, Reflections offers valuable insights from some of today’s most influential political figures.


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Reconstructing Retirement

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

In the United Kingdom, retirement programs are being reconstructed to follow the American practice of abolishing mandatory retirement and increasing state pension ages. This timely book compares prospects for work and retirement at age sixty five-plus in both the United States and the United Kingdom. After exploring the shifting logic behind both nations’ policies—policies that increase both the need and opportunities to work past age sixty five—David Lain presents an original comparative statistical analysis on the wide range of factors influencing employment at this age, from the ability to move between jobs in order to remain employed to changing employment trends. He then proposes a series of policies to address these factors across the life-course and promote security and autonomy for older people. Pathways to employment after sixty five are complex, and pressures to work at this age are likely to result in very unequal outcomes. This book will play a vital role in creating a more positive, more equitable future for late careers and retirement.


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Revisiting Moral Panics

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

We live in a world that is increasingly characterized as risky, dangerous, and threatening. Every day, a new social issue emerges seemingly designed to provoke a shared sense of panic. Drawing on the popular UK Economic Social and Research Council seminar series, this book uses the concept of moral panic to examine these social issues and anxieties and the solutions to them. With an introduction by Charles Critcher—coeditor of Moral Panics in the Contemporary World—and contributions from both well-known and up-and-coming researchers and practitioners, this book offers a stimulating and innovative overview of moral panic ideas for students and practitioners and an accessible introduction to the concept for a wider general public.


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Japanese/Korean Linguistics, Vol. 23

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Japanese and Korean are typologically similar, with linguistic phenomena in one often having counterparts in the other. The Japanese/Korean Linguistics Conference provides a forum for research, particularly through comparative study, of both languages. The papers in this volume are from the twenty-third conference, which was held at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. They include essays on the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, historical linguistics, discourse analysis, prosody, and psycholinguistics of both languages. Such comparative studies deepen our understanding of both languages and will be a useful reference for students and scholars in either field.


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Grassroots Youth Work

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Some of the most energetic, effective, and passionate activists involved in grassroots politics are young people—but their voices are rarely heard in policy, research, or public debate. This book remedies that, giving young activists their due and showing the effects of passionate social service practitioners who build relationships with marginalized young people in the face of spending cuts and shifting governmental priorities. Written by an experienced youth worker, Grassroots Youth Work uses interviews, dialogue, and excerpts from research diaries to bring youth work to life in both theory and practice.


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Grassroots Youth Work

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Some of the most energetic, effective, and passionate activists involved in grassroots politics are young people—but their voices are rarely heard in policy, research, or public debate. This book remedies that, giving young activists their due and showing the effects of passionate social service practitioners who build relationships with marginalized young people in the face of spending cuts and shifting governmental priorities. Written by an experienced youth worker, Grassroots Youth Work uses interviews, dialogue, and excerpts from research diaries to bring youth work to life in both theory and practice.


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Gabriela von Habsburg

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Gabriela von Habsburg has created a diverse body of sculptural works, which can be seen throughout Europe and the United States, including a 1990 sculpture at the National Academy of Science in Washington, DC. Although her works address a wide range of themes, she is perhaps best known for two works that reflect her time living and working in the Republic of Georgia and, later, as Georgia’s ambassador to Germany in Berlin. Both political and poetical, the sculptures in stainless steel and stone-printed lithography take as their subject events in the country’s turbulent recent history. For example, in the Rose Revolution Monument in Tbilisi and a second large monument in Sopron, von Habsburg pays homage to the wave of revolutions that followed the fall of the Iron Curtain.             The first book to assemble a representative survey of works from throughout von Habsburg’s career, Gabriela von Habsburg includes one hundred color illustrations, including photographs of the artist at work, and contributions by art historians and curators Manfred Schneckenburger and Dieter Ronte, who discuss the politicization of aesthetics and, more specifically, the ways in which von Habsburg’s work functions as a powerful form of political expression.  


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Practice Research Partnerships in Social Work

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Practice research partnerships in social work can make a significant difference to social work service delivery. Through clear multinational practice scenarios, critical questions, and examples from research, Christa Fouché guides researchers, students, educators, practice managers, funders, and practitioners in exploring partnerships that can create, contribute, consume, commission, or critique evidence in and for social work practice. The text encourages collaborative practice by demonstrating the transformative power of knowledge networks in making a difference in social work on a practical level. This comprehensive, accessibly written book will be an essential text for both students and practitioners, helping them to engage actively with research through their front line work.


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Storm

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Gales, cyclones, blizzards, tornados, and hurricanes—few things demonstrate the awesome power of nature like a good storm. Devastating, diverse, and sometimes appearing completely out of nowhere, storms are also a source of both scientific and aesthetic wonder. In this book, John Withington takes an in-depth and unique look at the nature of storms and the impact that they have—both physical and cultural—on our lives.             Withington shows how storms have changed the course of human history. From Roman times to the modern day, he shows how their devastating effects have wiped out entire communities, changed the fates of battle, and even reset the entire planet. He also shows how beneficial they have been to us: as an important feature of our atmosphere and climate, but also as a source of inspiration for nearly every artist who has ever lived, from Homer to Rembrandt, in works from the Old Testament to Robinson Crusoe. Beautifully illustrated, this book offers a fascinating look at Earth’s most fearsome events.  


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Strategy for Managing Complex Systems

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Strategy for Managing Complex Systems demonstrates that management and management theory have strong foundations in systems science, and most specifically in the cybernetics of truly complex—organismic, self-organizing, and evolving—systems. As Fredmund Malik shows, we live in a world of highly complex systems, many of which are both extremely fragile and extremely powerful. Nevertheless our institutions are ill-equipped to deal with changes in these systems, as we have little knowledge of their structures, the mechanisms of their behavior, and how to control them. This combination of societal ignorance and systems power, Malik argues, underscores the urgency of studying complex systems more thoroughly, rather than indulging in quick fixes.  Only when we understand and value complex systems’ potential for managing contemporary society’s institutions and organizations will we be able to implement necessary improvements. This book provides the basics of such cybernetic management, showing how we might create robust, self-organizing systems that are both functional and sustainably viable.



Spirits of the Earth

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Swiss novelist Catherine Colomb is known as one of the most unusual and inventive francophone novelists of the twentieth century. Fascinated by the processes of memory and consciousness, she has been compared to that of Virginia Woolf and Marcel Proust. The Spirits of the Earth is the first English translation of Colomb’s work and its arrival will introduce new readers to an iconic novel.The Spirits of the Earth is at heart a family drama, set at the Fraidaigue château, along the shores of Lake Geneva, and in the Maison d’en Haut country mansion, located in the hills above the lake. In these luxe locales, readers encounter upper-class characters with faltering incomes, parvenues, and even ghosts. Throughout, Colomb builds a psychologically penetrating and bold story in which the living and the dead intermingle and in which time itself is a mystery.


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Sports Criminology

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

From doping among professional athletes to crime prevention through sports, the discussion of crime in sports seems to be on the rise. This is the first book to provide a critical criminological perspective on sports and the myriad connections between sports and crime. Part of Policy’s New Horizons in Criminology series, it utilizes the interdisciplinary nature of criminology to incorporate emerging perspectives from diverse fields like the study of social harm, gender and sexuality studies, and green criminology. Written from an international perspective, Sports Criminology covers both a range of topics, from sports scandals to the possibility of crime prevention, and a range of sports disciplines. American football, boxing, soccer, and sumo are all examined, making this book an essential read for scholars of sports law and the sociology of sports alike.


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Social Policy Review 28

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Published in cooperation with the Social Policy Association, Social Policy Review is an annual volume that draws together international scholarship at the forefront of research on social policy. This edition provides a diverse overview of the best in social policy scholarship, with specially commissioned reviews of crucial pension, health care, conditionality, and housing debates. A themed section on personalized budgets examines the introduction and consequences of funding personalization in the United Kingdom, Australia, and Norway and considers the impact of such funding on vulnerable groups such as the elderly and the homeless.


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Substance not Spin

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Why does policy succeed or fail? In Substance not Spin, Nick Raynsford, a former member of the UK parliament, government minister, and campaigner pulls back the curtain on the front lines of policy making. Drawing on more than forty years of experience working at the very heart of both local and national government and the voluntary sector, Raynsford explores what works and what doesn’t in making and implementing policy and legislation. He gives an insider’s view on a range of events—some not previously made public—including the botched 1980s reform of housing benefit legislation, the vacuum left by the 1986 abolition of the Greater London Council, the ill-fated 2002 fire and rescue service strike and subsequent reform program, and fitful regeneration in the Thames Gateway in the 2000s. Bringing his investigation up to the current day, he even explores various devolution plans leading to the so-called Northern Powerhouse of the Coalition and now Conservative Government. Offering solutions to obstacles in policy making and implementation and challenging the prevailing public belief that politicians are unable to deliver, Substance not Spin provides a fascinating bridge across the political divide between policy and practice.



Vision in Motion

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Vision is not just a simple recognition of what passes through our field of sight, the reflection and observation of light and shape. Even before Freud posited dreams as a way of “seeing” even as we sleep, the writings of philosophers, artists, and scientists from Goethe to Cézanne have argued that to understand vision as a mere mirroring of the outside world is to overlook a more important cognitive act of seeing that is dependent on time.             Bringing together a renowned international group of contributors, Vision in Motion explores one of the most vexing problems in the study of vision and cognition: To make sense of the sensations we experience when we see something, we must configure many moments into a synchronous image. This volume offers a critical reexamination of seeing that restores a concept of “vision in motion” that avoids reducing the sensations we experience to narrative chronological sequencing. The contributors draw on Hume, Bergson, and Deleuze, among others, to establish a nuanced idea of how we perceive.


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Snowdrop

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Elegant flowers dressed in simple white and green, snowdrops look far too fragile to deal with wintry weather. But that’s just what they do, and they have become treasured by horticulturalists for their ability to flower in the earliest parts of the year. In this book, Gail Harland explores the role snowdrops have played in gardens and popular culture alike, as a treasured genus for enthusiast growers and an important symbol of hope and consolation.             Harland explores a variety of cultural meanings for the deceptively petit flower. In Victorian England snowdrop bands encouraged chastity among young women. They have been favorite subjects in paintings in many different eras, and today they are the iconic symbols of several hope-giving charities. Poets and writers have written extensively about them, as have pharmacists, who have used their chemical, galantamine, in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Today some of their rarer bulbs can fetch record-breaking sums, and annual festivals that celebrate them draw people from all over the world. Walking among their brilliant white beds, Harland offers an ideal companion for any plant-lover who has ever eagerly awaited this treasured sign of spring. 


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Spellbound

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Asserting that written language is on the verge of its greatest change since the advent of the printing press, visual artist Craig McDaniel and art historian Jean Robertson bring us Spellbound—a collection of heavily illustrated essays that interrogate assumptions about language and typography. Rethinking the alphabet, they argue, means rethinking human communication. Looking beyond traditional typography, the authors conceive of new languages in which encoded pictorial images offer an unparalleled fusion of art and language. In a world of constant technological innovation offered by e-books, tablets, cell phones, and the Internet, McDaniel and Robertson demonstrate provocatively what it would mean to move beyond the alphabet we know to a wholly new system of written communication.


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Education Systems and Inequalities

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

This is the first book to bring together an international roster of contributors to compare different education systems and their effects on social inequality. Starting with basic premises—such as how education systems can be characterized and what distinguishes them—the book goes on to explore those systems’ links with social structures, their role in expanding or ameliorating inequality, and the social mechanisms that underlie that role. It will be crucial to future debates on education and policy reform.


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Essays on the Artistry of Dennis Hopper

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Dennis Hopper (1936–2010) was one of most charismatic and protean figures to emerge from the American independent film movement of the 1960s and ’70s, an incredibly compelling screen presence who helped give cult classics like Easy Rider and Blue Velvet their off-kilter appeal. But his artistic interests went far beyond acting, and this collection of essays is the first major work to take in Hopper as a creative artist in all his fields of endeavor, from acting and directing to photography, sculpture, and expressionist painting. Stephen Naish doesn’t skimp on covering Hopper’s best-known work, but he breaks new ground in putting it in context with his other creative enterprises, showing how one medium informs another, and how they offer a portrait of an artist who was restless, even flawed at times, but always aiming to live up to his motto: create or die.  



Research and Policy in Ethnic Relations

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Historically, interactions between academic researchers, research funders, and research users interested in social policy interventions in ethnic relations have been tenuous at best. With this unique book, the contributors seek to develop a dialogue about the internal constraints that have an impact on this field of practice and to kickstart a wider debate within the research community. They aim to produce a renewed awareness of the current linkages between research and social policy in ethnic relations among students of the social sciences and social policy. Research and Policy in Ethnic Relations will be of interest to both academics and students engaged with the research agenda and the substantive policy areas discussed.


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Precarious Spaces

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Using an arts-based inquiry, Precarious Spaces addresses current concerns around the instrumentality and agency of art in the context of the precarity of daily life. The book offers a survey of socially and community-engaged art practices in South America, focusing in particular on Brazil’s “informal” situation, and contributes much to the ongoing debate of the possibility for change through social, environmental, and ecological solutions. The individual chapters, compiled by Katarzyna Kosmala and Miguel Imas, present a wide spectrum of contemporary social agency models with a particular emphasis on detailed case studies and local histories. Featuring critical reflections on the spaces of urban voids, derelict buildings, self-built communities such as favela, and roadside occupations, Precarious Spaces will make readers question their assumptions about precarity, and life in precarious realms.


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Navigating into the Unknown

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

As we face times of rapid social and technological change, the future may seem like a horizon approaching too quickly. In a few years, almost everything will be different: what we do, how we do it, and why we do it; how we produce and consume; how we conduct research; how we teach and learn; how we share information, communicate, and cooperate; how we work—and how we live. How do we deal with these dizzying transformations in business, politics, and society? As management expert Fredmund Malik shows, great changes also open up great possibilities, pushing aside the old and creating opportunities for the new. Management, as Malik understands it, is the task of taking advantage of these possibilities. This book is a call to clear-sightedness and personal courage among all managers and leaders. It is a chart for navigating the Great Transformation21, Malik’s paradigm for understanding this new world; it is a chart for navigating the future as an open horizon.



Narcissistic Parenting in an Insecure World

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

In this provocative history of parenting, Harry Hendrick analyzes the social and economic reasons behind parenting trends. He shows how broader social changes, including neoliberalism, feminism, the collapse of the social-democratic ideal, and the “new behaviorism,” have led to the rise of the anxious and narcissistic parent. The book charts the shift from the liberal and progressive parenting styles of the 1940s through the ’70s to the more behavioral, punitive, and managerial methods of childrearing today, made popular by so-called experts  like Gina Ford and Supernanny Jo Frost and—in the United Kingdom—by New Labour parent education programs. This trend, Hendrick argues, is symptomatic of the sour, mean-spirited, and vindictive social norms found throughout society today. It undermines the better instincts of parents and, therefore, damages parent-child relationships. Instead, he proposes, parents should focus on understanding and helping their children as they do the hard work of growing up.


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Narcissistic Parenting in an Insecure World

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

In this provocative history of parenting, Harry Hendrick analyzes the social and economic reasons behind parenting trends. He shows how broader social changes, including neoliberalism, feminism, the collapse of the social-democratic ideal, and the “new behaviorism,” have led to the rise of the anxious and narcissistic parent. The book charts the shift from the liberal and progressive parenting styles of the 1940s through the ’70s to the more behavioral, punitive, and managerial methods of childrearing today, made popular by so-called experts  like Gina Ford and Supernanny Jo Frost and—in the United Kingdom—by New Labour parent education programs. This trend, Hendrick argues, is symptomatic of the sour, mean-spirited, and vindictive social norms found throughout society today. It undermines the better instincts of parents and, therefore, damages parent-child relationships. Instead, he proposes, parents should focus on understanding and helping their children as they do the hard work of growing up.


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Magnet Theatre

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Cape Town’s Magnet Theatre has been a force in South African theater for three decades, a crucial space for theater, education, performance, and community throughout a turbulent period in South African history. Offering a dialogue between internal and external perspectives, as well as perspectives from performers, artists, and scholars, this book analyzes Magnet’s many productions and presents a rich compendium of the work of one of the most vital physical theater companies in Africa.


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Mountain

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Majestic and awe-inspiring, there is nothing like the sight of a mountain on the horizon. Throughout all of human history mountains have been linked to the eternal, attracting us to their dizzying heights, stunning us with their natural beauty, and often threatening us with their dangers. Through a compelling journey to both real and imaginary peaks, this book explores how the mountain has figured in our history, culture, and imaginations.             Veronica della Dora explores the ways mountains have functioned spiritually as a boundary between life and death, a bridge between the earth and the heavens. Interlacing science, culture, and religion, she sketches the mountain as a geological phenomenon that has profoundly influenced and been influenced by the human imagination, shaping our environmental consciousness and helping us understand our—quite small indeed—place in the world. She also explores their significance as objects of human feats, as prizes of adventure and sport, and as places of serene beauty for vacationers. Magnificently illustrated and showcasing famous peaks from all around the world, Mountain offers a fascinating dual portrait of these giants in nature and culture.  


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Marx's 'Capital'

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

This brilliantly concise book has established itself over twenty-five years and five editions as the standard companion to Karl Marx’s most important work, the sprawling Capital. This new edition retains the features that have made it a crucial teaching tool—a clear explanation of the structure of Marx’s analysis, an exploration of his method and terminology, and the significance of his central concepts—while also bringing it fully up to date with the latest scholarship and a clearly written analysis of the continuing relevance of Capital to today’s ongoing discussions of politics, economics, and the struggles of capitalism.  


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Building Fires in the Snow

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Diversity has always been central to Alaska identity, as the state’s population consists of people with many different backgrounds, viewpoints, and life experiences. This book opens a window into these diverse lives, gathering stories and poems about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer life into a brilliant, path-breaking anthology.             In these pages we see the panoply of LGBTQ life in Alaska today, from the quotidian urban adventures of a family—shopping, going out, working—to intimate encounters with Alaska’s breathtaking natural beauty. At a time of great change and major strides in LGBTQ civil rights, Building Fires in the Snow shows us an Alaska that shatters stereotypes and reveals a side of Alaska that’s been little seen until now.  


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Being a Scholar in the Digital Era

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

What opportunities, rather than disruptions, do digital technologies present? How do developments in digital media not only support scholarship and teaching but also further social justice? Written by two experts in the field, this accessible book offers practical guidance, examples, and reflection on this changing foundation of scholarly practice. It is the first to consider how new technologies can connect academics, journalists, and activists in ways that foster transformation on issues of social justice. Discussing digital innovations in higher education as well as what these changes mean in an age of austerity, this book provides both a vision of what scholars can be in the digital era and a road map to how they can enliven the public good.


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BMW Group Home Plant in Munich

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

BMW is the iconic German luxury automobile, motorcycle, and engine manufacturer. Headquartered in Munich, it also owns MINI and Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, making it one of the best-selling automakers in the world. One constant of BMW, since the very beginning, has been its knack for combining the brand’s long tradition of craftsmanship with cutting-edge technology in production.             Generously illustrated with historical and contemporary photographs, The BMW Group Home Plant in Munich gives fans of the beloved brand an opportunity to go behind the scenes at the nucleus of BMW automobile and engine production in the heart of Munich. Beginning with the foundation of a new plant by Gustav Otto, which became the BMW AG in 1922, and continuing on to the newest and most exciting breakthroughs in technology guiding the industry today, the book provides a comprehensive chronicle of industrial developments at BMW over the years, including key turning points and contributions by current and former BMW employees discussing the company’s history and approach to modernization.  


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Bewnans Ke / The Life of St Kea

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

In 2000, a sixteenth-century manuscript containing a copy of a previously unknown play in Middle Cornish, probably composed in the second half of the fifteenth century, was discovered among papers bequeathed to the National Library of Wales, Aberystwyth. This eagerly awaited edition of the play, published in association with the National Library of Wales, offers a conservatively edited text with a facing-page translation, and a reproduction of the original text at the foot of the page – vital for comparative purposes. Also included are a complete vocabulary, detailed linguistic notes, and a thorough introduction dealing with the language of the play, the hagiographic background of the St Kea material and the origins of other parts in the work of Geoffrey of Monmouth. The theme of the play is the contention between St Kea, patron of Kea parish in Cornwall, and Teudar, a local tyrant. This is combined with a long section dealing with the dispute over tribute payments between King Arthur and the Emperor Lucius Hiberius; Queen Guinevere’s adultery with Arthur’s nephew Modred; the latter’s invitation to Cheldric and his Saxon hordes to come to Britain to assist him in his conflict with his uncle; and Arthur’s battle with Modred.



Barozzi Veiga Arquitectos

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Barozzi Veiga Arquitectos are a Barcelona-based firm that was established by Fabrizio Barozzi and Alberto Veiga in 2004. In their first decade, they have built—and won awards for—major projects in Spain, Poland, Switzerland, and other European countries. This beautifully produced volume is the first comprehensive monograph on the firm. While it features the standard elements of such a work—including images, drawings, plans, and contextual references for all the firm’s major works—it also aims to offer more, presenting a broader, more intellectual take on Barozzi Veiga’s output and the way that it reflects the firm’s desire to find and draw on the primal condition of each location where they build.


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Ageing in Sub-Saharan Africa

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

A collection of in-depth ethnographic analyses of the impact of local and global transformations on the care—or lack of care—received by older people in sub-Saharan Africa, this book provides the pan-African evidence and enquiry needed to advance debates about how to address (and who should address) the long-term care needs of this vulnerable population. Contributors from the United Kingdom, the Congo, Kenya, Switzerland, the Netherlands, and France use case studies from eighteen different countries in all regions of sub-Saharan Africa to examine formal and informal care, including inter- and intra-generational care and retirement homes, as well as care in the context of poverty, HIV/AIDS, and migration.



AP 164: Ábalos and Herreros

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Iñaki Ábalos and Juan Herreros established the renowned architec­tural firm Ábalos & Herreros in Madrid in 1984. At the time, fol­lowing the end of the Franco regime, architects were valued more for their technical ability than for their contributions to theoretical research. In this context, Ábalos and Herreros’s melding of design with a range of publications and curatorial projects presented a remarkable challenge to assumptions about the role of an architect. In 2012, the Canadian Centre for Architecture obtained the Ábalos & Herreros archive, which contains documents related to more than 160 projects. The material comprises sketches, slides, models, col­lages, and drawings. The archive presents a compelling opportunity to reconstruct Ábalos and Herreros’s planning and design process. Each of the book’s three contributors—two of whom worked with Ábalos and Herreros—approaches the archive with specific questions, and their essays explore topics including the architects’ fascination with industrial architecture, their capacity to construct a hybrid materiality without recourse to building technology as language, and their innova­tive visions for landscape architecture. While many have written about the work of Ábalos and Herreros, previous books have been based mainly on their built projects and on­going research. Ábalos & Herreros Selected by Office Kersten Geers David Van Severen, Juan José Castellón and SO–IL is the first book to draw on the firm’s archive to offer a new take on this important architectural practice.


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Difficult Whole

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

In 1966, architect Robert Venturi published Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture, a manifesto that became one of the twentieth century’s most important statements about architecture. Drawing on both vernacular and high-style sources, Venturi introduced new lessons from the buildings of architects who were well known, like Michelangelo and Alvar Aalto, and those whose work had then been forgotten, like Frank Furness and Edwin Lutyens. Arguing against the diagrammatic forms that dominated the field at that time, Venturi made a case instead for “the difficult whole.”             Fifty years later, this book offers a fresh analysis and thorough re-evaluation of Venturi’s landmark work and its legacy. Through a radical rereading of material from the archives of Venturi, Scott Brown, and Associates, the editors propose a credible alternative to contemporary architectural discourse, one that takes account of Venturi’s arguments and offers a way forward. Featuring essays, as well as close analyses of twenty-eight projects by Venturi, Rauch, and Scott Brown, The Difficult Whole is sure to spark discussion—and inspiration—throughout the worlds of architecture and design.


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Death and Resurrection of Elvis Presley

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

There is no other way to put it: Elvis is the King. Note the present tense: even though Elvis (supposedly) died nearly forty years ago, he has lived on in our hearts, as a sound, as an image, and as an especially vigorous personality. In fact, it’s safe to say no other celebrity has done so quite as well. The Death and Resurrection of Elvis Presley is the story of that afterlife, of Elvis after he left the building. Walking the eccentrically carpeted rooms of Graceland, bidding into stratospheric sums on his auctioned relics, and mingling among the some 200,000 impersonators of his likeness, Ted Harrison offers nothing less than the ultimate Elvis tribute.             Harrison begins, of course, in pilgrimage: to Graceland. He shows how Elvis’s estate was pillaged nearly to ruin by his manager but was saved through the deft business acumen and financial vision of his divorced wife, one Priscilla Presley. If Graceland seems holy, that’s because it is: Harrison unveils in Elvis’s allure a deeply spiritual dimension, showing how Elvis fans, over the decades, have anointed their idol with Christ-like qualities. Through Elvis’s extravagance, Harrison raises fascinating links between money and faith, and through Elvis’s life, he shows how the King actually fulfilled a host of roles ranging from hero to martyr to saint. Underpinning the whole story is Elvis’s extraordinary charisma and—lest we forget—his astonishing musical genius.             Fascinating, colorful, and deeply informative, this book is a must-have for any fan, anyone who was ever lucky enough to see Elvis alive or who hopes they might still be able to.  


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Alaska Politics and Public Policy

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Politics in Alaska have changed significantly since the last major book on the subject was published more than twenty years ago, with the rise and fall of Sarah Palin and the rise and fall of oil prices being but two of the many developments to alter the political landscape. This book, the most comprehensive on the subject to date, focuses on the question of how beliefs, institutions, personalities, and power interact to shape Alaska politics and public policy. Drawing on these interactions, the contributors explain how and why certain issues get dealt with successfully and others unsuccessfully, and why some issues are taken up quickly while others are not addressed at all. This comprehensive guide to the political climate of Alaska will be essential to anyone studying the politics of America’s largest—and in some ways most unusual—state.


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Ageing and Globalisation

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Two of the most unprecedented transformations in the history of human social and economic life are currently underway. One, globalization, is the subject of tons of coverage and analysis. Relatively ignored, however, is the other one: the overall aging of the world’s population. This book offers the first in-depth look at the two forces in tandem, showing the many ways in which they interact and affect each other—and helping us for the first time fully to grasp the implications of both. This comprehensive introduction to globalization for gerontologists is part of the Ageing in a Global Context series, published in association with the British Society of Gerontology.


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Art of the Multitude

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Contemporary European public art often addresses the past and future of European unity, democracy, immigration, and civil rights. The Art of the Multitude explores how participation in art works affects the formation of public memory, the commemoration of historical events, and the creation of an urban landscape that articulates cultural identity and recognition. Looking in particular at the lifetime’s work of one of Europe’s foremost artists of the public realm, German conceptual artist Jochen Gerz, The Art of the Multitude uses a variety of artists’ works as fulcra for discussing the European experience of war and conflict, peace and reconciliation. And while the artworks discussed and implications thereof are certain to be of interest to art theorists and historians, cultural researchers in policy, public space, and the built environment will all find something to participate in or engage with.


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Architecture in Austria in the 20th and 21st Centuries

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Revised, updated, and expanded by nearly a hundred projects, this new edition of the catalog for the Architekturzentrum Wien’s permanent exhibition on Austrian architecture is the authoritative survey of the country’s architects, buildings, and styles. Featuring more than 2,300 images and plans, accompanied by explanatory texts—structured chronologically as well as thematically—the book points out both historical connections and contemporary movements. Including a timeline, an overview of all relevant media since 1836, brief biographies, and an index, this is the definitive reference for Austrian architecture during the last two centuries.  


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Agenda for Social Justice

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

The Agenda for Social Justice sheds light on some of the most pressing social problems in the contemporary United States and proposes public policy responses to those problems. Written by a highly respected team of contributors brought together by the Society for the Study of Social Problems at the University of Tennessee, it offers recommendations for key actions to be taken by elected officials, policy makers, and the public in advancing social justice. Of interest to scholars across a range of academic disciplines, from sociology to cultural studies, this book will also be an important resource for social justice advocates and activists.


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Concave Thoughts

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

The digital drawings of Yves Netzhammer invite viewers into a fascinating world of figures that appear both human and animal, while simultaneously blurring the distinction between object and living thing. By turns nightmarish or playful and cartoon-like, the creative cosmos depicted in Netzhammer’s drawings imagines an alternate reality, in which precise lines bind impossible combinations of objects with careful clarity.             Netzhammer ranks among the most renowned Swiss contemporary artists, his work comprising animation, video and sculptural installations, objects, and drawings. Concave Thoughts is a comprehensive resource on his work and imagery as well as an opulent art book.   


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Inside Crown Court

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Within the criminal justice systems of England and Wales, the Crown Court is the arena in which serious criminal offenses are prosecuted and sentenced. Based on up-to-date ethnographic research, including interviews and field observations, this timely book provides a vivid description of what it is like to attend court as a victim, a witness, or a defendant; the interplay between the different players in the courtroom; and the extent to which the court process is viewed as legitimate by those involved in it. While its research is focused on the Crown Court, the book’s findings are far from narrow. This valuable addition to the field brings to life the range of issues involved in jurisprudence and will be of great interest to students and scholars of criminal justice, policy makers and practitioners, and interested members of the general public the world over.


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Isidore of Seville and His Reception in the Early Middle Ages

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Isidore of Seville (560–636) was a crucial figure in the preservation and sharing of classical and early Christian knowledge. His compilations of the works of earlier authorities formed an essential part of monastic education for centuries. Due to the vast amount of information he gathered and its wide dissemination in the Middle Ages, Pope John Paul II even named Isidore the patron saint of the internet in 1997. This volume represents a cross-section of the various approaches scholars have taken toward Isidore’s writings. The essays explore his sources, how he selected and arranged them for posterity, and how his legacy was reflected in later generations’ work across the early medieval West. Rich in archival detail, this collection provides a wealth of interdisciplinary expertise on one of history’s greatest intellectuals.


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Indigenous Criminology

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Indigenous Criminology is the first book to explore indigenous peoples’ contact with criminal justice systems comprehensively in a contemporary and historical context. Drawing on comparative indigenous material from North America, Australia, and New Zealand, it both addresses the theoretical underpinnings of a specific indigenous criminology and explores this concept’s broader policy and practice implications for criminal justice at large. Written by leading criminologists specializing in indigenous peoples, Indigenous Criminology argues for the importance of indigenous knowledge and methodologies in shaping this field and suggests that the concept of colonialism is fundamental to understanding contemporary problems of criminology, such as deaths in custody, high imprisonment rates, police brutality, and the high levels of violence in some indigenous communities. Prioritizing the voices of indigenous peoples, this book will make a significant and lasting contribution to the decolonizing  of criminology.


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Imaging the City

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Imaging the City brings together the work of designers, artists, dancers, and media specialists who cross the borders of design and artistic practices to investigate how we perceive the city; how we imagine it; how we experience it; and how we might better design it. Breaking disciplinary boundaries, editors Steve Hawley, Edward Clift, and Kevin O’Brien provocatively open up the field of urban analysis and thought to the perspectives of creative professionals from non-urban disciplines. With a cast of contributors from across the globe, Imaging the City offers international insight for engaging with—and forecasting the future for—our cities.


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Impact of Losing Your Job

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Losing a job has always been understood as one of the most important causes of downward social mobility in modern societies. And it’s only gotten worse in recent years, as the weakening position of workers has made returning to the labor market even tougher. The Impact of Losing Your Job builds on findings from life course sociology to show clearly just what effects job loss has on income, family life, and future prospects. Key to Martin Ehlert’s analysis is a comparative look at the United States and Germany that enables him to show how different approaches to welfare state policies can ameliorate the effects of job loss—but can at the same time make labor insecurity more common.


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Imprisonment Worldwide

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

How many people are imprisoned across the globe? What factors can help explain variations in the use of imprisonment in different countries? What ethical considerations should apply to the way imprisonment is used? Providing a comprehensive account of prison populations the world over, this international book links prison statistics from the past fifteen years with insights from four well-respected experts on how prisons and prison populations are managed and the implications of these management techniques moving forward. Together, the authors shed light on what is meant by an ethical approach to the use of imprisonment and how such an approach can be sustained in ever more challenging social, economic, and political environments. Clear, concise, and featuring informative infographics, Imprisonment Worldwide is an engaging, critical contribution to current debates about prisons and the use and abuse of imprisonment. Not only an essential resource for scholars of criminology, law, political science, and public policy, it will also deepen the understanding of policy makers, prison professionals, activists, and the general public on this vital issue of modern society.


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In Their Own Words

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

“The war had begun and my heart beat then as it had neverbeaten before.”—Rosie Neal on the outbreak of war, 1914 “Soon the wounded began to arrive: some walking, some carried, some just helped along; the usual bloody, patient, battered crowd.”—Lawrence Gameson at the Battle of the Somme 1916 “There was a huge sheet of flame, and then the awful pall of yellow smoke, and the ship was gone. There were no survivors.”—Kit Caslon, the Battle of Jutland, 1916 World War I was arguably the defining event of the twentieth century. Claiming the lives of over sixteen million people across the globe, it had an enormous impact on every country, city, and person who experienced it. No nation in Europe was left untouched—even neutral states felt its devastating impact. Yet as In Their Own Words reveals, it was truly the ordinary people who were most affected by the war, such as citizens like Flora Sandes, the only British woman to serve in the military; Captain V.D. Siddons, who served with the RFC in Arabia supporting T.E. Lawrence; and Sidney Lewis, who, at twelve, was the youngest boy soldier in the army. In Their Own Words offers a gripping, poignant collection of memories that tell the story of World War I from the perspective of those who were there, using letters, diaries, and memoirs from the Imperial War Museum’s unparalleled archives. 


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Landscape and Englishness

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

As David Matless argues in this book—updated in this accessible, pocket edition—landscape has been central to definitions of Englishness for centuries. It is the aspect of English life where visions of the past, present, and future have met in debates over questions of national identity, disputes over history and modernity, and ideals of citizenship and the body. Extensively illustrated, Landscape and Englishness explores just how important the aesthetics of Britain’s cities and countryside have been to its people. Matless examines a wide range of material, including topographical guides, health manuals, paintings, poetry, architectural polemics, photography, nature guides, and novels. Taking readers to the interwar period, he explores how England negotiated the modern and traditional, the urban and rural, the progressive and preservationist, in its decisions over how to develop the countryside, re-plan cities, and support various cultures of leisure and citizenship. Tracing the role of landscape to Englishness from then up until the present day, he shows how familiar notions of heritage in landscape are products of the immediate post-war era, and he unveils how the present always resonates with the past. 


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Locating Localism

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

In the wake of many decades of increasing centralization, localism has been making a decided comeback in recent years. This book explores the development of localism as a new mode of statecraft and its implications for the everyday practice of citizenship. Jane Wills highlights the importance of civic infrastructure to effective engagement of citizens in local decision making, looks at the development of community organizing, neighborhood planning, and community councils, and positions this turn to the local in relationship to the longer geopolitical history of the British state.


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Locating Localism

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

In the wake of many decades of increasing centralization, localism has been making a decided comeback in recent years. This book explores the development of localism as a new mode of statecraft and its implications for the everyday practice of citizenship. Jane Wills highlights the importance of civic infrastructure to effective engagement of citizens in local decision making, looks at the development of community organizing, neighborhood planning, and community councils, and positions this turn to the local in relationship to the longer geopolitical history of the British state.


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Leftover Women

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

In the early years of the People’s Republic of China, the Communist Party sought to transform gender relations, but those gains have been steadily eroded in recent decades during China’s transition to a post-socialist era. In fact, women in China have experienced a dramatic rollback of rights and gains relative to men. In Leftover Women, journalist Leta Hong-Fincher exposes shocking levels of structural discrimination against women and highlights the broader damage this has caused to China’s economy, politics, and development.   Drawing on cutting-edge data from a Sina Weibo survey of over three hundred men and women as well as in-depth interviews with both men and women in China over several years, Leftover Women debunks several major myths about the status of women in China’s post-socialist period. In this thoroughly expanded second edition, Hong-Fincher builds on her earlier work to examine new developments, most notably China’s growing and increasingly assertive feminist movement, and she looks ahead to consider the implications of these developments for the future of China and its ruling regime.    The first book to offer a unique, inside view of educated women in China’s emerging middle class, Leftover Women provides an insightful analysis of the realities women in China face today.



Liquid Continent

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

This omnibus edition brings together Nicholas Woodsworth’s critically acclaimed Mediterranean trilogy into a single volume for the first time, allowing readers to fully appreciate the scope of Woodsworth’s search for a distinctively Mediterranean “cosmopolitanism.” Combining travel narrative, history, and reflection on contemporary lives and cultures, Woodsworth finds an intimacy, a garrulous warmth, and an extraordinary sociability as he travels from Alexandria through Venice and finally installs himself in a former Benedictine monastery in Istanbul overlooking the Golden Horn. Responding to this experience, he argues that the sea should not be seen as an empty space surrounded by Europe, Asia, and Africa, but rather as a single entity, a place from whose coastlines people look inwards over the water to each other—for it has its own cities, its own life, its own way of being.  


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Value of Labor

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

At the heart of today’s fierce political anger over income inequality is a feature of capitalism that Karl Marx famously obsessed over: the commodification of labor. Most of us think wage-labor economics is at odds with socialist thinking, but as Martha Lampland explains in this fascinating look at twentieth-century Hungary, there have been moments when such economics actually flourished under socialist regimes. Exploring the region’s transition from a capitalist to a socialist system—and the economic science and practices that endured it—she sheds new light on the two most polarized ideologies of modern history.             Lampland trains her eye on the scientific claims of modern economic modeling, using Hungary’s unique vantage point to show how theories, policies, and techniques for commodifying agrarian labor that were born in the capitalist era were adopted by the socialist regime as a scientifically designed wage system on cooperative farms. Paying attention to the specific historical circumstances of Hungary, she explores the ways economists and the abstract notions they traffic in can both shape and be shaped by local conditions, and she compellingly shows how labor can be commodified in the absence of a labor market. The result is a unique account of economic thought that unveils hidden but necessary continuities running through the turbulent twentieth century.   


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Feminisms

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

This collection brings together an exciting group of established and emerging scholars to consider the history of feminist film theory and new developments in the field and in film culture itself. Opening the field up to urgent questions and covering such topics as new experimental film, the digital image, consumerism, activism, and pornography, Feminisms will be essential reading for scholars of both film and feminism.


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Filming the City

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Filming the City brings together the work of filmmakers, architects, designers, video artists, and media specialists to provide three distinct prisms through which to examine the medium of film in the context of the city. The book presents commentaries on particular films and their social and urban relevance, offering contemporary criticisms of both film and urbanism from conflicting perspectives, and documenting examples of how to actively use the medium of film in the design of our cities, spaces and buildings. Bringing a diverse set of contributors to the collection, editors Edward Clift, Ari Mattes, and Mirko Guaralda offer readers a new approach to understanding the complex, multilayered interaction of urban design and film.


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Counternarrative Possibilities

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Counternarrative Possibilities reads Cormac McCarthy’s westerns against the backdrop of American mythology’s two formative national tropes: virgin land (from the 1950s) and homeland (after 9/11). Looking at McCarthy’s westerns in the context of American studies, James Dorson shows how his books counter the national narratives underlying these tropes and reinvest them with new, potentially transformative meaning. Departing from prevailing accounts of McCarthy that place him in relation to his literary antecedents, Counternarrative Possibilities takes a forward-looking approach that reads McCarthy’s work as a key influence on millennial fiction. Weaving together disciplinary history with longstanding debates over the relationship between aesthetics and politics, this book is at once an exploration of the limits of ideology critique in the twenty-first century and a timely, original reconsideration of McCarthy’s work after postmodernism.


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Cage in Search of a Bird

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Laura Wilmote is a television journalist living in Paris. Her life couldn’t be better—a stimulating job, a loving boyfriend, interesting friends—until her phone rings in the middle of one night. It is C., an old school friend whom Laura recently helped find a job at the same television station: “My phone rang. I knew right away it was you.” Thus begins the story of C.’s unrelenting, obsessive, incurable love/hatred of Laura. She is convinced that Laura shares her love, but cannot—or will not—admit it. C. begins to dress as Laura, to make her friends and family her own, and even succeeds in working alongside Laura on the unique program that is Laura’s signature achievement. The obsession escalates, yet is artfully hidden. It is Laura who is perceived as the aggressor at work, Laura who appears unwell, Laura who is losing it. Even Laura’s adoring boyfriend begins to question her. Laura seeks the counsel of a psychiatrist who diagnoses C. with De Clérambault syndrome—she is convinced that Laura is in love with her. And worse, the syndrome can only end in one of two ways: the death of the patient, or that of the object of the obsession.A Cage in Search of a Bird is the gripping story of two women caught in the vise of a terrible delusion. Florence Noiville brilliantly narrates this story of obsession and one woman’s attempts to escape the irrational love of another—an inescapable, never-ending love, a love that can only end badly.


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Companion to Crime, Harm and Victimisation

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Succinct, accessible, and comprehensive, this book is the first to provide definitions and explanations of key terms and concepts from the expanding field of crime, harm, and victimization. Contributions from a wide range of experts investigate theories, ideas, and case studies relating to victims of conventional crime and victims outside the remit of criminal law. The book explores both the domestic and international nature, extent, and measurement of crime and harm as well as responses to victims and victimization in connection with conventional, corporate, and state crimes and harms. As part of Policy’s Companions series, entries are presented in a user-friendly, quick-reference A‒Z format that clearly notes related sections and provides suggestions for further reading.


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Cathedrals for Garbage

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

We tend not think about the waste created by our modern consumer society: millions of tons of garbage, slag, and tanks filled with waste oil left over after the refining process. But for more than thirty years, artist and social activist Winfried Baumann has encouraged us to think about just these things by making them the focal point of his sculptures and other large-scale installations.             With Cathedrals for Garbage, Baumann presents an extensive series of cutting-edge concepts for the construction of waste-disposal plants and other solutions for dealing with the crushing volume of waste that could grow to threaten the survival of civilized society. Focusing on large urban spaces and drawing on his dual knowledge of architecture and art, Baumann makes a compelling argument for why urban planning must incorporate social responsibility.  


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China Rediscovered

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

This richly illustrated book showcases a previously unseen and virtually unknown historical collection of Chinese ceramics, formed in the early twentieth century by George Eumorfopoulos, a pivotal figure in the appreciation of Asian art. Taken together, these artifacts, now located at the Benaki Museum in Athens, Greece, build a rare time capsule of Western tastes and preoccupations with the East in the decades prior to World War II. The years between the collapse of the Qing dynasty in 1911 and the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949 marked an opening up of China to the rest of the world and coincided with the first archaeological excavations of the country’s early cultures. Working at the time in London, a center of imperialist power and global finance, Eumorfopoulos and his colleagues were instrumental in acquiring, assessing, interpreting, and manipulating the unearthed objects. The years of isolation that followed this period allowed aspects of his approach to become canonical, influencing later scholarly research on Chinese material culture. This groundbreaking exploration of approximately one hundred artifacts is not only an important account of Eumorfopoulos’s work, but also a story about China and the West—and the role of these antique materials in their cultural interplay.  


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Global Financial Crisis and Austerity

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Given the far-reaching impact of both the 2008 financial crash and postcrash austerity policies on so many people’s lives, there exists a need for a succinct, straightforward guide to the situation’s causes and its long-term significance. The Global Financial Crisis and Austerity fulfills that need. Written by an expert in political science, this book spans the fields of finance, economics, and politics to demystify the sometimes arcane world of global finance, such as the shadow banking system, and put the recent financial crisis in its historical context. Addressing a number of themes that economists writing on the crisis tend to neglect, David Clark not only outlines the policy responses of Western governments to the crash, the ensuing recession, and in their turn to austerity, but also reviews the crash’s larger legacy and asks if the crisis is really over. Supplementing his discussion with a glossary of key terms, processes, and institutions, Clark provides an invaluable overview for all of us affected by the crash, offering a range of possible scenarios for the future.


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Weltanschauung as an Ersatz Gestalt

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Jan Turnovský (1942–95) was a renowned architect and architectural theoretician. An exceptionally dedicated teacher and researcher throughout his tenure at the Vienna University of Technology’s Institute for Architecture and Design, he was also the author of the boldly original Poetics of a Wall Projection, where he explores architecture’s many rich layers of meaning. Turnovský’s thinking has been highly influential for generations of Austrian architects, but relatively little documentation remains from his early career, including his nascent forays into architectural theory.            The Weltanschauung as an Ersatz Gestalt was Turnovský’s thesis, written in 1978 as a requirement to complete his studies at the Architectural Association School of Architecture in London. For more than thirty years, it has remained unpublished—until now.  This facsimile publication sheds new light on the development of his theoretical trajectory by revealing Turnovský’s interest in the philosophy of “open systems” as proposed by the Italian novelist and semiotician Umberto Eco. Turnovský applies the logic of open systems to the architectural design process, which allows for a personalized perception that may differ from both the collective experience and the creator’s artistic vision. Drawing on this novel theoretical approach, Turnovský offers a new critical assessment of three widely accepted architectural practices of the time: numerical aesthetics, ideology, and semiology. A fascinating work by a major figure in contemporary architecture, The Weltanschauung a[...]


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Water and Asphalt

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

The series UFO: Explorations of Urbanism aims to fill a gap in the contemporary debate concerning urbanism by offering case studies that document and critically analyze a global spectrum of changing urban conditions in interaction with the continuous adaptation of urbanism and offer alternatives to contemporary mainstream urban projects.Water and Asphalt, the latest volume in the series, investigates the metropolitan area of Venice with regard to the increasing separation of residential and industrial neighborhoods. The densely populated region, criss-crossed by networks of roads and waterways, provides the ideal the test case for imagining the concept termed by this study as the “Project of Isotropy.” The researchers argue that conditions now exist for re-devising the isotropic space in Venice with a focus on the water system, roads and public transport, alternative mobility, forms of diffused welfare, innovative agriculture, and the decentralized production of energy.  


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We Kill Because We Can

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

We live in an age of drone warfare, where the attacks on targets deemed to be threatening happens remotely. The decisions to kill are made covertly in rooms far away from the target, and we can now kill without being personally present. Killing has become all too easy and convenient. As a result, argues Laurie Calhoun in this provocative book, self-defense has become conflated with outright aggression, and black ops have become the standard military operating procedure.   In this remarkable and often-shocking book, Calhoun dissects the moral, psychological, and cultural impact that these drone killings are having on modern society. In We Kill Because We Can she draws powerful, thought-provoking parallels between drone operators and mafia hitmen as well as the Trayvon Martin case and the killing of a teen in Yemen by drone. The result is a timely and provoking analysis of Western foreign policy and its disturbing use of remote-controlled death. "The drone assassination campaign is the most extraordinary global terror campaign yet conceived and executed. This chilling and comprehensive survey more than amply demonstrates that drone strikes are war crimes, and that this new technology is not only an effective device of mass murder at a distance, but that it also eliminates barriers for commanders to 'prosecute wars at their caprice.' That the technology will sooner or later be directed against the perpetrators is hardly in doubt, as the cycle of violence takes its predictable course."--Noam Chomsky


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Ebola

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

In 2013, the largest Ebola outbreak in history swept across West Africa, claiming thousands of lives in Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea and sending the international community into panic. By 2014, experts were grimly predicting that millions would be infected within months, and a huge international control effort was mounted to contain the virus. Yet paradoxically, at this point the disease was already going into decline in Africa itself. Why did outside observers get it so wrong? Paul Richards draws on his extensive firsthand experience in Sierra Leone to argue that the international community’s alarmed response failed to take account of local expertise and common sense. Crucially, Richards shows that the humanitarian response to the disease was most effective in those areas where it supported community initiatives already in place, such as giving local people agency in terms of disposing of bodies. In turn, the international response dangerously hampered recovery when it ignored or disregarded local knowledge. One of the first books to provide an in-depth analysis of the recent pandemic, Ebola offers a clear-eyed account of how and why the disease spread, and why the predictions of international commentators were so misguided. By learning from these mistakes and successes, we can better understand how to harness the power of local communities during future humanitarian health crises.  


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Ammassalik Eskimo

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

This is the facsimile edition of the second half-volume of the second part of William Thalbitzer's seminal and pioneering ethnographic study of the native tribes living in and around the Ammassalik area on the east coast of Greenland around the turn of the 20th century. 



Tackling Child Sexual Abuse

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

This bracing book makes a forceful case for reinvigorating our efforts to address and prevent childhood sexual abuse. In recent years, Sarah Nelson argues, the fight against childhood sexual abuse has been complacent, or even fearful. She attacks the causes of this head-on, reassessing backlashes like that surrounding the “satanic panic” and arguing that policy makers, practitioners, and academics have a duty to move beyond such problems and address the real issue. To that end, she proposes new models for child-centered, perpetrator-focused protection, community prevention, and working with survivor-offenders. Sure to be controversial, Preventing Child Sexual Abuse will challenge—and galvanize—the field.


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Tackling Child Sexual Abuse

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

This bracing book makes a forceful case for reinvigorating our efforts to address and prevent childhood sexual abuse. In recent years, Sarah Nelson argues, the fight against childhood sexual abuse has been complacent, or even fearful. She attacks the causes of this head-on, reassessing backlashes like that surrounding the “satanic panic” and arguing that policy makers, practitioners, and academics have a duty to move beyond such problems and address the real issue. To that end, she proposes new models for child-centered, perpetrator-focused protection, community prevention, and working with survivor-offenders. Sure to be controversial, Preventing Child Sexual Abuse will challenge—and galvanize—the field.


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Transparency and the Open Society

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Although greater transparency is increasingly seen as the answer to a wide range of social issues by governments, NGOs, and businesses around the world, evidence of its impact is mixed. Using case studies from around the world—including the United States, the United Kingdom, India, and Tanzania—this book surveys the global adoption of transparency, providing an essential framework for assessing its likely performance as a policy and the steps that can be taken to make it more effective. Addressing the role of transparency in the context of the growing use of surveillance and database-driven decision making, it is written for anyone, both in and outside of government and business, involved in campaigning for the development of transparency policies.


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Turkey

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Turkey is a nation of contradictions and contrasts. Though considered democratic, the Erdogan government has increasingly begun to resemble a dictatorship, jailing it opponents and violently suppressing dissent. And though Turkey is notionally secular, the Justice and Development Party’s power has fed the creeping influence of religious conservatism, with figures in the party denouncing abortion rights and attempting to criminalize adultery. Having long occupied an uneasy middle ground between a secular West and Islamic East, Turkey has been drawn into the conflicts of its neighbors, including the Arab Spring, the Syrian civil war, and the rise of ISIS. In this fascinating portrait of a nation in turmoil, the renowned Turkish journalist and novelist Ece Temelkuran provides a vivid and deeply personal account of the crisis afflicting modern Turkey.   Temelkuran identifies a long-running culture of repression and authoritarianism that has plagued Turkey throughout its history, a culture she traces back to the fall of the Ottomans and the continued climate of denial around the Armenian genocide. But, she firmly believes there is still a strong voice of dissent in Turkey, and she argues that the Gezi Park protests of 2013 represented a glimmer of hope that has not yet been fully extinguished and may still grow to rejuvenate democracy in the country. Providing unique insight into Turkey’s ongoing political turmoil, this is a timely look at a coun[...]


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Trees, Woods and Forests

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Forests—and the trees within them—have always been a central resource for the development of technology, culture, and the expansion of humans as a species. Examining and challenging our historical and modern attitudes toward wooded environments, this engaging book explores how our understanding of forests has transformed in recent years and how it fits in our continuing anxiety about our impact on the natural world.             Drawing on the most recent work of historians, ecologist geographers, botanists, and forestry professionals, Charles Watkins reveals how established ideas about trees—such as the spread of continuous dense forests across the whole of Europe after the Ice Age—have been questioned and even overturned by archaeological and historical research. He shows how concern over woodland loss in Europe is not well founded—especially while tropical forests elsewhere continue to be cleared—and he unpicks the variety of values and meanings different societies have ascribed to the arboreal. Altogether, he provides a comprehensive, interdisciplinary overview of humankind’s interaction with this abused but valuable resource.  


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News

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

For over thirty years, News: The Politics of Illusion has not simply reflected the political communication field—it has played a major role in shaping it. Today, the familiar news organizations of the legacy press are operating in a fragmenting and expanding mediaverse that resembles a big bang of proliferating online competitors that are challenging the very definition of news itself. Audience-powered sites such as the Huffington Post and Vox blend conventional political reporting with opinion blogs, celebrity gossip, and other ephemera aimed at getting clicks and shares. At the same time, the rise of serious investigative organizations such as ProPublica presents yet a different challenge to legacy journalism. Lance Bennett’s thoroughly revised tenth edition offers the most up-to-date guide to understanding how and why the media and news landscapes are being transformed. It explains the mix of old and new, and points to possible outcomes. Where areas of change are clearly established, key concepts from earlier editions have been revised. There are new case studies, updates on old favorites, and insightful analyses of how the new media system and novel kinds of information and engagement are affecting our politics. As always, News presents fresh evidence and arguments that invite new ways of thinking about the political information system and its place in democracy.  


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Influences

Wed, 14 Sep 2016 05:00:00 GMT

Today few would think of astronomy and astrology as fields related to theology. Fewer still would know that physically absorbing planetary rays was once considered to have medical and psychological effects. But this was the understanding of light radiation held by certain natural philosophers of early modern Europe, and that, argues Mary Quinlan-McGrath, was why educated people of the Renaissance commissioned artworks centered on astrological themes and practices. Influences is the first book to reveal how important Renaissance artworks were designed to be not only beautiful but also—perhaps even primarily—functional. From the fresco cycles at Caprarola, to the Vatican’s Sala dei Pontefici, to the Villa Farnesina, these great works were commissioned to selectively capture and then transmit celestial radiation, influencing the bodies and minds of their audiences. Quinlan-McGrath examines the sophisticated logic behind these theories and practices and, along the way, sheds light on early creation theory; the relationship between astrology and natural theology; and the protochemistry, physics, and mathematics of rays. An original and intellectually stimulating study, Influences adds a new dimension to the understanding of aesthetics among Renaissance patrons and a new meaning to the seductive powers of art.  


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