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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

 



Guitar Makers

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

It whispers, it sings, it rocks, and it howls. It expresses the voice of the folk—the open road, freedom, protest and rebellion, youth and love. It is the acoustic guitar. And over the last five decades it has become a quintessential American icon. Because this musical instrument is significant to so many—in ways that are emotional, cultural, and economic—guitar making has experienced a renaissance in North America, both as a popular hobby and, for some, a way of life. In Guitar Makers, Kathryn Marie Dudley introduces us to builders of artisanal guitars, their place in the art world, and the specialized knowledge they’ve developed. Drawing on in-depth interviews with members of the lutherie community, she finds that guitar making is a social movement with political implications.  Guitars are not simply made—they are born.  Artisans listen to their wood, respond to its liveliness, and strive to endow each instrument with an unforgettable tone. Although professional luthiers work within a market society, Dudley observes that their overriding sentiment is passion and love of the craft. Guitar makers are not aiming for quick turnover or the low-cost reproduction of commodities but the creation of singular instruments with unique qualities, and face-to-face transactions between makers, buyers, and dealers are commonplace. In an era when technological change has pushed skilled artisanship to the margins of the global economy, and in the midst of a capitalist system that places a premium on ever faster and more efficient modes of commerce, Dudley shows us how artisanal guitar makers have carved out a unique world that operates on alternative, more humane, and ecologically sustainable terms.


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Who Cleans the Park?

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

America’s public parks are in a golden age. Hundreds of millions of dollars—both public and private—fund urban jewels like Manhattan’s Central Park. Keeping the polish on landmark parks and in neighborhood playgrounds alike means that the trash must be picked up, benches painted, equipment tested, and leaves raked. Bringing this often-invisible work into view, however, raises profound questions for citizens of cities. In Who Cleans the Park? John Krinsky and Maud Simonet explain that the work of maintaining parks has intersected with broader trends in welfare reform, civic engagement, criminal justice, and the rise of public-private partnerships. Welfare-to-work trainees, volunteers, unionized city workers (sometimes working outside their official job descriptions), staff of nonprofit park “conservancies,” and people sentenced to community service are just a few of the groups who routinely maintain parks. With public services no longer being provided primarily by public workers, Krinsky and Simonet argue, the nature of public work must be reevaluated. Based on four years of fieldwork in New York City, Who Cleans the Park? looks at the transformation of public parks from the ground up. Beginning with studying changes in the workplace, progressing through the public-private partnerships that help maintain the parks, and culminating in an investigation of a park’s contribution to urban real-estate values, the book unearths a new urban order based on nonprofit partnerships and a rhetoric of responsible citizenship, which at the same time promotes unpaid work, reinforces workers’ domination at the workplace, and increases the value of park-side property. Who Cleans the Park? asks difficult questions about who benefits from public work, ultimately forcing us to think anew about the way we govern ourselves, with implications well beyond the five boroughs.


Media Files:
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Who Cleans the Park?

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

America’s public parks are in a golden age. Hundreds of millions of dollars—both public and private—fund urban jewels like Manhattan’s Central Park. Keeping the polish on landmark parks and in neighborhood playgrounds alike means that the trash must be picked up, benches painted, equipment tested, and leaves raked. Bringing this often-invisible work into view, however, raises profound questions for citizens of cities. In Who Cleans the Park? John Krinsky and Maud Simonet explain that the work of maintaining parks has intersected with broader trends in welfare reform, civic engagement, criminal justice, and the rise of public-private partnerships. Welfare-to-work trainees, volunteers, unionized city workers (sometimes working outside their official job descriptions), staff of nonprofit park “conservancies,” and people sentenced to community service are just a few of the groups who routinely maintain parks. With public services no longer being provided primarily by public workers, Krinsky and Simonet argue, the nature of public work must be reevaluated. Based on four years of fieldwork in New York City, Who Cleans the Park? looks at the transformation of public parks from the ground up. Beginning with studying changes in the workplace, progressing through the public-private partnerships that help maintain the parks, and culminating in an investigation of a park’s contribution to urban real-estate values, the book unearths a new urban order based on nonprofit partnerships and a rhetoric of responsible citizenship, which at the same time promotes unpaid work, reinforces workers’ domination at the workplace, and increases the value of park-side property. Who Cleans the Park? asks difficult questions about who benefits from public work, ultimately forcing us to think anew about the way we govern ourselves, with implications well beyond the five boroughs.


Media Files:
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What Is an Event?

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

We live in a world of breaking news, where at almost any moment our everyday routine can be interrupted by a faraway event. Events are central to the way that individuals and societies experience life. Even life’s inevitable moments—birth, death, love, and war—are almost always a surprise. Inspired by the cataclysmic events of September 11, Robin Wagner-Pacifici presents here a tour de force, an analysis of how events erupt and take off from the ground of ongoing, everyday life, and how they then move across time and landscape.What Is an Event? ranges across several disciplines, systematically analyzing the ways that events emerge, take shape, gain momentum, flow, and even get bogged down. As an exploration of how events are constructed out of ruptures, it provides a mechanism for understanding eventful forms and flows, from the micro-level of individual life events to the macro-level of historical revolutions, contemporary terrorist attacks, and financial crises. Wagner-Pacifici takes a close look at a number of cases, both real and imagined, through the reports, personal narratives, paintings, iconic images, political posters, sculptures, and novels they generate and through which they live on. What is ultimately at stake for individuals and societies in events, Wagner-Pacifici argues, are identities, loyalties, social relationships, and our very experiences of time and space. What Is an Event? provides a way for us all—as social and political beings living through events, and as analysts reflecting upon them—to better understand what is at stake in the formations and flows of the events that mark and shape our lives.


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What Is an Event?

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

We live in a world of breaking news, where at almost any moment our everyday routine can be interrupted by a faraway event. Events are central to the way that individuals and societies experience life. Even life’s inevitable moments—birth, death, love, and war—are almost always a surprise. Inspired by the cataclysmic events of September 11, Robin Wagner-Pacifici presents here a tour de force, an analysis of how events erupt and take off from the ground of ongoing, everyday life, and how they then move across time and landscape.What Is an Event? ranges across several disciplines, systematically analyzing the ways that events emerge, take shape, gain momentum, flow, and even get bogged down. As an exploration of how events are constructed out of ruptures, it provides a mechanism for understanding eventful forms and flows, from the micro-level of individual life events to the macro-level of historical revolutions, contemporary terrorist attacks, and financial crises. Wagner-Pacifici takes a close look at a number of cases, both real and imagined, through the reports, personal narratives, paintings, iconic images, political posters, sculptures, and novels they generate and through which they live on. What is ultimately at stake for individuals and societies in events, Wagner-Pacifici argues, are identities, loyalties, social relationships, and our very experiences of time and space. What Is an Event? provides a way for us all—as social and political beings living through events, and as analysts reflecting upon them—to better understand what is at stake in the formations and flows of the events that mark and shape our lives.


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Varieties of Social Imagination

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In July 2009, the American Journal of Sociology (AJS) began publishing book reviews by an individual writing as Barbara Celarent, professor of particularity at the University of Atlantis. Mysterious in origin, Celarent’s essays taken together provide a broad introduction to social thinking. Through the close reading of important texts, Celarent’s short, informative, and analytic essays engaged with long traditions of social thought across the globe—from India, Brazil, and China to South Africa, Turkey, and Peru. . . and occasionally the United States and Europe. Sociologist and AJS editor Andrew Abbott edited the Celarent essays, and in Varieties of Social Imagination, he brings the work together for the first time. Previously available only in the journal, the thirty-six meditations found here allow readers not only to engage more deeply with a diversity of thinkers from the past, but to imagine more fully a sociology—and a broader social science—for the future.


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Varieties of Social Imagination

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In July 2009, the American Journal of Sociology (AJS) began publishing book reviews by an individual writing as Barbara Celarent, professor of particularity at the University of Atlantis. Mysterious in origin, Celarent’s essays taken together provide a broad introduction to social thinking. Through the close reading of important texts, Celarent’s short, informative, and analytic essays engaged with long traditions of social thought across the globe—from India, Brazil, and China to South Africa, Turkey, and Peru. . . and occasionally the United States and Europe. Sociologist and AJS editor Andrew Abbott edited the Celarent essays, and in Varieties of Social Imagination, he brings the work together for the first time. Previously available only in the journal, the thirty-six meditations found here allow readers not only to engage more deeply with a diversity of thinkers from the past, but to imagine more fully a sociology—and a broader social science—for the future.


Media Files:
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Politics of Scale

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Rangelands are vast, making up one quarter of the United States and forty percent of the Earth’s ice-free land. And while contemporary science has revealed a great deal about the environmental impacts associated with intensive livestock production—from greenhouse gas emissions to land and water degradation—far less is known about the historic role science has played in rangeland management and politics. Steeped in US soil, this first history of rangeland science looks to the origins of rangeland ecology in the late nineteenth-century American West, exploring the larger political and economic forces that—together with scientific study—produced legacies focused on immediate economic success rather than long-term ecological well being. During the late 1880s and early 1890s, a variety of forces—from the Homestead Act of 1862 to the extermination of bison, foreign investment, and lack of government regulation—promoted free-for-all access to and development of the western range, with disastrous environmental consequences. To address the crisis, government agencies turned to scientists, but as Nathan F. Sayre shows, range science grew in a politically fraught landscape. Neither the scientists nor the public agencies could escape the influences of bureaucrats and ranchers who demanded results, and the ideas that became scientific orthodoxy—from fire suppression and predator control to fencing and carrying capacities—contained flaws and blind spots that plague public debates about rangelands to this day. Looking at the global history of rangeland science through the Cold War and beyond, The Politics of Scale identifies the sources of past conflicts and mistakes and helps us to see a more promising path forward, one in which rangeland science is guided less by capital and the state and more by communities working in collaboration with scientists.


Media Files:
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Politics of Scale

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Rangelands are vast, making up one quarter of the United States and forty percent of the Earth’s ice-free land. And while contemporary science has revealed a great deal about the environmental impacts associated with intensive livestock production—from greenhouse gas emissions to land and water degradation—far less is known about the historic role science has played in rangeland management and politics. Steeped in US soil, this first history of rangeland science looks to the origins of rangeland ecology in the late nineteenth-century American West, exploring the larger political and economic forces that—together with scientific study—produced legacies focused on immediate economic success rather than long-term ecological well being. During the late 1880s and early 1890s, a variety of forces—from the Homestead Act of 1862 to the extermination of bison, foreign investment, and lack of government regulation—promoted free-for-all access to and development of the western range, with disastrous environmental consequences. To address the crisis, government agencies turned to scientists, but as Nathan F. Sayre shows, range science grew in a politically fraught landscape. Neither the scientists nor the public agencies could escape the influences of bureaucrats and ranchers who demanded results, and the ideas that became scientific orthodoxy—from fire suppression and predator control to fencing and carrying capacities—contained flaws and blind spots that plague public debates about rangelands to this day. Looking at the global history of rangeland science through the Cold War and beyond, The Politics of Scale identifies the sources of past conflicts and mistakes and helps us to see a more promising path forward, one in which rangeland science is guided less by capital and the state and more by communities working in collaboration with scientists.


Media Files:
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Picturing America

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Instructive, amusing, colorful—pictorial maps have been used and admired since the first medieval cartographer put pen to paper depicting mountains and trees across countries, people and objects around margins, and sea monsters in oceans. More recent generations of pictorial map artists have continued that traditional mixture of whimsy and fact, combining cartographic elements with text and images and featuring bold and arresting designs, bright and cheerful colors, and lively detail. In the United States, the art form flourished from the 1920s through the 1970s, when thousands of innovative maps were mass-produced for use as advertisements and decorative objects—the golden age of American pictorial maps.  Picturing America is the first book to showcase this vivid and popular genre of maps. Geographer Stephen J. Hornsby gathers together 158 delightful pictorial jewels, most drawn from the extensive collections of the Library of Congress. In his informative introduction, Hornsby outlines the development of the cartographic form, identifies several representative artists, describes the process of creating a pictorial map, and considers the significance of the form in the history of Western cartography. Organized into six thematic sections, Picturing America covers a vast swath of the pictorial map tradition during its golden age, ranging from “Maps to Amuse” to “Maps for War.” Hornsby has unearthed the most fascinating and visually striking maps the United States has to offer: Disney cartoon maps, college campus maps, kooky state tourism ads, World War II promotional posters, and many more. This remarkable, charming volume’s glorious full­-color pictorial maps will be irresistible to any map lover or armchair traveler.


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How to Tame a Fox (and Build a Dog)

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Tucked away in Siberia, there are furry, four-legged creatures with wagging tails and floppy ears that are as docile and friendly as any lapdog. But, despite appearances, these are not dogs—they are foxes. They are the result of the most astonishing experiment in breeding ever undertaken—imagine speeding up thousands of years of evolution into a few decades. In 1959, biologists Dmitri Belyaev and Lyudmila Trut set out to do just that, by starting with a few dozen silver foxes from fox farms in the USSR and attempting to recreate the evolution of wolves into dogs in real time in order to witness the process of domestication. This is the extraordinary, untold story of this remarkable undertaking. Most accounts of the natural evolution of wolves place it over a span of about 15,000 years, but within a decade, Belyaev and Trut’s fox breeding experiments had resulted in puppy-like foxes with floppy ears, piebald spots, and curly tails. Along with these physical changes came genetic and behavioral changes, as well. The foxes were bred using selection criteria for tameness, and with each generation, they became increasingly interested in human companionship. Trut has been there the whole time, and has been the lead scientist on this work since Belyaev’s death in 1985, and with Lee Dugatkin, biologist and science writer, she tells the story of the adventure, science, politics, and love behind it all.  In How to Tame a Fox, Dugatkin and Trut take us inside this path-breaking experiment in the midst of the brutal winters of Siberia to reveal how scientific history is made and continues to be made today. To date, fifty-six generations of foxes have been domesticated, and we continue to learn significant lessons from them about the genetic and behavioral evolution of domesticated animals. How to Tame a Fox offers an incredible tale of scientists at work, while also celebrating the deep attachments that have brought humans and animals together throughout time.


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After the Flood

Thu, 23 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The past three decades have been characterized by vast change and crises in global financial markets—and not in politically unstable countries but in the heart of the developed world, from the Great Recession in the United States to the banking crises in Japan and the Eurozone. As we try to make sense of what caused these crises and how we might reduce risk factors and prevent recurrence, the fields of finance and economics have also seen vast change, as scholars and researchers have advanced their thinking to better respond to the recent crises. A momentous collection of the best recent scholarship, After the Flood illustrates both the scope of the crises’ impact on our understanding of global financial markets and the innovative processes whereby scholars have adapted their research to gain a greater understanding of them. Among the contributors are José Scheinkman and Lars Peter Hansen, who bring up to date decades of collaborative research on the mechanisms that tie financial markets to the broader economy; Patrick Bolton, who argues that limiting bankers’ pay may be more effective than limiting the activities they can undertake; Edward Glaeser and Bruce Sacerdote, who study the social dynamics of markets; and E. Glen Weyl, who argues that economists are influenced by the incentives their consulting opportunities create.  


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Drones and the Future of Armed Conflict

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

During the past decade, armed drones have entered the American military arsenal as a core tactic for countering terrorism. When coupled with access to reliable information, they make it possible to deploy lethal force accurately across borders while keeping one’s own soldiers out of harm’s way. The potential to direct force with great precision also offers the possibility of reducing harm to civilians. At the same time, because drones eliminate some of the traditional constraints on the use of force—like the need to gain political support for full mobilization—they lower the threshold for launching military strikes. The development of drone use capacity across dozens of countries increases the need for global standards on the use of these weapons to assure that their deployment is strategically wise and ethically and legally sound. Presenting a robust conversation among leading scholars in the areas of international legal standards, counterterrorism strategy, humanitarian law, and the ethics of force, Drones and the Future of Armed Conflict takes account of current American drone campaigns and the developing legal, ethical, and strategic implications of this new way of warfare. Among the contributions to this volume are a thorough examination of the American government’s legal justifications for the targeting of enemies using drones, an analysis of American drone campaigns’ notable successes and failures, and a discussion of the linked issues of human rights, freedom of information, and government accountability.


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Judicial Reputation

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Judges are society’s elders and experts, our masters and mediators. We depend on them to dispense justice with integrity, deliberation, and efficiency. Yet judges, as Alexander Hamilton famously noted, lack the power of the purse or the sword. They must rely almost entirely on their reputations to secure compliance with their decisions, obtain resources, and maintain their political influence. In Judicial Reputation, Nuno Garoupa and Tom Ginsburg explain how reputation is not only an essential quality of the judiciary as a whole, but also of individual judges. Perceptions of judicial systems around the world range from widespread admiration to utter contempt, and as judges participate within these institutions some earn respect, while others are scorned. Judicial Reputation explores how judges respond to the reputational incentives provided by the different audiences they interact with—lawyers, politicians, the media, and the public itself—and how institutional structures mediate these interactions. The judicial structure is best understood not through the lens of legal culture or tradition, but through the economics of information and reputation. Transcending those conventional lenses, Garoupa and Ginsburg employ their long-standing research on the latter to examine the fascinating effects that governmental interactions, multicourt systems, extrajudicial work, and the international rule-of-law movement have had on the reputations of judges in this era.


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Knowledge of Nature and the Nature of Knowledge in Early Modern Japan

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Between the early seventeenth and the mid-nineteenth century, the field of natural history in Japan separated itself from the discipline of medicine, produced knowledge that questioned the traditional religious and philosophical understandings of the world, developed into a system (called honzogaku) that rivaled Western science in complexity—and then seemingly disappeared. Or did it? In The Knowledge of Nature and the Nature of Knowledge in Early Modern Japan, Federico Marcon recounts how Japanese scholars developed a sophisticated discipline of natural history analogous to Europe’s but created independently, without direct influence, and argues convincingly that Japanese natural history succumbed to Western science not because of suppression and substitution, as scholars traditionally have contended, but by adaptation and transformation.             The first book-length English-language study devoted to the important field of honzogaku, The Knowledge of Nature and the Nature of Knowledge in Early Modern Japan will be an essential text for historians of Japanese and East Asian science, and a fascinating read for anyone interested in the development of science in the early modern era.


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Vaudeville Melodies

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

If you enjoy popular music and culture today, you have vaudeville to thank. From the 1870s until the 1920s, vaudeville was the dominant context for popular entertainment in the United States, laying the groundwork for the music industry we know today. In Vaudeville Melodies, Nicholas Gebhardt introduces us to the performers, managers, and audiences who turned disjointed variety show acts into a phenomenally successful business. First introduced in the late nineteenth century, by 1915 vaudeville was being performed across the globe, incorporating thousands of performers from every branch of show business. Its astronomical success relied on a huge network of theatres, each part of a circuit and administered from centralized booking offices. Gebhardt shows us how vaudeville transformed relationships among performers, managers, and audiences, and argues that these changes affected popular music culture in ways we are still seeing today. Drawing on firsthand accounts, Gebhardt explores the practices by which vaudeville performers came to understand what it meant to entertain an audience, the conditions in which they worked, the institutions they relied upon, and the values they imagined were essential to their success.


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Vaudeville Melodies

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

If you enjoy popular music and culture today, you have vaudeville to thank. From the 1870s until the 1920s, vaudeville was the dominant context for popular entertainment in the United States, laying the groundwork for the music industry we know today. In Vaudeville Melodies, Nicholas Gebhardt introduces us to the performers, managers, and audiences who turned disjointed variety show acts into a phenomenally successful business. First introduced in the late nineteenth century, by 1915 vaudeville was being performed across the globe, incorporating thousands of performers from every branch of show business. Its astronomical success relied on a huge network of theatres, each part of a circuit and administered from centralized booking offices. Gebhardt shows us how vaudeville transformed relationships among performers, managers, and audiences, and argues that these changes affected popular music culture in ways we are still seeing today. Drawing on firsthand accounts, Gebhardt explores the practices by which vaudeville performers came to understand what it meant to entertain an audience, the conditions in which they worked, the institutions they relied upon, and the values they imagined were essential to their success.


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Slow Trains Overhead

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Few people writing today could successfully combine an intimate knowledge of Chicago with a poet’s eye, and capture what it’s really like to live in this remarkable city. Embracing a striking variety of human experience—a chance encounter with a veteran on Belmont Avenue, the grimy majesty of the downtown El tracks, domestic violence in a North Side brownstone, the wide-eyed wonder of new arrivals at O’Hare, and much more—these new and selected poems and stories by Reginald Gibbons celebrate the heady mix of elation and despair that is city life. With Slow Trains Overhead, he has rendered a living portrait of Chicago as luminously detailed and powerful as those of Nelson Algren and Carl Sandburg. Gibbons takes the reader from museums and neighborhood life to tense proceedings in Juvenile Court, from comically noir-tinged scenes at a store on Clark Street to midnight immigrants at a gas station on Western Avenue, and from a child's piggybank to nature in urban spaces. For Gibbons, the city’s people, places, and historical reverberations are a compelling human array of the everyday and the extraordinary, of poverty and beauty, of the experience of being one among many. Penned by one of its most prominent writers, Slow Trains Overhead evokes and commemorates human life in a great city.


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Cancer Companion

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Cancer. It’s the diagnosis no one wants to hear. Unfortunately though, these days most of us have known or will know someone who receives it. But what’s next? With the diagnosis comes not only fear and uncertainty, but numerous questions, and a lot of unsolicited advice. With A Cancer Companion, esteemed oncologist Ranjana Srivastava is here to help, bringing both experience and honesty to guide cancer patients and their families through this labyrinth of questions and treatments. With candor and compassion, Srivastava provides an approachable and authoritative reference. She begins with the big questions, like what cancer actually is, and she moves on to offer very practical advice on how to find an oncologist, what to expect during and after treatments, and how to manage pain, diet, and exercise. She discusses in detail the different therapies for cancers and why some cancers are inoperable, and she skillfully addresses the emotional toll of the disease. She speaks clearly and directly to cancer patients, caretakers, and their loved ones, offering straightforward information and insight, something that many oncologists can’t always convey in the office.  


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O Sing unto the Lord

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For as long as people have worshipped together, music has played a key role in church life. With O Sing unto the Lord, Andrew Gant offers a fascinating history of English church music, from the Latin chant of late antiquity to the great proliferation of styles seen in contemporary repertoires. The ornate complexity of pre-Reformation Catholic liturgies revealed the exclusive nature of this form of worship. By contrast, simple English psalms, set to well-known folk songs, summed up the aims of the Reformation with its music for everyone. The Enlightenment brought hymns, the Methodists and Victorians a new delight in the beauty and emotion of worship. Today, church music mirrors our multifaceted worldview, embracing the sounds of pop and jazz along with the more traditional music of choir and organ. And reflecting its truly global reach, the influence of English church music can be found in everything from masses sung in Korean to American Sacred Harp singing. From medieval chorales to “Amazing Grace,” West Gallery music to Christmas carols, English church music has broken through the boundaries of time, place, and denomination to remain familiar and cherished everywhere. Expansive and sure to appeal to all music lovers, O Sing unto the Lord is the biography of a tradition, a book about people, and a celebration of one of the most important sides to our cultural heritage.


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Leo Strauss and the Problem of Political Philosophy

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Leo Strauss and his alleged political influence regarding the Iraq War have in recent years been the subject of significant media attention, including stories in the Wall Street Journal and New York Times.Time magazine even called him “one of the most influential men in American politics.” With The Truth about Leo Strauss, Michael and Catherine Zuckert challenged the many claims and speculations about this notoriously complex thinker. Now, with Leo Strauss and the Problem of Political Philosophy, they turn their attention to a searching and more comprehensive interpretation of Strauss’s thought as a whole, using the many manifestations of the “problem of political philosophy” as their touchstone.   For Strauss, political philosophy presented a “problem” to which there have been a variety of solutions proposed over the course of Western history. Strauss’s work, they show, revolved around recovering—and restoring—political philosophy to its original Socratic form. Since positivism and historicism represented two intellectual currents that undermined the possibility of a Socratic political philosophy, the first part of the book is devoted to Strauss’s critique of these two positions. Then, the authors explore Strauss’s interpretation of the history of philosophy and both ancient and modern canonical political philosophers, including Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, and Locke. Strauss’s often-unconventional readings of these philosophers, they argue, pointed to solutions to the problem of political philosophy. Finally, the authors examine Strauss’s thought in the context of the twentieth century, when his chief interlocutors were Schmitt, Husserl, Heidegger, and Nietzsche.   The most penetrating and capacious treatment of the political philosophy of this complex and often misunderstood thinker, from his early years to his last works, Leo Strauss and the Problem of Political Philosophy reveals Strauss’s writings as an attempt to show that the distinctive characteristics of ancient and modern thought derive from different modes of solving the problem of political philosophy and reveal why he considered the ancient solution both philosophically and politically superior.


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Diary of Our Fatal Illness

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This moving prose poem tells the story of an aged man who suffers a prolonged and ultimately fatal illness. From initial diagnosis to remission to relapse to death, the experience is narrated by the man’s son, a practicing doctor. Charles Bardes, a physician and poet, draws on years of experience with patients and sickness to construct a narrative that links myth, diverse metamorphoses, and the modern mechanics of death. We stand with the doctors, the family, and, above all, a sick man and his disease as their voices are artfully crafted into a new and powerful language of illness.


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Make It Rain

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Weather control. Juxtaposing those two words is enough to raise eyebrows in a world where even the best weather models still fail to nail every forecast, and when the effects of climate change on sea level height, seasonal averages of weather phenomena, and biological behavior are being watched with interest by all, regardless of political or scientific persuasion. But between the late nineteenth century—when the United States first funded an attempt to “shock” rain out of clouds—and the late 1940s, rainmaking (as it had been known) became weather control. And then things got out of control. In Make It Rain, Kristine C. Harper tells the long and somewhat ludicrous history of state-funded attempts to manage, manipulate, and deploy the weather in America. Harper shows that governments from the federal to the local became helplessly captivated by the idea that weather control could promote agriculture, health, industrial output, and economic growth at home, or even be used as a military weapon and diplomatic tool abroad. Clear fog for landing aircraft? There’s a project for that. Gentle rain for strawberries? Let’s do it! Enhanced snowpacks for hydroelectric utilities? Check. The heyday of these weather control programs came during the Cold War, as the atmosphere came to be seen as something to be defended, weaponized, and manipulated. Yet Harper demonstrates that today there are clear implications for our attempts to solve the problems of climate change.


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Of Beards and Men

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Beards—they’re all the rage these days. Take a look around: from hip urbanites to rustic outdoorsmen, well-groomed metrosexuals to post-season hockey players, facial hair is everywhere. The New York Times traces this hairy trend to Big Apple hipsters circa 2005 and reports that today some New Yorkers pay thousands of dollars for facial hair transplants to disguise patchy, juvenile beards. And in 2014, blogger Nicki Daniels excoriated bearded hipsters for turning a symbol of manliness and power into a flimsy fashion statement. The beard, she said, has turned into the padded bra of masculinity.Of Beards and Men makes the case that today’s bearded renaissance is part of a centuries-long cycle in which facial hairstyles have varied in response to changing ideals of masculinity. Christopher Oldstone-Moore explains that the clean-shaven face has been the default style throughout Western history—see Alexander the Great’s beardless face, for example, as the Greek heroic ideal. But the primacy of razors has been challenged over the years by four great bearded movements, beginning with Hadrian in the second century and stretching to today’s bristled resurgence. The clean-shaven face today, Oldstone-Moore says, has come to signify a virtuous and sociable man, whereas the beard marks someone as self-reliant and unconventional. History, then, has established specific meanings for facial hair, which both inspire and constrain a man’s choices in how he presents himself to the world. This fascinating and erudite history of facial hair cracks the masculine hair code, shedding light on the choices men make as they shape the hair on their faces. Oldstone-Moore adeptly lays to rest common misperceptions about beards and vividly illustrates the connection between grooming, identity, culture, and masculinity. To a surprising degree, we find, the history of men is written on their faces.


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Curators

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Over the centuries, natural history museums have evolved from being little more than musty repositories of stuffed animals and pinned bugs, to being crucial generators of new scientific knowledge. They have also become vibrant educational centers, full of engaging exhibits that share those discoveries with students and an enthusiastic general public.   At the heart of it all from the very start have been curators. Yet after three decades as a natural history curator, Lance Grande found that he still had to explain to people what he does. This book is the answer—and, oh, what an answer it is: lively, exciting, up-to-date, it offers a portrait of curators and their research  like none we’ve seen, one that conveys the intellectual excitement and the educational and social value of curation. Grande uses the personal story of his own career—most of it spent at Chicago’s storied Field Museum—to structure his account as he explores the value of research and collections, the importance of public engagement, changing ecological and ethical considerations, and the impact of rapidly improving technology. Throughout, we are guided by Grande’s keen sense of mission, of a job where the why is always as important as the what.   This beautifully written and richly illustrated book is a clear-eyed but loving account of natural history museums, their curators, and their ever-expanding roles in the twenty-first century.  


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Spirit of Religion and the Spirit of Liberty

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Tocqueville’s thesis on the relation between religion and liberty could hardly be timelier. From events in the Middle East and the spread of Islamist violence in the name of religion to the mandated coverage under the Affordable Care Act, the interaction between religion and politics has once again become central to political life. Tocqueville, facing the coming of a new social and political order within the traditional society that was France, faced this relation between politics and religion with freshness and relevance. He was particularly interested in reporting to his French compatriots on how the Americans had successfully resolved what, to many Frenchmen, looked to be an insuperable conflict. His surprising thesis was that the right kind of arrangement—a certain kind of separation of church and state that was not also a complete separation of religion and politics—could be seen in nineteenth century America to be beneficial to both liberty and religion. This volume investigates whether Tocqueville’s depiction was valid for the America he investigated in the 1830s and whether it remains valid today.  



Insights in the Economics of Aging

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The fraction of the population over age sixty-five in many developed countries is projected to rise, in some cases sharply, in coming decades. This has drawn growing interest to research on the health and economic circumstances of individuals as they age. Many individuals are retiring from paid work, yet they are living longer than ever. Their well-being is shaped by their past decisions such as their saving behavior, as well as by current and future economic conditions, health status, medical innovations, and a rapidly evolving landscape of policy incentives and supports. The contributions to Insights in the Economics of Aging uncover how financial, physical, and emotional well-being are integrally related. The authors consider the interactions between financial circumstances in later life, such as household savings and home ownership, physical circumstances such as health and disability, and emotional well-being, including happiness and mental health.


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Flavor and Soul

Sat, 18 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the United States, African American and Italian cultures have been intertwined for more than a hundred years. From as early as nineteenth-century African American opera star Thomas Bowers—“The Colored Mario”—all the way to hip-hop entrepreneur Puff Daddy dubbing himself “the Black Sinatra,” the affinity between black and Italian cultures runs deep and wide. Once you start looking, you’ll find these connections everywhere. Sinatra croons bel canto over the limousine swing of the Count Basie band. Snoop Dogg deftly tosses off the line “I’m Lucky Luciano ’bout to sing soprano.” Like the Brooklyn pizzeria and candy store in Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing and Jungle Fever, or the basketball sidelines where Italian American coaches Rick Pitino and John Calipari mix it up with their African American players, black/Italian connections are a thing to behold—and to investigate. In Flavor and Soul, John Gennari spotlights this affinity, calling it “the edge”—now smooth, sometimes serrated—between Italian American and African American culture. He argues that the edge is a space of mutual emulation and suspicion, a joyous cultural meeting sometimes darkened by violent collision. Through studies of music and sound, film and media, sports and foodways, Gennari shows how an Afro-Italian sensibility has nourished and vitalized American culture writ large, even as Italian Americans and African Americans have fought each other for urban space, recognition of overlapping histories of suffering and exclusion, and political and personal rispetto. Thus, Flavor and Soul is a cultural contact zone—a piazza where people express deep feelings of joy and pleasure, wariness and distrust, amity and enmity. And it is only at such cultural edges, Gennari argues, that America can come to truly understand its racial and ethnic dynamics.


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Gershom Scholem

Fri, 17 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Gershom Scholem (1897–1982) was ostensibly a scholar of Jewish mysticism, yet he occupies a powerful role in today’s intellectual imagination, having an influential contact with an extraordinary cast of thinkers, including Hans Jonas, Martin Buber, Walter Benjamin, Hannah Arendt, and Theodor Adorno. In this first biography of Scholem, Amir Engel shows how Scholem grew from a scholar of an esoteric discipline to a thinker wrestling with problems that reach to the very foundations of the modern human experience.             As Engel shows, in his search for the truth of Jewish mysticism Scholem molded the vast literature of Jewish mystical lore into a rich assortment of stories that unveiled new truths about the modern condition. Positioning Scholem’s work and life within early twentieth-century Germany, Palestine, and later the state of Israel, Engel intertwines Scholem’s biography with his historiographical work, which stretches back to the Spanish expulsion of Jews in 1492, through the lives of Rabbi Isaac Luria and Sabbatai Zevi, and up to Hasidism and the dawn of the Zionist movement. Through parallel narratives, Engel touches on a wide array of important topics including immigration, exile, Zionism, World War One, and the creation of the state of Israel, ultimately telling the story of the realizations—and failures—of a dream for a modern Jewish existence.  


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Perspectives from the Disciplines

Fri, 17 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In this companion volume to Bricks and Mortar, Jeffrey Scarborough and Raymond Ravaglia present a series of essays written by senior instructors and division heads at the Stanford Online High School (SOHS). Written from the perspective of the online-learning practitioner, these essays discuss in detail the challenges of teaching particular disciplines, accomplishing particular pedagogical objectives, and fostering the habits of mind characteristic of students who have received deep education in a given discipline. Perspectives from the Disciplines also examines counseling, student services, and student life viewpoints as it discusses how a truly international community has been fostered at SOHS, and how SOHS’s student relationships are in many ways deeper and more intimate than those found in traditional secondary schools.


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Visualizing Portuguese Power

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Images play a key role in political communication and the ways we come to understand the power structures that shape society. Nowhere is this more evident than in the process of empire building, in which visual language has long been a highly effective means of overpowering another culture with one’s own values and beliefs.             With Visualizing Portuguese Power, Urte Krass and a group of contributors examine the visual arts within the Portuguese empire between the sixteenth and eighteenth centuries. With a focus on the political appropriation of Portuguese-Christian art within the colonies, the book looks at how these and other objects could be staged to generate new layers of meaning. Beyond religious images, the book shows that the appropriation of the visual arts to reinforce important political concepts also took place in the outside the religious sphere, including adaptations of local artistic customs to reinforce Portuguese power.


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Values of Happiness

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How people conceive of happiness reveals much about who they are and the values they hold dear. Drawing on ethnographic insights from diverse field sites around the world, this book offers a unique window onto the ways in which people grapple with fundamental questions about how to live and what it means to be human. Developing a distinctly anthropological approach concerned less with gauging how happy people are than with how happiness figures as an idea, mood, and motive in everyday life, the book explores how people strive to live well within challenging or even hostile circumstances. The contributors explore how happiness intersects with dominant social values as well as an array of aims and aspirations that are potentially conflicting, demonstrating that not every kind of happiness is seen as a worthwhile aim or evaluated in positive moral terms. In tracing this link between different conceptions of happiness and their evaluations, the book engages some of the most fundamental questions concerning human happiness: What is it and how is it achieved? Is happiness everywhere a paramount value or aim in life? How does it relate to other ideas of the good? What role does happiness play in orienting peoples’ desires and life choices? Taking these questions seriously, the book draws together considerations of meaning, values, and affect, while recognizing the diversity of human ends.


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New Dawn for the Second Sex

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

To what extent is Simone de Beauvoir's study The Second Sex still relevant? From her work it emerges that patriarchy is a many-headed monster. Over the past decades, various heads of this monster have been slayed: important breakthroughs have been achieved by and for women in law, politics, and economics. Today, however, we witness movements in the opposite direction, such as a masculinist political revival in different parts of the world, the spread of the neoliberal myth of the Super Woman, the rise of transnational networks of trafficking in women and children, and a new international "Jihadism." This suggests that patriarchy is indeed a Hydra: a multi-headed monster that grows several new heads every time one head is cut off. Since different—often hybrid—heads of patriarchy dominate in different settings, feminism requires a variety of strategies. Women's movements all over the world today are critically creating new models of self and society in their own contexts. Drawing on notions of Beauvoir, as well as Michel Foucault, this book outlines a "feminism in a new key," which consists of women's various freedom practices, each hunting the Hydra in their own key—but with mutual support.


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No New Kind of Duck

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What do we learn by making art? What do we discover by discussing our art with other people? These are the questions at the heart of No New Kind of Duck, which documents an exchange between Jan Verwoert and artists, critics, and other researchers at the Graduate School at the Berlin University of the Arts, including artists Alex Martinis Roe, Jeremiah Day, Azin Feizabadi, Lizza May David, and Ralf Baecker and composers Nuria Núñez Hierro and Björn Erlach. Creating art and coining the terms to explain and define one’s artistic practice, the contributors find, are two closely related yet distinct practices. The book begins with an introduction by Verwoert that discusses the politics of art as a form of knowledge production. Verwoert’s introduction is followed by contributions that turn the focus on the stakes of an art practice today. The book also presents a careful selection of art, in which each piece is presented without accompanying explanations or justification, highlighting the possibilities for artists to coin their own terms to describe the concerns of their practice. Beautifully designed by artist Nienke Terpsma, the book will be an equally welcome companion for established or aspiring artists.  


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Nutrition for a Better Life

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Immense advances in the life sciences have deepened our understanding of the connection between nutrition and health, revealing that we can effectively improve our health and quality of life by redesigning our diet on a scientific basis. In Nutrition for a Better Life, one of the food industry’s leading experts takes a factual look into the past and future of food and nutrition. As former Nestlé CEO Peter Brabeck-Letmathe shows, while in the past forty years convenience was the selling point for many industrially produced foods, consumers have now come to demand specifically healthy products. Going forward, it is health that will drive innovation in the industry. Using cutting-edge technology and scientifically based nutrition standards, the food industry will play a decisive role in improving the well-being of entire population groups, offering effective and cost-saving personalized diets that will both prevent and administer to the acute and chronic diseases of the twenty-first century.



Machiavelli on Liberty and Conflict

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

More than five hundred years after Machiavelli wrote The Prince, his landmark treatise on the pragmatic application of power remains a pivot point for debates on political thought. While scholars continue to investigate interpretations of The Prince in different contexts throughout history, from the Renaissance to the Risorgimento and Italian unification, other fruitful lines of research explore how Machiavelli’s ideas about power and leadership can further our understanding of contemporary political circumstances.             With Machiavelli on Liberty and Conflict, David Johnston, Nadia Urbinati, and Camila Vergara have brought together the most recent research on The Prince, with contributions from many of the leading scholars of Machiavelli, including Quentin Skinner, Harvey Mansfield, Erica Benner, John McCormick, and Giovanni Giorgini. Organized into four sections, the book focuses first on Machiavelli’s place in the history of political thought: Is he the last of the ancients or the creator of a new, distinctly modern conception of politics? And what might the answer to this question reveal about the impact of these disparate traditions on the founding of modern political philosophy? The second section contrasts current understandings of Machiavelli’s view of virtues in The Prince. The relationship between political leaders, popular power, and liberty is another perennial problem in studies of Machiavelli, and the third section develops several claims about that relationship. Finally, the fourth section explores the legacy of Machiavelli within the republican tradition of political thought and his relevance to enduring political issues.  


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Supersizing Urban America

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

More than one-third of adults in the United States are obese. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that there are over 112,000 obesity-related deaths annually, and for many years, the government has waged a very public war on the problem. Former Surgeon General Richard Carmona warned in 2006 that “obesity is the terror within,” going so far as to call it a threat that will “dwarf 9/11.”   What doesn’t get mentioned in all this? The fact that the federal government helped create the obesity crisis in the first place—especially where it is strikingly acute, among urban African-American communities. Supersizing Urban America reveals the little-known story of how the U.S. government got into the business of encouraging fast food in inner cities, with unforeseen consequences we are only beginning to understand. Chin Jou begins her story in the late­ 1960s, when predominantly African-American neighborhoods went from having no fast food chain restaurants to being littered with them. She uncovers the federal policies that have helped to subsidize that expansion, including loan guarantees to fast food franchisees, programs intended to promote minority entrepreneurship, and urban revitalization initiatives. During this time, fast food companies also began to relentlessly market to urban African-American consumers. An unintended consequence of these developments was that low-income minority communities were disproportionately affected by the obesity epidemic. ​In the first book about the U.S. government’s problematic role in promoting fast food in inner-city America, Jou tells a riveting story of the food industry, obesity, and race relations in America that is essential to understanding health and obesity in contemporary urban America.


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Use of Confessionary Evidence under the Counter-Terrorism Laws of Sri Lanka

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For more than three decades, the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) fought a gruesome war for independence against the majoritarian Sinhalese government of Sri Lanka. Even as the government fought LTTE on the battlefield, it also pursued a legal war through the enactment of counterterrorism laws that permitted indefinite detention and the use of confessions as sole evidence. This book applies theoretical insights from the work of philosophers such as Carl Schmitt, Giorgio Agamben, and Michel Foucault to the Sri Lankan context to examine the conflicting narratives relating to these laws produced by both sides in the conflict.  


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Understanding Health and Social Care

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Austerity measures have substantially changed the landscape for social and health care in the United Kingdom. Fully updated to reflect key developments under the Coalition and subsequent governments, this third edition of Understanding Health and Social Care provides a current guide to the increasingly important partnership between health and social care workers. Jon Glasby combines practical information about welfare systems with key theoretical material to present a complete picture of these overlapping fields with respect to a range of adult service user groups. Drawing on user-focused case studies and reinforcing his lessons with reflective exercises and suggestions for further reading, he looks at key themes such as partnership working and integrated care, independent living and disability, discrimination, user involvement, and support for caregivers.


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Understanding Health and Social Care

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Austerity measures have substantially changed the landscape for social and health care in the United Kingdom. Fully updated to reflect key developments under the Coalition and subsequent governments, this third edition of Understanding Health and Social Care provides a current guide to the increasingly important partnership between health and social care workers. Jon Glasby combines practical information about welfare systems with key theoretical material to present a complete picture of these overlapping fields with respect to a range of adult service user groups. Drawing on user-focused case studies and reinforcing his lessons with reflective exercises and suggestions for further reading, he looks at key themes such as partnership working and integrated care, independent living and disability, discrimination, user involvement, and support for caregivers.


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Wellington's Dearest Georgy

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Two centuries after the Battle of Waterloo, Alice Marie Crossland offers here a new account, based largely on unpublished sources, of the flirtatious friendship that seems to have occupied at least part of the Duke of Wellington’s mind in the hours leading up to the battle. Lady Georgina Lennox met the future Duke soon after his return from India in 1804, when he took up a post as chief secretary to her father. At the time, she was a young, beautiful, and intensely popular young woman, surrounded by suitors, and she and the Duke enjoyed a close, teasingly intimate friendship. As the years went by, it blossomed into a true bond, strengthened by a broader friendship between the two families. The night before the Battle of Waterloo, Lady Lennox’s mother, the Duchess of Richmond, threw a ball for the officers that has become legendary for its glitz and defiance in the face of the coming action. Georgy herself had a front-row seat at the battle, and afterwards she helped tend wounded soldiers in Brussels. ​Crossland tells the story of Georgy and Wellington brilliantly, then moves beyond it to Lady Lennox’s later life, which saw her marry the future Baron de Ros, who became a spy and later governor of the Tower of London; when she died at ninety-six, none could say she hadn’t lived on a large scale.


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Where are the Unions?

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The start of this century has been marked by global demands for economic justice. From the wave that swept through Latin America to the Arab revolutions and the Occupy and anti-austerity movements in Europe and North America, the past twenty years have witnessed the birth of a new type of mass mobilization. Looking closely at this worldwide push for change, Where are the Unions? is the first book to compare the challenges faced by movements in Latin America with those in the Arab world and Europe.   As the contributors to this volume show, workers’ strikes and protests played a critical role in these mass movements, yet their role has been significantly understated in many narratives of these events.  Where are the Unions? corrects this oversight by focusing on the complex interactions among organized workers, the unemployed, the self-employed, youth, students, and the state, while critically assessing the concept of the precariat—the social class made up of people without job security. With contributions from four continents, this is the most comprehensive look at the global context of mass mobilization within the last two decades.  


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Where are the Unions?

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The start of this century has been marked by global demands for economic justice. From the wave that swept through Latin America to the Arab revolutions and the Occupy and anti-austerity movements in Europe and North America, the past twenty years have witnessed the birth of a new type of mass mobilization. Looking closely at this worldwide push for change, Where are the Unions? is the first book to compare the challenges faced by movements in Latin America with those in the Arab world and Europe.   As the contributors to this volume show, workers’ strikes and protests played a critical role in these mass movements, yet their role has been significantly understated in many narratives of these events.  Where are the Unions? corrects this oversight by focusing on the complex interactions among organized workers, the unemployed, the self-employed, youth, students, and the state, while critically assessing the concept of the precariat—the social class made up of people without job security. With contributions from four continents, this is the most comprehensive look at the global context of mass mobilization within the last two decades.  


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Why the Dalai Lama is a Socialist

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“I am a socialist,” declared the Dalai Lama to the surprise of many recently. Though Buddhists and socialists both might be perplexed at the suggestion that their approaches to life share fundamental principles, important figures in Buddhism have increasingly been framing contemporary social and economic problems in distinctly socialist terms.  In this innovative and provocative work, Terry Gibbs argues that the shared values expressed in each tradition could provide useful signposts for creating a truly humane, compassionate, and free society.Why the Dalai Lama Is a Socialist is the first book to accessibly link Buddhism to socialist thought and social justice. As interest in Buddhism, particularly in the West, continues to increase dramatically and as the Dalai Lama remains one of the most high-profile religious figures in the world, this book provides a timely comparison of the complementary ideals of the Buddhist and socialist traditions.  Gibbs is hopeful about our potential to create a more just society through collective effort, and Why the Dalai Lama Is a Socialist is grounded in his fundamental belief that everyday human activity makes a difference.  


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William Robert Grove

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

William Robert Grove (1811–1896) was a giant of science in the nineteenth century, but he’s largely been forgotten today. A pioneer in the harnessing of electrical energy, he invented an early battery known as the Grove Voltaic Cell, developed one of the first incandescent lights, and created the first fuel cell, using an approach that is still the basis of fuel cell technology today. Along the way, he also published a landmark essay, “The Correlation of Physical Forces,” and led the mid-century reform of the Royal Society. This book tracks Grove’s scientific career and places it within the context of the larger Victorian scientific and intellectual world, establishing anew his crucial place in the history of science, while also showing how he helped to forge a distinct Welsh identity within the scientific community of the period.  


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William Robert Grove

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

William Robert Grove (1811–1896) was a giant of science in the nineteenth century, but he’s largely been forgotten today. A pioneer in the harnessing of electrical energy, he invented an early battery known as the Grove Voltaic Cell, developed one of the first incandescent lights, and created the first fuel cell, using an approach that is still the basis of fuel cell technology today. Along the way, he also published a landmark essay, “The Correlation of Physical Forces,” and led the mid-century reform of the Royal Society. This book tracks Grove’s scientific career and places it within the context of the larger Victorian scientific and intellectual world, establishing anew his crucial place in the history of science, while also showing how he helped to forge a distinct Welsh identity within the scientific community of the period.  


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How Philanthropy Is Changing in Europe

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

There is a new age of philanthropy in Europe: a €50 billion-plus financial market. New wealth, growing social need, and innovations in finance are creating a revolution in how people give. In this detailed, how-to guide to researching philanthropy in Europe, Christopher Carnie maps these changes, focusing on major donors—people and foundations investing or donating €25,000 or mroe—to help readers find their way around this transforming sector. Looking across the continent, How Philanthropy Is Changing in Europe includes interviews with philanthropists, wealth managers, and fundraisers that shed light on key segments of European philanthropy, such as the role of women. Carnie also draws on new giving data to provide practical insider knowledge on how to access donors and donor information. Complete with a substantial appendix of sources, this book not only helps readers to understand the revolution in philanthropy in Europe, but also supplies crucial market information for anyone building their own fundraising or philanthropy strategies.


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That Which Is Not Drawn

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For more than three decades, artist William Kentridge has explored in his work the nature of subjectivity, the possibilities of revolution, the Enlightenment’s legacy in Africa, and the nature of time itself. At the same time, his creative work has stretched the boundaries of the very media he employs. Though his pieces have allowed viewers to encounter the traditions of landscape and self-portraiture, the limits of representation and the possibilities for animated drawing, and the labor of art, no guide to understanding the full scope of his art has been available until now. For five days, Kentridge sat with Rosalind C. Morris to talk about his work. The result—That Which Is Not Drawn—is a wide-ranging conversation and deep investigation into the artist’s techniques and into the psychic and philosophical underpinnings of his body of work. In these pages, Kentridge explains the key concerns of his art, including the virtues of bastardy, the ethics of provisionality, the nature of translation and the activity of the viewer. And together, Kentridge and Morris trace the migration of images across his works and consider the possibilities for a revolutionary art that remains committed to its own transformation. “That’s the thing about a conversation,” Kentridge reflects. “The activity and the performance, whether it’s the performance of drawing or the performance of speech and conversation, is also the engine for new thoughts to happen. It’s not just a report of something you know.” And here, in this engaging dialogue, we at last have a guide to the continually exciting, continually changing work of one of our greatest living artists.


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Television Antiheroines

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As television has finally started to create more leading roles for women, the female antiheroine has emerged as a compelling and dynamic character type. Television Antiheroines looks closely at this recent development, exploring the emergence of women characters in roles typically reserved for men, particularly in the male-dominated genre of the crime and prison drama.   The essays collected in Television Antiheroines are divided into four sections or types of characters: mafia women, drug dealers and aberrant mothers, women in prison, and villainesses. Looking specifically at shows such as Gomorrah, Mafiosa, The Wire, The Sopranos, Sons of Anarchy, Orange is the New Black, and Antimafia Squad, the contributors explore the role of race and sexuality and focus on how many of the characters transgress traditional ideas about femininity and female identity, such as motherhood. They examine the ways in which bad women are portrayed and how these characters undermine gender expectations and reveal the current challenges by women to social and economic norms. Television Antiheroines will be essential reading for anyone with a serious interest in crime and prison drama and the rising prominence of women in nontraditional roles.


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Too Much Stuff

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Where has capitalism gone wrong? Why are advanced capitalist economies so sick, and why do conventional policy solutions—such as reduced taxes and increased money supply—produce only wider income disparity and inequality? We are now living in a new world in which a majority of people enjoys the highest living standard in history, acquiring more and more goods and services as necessary luxuries. But as Kozo Yamamura shows, despite our apparent lust for gourmet food and designer clothes, for larger homes, the latest gadgets, and exotic vacations, demand for these goods actually grows slowly, so relying on them to reinvigorate our economies will not succeed. With Too Much Stuff, Yamamura upends conventional capitalist wisdom to provide a new approach. He calls for increased tax-funded demand to address a range of societal needs—such as environmental concerns, social safety nets, infrastructure, and better education and housing for all. By addressing these needs, argues Yamamura, we can also take huge steps toward reducing the growing wealth gap that threatens global democracy. Both solutions-oriented and accessibly written, this book draws on fascinating case studies from the United States, Japan, and Germany, as well as convincing evidence from across the Western world, to suggest practical steps forward that we can all understand and support. Too Much Stuff boldly challenges the economic orthodoxy and, in so doing, challenges us to think outside the box for the betterment of all.


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Tasting Spain

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Part travelogue, part memoir, and part cookbook, this addition to the Haus Armchair Traveller series offers a dynamic journey through Spain, one where the focus is on culinary delights found everywhere from Madrid’s cafes to Barcelona’s fish markets. H. M. van den Brink paints an evocative scene of everyday life in Spain. Readers see the urban shop windows displaying famous serrano ham and Spanish sweet cakes, taste crispy pigs’ ears along with rich chickpea soup, and smell the strong coffee and steaming tortillas often enjoyed while breakfasting outdoors. An appealing blend of historical background and personal recollections, Tasting Spain shapes a lively account of the country and its culture, both in the city and out in the countryside. From exquisite restaurants to private settings, this is a book about eating—meals that Van den Brink has enjoyed solo or with friends—and about the vivid and sustaining memories such meals can create. “I am not a cook, nor a historian, nor a critic,” writes Van den Brink. “I am just an eater.” With Tasting Spain, he opens new vistas on Spanish cuisine that will tickle the taste buds of readers and leave them hungry for more of this beautiful land.


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Dianna Frid + Richard Rezac

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Dianna Frid’s sculptures, installations, artist’s books, and mixed media work explore the intersection of text and textile, matter and subject matter. Richard Rezac has created thought-provoking abstract object-sculptures since the 1980s. This book, the catalog for a recent exhibition at the DePaul Art Museum, brings together works by both of these Chicago-based artists. In doing so, Dianna Frid + Richard Rezac: Split Complementary shines a light on their shared sensibilities—a rigorous yet poetic approach that revels in the nuances of color, surface, and material. Frid’s and Rezac’s works appear here accompanied by rare books from DePaul University’s John T. Richardson Library and a variety of objects from the DePaul Art Museum’s permanent collection. The juxtaposition of objects made by artists, craftspeople, and bookbinders generates affinities that broaden how we see and understand all of the work assembled in these pages. Complementing each other formally, these pieces offer opportunities to find familiar patterns in unfamiliar forms and surprising connections between dissimilar objects.   


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Doing Reflexivity

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Reflexivity—thinking critically about one’s own position and how it affects one’s research—is vital in any social research project. But there is relatively little advice available about how to achieve it in practice. Doing Reflexivity offers that advice, presenting both a clear argument for the importance of thinking reflexively and a practical guide to actually making it part of research. Built primarily on the contributions and approach of Pierre Bourdieu, it matches academic analysis and practical examples and will be of use to researchers at all stages of their careers.


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Doing Reflexivity

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Reflexivity—thinking critically about one’s own position and how it affects one’s research—is vital in any social research project. But there is relatively little advice available about how to achieve it in practice. Doing Reflexivity offers that advice, presenting both a clear argument for the importance of thinking reflexively and a practical guide to actually making it part of research. Built primarily on the contributions and approach of Pierre Bourdieu, it matches academic analysis and practical examples and will be of use to researchers at all stages of their careers.


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December

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the historic tradition of calendar stories and calendar illustrations, author and film director Alexander Kluge and celebrated visual artist Gerhard Richter have composed December, a collection of thirty-nine stories and thirty-nine snow-swept photographs for the darkest month of the year.In stories drawn from modern history and the contemporary moment, from mythology, and even from meteorology, Kluge toys as readily with time and space as he does with his characters. In the narrative entry for December 1931, Adolf Hitler avoids a car crash by inches. In another, we relive Greek financial crises. There are stories where time accelerates, and others in which it seems to slow to the pace of falling snow. In Kluge’s work, power seems only to erode and decay, never grow, and circumstances always seem to elude human control. When a German commander outside Moscow in December of 1941 remarks, “We don’t need weapons to fight the Russians but a weapon to fight the weather,” the futility of his struggle is painfully present.  Accompanied by the ghostly and wintry forest scenes captured in Gerhard Richter's photographs, these stories have an alarming density, one that gives way at unexpected moments to open vistas and narrative clarity. Within these pages, the lessons are perhaps not as comforting as in the old calendar stories, but the subversive moralities are always instructive and perfectly executed.Praise for Alexander Kluge“More than a few of Kluge's many books are essential, brilliant achievements. None are without great interest.”—Susan Sontag “Alexander Kluge, that most enlightened of writers.”—W.G. Sebald


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Eurasian Encounters

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The essays in this volume explore crucial intellectual and cultural exchanges between Asia and Europe in the first half of the twentieth century. Examining the increased mobility of people and information, scientific advances, global crises, and the unraveling of empires, Eurasian Encounters demonstrates that this time period saw an unprecedented increase in the transnational flow of politically and socially influential ideas. Together, the contributors show how the two ends of Eurasia interacted in artistic, academic, and religious spheres using new international and cosmopolitan approaches.


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Ethnologia Europaea 45:1

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT




Personalities on the Plate

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In recent years, scientific advances in our understanding of animal minds have led to major changes in how we think about, and treat, animals in zoos and aquariums. The general public, it seems, is slowly coming to understand that animals like apes, elephants, and dolphins have not just brains, but complicated inner and social lives, and that we need to act accordingly.   Yet that realization hasn’t yet made its presence felt to any great degree in our most intimate relationship with animals: at the dinner table. Sure, there are vegetarians and vegans all over, but at the same time, meat consumption is up, and meat remains a central part of the culinary and dining experience for the majority of people in the developed world.   With Personalities on the Plate, Barbara King asks us to think hard about our meat eating--and how we might reduce it. But this isn’t a polemic intended to convert readers to veganism. What she is interested in is why we’ve not drawn food animals into our concern and just what we do know about the minds and lives of chickens, cows, octopuses, fish, and more. Rooted in the latest science, and built on a mix of firsthand experience (including entomophagy, which, yes, is what you think it is) and close engagement with the work of scientists, farmers, vets, and chefs, Personalities on the Plate is an unforgettable journey through the world of animals we eat. Knowing what we know--and what we may yet learn--what is the proper ethical stance toward eating meat? What are the consequences for the planet? How can we life an ethically and ecologically sound life through our food choices?   We could have no better guide to these fascinatingly thorny questions than King, whose deep empathy embraces human and animal alike. Readers will be moved, provoked, and changed by this powerful book.


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Accommodating Difference

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For vulnerable older, disabled, or homeless people who need accommodation and support, a variety of different services have been developed, from hostels and group homes to extra-care housing and retirement villages. But do these settings effectively improve the well-being of those who live in them? This book explores the rationale behind these accommodations and the impact different forms of accommodation policy and practice have on the lives of vulnerable people, arguing for a flexible policy approach that places people in control of their own lives. Applying an original evaluation framework to case studies in the United Kingdom and Sweden—two countries with long and differing service histories—Accommodating Difference raises important questions, making it a valuable resource for supported housing practitioners and policy makers, as well as for students of urban studies, planning, and health and social care.


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Art of Neighbouring

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For the nations on its borders, the rapid rise of China represents an opportunity—but it also brings worry, especially in areas that have long been disputed territories of contact and exchange. This book gathers contributors from a range of disciplines to look at how people in those areas are actively engaging in making relationships across the border, and how those interactions are shaping life in the region—and in the process helping to reconfigure the cultural and political landscape of post–Cold War Asia.  


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Artist as Culture Producer

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

When Living and Sustaining a Creative Life was published in 2013, it became an immediate sensation. Edited by Sharon Louden, the book brought together forty essays by working artists, each sharing their own story of how to sustain a creative practice that contributes to the ongoing dialogue in contemporary art. The book struck a nerve—how do artists really make it in the world today? Louden took the book on a sixty-two-stop book tour, selling thousands of copies, and building a movement along the way. Now, Louden returns with a sequel: forty more essays from artists who have successfully expanded their practice beyond the studio and become change agents in their communities. There is a misconception that artists are invisible and hidden, but the essays here demonstrate the truth—artists make a measurable and innovative economic impact in the non-profit sector, in education, and in corporate environments. The Artist as Culture Producer illustrates how today’s contemporary artists add to creative economies through out-of-the-box thinking while also generously contributing to the well-being of others. By turns humorous, heartbreaking, and instructive, the testimonies of these forty diverse working artists will inspire and encourage every reader—from the art student to the established artist. With a foreword by Hyperallergic cofounder and editor-in-chief Hrag Vartanian, The Artist as Culture Producer is set to make an indelible mark on the art world—redefining how we see and support contemporary artists. Louden’s worldwide book tour begins in March 2017. More information and tour dates can be found online at www.livesustain.org.


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Art of Ethics in the Information Society

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

New technologies are often implemented before their ethical consequences have been fully understood. In this volume, experts working in the sciences, arts, and philosophy of technology share novel perspectives on how we can best identify and navigate the new ethical crossroads emerging in our information society. With an eye toward the future, the contributors present an essential and unique view on the interplay between ethics and modern technology.


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Arthur Koestler

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Born in Budapest in 1905, Arthur Koestler was a pivotal European writer and intellectual who inspired, provoked, and intrigued in equal measure. Koestler wrote enduring works of reportage and memoir, but he is most famous for his political novel Darkness at Noon, which received widespread international acclaim. In Arthur Koestler, Edward Saunders offers a fresh and clear-eyed account of the life and work of an enigmatic, challenging writer who continues to polarize opinion today. Saunders sketches Koestler as a leading documentarian of some of the key moments in twentieth-century European history, showing the remarkable ways that he was able to stage himself as a witness to them. Saunders explores Koestler’s struggle with his Jewish identity, outlines his ideas on the theory of science and the ways he tried to imagine the future of science and humankind, and directly engages with the controversial claims of sexual violence that have emerged in the years following Koestler’s suicide. Differentiating the life Koestler led from the story he wanted to tell about it and various ways the public has influenced his reputation after his death, this book offers a balanced portrait of a vibrant figure in twentieth-century arts and letters.


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Alternatives to Neoliberalism

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Though neoliberalism has faced renewed challenges in recent years, it nonetheless remains the dominant ideology throughout much of the West. This book brings together a stellar group of social and policy analysts to mount a powerful challenge to neoliberal framing and policies. The disparate contributions of these contributors—whose numbers include Colin Crouch, Anna Coote, Grahame Thompson, and Ted Benton, among others—are then synthesized by the editors into a larger framework for social democracy, one that is rooted in feminism, environmentalism, democratic equality, and the accountability of the market to the greater needs of civil society. Designed for both teaching and research, planning and practice, it will be invaluable for both politics and policy in the years ahead.


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Celluloid War Memorials

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Creating Celluloid War Memorials for the British Empire looks at the British Instructional Film company and its production of war re-enactments and documentaries during the mid to late 1920s. It is both a work of cinema history and a study of the public’s memory of World War I. As Mark Connelly shows, these films, made in the decade following the end of the war, helped to shape the way in which that war was remembered, and may be understood as microhistories that reveal vital information about perceptions of the Great War, national and imperial identities, the role of cinema as a shaper of attitudes and identities, power relations between Britain and the United States, and the nature of popular culture.



City at Eye Level

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The way in which most city inhabitants and visitors interact with an urban landscape on a day-to-day basis is on the street level. Storefronts, first floor apartments, and sidewalks are the most immediate and common experience of a city. These plinths are the ground floors that negotiate between inside and outside, the public and private spheres. Featuring more than one hundred pages of new analysis and a new foreword from Joan Clos, under-secretary-general of the United Nations and executive director of UN-Habitat, this thoroughly revised and expanded edition of The City at Eye Level qualitatively evaluates plinths by exploring specific examples from all over the world. Over twenty-five experts investigate the design, land use, and road and foot traffic in rigorously researched essays, case studies, and interviews. These pieces are supplemented by more than two hundred beautiful color images—sixty new to this edition—that engage not only with issues in design, but also the concerns of urban communities. The editors have put together a comprehensive guide for anyone concerned with improving or building plinths, including planners, building owners, property and shop managers, designers, and architects.


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Capitalism and Its Discontents

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In this book, John Kraniauskas uses close examinations of a number of modern and contemporary Latin American and North American novels and films to highlight the relationship between such texts and their regional cultural, political, and social contexts. Studies of a novel by James Ellroy and the TV series The Wire enable Kraniauskas to consider how ideas developed in one context can be used to explain experiences in another; he also explores an ongoing shift from texts that are centered on the state and its actions to those in which other groups come to the fore. Throughout, there’s a useful emphasis on the cultural experience of money, and how it can be traced through a wide variety of texts and cultural productions.  


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Communist Manifesto

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“Workers of the world, Unite!”   With these words, concludes one of the world's most influential political texts—The Communist Manifesto. Surviving through countless decades of revolution and counter-revolution, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’ work remains as relevant today as it was in 1848, providing a rallying cry for people struggling under conditions of economic oppression worldwide.   Fiery and provocative, The Communist Manifesto has been a call-to-arms for everyone engaged in the movement to expose and overthrow the broken and exploitative capitalist system. This beautiful collectible edition includes a new introduction by Jodi Dean and a new foreword by David Harvey. Published to coincide with the centenary of the Russian Revolution, which it inspired, the Manifesto will continue to ignite a new generation struggling under the weight of debt and global financial crisis.  


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Communist Manifesto

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“Workers of the world, Unite!”   With these words, concludes one of the world's most influential political texts—The Communist Manifesto. Surviving through countless decades of revolution and counter-revolution, Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’ work remains as relevant today as it was in 1848, providing a rallying cry for people struggling under conditions of economic oppression worldwide.   Fiery and provocative, The Communist Manifesto has been a call-to-arms for everyone engaged in the movement to expose and overthrow the broken and exploitative capitalist system. This beautiful collectible edition includes a new introduction by Jodi Dean and a new foreword by David Harvey. Published to coincide with the centenary of the Russian Revolution, which it inspired, the Manifesto will continue to ignite a new generation struggling under the weight of debt and global financial crisis.  


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Companion to State Power, Liberties and Rights

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This handbook sets out, defines, and analyzes the essential vocabulary and terminology involved in the study of state power, individual liberties, and rights. As part of the Companions series, it is organized alphabetically, taking up and defining key topics in these areas, particularly as they relate to the study of crime and harm. Topics addressed include state and corporate crime, terrorism, security, risk, legislation and policy, human rights and civil liberties, policing, punishments and detention, surveillance and regulation, and many others. Accessible yet challenging, the book will be useful for both undergraduates and graduate students working in criminology, criminal justice, international relations, political science, and other fields.


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Kiosk Literature of Silver Age Spain

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The so-called “Silver Age” of Spain ran from 1898 to the rise of Franco in 1939 and was characterized by intense urbanization, widespread class struggle and mobility, and a boom in mass culture. This book offers a close look at one manifestation of that mass culture: weekly collections of short, often pocket-sized books sold in urban kiosks at low prices. These series published a wide range of literature in a variety of genres and formats, but their role as disseminators of erotic and anarchist fiction led them to be censored by the Franco dictatorship. This book offers the most detailed scholarly analysis of kiosk literature to date, examining the kiosk phenomenon through the lens of contemporary interdisciplinary theories of urban space, visuality, celebrity, gender and sexuality, and the digital humanities.  


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Leading Policing in Europe

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Historically, we have known little about the heads of police in Europe, but over the course of two years of careful research, Bryn Caless and Steve Tong worked to remedy this gap. Caless and Tong here draw on unprecedented access to those at the top of European police forces to obtain detailed comments from more than one hundred strategic police leaders in twenty-two countries. This book presents for the first time information about how these leaders are selected for high office, how they are held accountable, and how they view current and future challenges in policing. Endorsed by the director of CEPOL, the European Police College, the head of the International Division of Bramshill National Police College, UK, as well as Richard Wainright, the director of Europol, Leading Policing in Europe offers timely and unparalleled insight into the little-known elite of the law-enforcement world.


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Babies for Sale?

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Transnational surrogacy parenthood is on the rise. For example, in the United States, the practice has been legalized in several states, while in India state sponsored “medical tourism” has established nearly three thousand surrogacy clinics. Globalization, new reproductive technologies, and rising infertility rates are combining to produce a quiet revolution in social ethics and the nature of parenting. Whereas much of the current scholarship has confined itself to the legal implications of this phenomenon and has largely focused on only a few countries, this groundbreaking anthology offers a much wider perspective.Babies for Sale features contributions by activists and scholars from a range of countries and disciplines in order to offer the first genuinely international study of transnational surrogacy. Rooted in feminist perspectives, many of the essays give voice to those most affected by the global surrogacy chain, namely the surrogate mothers, donors, prospective parents, and the children themselves. Through case studies ranging from Israel to Mexico, the book outlines the forces that are driving the growth of transnational surrogacy, as well as its implications for feminism, human rights, motherhood, and masculinity. Contributors include: Wendy Chavkin, Professor of Public Health and Obstetrics, University of Columbia Diane Beeson, Professor Emerita of Sociology, California State University and Associate Director, Alliance for Human Biotechnology  Marsha Tyson Darling, Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Director of the Centre for African, Black and Caribbean Studies, Adelphi University  Ayesha Chatterjee, Programme Manager, Our Bodies Ourselves Global Initiative Sally Whelan, Co-founder of Our Bodies Ourselves Emma Maniere, Programme Assistant, Gynuity Health Projects, NYC Laura Swerdlow, planned parenthood advocate, Oregon France Winddance Twine, Professor of Sociology and Black Studies, University of California at Santa Barbara   


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Babies for Sale?

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Transnational surrogacy parenthood is on the rise. For example, in the United States, the practice has been legalized in several states, while in India state sponsored “medical tourism” has established nearly three thousand surrogacy clinics. Globalization, new reproductive technologies, and rising infertility rates are combining to produce a quiet revolution in social ethics and the nature of parenting. Whereas much of the current scholarship has confined itself to the legal implications of this phenomenon and has largely focused on only a few countries, this groundbreaking anthology offers a much wider perspective.Babies for Sale features contributions by activists and scholars from a range of countries and disciplines in order to offer the first genuinely international study of transnational surrogacy. Rooted in feminist perspectives, many of the essays give voice to those most affected by the global surrogacy chain, namely the surrogate mothers, donors, prospective parents, and the children themselves. Through case studies ranging from Israel to Mexico, the book outlines the forces that are driving the growth of transnational surrogacy, as well as its implications for feminism, human rights, motherhood, and masculinity. Contributors include: Wendy Chavkin, Professor of Public Health and Obstetrics, University of Columbia Diane Beeson, Professor Emerita of Sociology, California State University and Associate Director, Alliance for Human Biotechnology  Marsha Tyson Darling, Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies and Director of the Centre for African, Black and Caribbean Studies, Adelphi University  Ayesha Chatterjee, Programme Manager, Our Bodies Ourselves Global Initiative Sally Whelan, Co-founder of Our Bodies Ourselves Emma Maniere, Programme Assistant, Gynuity Health Projects, NYC Laura Swerdlow, planned parenthood advocate, Oregon France Winddance Twine, Professor of Sociology and Black Studies, University of California at Santa Barbara   


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Basic Czech III

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

BASIC CZECH is a modern textbook of Czech as a foreign language based on English, a sequel to Basic Czech I and Basic Czech II. It consists of six units (approx. 2000 words and phrases) and it is based on communicative and comparative approach. The textbook can be used in intensive as well as two-semester and other types of classes. It is also suitable for self-study. It provides the key to all exercises. All words and phrases are included in the Czech-English word list at the end of each unit.The grammatical and lexical topics covered in this volume exceed the level we commonly call basic. Nevertheless to preserve the formal continuity of all three volumes, we have kept the title "Basic Czech." Grammar and vocabulary covered corresponds with level B1-B2 of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages.  



Brain Culture

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This unique book offers a timely analysis of the effects of our rapidly growing knowledge about the brain, mind, and behavior on public policy and practice. Jessica Pykett examines the interactions of developments in neuroscience, education, architecture and design, and workplace training, showing how the global spread of neuroscientific understandings of brain functioning has led to changes in—and questions about—how we approach issues of policy, governance, and the encouragement and enforcement of particular behaviors. Researchers and practitioners in both the social and behavioral sciences, as well as policy makers, will find its insights surprising and valuable.


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Reaper

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Booted out of the British army in disgrace after a secret mission gone badly wrong, Adam Caine is down to his last chance when Reaper begins: he’s been called in and offered an opportunity to make good—not because of what he knows, but who. Khalid Bashir, a Pakistani soldier trained by the British at Sandhurst Military College. Graduating alongside Caine, Bashir was expected to return to this homeland and be an ally in the war on terror. Instead, he joined the Taliban and began using his training against the coalition troops who thought they would be his allies. Why? Because the United States killed his entire family in a drone strike. Now Caine has to hunt down Bashir and try to stop him. But who is he working for, and why does he get the sense there’s more going on than he’s been told? Could there be someone manipulating both men for his own secret ends? This thriller, written by a British army veteran of the conflict in Afghanistan, turns the reality of today’s war on terror into edge-of-your-seat adventure.


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Rogue

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Robert “Cam” Cameron was happily living out his retirement in England’s Lake District, far from the danger and secrets of his career as a covert military operative. But then he was dragged right back in . . . ​In the first two novels of his semi-autobiographical Sterling trilogy, Sterling and Assets, Robert Cameron has thrilled readers with Cam’s adventures battling terrorists around the globe. Now he puts Cam to his biggest test: when one of the operatives of the highly secretive and even more highly trained Assets group—which, like its operatives, doesn’t even exist officially—snaps and goes rogue, Cam is forced to lead a team to hunt him down and take him out. Cam has hunted plenty of bad men before, and he’s always come out on top. But this time, he’s hunting one of his own. 


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Rocks, Ice and Dirty Stones

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The king of stones, valued since antiquity for their unrivalled hardness, diamonds today are both desired and deplored. Once faceted and polished they glitter on the fingers of brides-to-be and in the ornaments of the super-rich, but their extraction from some of the world’s poorest countries remains contentious. Immensely valuable for their size, diamonds can be easily hidden and transported, making them perfect contraband. Diamonds have been widely used in industry since the nineteenth century and have long been valued for their pharmaceutical and prophylactic properties. This entertaining and richly illustrated book examines the history of the diamond trade through the centuries from India and Brazil to South Africa and Europe and investigates what happens to diamonds once they reach the cutters and polishers. Marcia Pointon takes the reader on a unique tour of the ways in which the quadrahedron diamond shape has inspired design, architecture, and painting, from the symbolism of medieval manuscripts to modern-day graffiti. She questions the etiquette of engagement rings, and she reminds us why and how lost, stolen, or cursed diamonds create suspense in so many classic novels and films. This compelling and fascinating account of the history of sparklers around the world will appeal to all who covet, as well as all who despise, the unparalleled brilliance and glitter of the diamond.  


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Radical Solutions to the Housing Supply Crisis

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book analyzes the roots of the current housing crisis in England, critically reviews the development of policy under the New Labour and Coalition Governments, and presents a specific critique of the current Conservative Government’s housing and planning reforms. Demonstrating how successive governments have failed to achieve their objectives in this area, Duncan Bowie sets out a radical reform program based on an alternative set of policy priorities and delivery mechanisms. By focusing on the supply of sustainable, affordable housing, Bowie makes a timely argument for an integrated reform of policy on land, taxation, planning, and public investment.


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Moses Complex

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Moses has long been a source of modern fascination. For Sigmund Freud and psychoanalysis, Moses was a particularly fruitful subject for the study of memory and historiography. He also held great interest for the visual and performing arts. In the 1920s and ’30s, the composer Arnold Schoenberg wrote the three-act opera Moses and Aron. First performed just a few years before his exile to the United States, it required that its audiences distinguish voices from forceful background noise, just as Moses had to confront the burning bush before he could hear the voice of God. In 1974, filmmakers Jean-Marie Straub and Danièle Huillet created an avant-garde cinematic adaptation of Schoenberg’s opera that continued the composer’s examination of the established hierarchies of seeing and hearing. In The Moses Complex, Ute Holl analyzes these major works in detail and deep historical context, synthesizing the complex models of resistance to explore the relationships among media, migration, and politics. Since Moses descended from Sinai with the tablets inscribed with the Ten Commandments, new media and new laws have often emerged simultaneously. Liberation, in particular, has been negotiated through many different cultural media, with psychoanalysis, music, and cinema all describing exodus and exile as a process of force. Offering a dynamic and comprehensive political and cultural theory of migration and violence, The Moses Complex speaks equally well to psychoanalytic, musical, and cinematic thinking as it does to our tendency toward violence in the treatment of migrants today.


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Multilingualism, Nationhood, and Cultural Identity

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Before the modern nation-state became a stable, widespread phenomenon throughout northern Europe, multilingualism—the use of multiple languages in one geographical area—was common throughout the region. This book brings together historians and linguists, who apply their respective analytic tools to offer an interdisciplinary interpretation of the functions of multilingualism in identity-building in the period, and, from that, draws valuable lessons for understanding today’s cosmopolitan societies.  


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Moor

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

It’s the early 1970s and Dion Katthusen, thirteen, is growing up fatherless in a small village in northern Germany. An only child plagued with a devastating stutter, Dion is ostracized by his peers and finds solace in the company of nature, collecting dragonflies in a moor filled with myths and legends. On the precipice of adulthood, Dion begins to spill the secrets of his heart—his burning desire for faultless speech and his abiding relationship with his mother, a failed painter with secrets of her own. Even as Dion spins his story, his speech is filled with fissures and holes—much like the swampy earth that surrounds him. Nature, though so often sublime, can also be terribly cruel.Moor is Dion’s story—a story of escaping the quicksand of loneliness and of the demands we make on love, even as those surrounding us are hurt in their misguided attempts to bear our suffering. Powerfully tuned to the relationship between human and nature, mother and son, Moor is a mysterious and experimental portrait of childhood. Written by up-and-coming German novelist Gunther Geltinger, the novel received critical acclaim in Germany and is now presented in English for the first time by translator Alexander Booth. Evocative and bold, Dion’s story emerges from the forces of nature, his voice rising from the ground beneath the reader’s feet, not soon to be forgotten.


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Machine in the Ghost

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

We live in a digital age, buy and sell in a digital economy, and consume—oh do we consume—digital media. The digital lies at the heart of our contemporary, information-heavy, media-saturated lives, and although we may talk about the digital as a cultural phenomenon, the thing itself—digitality—is often hidden to us, a technology that someone else has invented and that lives buried inside our computers, tablets, and smartphones. In this book, Robin Boast follows the video streams and social media posts to their headwaters in order to ask: What, exactly, is the digital?             Boast tackles this fundamental question by exploring the origins of the digital and showing how digital technology works. He goes back to 1874, when a French telegraph engineer, Jean-Maurice-Émile Baudot, invented the first means of digital communication, the Baudot code. From this simple 5-bit code, Boast takes us to the first electronic computers, to the earliest uses of graphics and information systems in the 1950s, our interactions with computers through punch cards and programming languages, and the rise of digital media in the 1970s.Via various and sometimes unanticipated historical routes, he reveals the foundations of digitality and how it has flourished in today’s explosion of technologies and the forms of communication and media they enable, making real the often intangible force that guides so much of our lives.  


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Mikhail Bulgakov

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Mikhail Bulgakov (1891–1940) was one of the most popular Russian writers of the twentieth century, but many of his works were banned for decades after his death due to the extreme political repression his country enforced. Even his great novel, The Master and Margarita, was written in complete secrecy during the 1930s for fear of the writer being arrested and shot. In her revelatory new biography, J. A. E. Curtis provides a fresh account of Bulgakov’s life and work, from his idyllic childhood in Kiev to the turmoil of World War One, the Russian Revolution, and civil war. Exploring newly available archives that have opened up following the dissolution of the USSR, Curtis draws on new historical documents in order to trace Bulgakov’s life. She offers insights on his absolute determination to establish himself as a writer in Bolshevik Moscow, his three marriages and tumultuous personal life, and his triumphs as a dramatist in the 1920s. She also reveals how he struggled to defend his art and preserve his integrity in Russia under the close scrutiny of Stalin himself, who would personally weigh in each time on whether one of his plays should be permitted or banned. Based upon many years of research and examining previously little-known letters and diaries, this is an absorbing account of the life and work of one of Russia’s most inventive and exuberant novelists and playwrights.


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Localism and Neighbourhood Planning

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As in many other areas of public policy in the United Kingdom, in recent years city planning has increasingly been localized, all the way down to the neighborhood level. This book is the first to critically analyze this shift, which has proved to be among the most contentious and controversial of all contemporary planning initiatives. Focusing on the newly granted rights of communities to draw up statutory Neighbourhood Development Plans, it moves from there to engage with larger debates about the theory and practice of localism, setting this trend within an international context with cases from the United States, Australia, and France, as well as the United Kingdom.


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Localism and Neighbourhood Planning

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As in many other areas of public policy in the United Kingdom, in recent years city planning has increasingly been localized, all the way down to the neighborhood level. This book is the first to critically analyze this shift, which has proved to be among the most contentious and controversial of all contemporary planning initiatives. Focusing on the newly granted rights of communities to draw up statutory Neighbourhood Development Plans, it moves from there to engage with larger debates about the theory and practice of localism, setting this trend within an international context with cases from the United States, Australia, and France, as well as the United Kingdom.


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Story of an African Working Class

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Vividly telling the story of Ghana’s gold miners, one of the oldest and most militant groups of workers in Africa, Jeff Crisp details the workers’ struggle against exploitative mining companies, repressive governments, and authoritarian trade union leaders.   Drawing on a wide range of original sources, including previously secret government and company records, Crisp explores the changing nature of life and work in the gold mines from the colonial era through the 1980s, and he examines the distinctive forms of political consciousness and organization that the miners developed in response to their conditions. He also provides a detailed account of the changing techniques of labor control employed by mining capital and the state, and shows how they failed to curb the workers' solidarity and tradition of militant resistance.  Combining lively historical narrative with original analysis, this book remains a unique contribution to the history of Africa and its working class.    


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Social and Caring Professions in the European Welfare States

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the wake of widespread austerity policies in a number of nations throughout Europe, the time is right for an assessment of the current state of welfare and caring professions in the region. This book offers in-depth understanding of the everyday work of professionals in these fields in different national and social contexts, viewed through an interdisciplinary lens and from different empirical and theoretical perspectives. It also covers aspects of education within welfare professions and how that differs across Europe.


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Street Art, Book Art

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Street Art Book Art is a follow-up to Street Art Fine Art, which reproduced artworks created for a show at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in which classic works of fine art were reinterpreted by some of today’s most cutting-edge street artists. The juxtaposition of styles and the subtle humor inherent in the project made it a favorite of gallery-goers and contemporary artists alike.   Inspired by the success of the original show, Ingrid Beazley commissioned fifteen of the artists represented there—including SStik, Conor Harrington, Thierry Noir, RUN, Christiaan Nagel, and Mad C—to produce a series of unique cover designs directly on copies of Street Art Fine Art that had been produced with blank covers. The result is an absolutely fascinating mish-mash of forms and styles, commenting on and transforming the original work, which itself was full of commentaries and transformations of familiar art. Street Art Book Art, with its beautiful reproductions of the artists’ wide-ranging cover designs, reminds us that art itself is endlessly inventive, whether it’s in a museum, on the street, or even on your bookshelf.


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Father Involvement in the Early Years

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The institution of fatherhood is in transition, as men try to balance being active and involved fathers with meeting the demands of the workplace. This book explores these challenges in the context of crossnational policies and the influences of those policies on the daily childcare practices of fathers. Highlighting the increasing interest in the enduring impact of early life experience, the contributors present the most up-to-date research on father involvement with young, preschool-age children in six countries—Finland, Germany, Italy, Slovenia, the United Kingdom, and the United States—offering insight into the effects of different national policies related to parenting in general and fathers in particular.


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French as Language of Intimacy in the Modern Age

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For centuries, French was the language of international commercial and diplomatic relations, a near-dominant language in literature and poetry, and was widely used in teaching. It even became the fashionable language of choice in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries for upper class Dutch, Russians, Italians, Egyptians, and others for personal correspondence, travel journals, and memoirs. This book is the first to take a close look at how French was used in that latter context: outside of France, in personal and private life. It gathers contributions from historians, literary scholars, and linguists and covers a wide range of geographical areas.  


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Philosophy of Loneliness

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For many of us it is the ultimate fear: to die alone. Loneliness is a difficult subject to address because it has such negative connotations in our intensely social world. But the truth is that wherever there are people, there is loneliness. You can be lonely sitting in the quiet of your home, in the still of an afternoon park, or even when surrounded by throngs of people on a busy street. One need only turn on the radio to hear a crooner telling us just how lonesome we can be. In this groundbreaking book, philosopher Lars Svendsen confronts loneliness head on, investigating both the negative and positive sides of this most human of emotions.             Drawing on the latest research in philosophy, psychology, and the social sciences, A Philosophy of Loneliness explores the different kinds of loneliness and examines the psychological and social characteristics that dispose people to them. Svendsen looks at the importance of friendship and love, and he examines how loneliness can impact our quality of life and affect our physical and mental health. In a provocative move, he also argues that the main problem in our modern society is not that we have too much loneliness but rather too little solitude, and he looks to those moments when our loneliness can actually tell us profound things about ourselves and our place in the world. The result is a fascinating book about a complex and deeply meaningful part of our very being.    


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Psyche on the Skin

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

It’s a troubling phenomenon that many of us think of as a modern psychological epidemic, a symptom of extreme emotional turmoil in young people, especially young women: cutting and self-harm. But few of us know that it was 150 years ago—with the introduction of institutional asylum psychiatry—that self-mutilation was first described as a category of behavior, which psychiatrists, and later psychologists and social workers, attempted to understand. With care and focus, Psyche on the Skin tells the secret but necessary history of self-harm from the 1860s to the present, showing just how deeply entrenched this practice is in human culture.             Sarah Chaney looks at many different kinds of self-injurious acts, including sexual self-mutilation and hysterical malingering in the late Victorian period, self-marking religious sects, and self-mutilation and self-destruction in art, music, and popular culture. As she shows, while self-harm is a widespread phenomenon found in many different contexts, it doesn’t necessarily have any kind of universal meaning—it always has to be understood within the historical and cultural context that surrounds it. Bravely sharing her own personal experiences with self-harm and placing them within its wider history, Chaney offers a sensitive but engaging account—supported with powerful images—that challenges the misconceptions and controversies that surround this often misunderstood phenomenon. The result is crucial reading for thera[...]


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People's History of the Russian Revolution

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Russian Revolution may be the most misunderstood and misrepresented event in modern history, its history told in a mix of legends and anecdotes. In A People's History of the Russian Revolution, Neil Faulkner sets out to debunk the myths and pry fact from fiction, putting at the heart of the story the Russian people who are the true heroes of this tumultuous tale. In this fast-paced introduction, Faulkner tells the powerful narrative of how millions of people came together in a mass movement, organized democratic assemblies, mobilized for militant action, and overturned a vast regime of landlords, profiteers, and warmongers.   Faulkner rejects caricatures of Lenin and the Bolsheviks as authoritarian conspirators or the progenitors of Stalinist dictatorship, and forcefully argues that the Russian Revolution was an explosion of democracy and creativity—and that it was crushed by bloody counter-revolution and replaced with a form of bureaucratic state-capitalism.   Grounded by powerful first-hand testimony, this history marks the centenary of the Revolution by restoring the democratic essence of the revolution, offering a perfect primer for the modern reader.


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Pagan Christmas

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This authoritative work sheds light on the religious world of the Kalasha people of the Birir valley in the Chitral district of Pakistan, focusing on their winter feasts, which culminate every year in a great winter solstice festival. The Kalasha are not only the last example of a pre-Islamic culture in the Hindu Kush and Karakorum mountains but also practice the last observable example anywhere in the world of an archaic Indo-European religion. In this book, Augusto S. Cacopardo takes readers inside the world of the Kalasha people. Cacopardo outlines the history and culture of this ancient but still extant people. Exploring an array of relevant literature, he enriches our understanding of their practices and beliefs through illuminating comparisons with both the Indian religious world and the religious folklore of Europe. Bringing together several disciplinary approaches and drawing on extensive ethnographic fieldwork, this book offers the first extended study of this little-known but fascinating Kalasha community. It will take its place as a standard international reference source on the anthropology, ethnography, and history of religions in Pakistan and Central South Asia.  


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Political (Dis)engagement

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In what ways are the meaning and practice of politics changing? Why might so many people feel dissatisfied with and disaffected by electoral politics? What approaches do political activists use to raise issues and mobilize people for action? What role do the Internet and social media play in contemporary citizenship and activism? This truly interdisciplinary book offers answers to all of these questions. Bringing together international academics, political activists, and campaigners, it explores the meaning of politics and citizenship in contemporary society and the current forms of political (dis)engagement. This book offers a rare dialogue between analysts and activists and will be especially valuable to academics and students across the social sciences, in particular sociology and political science.


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Silences of Hammerstein

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Silences of Hammerstein, the latest work from one of Germany’s most significant contemporary authors, engages readers with a blend of a documentary, collage, narration, and fictional interviews. The gripping plot revolves around the experiences of real-life German General Kurt von Hammerstein and his wife and children. A member of an old military family, a brilliant staff officer, and the last commander of the German army before Hitler seized power, Hammerstein, who died in 1943 before Hitler’s defeat, was nevertheless an idiosyncratic character. Too old to be a resister, he retained an independence of mind that was shared by his children: three of his daughters joined the Communist Party, and two of his sons risked their lives in the July 1944 Plot against Hitler and were subsequently on the run till the end of the war. Hammerstein never criticized his children for their activities, and he maintained contacts with the Communists himself and foresaw the disastrous end of Hitler’s dictatorship. In The Silences of Hammerstein, Hans Magnus Enzensberger offers a brilliant and unorthodox account of the military milieu whose acquiescence to Nazism consolidated Hitler’s power and of the heroic few who refused to share in the spoils.


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Ethics and the Orator

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For thousands of years, critics have attacked rhetoric and the actual practice of politics as unprincipled, insincere, and manipulative. In Ethics and the Orator, Gary A. Remer disagrees, offering the Ciceronian rhetorical tradition as a rejoinder. He argues that the Ciceronian tradition is based on practical or “rhetorical” politics, rather than on idealistic visions of a politics-that-never-was—a response that is ethically sound, if not altogether morally pure. Remer’s study is distinct from other works on political morality in that it turns to Cicero, not Aristotle, as the progenitor of an ethical rhetorical perspective. Contrary to many, if not most, studies of Cicero since the mid-nineteenth century, which have either attacked him as morally indifferent or have only taken his persuasive ends seriously (setting his moral concerns to the side), Ethics and the Orator demonstrates how Cicero presents his ideal orator as exemplary not only in his ability to persuade, but in his capacity as an ethical person. Remer makes a compelling case that Ciceronian values—balancing the moral and the useful, prudential reasoning, and decorum—are not particular only to the philosopher himself, but are distinctive of a broader Ciceronian rhetorical tradition that runs through the history of Western political thought post-Cicero, including the writings of Quintilian, John of Salisbury, Justus Lipsius[...]


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Great Cat and Dog Massacre

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The tragedies of World War II are well known. But at least one has been forgotten: in September 1939, four hundred thousand cats and dogs were massacred in Britain. The government, vets, and animal charities all advised against this killing. So why would thousands of British citizens line up to voluntarily euthanize household pets? In The Great Cat and Dog Massacre, Hilda Kean unearths the history, piecing together the compelling story of the life—and death—of Britain’s wartime animal companions. She explains that fear of imminent Nazi bombing and the desire to do something to prepare for war led Britons to sew blackout curtains, dig up flower beds for vegetable patches, send their children away to the countryside—and kill the family pet, in theory sparing them the suffering of a bombing raid. Kean’s narrative is gripping, unfolding through stories of shared experiences of bombing, food restrictions, sheltering, and mutual support. Soon pets became key to the war effort, providing emotional assistance and helping people to survive—a contribution for which the animals gained government recognition. Drawing extensively on new research from animal charities, state archives, diaries, and family stories, Kean does more than tell a virtually forgotten story. She complicates our understanding of World War II as a “good war” fought by a nation of “good” peop[...]


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