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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Sun, 23 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

 



Peregrine Returns

Fri, 21 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Peregrine falcons have their share of claims to fame. With a diving speed of over two hundred miles per hour, these birds of prey are the fastest animals on earth or in the sky, and they are now well known for adapting from life on rocky cliffs to a different kind of mountain: modern skyscrapers. But adaptability only helps so much. In 1951, there were no peregrines left in Illinois, for instance, and it looked as if the species would be wiped out entirely in North America. Today, however, peregrines are flourishing. In The Peregrine Returns, Mary Hennen gives wings to this extraordinary conservation success story. Drawing on the beautiful watercolors of Field Museum artist-in-residence Peggy Macnamara and photos by Field Museum research assistant Stephanie Ware, as well as her own decades of work with peregrines, Hennen uses a program in Chicago as a case study for the peregrines’ journey from their devastating decline to the discovery of its cause (a thinning of eggshells caused by a by-product of DDT), through to recovery, revealing how the urban landscape has played an essential role in enabling falcons to return to the wild—and how people are now learning to live in close proximity to these captivating raptors. Both a model for conservation programs across the country and an eye-opening look at the many creatures with which we share our homes, this richly illustrated story is an inspiring example of how urban architecture can serve not only our cities’ human inhabitants, but also their wild ones.


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American Tianxia

Wed, 19 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

After a meteoric rise, China’s once inexorable growth has come to a screeching halt, ending the Chinese dream of establishing a new tianxia (“harmonious order”) in Asia with China at its center. In this book, Salvatore Babones provides an up-to-date assessment of China’s economic problems and how they are undermining China’s challenge to a Western-dominated world. As China’s neighbors and many of its own most talented people look to the United States to ensure their security and prosperity, global power is slowly but surely consolidating in a twenty-first-century American tianxia. A closely argued antidote to defeatist accounts of Western decline, American Tianxia explores how liberal individualism has become the leitmotif of an emerging order in which people of all nationalities seek a share in the economic, cultural, and political system that is America writ large.


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Flora of Iraq Volume Five Part One

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Flora of Iraq is the only botanical guide for this region in the Middle East. It enables anyone documenting, studying, or managing Iraq’s vast and rich flora to identify the area’s vascular cryptogams (plants that do not make seeds) as well as its flowering plants. In addition to detailed taxonomic information, a large amount of supplementary data of general biological and economic interest is provided, as well as notes on vernacular names. Rounding out a series decades in the making, it is a vital contribution to our floral knowledge of Iraq.



Europe Faces Europe

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Europe Faces Europe examines Eastern European perspectives on European identity. The contributors to this volume map narratives of Europe rooted in Eastern Europe, examining their relationship to philosophy, journalism, social movements, literary texts, visual art, and popular music. Moving the debate and research on European identity beyond the geographical power center, the essays explore how Europeanness is conceived of in the dynamic region of Eastern Europe. Offering a fresh take on European identity, Europe Faces Europe comes at an important time, when Eastern Europe and European identity are in an important and vibrant phase of transition.


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End of Silence

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the late 1960s, between one and two million people were killed by Indonesian president Suharto’s army in the name of suppressing communism—and more than fifty years later, the issue of stigmatization is still relevant for many victims of the violence and their families. The End of Silence presents the stories of these individuals, revealing how many survivors from the period have been so strongly affected by the strategy used by Suharto and his Western allies that these survivors, still afraid to speak out, essentially serve to maintain the very ideology that led to their persecution.


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Expanding Welfare in an Age of Austerity

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In recent decades, the rapid expansion of lower-quality, atypical employment has created a growing group of people excluded not only from generous labor market protections, but from welfare state coverage as well. This situation would seem to call for increased spending on the social safety net, yet governments throughout continental Europe, especially since the financial crisis, have instead been turning to austerity. As a result, they have had to choose between either extending coverage and retrenching the good benefits given to "insiders" or maintaining the protection, coverage, and benefits of the relatively well-off at the expense of a growing class of excluded "outsiders." This book asks why different nations have taken different approaches in addressing—or not addressing—this problem.


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Egypt

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From Roman villas to Hollywood films, ancient Egypt has been a source of fascination and inspiration in many other cultures. But why, exactly, has this been the case? In this book, Christina Riggs examines the history, art, and religion of ancient Egypt to illuminate why it has been so influential throughout the centuries. In doing so, she shows how the ancient past has always been used to serve contemporary purposes. Often characterized as a lost civilization that was discovered by adventurers and archeologists, Egypt has meant many things to many different people. Ancient Greek and Roman writers admired ancient Egyptian philosophy, and this admiration would influence ideas about Egypt in Renaissance Europe as well as the Arabic-speaking world. By the eighteenth century, secret societies like the Freemasons looked to ancient Egypt as a source of wisdom, but as modern Egypt became the focus of Western military strategy and economic exploitation in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, its ancient remains came to be seen as exotic, primitive, or even dangerous, tangled in the politics of racial science and archaeology. The curse of the pharaohs or the seductiveness of Cleopatra were myths that took on new meanings in the colonial era, while ancient Egypt also inspired modernist, anti-colonial movements in the arts, such as in the Harlem Renaissance and Egyptian Pharaonism. Today, ancient Egypt—whether through actual relics or through cultural homage—can be found from museum galleries to tattoo parlors. Riggs helps us understand why this “lost civilization” continues to be a touchpoint for defining—and debating—who we are today.  


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Enlightenment in Iberia and Ibero-America

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book considers the way that two different Iberian imperial systems responded to challenges in their struggle to sustain territorial integrity and economic interests in the face of international competition. Brian Hamnett shows how, during a period of "Enlightened Despotism," absolutist governments in Spain and Portugal sought to harness Enlightenment ideas in service of their policies of reform, a process that contributed greatly to the longer-term project of transforming absolutist governments into constitutional systems.


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Entrancement

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This powerful, ground-breaking study of dreaming, death, music, and shared consciousness brings together a staggering number of fields to explore what we know about dreaming and its interactions with other forms of consciousness. Setting a humanistic, evidence-based context, Ruth Finnegan engages with anthropology, ethnomusicology, sociology, psychology, parapsychology, cognitive science, and more, building a strikingly diverse base of evidence and analysis with which to treat a subject that is all too often taken lightly. Entrancement will quickly prove indispensable for anyone studying these altered states of consciousness and what we can know about how they work and what they do for our minds, bodies, and selves.


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Flora Japonica

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Botanists, horticulturalists, and ordinary plant lovers have been fascinated by Japanese indigenous plants for more than two centuries now, dating back to early discoveries by Western botanists visiting Japan who collected specimens that influenced horticulture and breeding throughout Europe. The excitement generated by Japanese plants in the West led botanical painters in Japan to take note, and thus began a long tradition of depicting their native flora. With this wonderful collection, Kew honors that legacy through a celebration of modern Japanese botanical art. It offers twelve removable postcards featuring stunning art that was newly commissioned for the book Flora Japonica. Each card depicts a different specimen found in Japan, presented in full color. No fan of Japanese plants will want to miss this lovely little gift.


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Fragile Order - Rolf Mühlethaler

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Rolf Mühlethaler is an award-winning Swiss architect whose approach is characterized by a comprehensive analysis of local and historical contexts in combination with a deep conceptual understanding of structural elements, symmetry, simplicity, and repetition. Drawing on more than thirty years of experience—twenty with his own Bern-based firm, Rolf Mühlethaler Architekt—he carefully designs and crafts his buildings with an eye toward balancing these concerns, or creating a fragile order. Published to accompany a major exhibition at Architekturgalerie Luzern, Fragile Order—Rolf Mühlethaler presents the first comprehensive English-language look at Mühlethaler’s complete body of work. The architect has realized projects for both publics and private clients, including single- and multi-family residences, schools, studios, and office spaces, as well as conversions of historic industrial buildings. Richly illustrated throughout with photographs that capture all stages of the process, from design sketches to completed projects, Fragile Order—Rolf Mühlethaler will be of interest to architects, as well as structural and building engineers.  


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From the Berlin Journal

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Max Frisch (1911–91) was a giant of twentieth-century German literature. When Frisch moved into a new apartment in Berlin’s Sarrazinstrasse, he began keeping a journal, which he came to call the Berlin Journal. A few years later, he emphasized in an interview that this was by no means a “scribbling book,” but rather a book “fully composed.” The journal is one of the great treasures of Frisch’s literary estate, but the author imposed a retention period of twenty years from the date of his death because of the “private things” he noted in it. From the Berlin Journal now marks the first publication of excerpts from Frisch’s journal. Here, the unmistakable Frisch is back, full of doubt, with no illusions, and with a playfully sharp eye for the world. From the Berlin Journal pulls from the years 1946–49 and 1966–71. Observations about the writer’s everyday life stand alongside narrative and essayistic texts, as well as finely-drawn portraits of colleagues like Günter Grass, Uwe Johnson, Wolf Biermann, and Christa Wolf, among others. Its foremost quality, though, is the extraordinary acuity with which Frisch observed political and social conditions in East Germany while living in West Berlin. 


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Film Museum Practice and Film Historiography

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Rich in detail, this is a study of the interrelationships between film historical discourse and archival practices. Exploring the history of several important collections from the EYE Film Museum in Amsterdam, Bregt Lameris shows how archival films and collections always carry the historical traces of selection policies, restoration philosophies, and exhibition strategies. The result is a compelling argument that film archives can never be viewed simply as innocent or neutral sources of film history.


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ASEAN Miracle

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) is a miracle. In an era of growing cultural pessimism, there is a pervasive belief that different civilizations cannot function together. Yet the ten countries of ASEAN are a thriving counter-example of coexistence. Here, more than 625 million people live together in peace. In 1967, leaders from Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand struck a landmark agreement, forming ASEAN. They had realized that political and economic cooperation would bring greater stability and prosperity to the region. Fifty years and five additional countries later, the alliance has remained one of the world’s most successful collaborations. Kishore Mahbubani and Jeffery Sng explain how this partnership has benefited the ten member countries and why it should serve as a model for other regions of the world, challenging our assumptions about international cooperation. As the world turns to Asia and the United States and China jostle for dominance, the ASEAN region will have an undeniably powerful role in shaping our global systems. Mahbubani and Sng offer an important primer for understanding this immensely successful—and woefully underappreciated—regional organization.


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Acting and Its Refusal in Theatre and Film

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Acting has traditionally been considered a form of pretending or falsehood, compared with the so-called reality or truth of everyday life. Yet in the postmodern era, a reversal has occurred—real life is revealed as something acted and acting is where people have begun to search for truth. In Acting and its Refusal in Theatre and Film, Marian McCurdy considers the ethical desire of refusing to act—which results from blurred boundaries of acting and living—and examines how real life and performance are intertwined. Offering a number of in-depth case studies, the book contextualizes refusals of acting on stage and screen and engages in an analysis of fascist theatricality, sexual theatricality, and the refusal of theatricality altogether.


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Albert Einstein's Bright Ideas

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

At its most basic, philosophy is about learning how to think about the world around us. It should come as no surprise, then, that children make excellent philosophers! Naturally inquisitive, pint-size scholars need little prompting before being willing to consider life’s “big questions,” however strange or impractical. Plato & Co. introduces children—and curious grown-ups—to the lives and work of famous philosophers, from Socrates to Descartes, Einstein, Marx, and Wittgenstein. Each book in the series features an engaging—and often funny—story that presents basic tenets of philosophical thought alongside vibrant color illustrations.            In Albert Einstein’s Flashes of Inspiration, the young Albert Einstein has a very important job: he must deliver electricity to the big Oktoberfest celebration in Munich. As he hurries from one merry-go-round to another, nothing seems to be going as planned. With his sister, Maja, Heinrich the dog, and Niels Bohr, a qualified dwarf-thrower, can he win a battle against the laws of the universe? The key just may lie in the question of whether a dumpling can fly faster than light?  


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Charlotte Perriand

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Charlotte Perriand is one of the foremost figures in twentieth-century interior design. Together with her contemporaries and collaborators Pierre Jeanneret and Le Corbusier, she created many pieces of furniture we now consider classics, including the instantly recognizable LC4 chaise. Her pioneering work with metal was particularly instrumental in paving the way for the machine-age aesthetic popular throughout the 1920s and ’30s. The third volume in a planned four-part series, this lavish book covers the years between 1956 and 1968. During this period, Perriand established a relationship with the Galerie Steph Simon, which exhibited and published some of her most iconic work, as well as that of renowned contemporaries Serge Mouille, Georges Jouve, and Jean Prouvé. Perriand also completed several high-profile projects throughout the 1960s, most of which are published here for the first time, including comprehensive branding and designs for Air France’s offices around the world and the renovation of the Palais des Nations, where many of her designs for furniture and the assembly halls she decorated remain in use and relatively unchanged to this day. The new volume also documents comprehensively her close, yet little-known, links to Brazil. Covering these important moments and many others, Charlotte Perriand continues the four-volume exploration of this key figure, complete with annotations and a bibliography for further research.  


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Double Crossed

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the United States, the popular symbols of organized crime are still Depression-era figures such as Al Capone, Lucky Luciano, and Meyer Lansky—thought to be heads of giant, hierarchically organized mafias. In Double Crossed, Michael Woodiwiss challenges perpetuated myths to reveal a more disturbing reality of organized crime—one in which government officials and the wider establishment are deeply complicit.   Delving into attempts to implement policies to control organized crime in the United States, Italy, and the United Kingdom, Woodiwiss reveals little known manifestations of organized crime among the political and corporate establishment. A follow up to his 2005 Gangster Capitalism, Woodiwiss broadens and brings his argument up to the present by examining those who constructed and then benefitted from myth making. These include Italian dictator Benito Mussolini, opportunistic American politicians and officials, and, more recently, law enforcement bureaucracies led by the FBI. Organized crime control policies now tend to legitimize repression and cover up failure. They do little to control organized crime. While the U.S. continues to export its organized crime control template to the rest of the world, opportunities for successful criminal activity proliferate at local, national, and global levels, making successful prosecutions irrelevant.


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Culture War

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The culture wars—intertwining art, culture, and politics—have sparked prominent political debates across the globe for many years, but particularly in Europe and America since 2001. Focusing specifically on the experience of Denmark during this period, Culture War aims to analyze and understand the rise of right-wing nationalism in Europe as part of the globalization and mediatization of the modern nation state and the culture war and affective politics arising from it. This culture war provides an example of an affective cultural politics in which institutional structures become entwined with media representations, events, and patterns of belonging.             Employing a detailed and critically reflective argument covering social media, television, political campaigns, advertising, and “artivism,” Camilla Møhring Reestorff refuses the traditional distinction between the world of visual culture and the political domain, and she provides multiple tools for understanding the dynamics of contemporary affective cultural politics in a highly mediatized environment.


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Chinese Medicinal Plants, Herbal Drugs and Substitutes

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The product of fifteen years of collecting activity throughout China, this book offers the first comprehensive, botanically authoritative, and practical illustrated identification guide to Chinese medicinal plants and drugs and their substitutes. The herbal drugs included in the book are officially recognized in the Chinese pharmacopoeia, with an eye toward drugs that are common in international trade, as well as those recognized by Western medical associations. The book is laid out to allow quick and easy cross-referencing of official and substitute species and will be ideal for those without botanical information training. A joint project of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the Institute of Medicinal Plant Development at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, it will be indispensable for anyone working with traditional or herbal remedies.  


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Clouds

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Clouds have been objects of delight and fascination throughout human history, their fleeting magnificence and endless variety having inspired scientists and daydreamers alike. Described by Aristophanes as “the patron goddesses of idle men,” clouds and the ever-changing patterns they create have long symbolized the restlessness and unpredictability of nature, and yet they are also the source of life-giving rains. In this book, Richard Hamblyn examines clouds in their cultural, historic, and scientific contexts, exploring their prevalence in our skies as well as in our literature, art, and music.             As Hamblyn shows, clouds function not only as a crucial means of circulating water around the globe but also as a finely tuned thermostat regulating the planet’s temperature. He discusses the many different kinds of clouds, from high, scattered cirrus clouds to the plump thought-bubbles of cumulus clouds, even exploring man-made clouds and clouds on other planets. He also shows how clouds have featured as meaningful symbols in human culture, whether as ominous portents of coming calamities or as ethereal figures giving shape to the heavens, whether in Wordsworth’s poetry or today’s tech speak. Comprehensive yet compact, cogent and beautifully illustrated, this is the ultimate guidebook to those shapeshifters of the sky.


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Canaletto and the Art of Venice

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Canaletto (1697–1768) was the archetypical Venetian painter and printmaker. His superlative cityscapes record views of the ancient monuments and famous modern buildings of European cities that are now familiar and beloved throughout the world—none more so than the works depicting his native Venice. His lively, yet elegant paintings and prints were enthusiastically collected by foreign patrons, among them Joseph Smith, the British consul to Venice, who later sold his large collection to King George III. As a result, the Royal Collection now holds the largest and finest collection of Canaletto’s works in existence.             Canaletto and the Art of Venice is the first book to showcase in full this rich collection of eighteenth-century Venetian art held by the Royal Collection. It explores paintings, prints, and drawings by Canaletto, as well as many of his contemporaries, including Sebastiano and Marco Ricci, Antonio Visentini, Francesco Zuccarelli, and Giovanni Battista Piazzetta. Lavishly illustrated, the book presents these works against the background of the social and artistic networks of the period, looking at the links between art and theater in Venice, as well as the role of the city as a center for printmaking and book production. Brilliantly alive with light, Canaletto’s paintings and prints recreate with remarkable clarity times past, and appreciation for his work continues to expand and grow. Canaletto and the Art of Venice provides welcome insight into both the artist and the broader veduta genre of urban landscape painting.  


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Conversations, Volume 3

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“I wrote a poem this morning, and one of the themes of the poem is that languages are not equivalent, that each language is a new way of feeling the world.”—Jorge Luis Borges    Recorded during Borges’ final years, this third volume of his conversations with Osvaldo Ferrari offers a rare glimpse into the life and work of Argentina’s master writer and favorite conversationalist. In Conversations: Volume 3, Borges and Ferrari discuss subjects as diverse as film criticism, fantastic literature, science fiction, the Argentinian literary tradition, and the works of writers such as Bunyan, Wilde, Joyce, and Yeats, among others. With his signature wit, Borges converses on the philosophical basis of his writing, his travels, and his fascination with religious mysticism. He also ruminates on more personal themes, including the influence of his family on his intellectual development, his friendships, and living with blindness.   The recurrent theme of these conversations, however, is a life lived through books. Borges draws on the resources of a mental library that embraces world literature, both ancient and modern. He recalls the works that were a constant presence in his memory and maps his changing attitudes to a highly personal canon. These conversations are a testimony to the supple ways that Borges explored his own relation to numerous traditions—the conjunction of his life, his lucidity, and his imagination.


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Community Organization and Development

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book traces the history of community development and organizing as it evolved separately in Britain and the United States, showing how the social and political situations in each country determined the shapes and directions it took. As changes in the demographics and political structures of developed economies have increased the need, and potential, for effective community organizing, this comprehensive history will help us understand how it has worked in the past, and how national policy and local development can be combined for maximum effect.


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Cool Plants for Cold Climates

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

A cold climate is no excuse for a dull, colorless garden. The key is knowing the right plants that will survive and thrive in even the chilliest environments. Who better to guide gardeners than an expert from the far north? Award-winning designer and Alaska gardener Brenda Adams has spent decades searching for exceptional plants that flourish in wintery climates. In Cool Plants for Cold Climates, she presents vivid and detailed portraits of the best and most beautiful of the bunch. When Adams moved from the warm Southwest to Alaska, she found herself in a different gardening world, with few guides on how to approach this new ecosystem. Now, more than twenty-five years later, she shares the secrets gained from her years of gardening experiments as well as bountiful advice from friends and local nurseries. She explains how to evaluate a plant, balancing its artistic attributes with its more utilitarian ones, as well as how to evaluate your space and soil. Adams then takes you into the nursery, offering guidance on how to pick the best of the best. Finally, she offers a detailed look at a wide variety of wonderful plants, highlighting those that offer overall beauty, are especially easy to care for, and solidly hardy. With more than three hundred vivid pictures of both individual plants and full gardens, Adams proves that there is a bounty of plants, in a rainbow of colors, waiting to brighten up your space.


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Barbarians

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

We often think of the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome as discrete incubators of Western culture, places where ideas about everything from government to art to philosophy were free to develop and then be distributed outward into the wider Mediterranean world. But as Peter Bogucki reminds us in this book, Greece and Rome did not develop in isolation. All around them were rural communities who had remarkably different cultures, ones few of us know anything about. Telling the stories of these nearly forgotten people, he offers a long-overdue enrichment of how we think about classical antiquity.             As Bogucki shows, the lands to the north of the Greek and Roman peninsulas were inhabited by non-literate communities that stretched across river valleys, mountains, plains, and shorelines from the Atlantic Ocean in the west to the Ural Mountains in the east. What we know about them is almost exclusively through archeological finds of settlements, offerings, monuments, and burials—but these remnants paint a portrait that is just as compelling as that of the great literate, urban civilizations of this time. Bogucki sketches the development of these groups’ cultures from the Stone Age through the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west, highlighting the increasing complexity of their societal structures, their technological accomplishments, and their distinct cultural practices. He shows that we are still learning much about them, as he examines new historical and archeological discoveries as well as the ways our knowledge about these groups has led to a vibrant tourist industry and even influenced politics. The result is a fascinating account of several nearly vanished cultures and the modern methods that have allowed us to rescue them from historical oblivion.  


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Breaking Bad, Breaking Out, Breaking Even

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Breaking Bad is known for its grim and gritty outbursts of anger and violence. In the chaotic story of a meth-dealing high school chemistry teacher, time seems to collapse, and we feel as though the lives of the characters are moving inevitably closer to their ends. This warped perspective wends its way through virtually every aspect of the story, intensifying the meaning we attach to the characters’ precarious lives.             Hoping to cultivate a deeper understanding of the series, Breaking Bad, Breaking Out, Breaking Even offers a new way of approaching the program though its complex treatment of time. With its grotesque portrayal of life on the brink of death, argues Gertrud Koch, we can best view Breaking Bad as a black comedy between Chaplin’s Monsieur Verdoux and film noir. Koch takes readers through the ways in which this is accomplished through the show’s various visual elements and masterful temporal and narrative structuring. Full of fascinating insights, the book will appeal to the show’s many fans, as well as anyone interested in film studies, media studies, or popular culture.  


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Balfour’s Shadow

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“His Majesty’s government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavours to facilitate the achievement of this object.”   This is the infamous Balfour Declaration, which began one hundred years of conflict with the Palestinian people. Penned in 1917 by British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour, these words had an immense impact on history that still emanates a century later. In the controversial, fast-paced Balfour’s Shadow, David Cronin traces the story of the rhetorical and practical assistance that Britain has given to the Zionist movement and the state of Israel since that day. Skillfully and engagingly written, Balfour’s Shadow uses previously unreleased sources and archives to reveal a new side to an old story. Cronin focuses on important historical events such as the Arab Revolt, the Nakba and establishment of the state, the ‘56 and ‘67 wars, the Cold War, and controversial public figures like Tony Blair. Marking the 100th anniversary of the Balfour Declaration, Cronin provides a fascinating take on this oft-maligned, important history.


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Rubbish Theory

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How do objects that are worth little to nothing become valuable? Who is behind the creation of value, and which types of people find value and comfort in transient, durable, and rubbish objects?   When his highly influential Rubbish Theory, first published in 1979, Michael Thompson launched the discipline of waste studies. It remains the most comprehensive analysis on the culture of waste to date. Thompson argues that there are two mutually exclusive cultural categories that are socially imposed on the world of objects: a transient category and a durable category. However, he identifies a region of flexibility, wherein a transient object that declines in value and life span can linger in a valueless and timeless limbo of rubbish, until it is discovered by a creative individual and transferred into something deemed durable. He links stability and change on one hand, with materiality on the other, providing a rich analysis of social and cultural dynamics. His instrumental theory of rubbish draws on case studies and anthropological fieldwork to highlight the ever-changing subtleties of object value and our complex relationship to waste.   Bringing Rubbish Theory back into print, this updated edition includes a new introduction, preface, foreword, and afterword, thoroughly exploring how Thompson’s key theories have affected our world in the four decades since it was first published and placing it in a contemporary context that shines light on the continued relevance of the book today.   


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Royal Teas

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What could be more quintessentially British than a spot of afternoon tea? It’s a hallowed tradition that’s taken particularly seriously at Buckingham Palace, where for more than a decade Royal Chef Mark Flanagan and his team have prepared an afternoon tea that reflects the best of this venerable tradition across the seasons, from springtime picnics to sophisticated summer garden parties and festive Christmas teas.            Royal Teas, the follow-up to A Royal Cookbook, shares Flanagan’s recipes for a variety of tantalizing tea-time treats, including sweet and savory pastries, cookies, and show-stopping cakes. Each recipe is reproduced with clear instructions and a table to convert measurements to the ones you are most familiar with and is accompanied by beautiful photographs of the tableware, floral arrangements, and other decorative items that adorn the royal table throughout the year. Organized by season, the book is also a testament to the Royal Kitchens’ commitment to sourcing fresh, local ingredients, from the mulberry trees in the Palace Gardens, whose berries are harvested and made into deliciously syrupy jam, to the beehives that provide the year-round honey used in honey sponge cake. The first official tea-time cookbook from the Royal Collection, Royal Tea invites readers to take a break in the day to indulge in a Royal Family–tested sweet treat—well-behaved corgis welcome!  


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Research and Evaluation for Busy Students and Practitioners

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Even as the pace of research increases, researchers do not exist in a bubble. Brilliantly attuned to the demands placed on today’s researchers—people who want to stay on top of their job and still have a life—this book considers how students, academics, and professionals alike can save time and stress without compromising the quality of their work. Drawing on interviews with researchers as well as the author’s extensive experience, this fully revised second edition of Helen Kara’s Research and Evaluation for Busy Practitioners provides a wealth of practical advice on a range of topics like using social media and the diversity of available methodologies, including action research, arts-based methods, and digitally mediated research. Comprehensive, global in its scope, and supportive, this second edition is also accompanied by a fully revised and updated companion website, http://policypress.co.uk/resources/kara-research.


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Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Why are house prices in many advanced economies rising faster than incomes? What is the relationship between the financial system and the price of land? In this accessible but provocative guide to the economics of land and housing, the authors reveal how many of the key challenges facing modern economies, including housing crises, financial instability, and growing inequalities, are intimately tied to the land economy.   Looking at the ways in which discussions of land have been routinely excluded from both housing policy and economic theory, Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing argues that in order to tackle these increasingly pressing issues a major re-thinking by both politicians and economists is required. This is the first comprehensive guide to the role of land in the economy, making this an essential reference for students, scholars, policymakers, activists, and NGOs working on land issues.  


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Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Why are house prices in many advanced economies rising faster than incomes? What is the relationship between the financial system and the price of land? In this accessible but provocative guide to the economics of land and housing, the authors reveal how many of the key challenges facing modern economies, including housing crises, financial instability, and growing inequalities, are intimately tied to the land economy.   Looking at the ways in which discussions of land have been routinely excluded from both housing policy and economic theory, Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing argues that in order to tackle these increasingly pressing issues a major re-thinking by both politicians and economists is required. This is the first comprehensive guide to the role of land in the economy, making this an essential reference for students, scholars, policymakers, activists, and NGOs working on land issues.  


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Polish families and migration since EU accession

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Based on 115 interviews with Polish mothers in the UK and Poland, as well as a specially-commissioned opinion poll, this topical book discusses recent Polish migration to the UK. In a vivid account of every stage of the migration process, the book explores why so many Poles have migrated since 2004, why more children migrate with their families and how working-class families in the West of England make decisions about whether to stay. Covering many broader themes - including livelihoods and migration cultures in Poland, experiences of integration into UK communities and issues surrounding return to Poland - this book is highly relevant to migration policy across Europe and beyond. It will be of interest to policy-makers and the general public as well as students and scholars.


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Order, Materiality and Urban Space in the Early Modern Kingdom of Sweden

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Our corporeality and immersion in the material world make us inherently spatial beings, and the fact that we all share everyday experiences in the global physical environment means that community is also spatial by nature. This book explores the relationship between the seventeenth-century townspeople of Turku, Sweden, and their urban surroundings. Riitta Laitinen offers a novel account of civil and social order in this early modern town, highlighting the central importance of materiality and spatiality and breaking down the dichotomy of public versus private life that has dominated traditional studies of the time period.


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Human Atlas of Europe

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What does Brexit actually mean for the United Kingdom and what are the wider implications for Europe? Was the UK “leave” vote actually symptomatic of broader issues within Europe such as population mobility and the rise of non-traditional parties?   Written by leading international authors, this timely atlas explores Europe’s society, culture, economy, politics, and environment using state of the art mapping techniques. With maps covering over eighty topics ranging from life expectancy to greenhouse gas emissions, gross domestic product, and Eurovision voting, The Human Atlas of Europe addresses fundamental questions around social cohesion and sustainable growth as Europe negotiates the United Kingdom’s exit while continuing through the economic crisis.   This concise, accessible atlas is packed with exciting features, including:  short introductions to each topicmaps using the very latest datainfographics bringing this all to lifesummaries of key information including league tablescore statistics on Europe Taken as a whole, the atlas shows how geographical and state boundaries only tell a partial story. The people of Europe still live in a far more cohesive continent than they realize.


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Hive at Kew

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As bee populations worldwide face alarming population declines, public awareness of the centrality of bees to the life cycle of plants is rapidly growing. The time couldn’t be better for a major piece of educational artwork designed to help people understand the lives and social structures of bees: The Hive.   Created by artist Wolfgang Buttress for the UK Pavilion at the 2015 Milan Expo, the Hive now lives at Kew Gardens, where it soars fifty feet into the air, offering visitors to the Gcardens an immersive, multisensory experience rooted in the latest scientific research into the lives of bees. Visitors approach the giant lattice structure through a wildflower meadow—just as if they were bees returning home. Inside, the hive buzzes with activity: glowing LEDs shimmer through the space, while a symphony of orchestral sounds fill the air, as a soundscape of buzzes and pulses rumbles underneath. The result is an unforgettable simulation of life in the hive, and a potent reminder of the complexity of bee life.   This book celebrates the installation of the Hive through stunning photography and accounts of the artwork’s scientific underpinnings. It’s the perfect gift for any budding beekeeper.  


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House 1 Catalogue

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Atelier de la Conception de l’Espace (ALICE), affiliated with the School of Architecture at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, is an educational facility focusing on preparing students for the practice of architecture. To cultivate the ability to create or shape space, students must be confronted with an educational framework that prepares them for the field’s many practical challenges, from cultural, social, environmental, and physical concerns to working with the wide range of collaborators who must bring their creativity and expertise together in the design process. The second volume in a four-part series on ALICE, The House 1 Catalog focuses on a prototype, House I, developed and constructed throughout the academic year. This mobile structure incorporates ALICE’s core values of communication and collaboration in building processes, and it will travel as part of an exhibition to several major cities, where it will be continually modified and reconfigured. With five hundred illustrations, this book continues the experimental narrative Dieter Dietz, Matthias Michel, and Daniel Zamarbide began in The Invention of Space, which will be further developed in the forthcoming third and fourth volumes in the series. ALICE plays a key role in the success of one of Europe’s leading schools of architecture, and this book, together with the three other volumes in the series, provides an opportunity to explore the exceptional learning environment ALICE offers.  


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Higher Education in 2040

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Since the Middle Ages, universities have displayed impressive resourcefulness in their ability to adapt to the changing dynamics and demands of their times. But in the last fifty years, the landscape of higher education—with the emergence of online and mass education, skyrocketing tuition, and a controversial system for ranking institutions—has begun evolving so rapidly and profoundly that the concept of the university now needs to be rethought. This book explores the future of modern higher education by looking at it on a global scale. Bert van der Zwaan compares European developments with those taking place in North America and Asia to argue that the phoenix of an entirely new type of university will rise from the ashes of the classical system: less tied to buildings and set locations, the new university will embed itself more deeply in society by offering innovative forms of digital knowledge and making customized teaching available on demand. A timely discussion of a topic whose worldwide impact continues to grow, this is essential reading for anyone concerned about the state of higher education—both for today’s students and in the decades to come.


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Haiti Will Not Perish

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The world’s first independent black republic, Haiti was forged in the fire of history’s only successful slave revolution. Yet more than two hundred years later, the full promise of the revolution—a free country and a free people—remains unfulfilled. Home for more than a decade to one of the world’s largest UN peacekeeping forces, Haiti has a tumultuous political culture—buffeted by coups and armed political partisans—that combined with economic inequality and environmental degradation, created immense difficulties even before a devastating earthquake leveled the capital of Port-au-Prince in 2010, killing tens of thousands of people. This grim tale, however, is not the whole story. In this moving and detailed history, Michael Deibert, who has spent two decades reporting on Haiti, chronicles the heroic struggles of Haitians to build their longed-for country in the face of overwhelming odds. Based on years of interviews with Haitian political leaders, international diplomats, peasant advocates, gang leaders, and hundreds of ordinary Haitians, Deibert’s book provides a vivid, complex, and challenging analysis of Haiti’s recent history.  


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Haiti Will Not Perish

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The world’s first independent black republic, Haiti was forged in the fire of history’s only successful slave revolution. Yet more than two hundred years later, the full promise of the revolution—a free country and a free people—remains unfulfilled. Home for more than a decade to one of the world’s largest UN peacekeeping forces, Haiti has a tumultuous political culture—buffeted by coups and armed political partisans—that combined with economic inequality and environmental degradation, created immense difficulties even before a devastating earthquake leveled the capital of Port-au-Prince in 2010, killing tens of thousands of people. This grim tale, however, is not the whole story. In this moving and detailed history, Michael Deibert, who has spent two decades reporting on Haiti, chronicles the heroic struggles of Haitians to build their longed-for country in the face of overwhelming odds. Based on years of interviews with Haitian political leaders, international diplomats, peasant advocates, gang leaders, and hundreds of ordinary Haitians, Deibert’s book provides a vivid, complex, and challenging analysis of Haiti’s recent history.  


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Invasive Alien Species in Seychelles

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

First reviewing how invasive species threaten ecosystems, public health, and economies, Gérard Rocamora and Elvina Henriette then explore the importance of invasive species management in ecological restoration on islands and the recovery of threatened species. Highlighting the Seychelles’ success in eradicating and controlling invasive vertebrates, the book goes on to provide detailed species accounts of the islands’ main invasive plants and animals. Covering forty-four invasive species, the book includes distribution maps, details on ecology and specific threats posed, information on control and eradication attempts in the Seychelles and the region at large, and management recommendations.


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Images of Occupation in Dutch Film

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The German occupation of the Netherlands during World War II left a lasting mark on Dutch memory and culture. This book is the first to explore depictions of that period in films made a generation later, between 1962 and 1986. As Dutch public opinion towards the war altered over the postwar decades, the historical trajectory of Dutch recovery and reconstruction—political, economic, and, most complicated of all, psychological—came to be revealed, often unconsciously, in the films of the period.


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Irish Social Policy

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

When the first edition of Irish Social Policy was published in 2009, Ireland’s enduring economic crisis was only beginning to emerge. In the time since, nearly all areas of Irish social policy have been significantly affected, as policy makers have sought to combat the numerous, multifaceted social challenges posed by Ireland’s economic downfall. Retaining the first edition’s original structure and the same highly accessible style, this second edition of Irish Social Policy is fully updated and revised to reflect these dramatic shifts. Needs and risks associated with recession and economic precarity have escalated, while social services have simultaneously been forced to cope with significant cutbacks and restructuring. Changes in the landscape of policy making processes and policy drivers are also occurring, as are shifts in the politics and ideas underpinning Ireland’s social policy. Particularly timely in light of these ongoing changes, this imperative book offers a comprehensive and in-depth introduction to social policy in the evolving Ireland of today.


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Irish Social Policy

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

When the first edition of Irish Social Policy was published in 2009, Ireland’s enduring economic crisis was only beginning to emerge. In the time since, nearly all areas of Irish social policy have been significantly affected, as policy makers have sought to combat the numerous, multifaceted social challenges posed by Ireland’s economic downfall. Retaining the first edition’s original structure and the same highly accessible style, this second edition of Irish Social Policy is fully updated and revised to reflect these dramatic shifts. Needs and risks associated with recession and economic precarity have escalated, while social services have simultaneously been forced to cope with significant cutbacks and restructuring. Changes in the landscape of policy making processes and policy drivers are also occurring, as are shifts in the politics and ideas underpinning Ireland’s social policy. Particularly timely in light of these ongoing changes, this imperative book offers a comprehensive and in-depth introduction to social policy in the evolving Ireland of today.


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Logical Reasoning with Diagrams and Sentences

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Logical Reasoning with Diagrams and Sentences courseware package teaches the principles of analytical reasoning and proof construction using a carefully crafted combination of textbook, desktop, and online materials. This package is sure to be an essential resource in a range of courses incorporating logical reasoning, including formal linguistics, philosophy, mathematics, and computer science. Unlike traditional formal treatments of reasoning, this package uses both graphical and sentential representations to reflect common situations in everyday reasoning where information is expressed in many forms, such as finding your way to a location using a map and an address. It also teaches students how to construct and check the logical validity of a variety of proofs—of consequence and non-consequence, consistency and inconsistency, and independence—using an intuitive proof system which extends standard proof treatments with sentential, graphical, and heterogeneous inference rules, allowing students to focus on proof content rather than syntactic structure. Building upon the widely used Tarski’s World and Language, Proof and Logic courseware packages, Logical Reasoning with Diagrams and Sentences contains more than three hundred exercises, most of which can be assessed by the Grade Grinder online assessment service; is supported by an extensive website through which students and instructors can access online video lectures by the authors; and allows instructors to create their own exercises and assess their students’ work.Logical Reasoning with Diagrams and Sentences is an expanded revision of the Hyperproof courseware package.


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Living Jigsaw

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

After decades of emphasis on pest control, often achieved through chemical means, gardeners around the world are beginning to come around to a new—or, really, old—way of thinking: a garden whose very diversity of plant and animal life makes it healthy, beautiful, and productive.   If you’ve been wanting to make that change, The Living Jigsaw is the book for you. This masterclass in natural gardening outlines a cornucopia of tried-and-true techniques to help you develop a healthy garden ecology. Val Bourne introduces both new and experienced gardeners to the wide diversity of birds, animals, insects, and even slugs that help bring a natural balance to a home garden—and help its plants and flowers shrug off problems before they become entrenched. This season-by-season guide offers planting strategies, tips for successful cultivation, and new insights into the interactions between plants and animals that are an essential part of any healthy garden.   As much a celebration of natural gardening as a how-to book, and written both to teach and to inspire, The Living Jigsaw will help you make sure that your green thumb is truly, ecologically green.


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Luther Effect

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

To mark the occasion of the five-hundredth anniversary of the Protestant Reformation in 2017, The Luther Effect offers a vivid and rich journey across five centuries and four continents, detailing the visual history of the growth of Protestantism around the world. The Luther Effect examines how Protestantism has affected—and been affected by—encounters with diverse denominations, cultures, and lifestyles throughout the centuries. It explores how Protestantism has adapted and transformed and how different people around the world have adopted, modified, and followed its doctrine. Including two hundred and fifty stunning color plates and looking specifically at the art and cultural objects created in response to and in celebration of the religious movement, The Luther Effect presents the first comprehensive global history of Protestantism’s influence, reverberations, and reception.   


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Landscape Engravings

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For her most recent series, Austrian artist Katharina Anna Loidl has reworked steel engravings of Swiss alpine landscapes, transforming the original nineteenth-century prints with an etching needle and burin. By carefully removing parts of the printer’s ink, Loidl also removes portions of the landscapes. In their place, she introduces simple geometric shapes, deliberately lacking in distinguishing architectural detail so that viewers are encouraged to imagine the addition of structures of their choosing—apartment blocks, industrial buildings, or sports facilities—to the idyllic images.            Landscape Engravings brings together fifty of Loidl’s alpine landscapes. Vitus Weh;s essay examines the sublime and crystalline character of Loidl’s art, and Paolo Bianchi looks at aspects of romanticism as a fund, landscape as a sensation, and the art of repetition. By introducing spatial interventions to the idyllic, perhaps idealized, images, Loidl asks the reader to consider the impact of residential and industrial encroachment on the natural world and the value we ought to place on its preservation.  


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Lulu in New York and Other Tales

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

American Artist Max Ferguson’s paintings often feature solitary figures, brooding atmospheres, and urban landscapes whose narrative and cinematic qualities hint at hidden stories, secrets, and conversations waiting to happen. Writer Robert Power’s fiction of longing and resolution, alienation and loving, provide the perfect voice to give life to Ferguson’s mysterious paintings. Lulu in New York and Other Tales brings their work together in a unique collaboration.  Lulu in New York and Other Tales presents an exquisite and beautifully crafted volume of sixty stories from Power, inspired by paintings from throughout Ferguson’s career. Some of the pictures, like Chess Players and Interiors lend themselves to whimsical or heart-rending conversations. Others, such as Woman in Bath, Subway, and Billy’s Topless have violence and menace simmering at their core. Other paintings that inspire tales of reflection, reminiscing on love both lost and found.   Binding Ferguson’s paintings and Power’s storytelling together is a shared appreciation of the nuances, agonies and ecstasies, complexities and delicacies, of the human condition. The result is a lushly produced book that is at once powerful and beautiful, and will appeal to both art and short story lovers.  


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Lost Jungle

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Why has the Hollywood sound serial received so little scholarly attention? These short, usually weekly films ending in cliffhangers began in the silent era but continued to be extremely popular in the 1930s and 1940s after the advent of synchronized sound. In The Lost Jungle Guy Barefoot explores the popularity of particular serials such as Flash Gordon (1936) and The Lone Ranger (1938), contextualizing the serial in the broader context of American film culture during the Great Depression and Second World War. Barefoot also examines less familiar science fiction, western, jungle, and crime serials, and considers the production of sound serials, highlighting how they drew upon earlier conventions of silent cinema and melodrama.


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Mindful Movement

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In Mindful Movement, exercise physiologist, somatic therapist, and advocate Martha Eddy uses original interviews, case studies, and practice-led research to define the origins of a new holistic field—somatic movement education and therapy­—and its impact on fitness, ecology, politics, and performance. The book reveals the role dance has played in informing and inspiring the historical and cultural narrative of somatic arts. Providing an overview of the antecedents and recent advances in somatic study and with contributions by diverse experts, Eddy highlights the role of Asian movement, the European physical culture movement and its relationship to the performing arts, and female perspectives in developing somatic movement, somatic dance, social somatics, somatic fitness, somatic dance and spirituality, and ecosomatics. Mindful Movement unpacks and helps to popularize awareness of both the body and the mind.


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Mollusques Continentaux de la Martinique

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This bilingual French-English book explores the little-known continental (terrestrial and freshwater) molluscs of Martinique. After outlining the island’s natural habitats, it draws on recent collecting expeditions, literature review, and private and public collections to describe the ecology of Martinique’s 86 species in detail through distribution maps, lists of their known locations, and notes on protection status. Illustrated keys also help readers identify specimens to the class, family, genus, or species level, and beautiful color plates show the living animals, their shells, and habitats.


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Marriage, Sex and Death

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

By the end of the fifth century, with the structural collapse of the Roman Empire in the west, Western Europe had fallen into the so-called Dark Ages. With the power of Rome removed, the Catholic Church stepped in to fill the void; its political rise, alongside that of the Germanic kingdoms, led to dramatic changes in law, politics, power, and culture. Against the backdrop of that upheaval, the family became a vitally important area of focus for cultural struggles related to morality, law, and tradition. This book explores those battles in order to demonstrate, through the family, the intersections between Roman and Christian legal culture, thought, and political power.


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Private Security in Africa

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Across Africa, growing economic inequality, instability, and urbanization have led to the rapid rise of private security providers. While these private security providers have already had a significant impact on African societies, their impact has so far received little in the way of comprehensive analysis—until now. Drawing on a wide range of disciplinary approaches, and encompassing anthropology, sociology, and political science, Private Security in Africa offers unique insight into the lives and experiences of security providers and those affected by them, as well as into the fragile state context which has allowed them to thrive.    Featuring original research and case studies ranging from private policing in South Africa to the recruitment of Sierra Leonean men for private security work in Iraq, the book considers the full implications of private security providers on security and the state, not only within Africa but for the world as a whole.  


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What Is Islamophobia?

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

As anti-Muslim undercurrents in the United States and other western societies become increasingly entrenched, the phenomenon of Islamophobia—and the need to understand what perpetuates it—has never been greater. Critiquing mainstream, conservative, and notionally left arguments, What Is Islamophobia? offers an original and necessary alternative to the existing literature by analyzing what the editors call the “five pillars of Islamophobia:” the institutions and machinery of the state, the counter-jihad movement, the neoconservative movement, the transnational Zionist movement, and assorted liberal groups, including the pro-war left and the new atheist movement.   Together, the contributors demonstrate that this emergent racism is not simply a product of ideology, but is driven by a combination of social, political, and cultural factors. What Is Islamophobia? concludes with reflections on existing strategies for tackling this growing issue and considers different approaches to countering anti-Muslim prejudice.  


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Urban Traditions and Historic Environments in Sindh

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Shikarpoor Historic City, in Sindh, Pakistan, has a rich historical heritage: as a central point on caravan trade routes, it served as the gateway to Afghanistan and Central Asia. In recognition of that history, in 1998 the government of Sindh named it a protected heritage site—but that status hasn’t prevented the ongoing destruction of the city’s historic fabric. This book tells the story of Shikarpoor and presents as complete a picture of its threatened historical fabric as possible, through copious maps and images past and present.  


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Towards Just and Sustainable Economies

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Across the globe, the problems inherent in capitalism are becoming ever more apparent, from the dismantling of the welfare state to the threats of climate change. Yet the question of how to replace the current business model of capitalism has always been vexed. This book argues that the time is now, and that we have a model at hand, operating throughout the Global South: social and solidarity economies, economies structured around the sharing of resources, the meeting of social needs, and the building of a sustainable future. Academics from a range of disciplines and a number of European and Latin American countries are brought together here to debate the issues at the heart of this problem, and to raise challenging questions for policy makers and citizens alike.


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Threadbare

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Alaska’s perch at the geographic corner of civilization isn’t all wilderness and reality TV. There’s a darker side too. Above the 49th parallel some of the nation’s highest rates of alcoholism, suicide, and violent crime can be found. While it can easy to write off or even romanticize these statistics as the product of a lingering Wild West culture, talking with real Alaskans reveals a different story. Journalist Mary Kudenov set out to find the true stories behind this “end-of-the-road” culture. Through her essays, we meet Alaskans who live outside the common adventurer narrative: a recent graduate of a court-sponsored sobriety program, a long-timer in the Hiland Mountain Correctional Center for women, a slum-landlord’s emancipated teenage daughter, and even a post-rampage spree killer. Her subjects struggle with poverty and middle-class aspirations, education and minimum wage work, God and psychology. The result is a raw and startling collection of direct, ground-level reporting that will leave you deeply moved.


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Sun

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

It’s a good story: we are made of matter like that we also find in the stars. Essential to our planet’s existence, the Sun—our nearest star––is also the most fascinating object humans have ever adored, literally the difference between day and night. But getting beyond these basic perceptions requires scientific understanding. What, for instance, is the sun made of? Why does it burn so brightly? How long will it last? This book not only answers these questions but also tells the story of how we came to know—not merely behold—the grandest entity in our sky.             Leon Golub and Jay M. Pasachoff offer an engaging and informative account of solar science and its history, drawing on centuries of study by solar astronomers who have looked to the Sun not only to learn about our own solar system but also about what lies in the distant wilderness of faintly glimmering stars. They skim along the surface of the Sun, which is decorated with sunspots, discussing these fascinating magnetic aberrations and the roughly eleven-year cycles they abide. They follow seismic waves into the interior of the Sun and its unending nuclear fusion. They show us what is unveiled in solar eclipses and what new views and knowledge our space exploration has afforded us. They brave solar weather, and they trace the arcs of radiation and particles whose effects we can see on earth in phenomena such as the northern and southern lights.             Glowing with a wide assortment of astonishing images, this beautifully illustrated guide will delight everyone, from those who know what a coronagraph is to those who simply like to step out on a bright day, close their eyes, and feel the Sun’s warmth upon their skin.  


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Skeleton Plays Violin

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The work of poet Georg Trakl, a leading Austrian-German expressionist, has been praised by many, including his contemporaries Rainer Maria Rilke and Else Lasker-Schüler, as well as his patron Ludwig Wittgenstein. Wittgenstein famously wrote that while he did not truly understand Trakl’s poems, they had the tone of a “truly ingenious person,” which pleased him.A Skeleton Plays Violin comprises the final volume in a trilogy of works by Trakl published by Seagull Books. This selection gathers Trakl’s early, middle, and late work, none of it published in book form during his lifetime. The work here ranges widely, from his haunting prose pieces to his darkly beautiful poems documenting the first bloody weeks of World War I on the Eastern Front.   Book Three of Our Trakl—the series that began with Trakl’s first book Poems and his posthumously published Sebastian Dreaming—also includes translations of unpublished poems and significant variants. Interpolated throughout this comprehensive and chronological selection is a biographical essay that provides more information about Trakl’s gifted and troubled life, especially as it relates to his poetry, as well as the necessary context of his relationship with his favorite sibling, his sister Grete, whose role as a muse to her brother is still highly controversial. Trakl’s life was mysterious and fascinating, a fact reflected in his work. A Skeleton Plays Violin should not be missed.  


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Vincent van Gogh

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Vincent van Gogh’s career lasted just a decade, but in this short time he created more than two thousand paintings, including some of the most famous and influential works of Western art. He was also prolific writer, penning hundreds of letters to his brother, Theo, that form an unusually rich record of his life and work, from his early development as an artist to his struggles with mental illness that sadly cut short a promising career. This book draws on Van Gogh’s letters to provide a powerful and poignant account of his life and work.Lively, accessible, and lavishly illustrated, this new book offers a concise introduction to this great master of art. 


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Visions of the End in Medieval Spain

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This is the first study to bring together all twenty-nine extant copies of the medieval Commentary on the Apocalypse, which was written by Spanish monk Beatus of Liébana. John Williams, a renowned expert on the Commentary, shares a lifetime of study and offers new insights on these strikingly illustrated manuscripts. As he shows, the Commentary responded to differing monastic needs within the shifting context of the Middle Ages. Of special interest is a discussion of the recently discovered Geneva copy: one of only three commentaries to be written outside of the Iberian Peninsula, this manuscript shows both close affinities to the Spanish model and fascinating deviations from it in terms of its script and style of illustrations.


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King of Kings

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Haile Selassie I, the last emperor of Ethiopia, was as brilliant as he was formidable. An early proponent of African unity and independence who claimed to be a descendant of King Solomon, he fought with the Allies against the Axis powers during World War II and was a messianic figure for the Jamaican Rastafarians. But the final years of his empire saw turmoil and revolution, and he was ultimately overthrown and assassinated in a communist coup. Written by Asfa-Wossen Asserate, Haile Selassie’s grandnephew, this is the first major biography of this final “king of kings.” Asserate, who spent his childhood and adolescence in Ethiopia before fleeing the revolution of 1974, knew Selassie personally and gained intimate insights into life at the imperial court. Introducing him as a reformer and an autocrat whose personal history—with all of its upheavals, promises, and horrors—reflects in many ways the history of the twentieth century itself, Asserate uses his own experiences and painstaking research in family and public archives to achieve a colorful and even-handed portrait of the emperor.


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Drilling through Hard Boards

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Max Weber famously described politics as “a strong, slow drilling through hard boards with both passion and judgment.” Taking this as his inspiration, Alexander Kluge brings readers yet another literary masterpiece. Drilling through Hard Boards is a kaleidoscopic meditation on the tools available to those who struggle for power. Weber’s metaphorical drill certainly embodies intelligent tenacity as a precondition for political change. But what is a hammer in the business of politics, Kluge wonders, and what is a subtle touch? Eventually, we learn that all questions of politics lead to a single one: what is political in the first place?  In the book, Kluge masterfully unspools more than one hundred vignettes, through which it becomes clear that the political is more often than not personal. Politics are everywhere in our everyday lives, so along with the stories of major political figures, we also find here the small, mostly unknown ones: Elfriede Eilers alongside Pericles, Chilean miners next to Napoleon, a three-month-old baby beside Alexander the Great. Drilling through Hard Boards is not just Kluge’s newest fiction, it is a masterpiece of political thought.


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Diogenes the Dog-Man

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

At its most basic, philosophy is about learning how to think about the world around us. It should come as no surprise, then, that children make excellent philosophers! Naturally inquisitive, pint-size scholars need little prompting before being willing to consider life’s “big questions,” however strange or impractical. Plato & Co. introduces children—and curious grown-ups—to the lives and work of famous philosophers, from Socrates to Descartes, Einstein, Marx, and Wittgenstein. Each book in the series features an engaging—and often funny—story that presents basic tenets of philosophical thought alongside vibrant color illustrations.             In Diogenes the Dog-Man, the philosopher Diogenes not only admires the honesty of dogs, he has actually become one—sleeping, eating, and lifting his leg to pee wherever he chooses! Best of all, unlike humans, who dupe one another as to their true feelings, Diogenes the Dog-Man is free to bark his displeasure and even bite his adversaries in the calves—even if they happen to be Alexander the Great. Initially, the citizens gathered in the Agora think Diogenes is mad. Does he have rabies? But it soon becomes clear that we can all learn a thing or two from dogs about how to live a simple life.


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Dr. Freud, Fish Whisperer

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

At its most basic, philosophy is about learning how to think about the world around us. It should come as no surprise, then, that children make excellent philosophers! Naturally inquisitive, pint-size scholars need little prompting before being willing to consider life’s big questions, however strange or impractical. Plato & Co. introduces children—and curious grown-ups—to the lives and work of famous philosophers, from Socrates to Descartes, Einstein, Marx, and Wittgenstein. Each book in the series features an engaging—and often funny—story that presents basic tenets of philosophical thought alongside vibrant color illustrations. Sprawled in his favorite armchair, Dr. Freud notices a peculiar phrase in pages of his notebook: “preaching to the fishes.” What could he have meant by this? If there’s one thing he has learned working as a psychoanalyst, it’s that the best way to make sense of yourself is through your dreams—and so he settles down for a nice long nap. But no sooner does his head hit the pillow than he begins to hear voices! A frightened fish with a childhood memory lodged in its throat coaxes Dr. Freud into the cold water, where his ideas come to life through an unforgettable cast of characters, including a loquacious carp and three frogs—Id, Ego, and Superego—locked in fierce competition for a single waterlily.  


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Designing TWA

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT




Power without Victory

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For decades, Woodrow Wilson has been remembered as either a paternalistic liberal or reactionary conservative at home and as a naïve idealist or cynical imperialist abroad. Historians’ harsh judgments of Wilson are understandable. He won two elections by promising a deliberative democratic process that would ensure justice and political empowerment for all. Yet under Wilson, Jim Crow persisted, interventions in Latin America increased, and a humiliating peace settlement was forced upon Germany. A generation after Wilson, stark inequalities and injustices still plagued the nation, myopic nationalism hindered its responsible engagement in world affairs, and a second vastly destructive global conflict threatened the survival of democracy worldwide—leaving some Americans today to wonder what, exactly, the buildings and programs bearing his name are commemorating. In Power without Victory, Trygve Throntveit argues that there is more to the story of Wilson than these sad truths. Throntveit makes the case that Wilson was not a “Wilsonian,” as that term has come to be understood, but a principled pragmatist in the tradition of William James. He did not seek to stamp American-style democracy on other peoples, but to enable the gradual development of a genuinely global system of governance that would maintain justice and facilitate peaceful change—a goal that, contrary to historical tradition, the American people embraced. In this brilliant intellectual, cultural, and political history, Throntveit gives us a new vision of Wilson, as well as a model of how to think about the complex relationship between the world of ideas and the worlds of policy and diplomacy.


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Power without Victory

Sat, 15 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For decades, Woodrow Wilson has been remembered as either a paternalistic liberal or reactionary conservative at home and as a naïve idealist or cynical imperialist abroad. Historians’ harsh judgments of Wilson are understandable. He won two elections by promising a deliberative democratic process that would ensure justice and political empowerment for all. Yet under Wilson, Jim Crow persisted, interventions in Latin America increased, and a humiliating peace settlement was forced upon Germany. A generation after Wilson, stark inequalities and injustices still plagued the nation, myopic nationalism hindered its responsible engagement in world affairs, and a second vastly destructive global conflict threatened the survival of democracy worldwide—leaving some Americans today to wonder what, exactly, the buildings and programs bearing his name are commemorating. In Power without Victory, Trygve Throntveit argues that there is more to the story of Wilson than these sad truths. Throntveit makes the case that Wilson was not a “Wilsonian,” as that term has come to be understood, but a principled pragmatist in the tradition of William James. He did not seek to stamp American-style democracy on other peoples, but to enable the gradual development of a genuinely global system of governance that would maintain justice and facilitate peaceful change—a goal that, contrary to historical tradition, the American people embraced. In this brilliant intellectual, cultural, and political history, Throntveit gives us a new vision of Wilson, as well as a model of how to think about the complex relationship between the world of ideas and the worlds of policy and diplomacy.


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Evidence

Mon, 10 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Howard S. Becker is a master of his discipline. His reputation as a teacher, as well as a sociologist, is supported by his best-selling quartet of sociological guidebooks: Writing for Social Scientists, Tricks of the Trade, Telling About Society, and What About Mozart? What About Murder? It turns out that the master sociologist has yet one more trick up his sleeve—a fifth guidebook, Evidence. Becker has for seventy years been mulling over the problem of evidence. He argues that social scientists don’t take questions about the usefulness of their data as evidence for their ideas seriously enough. For example, researchers have long used the occupation of a person’s father as evidence of the family’s social class, but studies have shown this to be a flawed measure—for one thing, a lot of people answer that question too vaguely to make the reasoning plausible. The book is filled with examples like this, and Becker uses them to expose a series of errors, suggesting ways to avoid them, or even to turn them into research topics in their own right. He argues strongly that because no data-gathering method produces totally reliable information, a big part of the research job consists of getting rid of error. Readers will find Becker’s newest guidebook a valuable tool, useful for social scientists of every variety.


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Evidence

Mon, 10 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Howard S. Becker is a master of his discipline. His reputation as a teacher, as well as a sociologist, is supported by his best-selling quartet of sociological guidebooks: Writing for Social Scientists, Tricks of the Trade, Telling About Society, and What About Mozart? What About Murder? It turns out that the master sociologist has yet one more trick up his sleeve—a fifth guidebook, Evidence. Becker has for seventy years been mulling over the problem of evidence. He argues that social scientists don’t take questions about the usefulness of their data as evidence for their ideas seriously enough. For example, researchers have long used the occupation of a person’s father as evidence of the family’s social class, but studies have shown this to be a flawed measure—for one thing, a lot of people answer that question too vaguely to make the reasoning plausible. The book is filled with examples like this, and Becker uses them to expose a series of errors, suggesting ways to avoid them, or even to turn them into research topics in their own right. He argues strongly that because no data-gathering method produces totally reliable information, a big part of the research job consists of getting rid of error. Readers will find Becker’s newest guidebook a valuable tool, useful for social scientists of every variety.


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Everyday Mathematics for Parents

Mon, 10 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Everyday Mathematics (EM) program was developed by the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) and is now used in more than 185,000 classrooms by almost three million students. Its research-based learning delivers the kinds of results that all school districts aspire to. Yet despite that tremendous success, EMoften leaves parents perplexed. Learning is accomplished not through rote memorization, but by actually engaging in real-life math tasks. The curriculum isn’t linear, but rather spirals back and forth, weaving concepts in and out of lessons that build overall understanding and long-term retention. It’s no wonder that many parents have difficulty navigating this innovative mathematical and pedagogic terrain.Now help is here. Inspired by UCSMP’s firsthand experiences with parents and teachers, Everyday Mathematics for Parents will equip parents with an understanding of EM and enable them to help their children with homework—the heart of the great parental adventure of ensuring that children become mathematically proficient.Featuring accessible explanations of the research-based philosophy and design of the program, and insights into the strengths of EM, this little book provides the big-picture information that parents need. Clear descriptions of how and why this approach is different are paired with illustrative tables that underscore the unique attributes of EM. Detailed guidance for assisting students with homework includes explanations of the key EM concepts that underlie each assignment. Resources for helping students practice math more at home also provide an understanding of the long-term utility of EM. Easy to use, yet jam-packed with knowledge and helpful tips, Everyday Mathematics for Parents will become a pocket mentor to parents and teachers new to EM who are ready to step up and help children succeed. With this book in hand, you’ll finally understand that while this may not be the way that you learned math, it’s actually much better.



Sweet Science

Mon, 10 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Today we do not expect poems to carry scientifically valid information. But it was not always so. In Sweet Science, Amanda Jo Goldstein returns to the beginnings of the division of labor between literature and science to recover a tradition of Romantic life writing for which poetry was a privileged technique of empirical inquiry. Goldstein puts apparently literary projects, such as William Blake’s poetry of embryogenesis, Goethe’s journals On Morphology, and Percy Shelley’s “poetry of life,” back into conversation with the openly poetic life sciences of Erasmus Darwin, J. G. Herder, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, and Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire. Such poetic sciences, Goldstein argues, share in reviving Lucretius’s De rerum natura to advance a view of biological life as neither self-organized nor autonomous, but rather dependent on the collaborative and symbolic processes that give it viable and recognizable form. They summon De rerum natura for a logic of life resistant to the vitalist stress on self-authorizing power and to make a monumental case for poetry’s role in the perception and communication of empirical realities. The first dedicated study of this mortal and materialist dimension of Romantic biopoetics, Sweet Science opens a through-line between Enlightenment materialisms of nature and Marx’s coming historical materialism.


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Sweet Science

Mon, 10 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Today we do not expect poems to carry scientifically valid information. But it was not always so. In Sweet Science, Amanda Jo Goldstein returns to the beginnings of the division of labor between literature and science to recover a tradition of Romantic life writing for which poetry was a privileged technique of empirical inquiry. Goldstein puts apparently literary projects, such as William Blake’s poetry of embryogenesis, Goethe’s journals On Morphology, and Percy Shelley’s “poetry of life,” back into conversation with the openly poetic life sciences of Erasmus Darwin, J. G. Herder, Jean-Baptiste Lamarck, and Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire. Such poetic sciences, Goldstein argues, share in reviving Lucretius’s De rerum natura to advance a view of biological life as neither self-organized nor autonomous, but rather dependent on the collaborative and symbolic processes that give it viable and recognizable form. They summon De rerum natura for a logic of life resistant to the vitalist stress on self-authorizing power and to make a monumental case for poetry’s role in the perception and communication of empirical realities. The first dedicated study of this mortal and materialist dimension of Romantic biopoetics, Sweet Science opens a through-line between Enlightenment materialisms of nature and Marx’s coming historical materialism.


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Henry David Thoreau

Fri, 07 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“Walden. Yesterday I came here to live.” That entry from the journal of Henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. His attempt to “live deliberately” in a small woods at the edge of his hometown of Concord has been a touchstone for individualists and seekers since the publication of Walden in 1854.   But there was much more to Thoreau than his brief experiment in living at Walden Pond. A member of the vibrant intellectual circle centered on his neighbor Ralph Waldo Emerson, he was also an ardent naturalist, a manual laborer and inventor, a radical political activist, and more. Many books have taken up various aspects of Thoreau’s character and achievements, but, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, “Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, many-sided.” Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls restores Henry David Thoreau to us in all his profound, inspiring complexity.   Walls traces the full arc of Thoreau’s life, from his early days in the intellectual hothouse of Concord, when the American experiment still felt fresh and precarious, and “America was a family affair, earned by one generation and about to pass to the next.” By the time he died in 1862, at only forty-four years of age, Thoreau had witnessed the transformation of his world from a community of farmers and artisans into a bustling, interconnected commercial nation. What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, wild nature that Thoreau celebrated?   Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos. We meet the man whose belief[...]


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Shakespeare's Rome

Wed, 05 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For more than forty years, Paul Cantor’s Shakespeare’s Rome has been a foundational work in the field of politics and literature. While many critics assumed that the Roman plays do not reflect any special knowledge of Rome, Cantor was one of the first to argue that they are grounded in a profound understanding of the Roman regime and its changes over time. Taking Shakespeare seriously as a political thinker, Cantor suggests that his Roman plays can be profitably studied in the context of the classical republican tradition in political philosophy.             In Shakespeare’s Rome, Cantor examines the political settings of Shakespeare’s Roman plays, Coriolanus and Antony and Cleopatra, with references as well to Julius Caesar. Cantor shows that Shakespeare presents a convincing portrait of Rome in different eras of its history, contrasting the austere republic of Coriolanus, with its narrow horizons and martial virtues, and the cosmopolitan empire of Antony and Cleopatra, with its “immortal longings” and sophistication bordering on decadence.


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Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, Fourth Edition

Sun, 02 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From sprawling houses to compact bungalows and from world-famous museums to a still-working gas station, Frank Lloyd Wright’s designs can be found in nearly every corner of the country. While the renowned architect passed away more than fifty years ago, researchers and enthusiasts are still uncovering structures that should be attributed to him. William Allin Storrer is one of the experts leading this charge, and his definitive guide, The Architecture of Frank Lloyd Wright, has long been the resource of choice for anyone interested in Wright.  Thanks to the work of Storrer and his colleagues at the Rediscovering Wright Project, thirty-seven new sites have recently been identified as the work of Wright. Together with more photos, updated and expanded entries, and a new essay on the evolution of Wright’s unparalleled architectural style, this new edition is the most comprehensive and authoritative catalog available. Organized chronologically, the catalog includes full-color photos, location information, and historical and architectural background for all of Wright’s extant structures in the United States and abroad, as well as entries for works that have been demolished over the years. A geographic listing makes it easy for traveling Wright fans to find nearby structures and a new key indicates whether a site is open to the public. Publishing for Wright’s sesquicentennial, this new edition will be a trusted companion for anyone embarking on their own journeys through the wonder and genius of Frank Lloyd Wright.


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Till The Break of Day

Sat, 01 Jul 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book documents the development of psychiatry in Singapore since its humble beginnings in the British colonial period. It should be of interest to health professionals, medical students, historians interested in the development of medicine and psychiatry and even members of the public with some basic understanding of psychiatry and psychology. Relatives and caregivers of psychiatric patients would also find the information furnished in this book enlightening.


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Richard Gerstl

Thu, 29 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Richard Gerstl (1883–1908) has recently emerged from the shadows of his contemporaries Gustav Klimt, Oskar Kokoschka, and Egon Schiele to be ranked by art historians as one of the leading artists of the Vienna-based Austria expressionist movement at the beginning of the twentieth century. This lush catalog of his work introduces this significant artist to a broad, international audience. Gerstl painted for just four to six years before his tragic suicide at age twenty-five. Because he had refused to show his work during his lifetime, he was for many years largely overlooked. But his portraits and landscapes like Self Portrait Against a Blue Background and The Fey Sisters are today regarded by both the academy and the art world as some of best examples of Austrian expressionism for their ability to evoke a visceral, emotional response in viewers through their distorted forms and exaggeratedly expressive use of color. With more than eighty works by Gerstl, this book provides a comprehensive portrait of his amazingly short, but powerfully prolific career.  


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Shakespeare's Roman Trilogy

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Paul A. Cantor first probed Shakespeare’s Roman plays—Coriolanus, Julius Caeser, and Antony and Cleopatra—in his landmark Shakespeare’s Rome (1976). With Shakespeare’s Roman Trilogy, he now argues that these plays form an integrated trilogy that portrays the tragedy not simply of their protagonists but of an entire political community. Cantor analyzes the way Shakespeare chronicles the rise and fall of the Roman Republic and the emergence of the Roman Empire. The transformation of the ancient city into a cosmopolitan empire marks the end of the era of civic virtue in antiquity, but it also opens up new spiritual possibilities that Shakespeare correlates with the rise of Christianity and thus the first stirrings of the medieval and the modern worlds. More broadly, Cantor places Shakespeare’s plays in a long tradition of philosophical speculation about Rome, with special emphasis on Machiavelli and Nietzsche, two thinkers who provide important clues on how to read Shakespeare’s works. In a pathbreaking chapter, he undertakes the first systematic comparison of Shakespeare and Nietzsche on Rome, exploring their central point of contention: Did Christianity corrupt the Roman Empire or was the corruption of the Empire the precondition of the rise of Christianity? Bringing Shakespeare into dialogue with other major thinkers about Rome, Shakespeare’s Roman Trilogy reveals the true profundity of the Roman Plays.  


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Shakespeare's Roman Trilogy

Wed, 28 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Paul A. Cantor first probed Shakespeare’s Roman plays—Coriolanus, Julius Caeser, and Antony and Cleopatra—in his landmark Shakespeare’s Rome (1976). With Shakespeare’s Roman Trilogy, he now argues that these plays form an integrated trilogy that portrays the tragedy not simply of their protagonists but of an entire political community. Cantor analyzes the way Shakespeare chronicles the rise and fall of the Roman Republic and the emergence of the Roman Empire. The transformation of the ancient city into a cosmopolitan empire marks the end of the era of civic virtue in antiquity, but it also opens up new spiritual possibilities that Shakespeare correlates with the rise of Christianity and thus the first stirrings of the medieval and the modern worlds. More broadly, Cantor places Shakespeare’s plays in a long tradition of philosophical speculation about Rome, with special emphasis on Machiavelli and Nietzsche, two thinkers who provide important clues on how to read Shakespeare’s works. In a pathbreaking chapter, he undertakes the first systematic comparison of Shakespeare and Nietzsche on Rome, exploring their central point of contention: Did Christianity corrupt the Roman Empire or was the corruption of the Empire the precondition of the rise of Christianity? Bringing Shakespeare into dialogue with other major thinkers about Rome, Shakespeare’s Roman Trilogy reveals the true profundity of the Roman Plays.  


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Matatu

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Drive the streets of Nairobi, and you are sure to see many matatus—colorful minibuses that transport huge numbers of people around the city. Once ramshackle affairs held together with duct tape and wire, matatus today are name-brand vehicles maxed out with aftermarket detailing. They can be stately black or extravagantly colored, sporting names, slogans, or entire tableaus, with airbrushed portraits of everyone from Kanye West to Barack Obama. In this richly interdisciplinary book, Kenda Mutongi explores the history of the matatu from the 1960s to the present.             As Mutongi shows, matatus offer a window onto the socioeconomic and political conditions of late-twentieth-century Africa. In their diversity of idiosyncratic designs, they reflect multiple and divergent aspects of Kenyan life—including, for example, rapid urbanization, organized crime, entrepreneurship, social insecurity, the transition to democracy, and popular culture—at once embodying Kenya’s staggering social problems as well as the bright promises of its future. Offering a shining model of interdisciplinary analysis, Mutongi mixes historical, ethnographic, literary, linguistic, and economic approaches to tell the story of the matatu and explore the entrepreneurial aesthetics of the postcolonial world.  


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I in Team

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

There is one sound that will always be loudest in sports. It isn’t the squeak of sneakers or the crunch of helmets; it isn’t the grunts or even the stadium music. It’s the deafening roar of sports fans. For those few among us on the outside, sports fandom—with its war paint and pennants, its pricey cable TV packages and esoteric stats reeled off like code—looks highly irrational, entertainment gone overboard. But as Erin C. Tarver demonstrates in this book, sports fandom has become extraordinarily important to our psyche, a matter of the very essence of who we are.             Why in the world, Tarver asks, would anyone care about how well a total stranger can throw a ball, or hit one with a bat, or toss one through a hoop? Because such activities and the massive public events that surround them form some of the most meaningful ritual identity practices we have today. They are a primary way we—as individuals and a collective—decide both who we are who we are not. And as such, they are also one of the key ways that various social structures—such as race and gender hierarchies—are sustained, lending a dark side to the joys of being a sports fan. Drawing on everything from philosophy to sociology to sports history, she offers a profound exploration of the significance of sports in contemporary life, showing us just how high the stakes of the game are.  


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I in Team

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

There is one sound that will always be loudest in sports. It isn’t the squeak of sneakers or the crunch of helmets; it isn’t the grunts or even the stadium music. It’s the deafening roar of sports fans. For those few among us on the outside, sports fandom—with its war paint and pennants, its pricey cable TV packages and esoteric stats reeled off like code—looks highly irrational, entertainment gone overboard. But as Erin C. Tarver demonstrates in this book, sports fandom has become extraordinarily important to our psyche, a matter of the very essence of who we are.             Why in the world, Tarver asks, would anyone care about how well a total stranger can throw a ball, or hit one with a bat, or toss one through a hoop? Because such activities and the massive public events that surround them form some of the most meaningful ritual identity practices we have today. They are a primary way we—as individuals and a collective—decide both who we are who we are not. And as such, they are also one of the key ways that various social structures—such as race and gender hierarchies—are sustained, lending a dark side to the joys of being a sports fan. Drawing on everything from philosophy to sociology to sports history, she offers a profound exploration of the significance of sports in contemporary life, showing us just how high the stakes of the game are.  


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Rights on Trial

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Gerry Handley faced years of blatant race-based harassment before he filed a complaint against his employer: racist jokes, signs reading “KKK” in his work area, and even questions from coworkers as to whether he had sex with his daughter as slaves supposedly did. He had an unusually strong case, with copious documentation and coworkers’ support, and he settled for $50,000, even winning back his job. But victory came at a high cost. Legal fees cut into Mr. Handley’s winnings, and tensions surrounding the lawsuit poisoned the workplace. A year later, he lost his job due to downsizing by his company. Mr. Handley exemplifies the burden plaintiffs bear in contemporary civil rights litigation. In the decades since the civil rights movement, we’ve made progress, but not nearly as much as it might seem. On the surface, America’s commitment to equal opportunity in the workplace has never been clearer. Virtually every company has antidiscrimination policies in place, and there are laws designed to protect these rights across a range of marginalized groups. But, as Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson, and Laura Beth Nielsen compellingly show, this progressive vision of the law falls far short in practice. When aggrieved individuals turn to the law, the adversarial character of litigation imposes considerable personal and financial costs that make plaintiffs feel like they’ve lost regardless of the outcome of the case. Employer defendants also are dissatisfied with the system, often feeling “held up” by what they see as frivolous cases. And even when the case is resolved in the plaintiff’s favor, the conditions that gave rise to the lawsuit rarely change. In fact, the contemporary approach to workplace discrimination law perversely comes to [...]


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Rights on Trial

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Gerry Handley faced years of blatant race-based harassment before he filed a complaint against his employer: racist jokes, signs reading “KKK” in his work area, and even questions from coworkers as to whether he had sex with his daughter as slaves supposedly did. He had an unusually strong case, with copious documentation and coworkers’ support, and he settled for $50,000, even winning back his job. But victory came at a high cost. Legal fees cut into Mr. Handley’s winnings, and tensions surrounding the lawsuit poisoned the workplace. A year later, he lost his job due to downsizing by his company. Mr. Handley exemplifies the burden plaintiffs bear in contemporary civil rights litigation. In the decades since the civil rights movement, we’ve made progress, but not nearly as much as it might seem. On the surface, America’s commitment to equal opportunity in the workplace has never been clearer. Virtually every company has antidiscrimination policies in place, and there are laws designed to protect these rights across a range of marginalized groups. But, as Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson, and Laura Beth Nielsen compellingly show, this progressive vision of the law falls far short in practice. When aggrieved individuals turn to the law, the adversarial character of litigation imposes considerable personal and financial costs that make plaintiffs feel like they’ve lost regardless of the outcome of the case. Employer defendants also are dissatisfied with the system, often feeling “held up” by what they see as frivolous cases. And even when the case is resolved in the plaintiff’s favor, the conditions that gave rise to the lawsuit rarely change. In fact, the contemporary approach to workplace discriminati[...]


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Socialist Peace?

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For the last twenty years, the West African nation of Guinea has exhibited all of the conditions that have led to civil wars in other countries, and Guineans themselves regularly talk about the inevitability of war. Yet the country has narrowly avoided conflict again and again. In A Socialist Peace?, Mike McGovern asks how this is possible, how a nation could beat the odds and evade civil war.               Guinea is rich in resources, but its people are some of the poorest in the world. Its political situation is polarized by fiercely competitive ethnic groups. Weapons flow freely through its lands and across its borders. And, finally, it is still recovering from the oppressive regime of Sékou Touré. McGovern argues that while Touré’s reign was hardly peaceful, it was successful—often through highly coercive and violent measures—at establishing a set of durable national dispositions, which have kept the nation at peace. Exploring the ambivalences of contemporary Guineans toward the afterlife of Touré’s reign as well as their abiding sense of socialist solidarity, McGovern sketches the paradoxes that undergird political stability.  


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Socialist Peace?

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For the last twenty years, the West African nation of Guinea has exhibited all of the conditions that have led to civil wars in other countries, and Guineans themselves regularly talk about the inevitability of war. Yet the country has narrowly avoided conflict again and again. In A Socialist Peace?, Mike McGovern asks how this is possible, how a nation could beat the odds and evade civil war.               Guinea is rich in resources, but its people are some of the poorest in the world. Its political situation is polarized by fiercely competitive ethnic groups. Weapons flow freely through its lands and across its borders. And, finally, it is still recovering from the oppressive regime of Sékou Touré. McGovern argues that while Touré’s reign was hardly peaceful, it was successful—often through highly coercive and violent measures—at establishing a set of durable national dispositions, which have kept the nation at peace. Exploring the ambivalences of contemporary Guineans toward the afterlife of Touré’s reign as well as their abiding sense of socialist solidarity, McGovern sketches the paradoxes that undergird political stability.  


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Supreme Court Review 2016

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For more than fifty years, The Supreme Court Review has won acclaim for providing a sustained and authoritative survey of the implications of the Court’s most significant decisions. The Supreme Court Review is an in-depth annual critique of the Supreme Court and its work, keeping up on the forefront of the origins, reforms, and interpretations of American law. It is written by and for legal academics, judges, political scientists, journalists, historians, economists, policy planners, and sociologists.  


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Decolonizing the Map

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Almost universally, newly independent states seek to affirm their independence and identity by making the production of new maps and atlases a top priority. For formerly colonized peoples, however, this process neither begins nor ends with independence, and it is rarely straightforward. Mapping their own land is fraught with a fresh set of issues: how to define and administer their territories, develop their national identity, establish their role in the community of nations, and more. The contributors to Decolonizing the Map explore this complicated relationship between mapping and decolonization while engaging with recent theoretical debates about the nature of decolonization itself.   These essays, originally delivered as the 2010 Kenneth Nebenzahl, Jr., Lectures in the History of Cartography at the Newberry Library, encompass more than two centuries and three continents—Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Ranging from the late eighteenth century through the mid-twentieth, contributors study topics from mapping and national identity in late colonial Mexico to the enduring complications created by the partition of British India and the racialized organization of space in apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa. A vital contribution to studies of both colonization and cartography, Decolonizing the Map is the first book to systematically and comprehensively examine the engagement of mapping in the long—and clearly unfinished—parallel processes of decolonization and nation building in the modern world.


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Elementary and Grammar Education in Late Medieval France

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries saw a marked increase in the availability of elementary and grammar education in Europe. In France, that rise took the form of a unique blend of trends seen elsewhere in Europe, ranging from Church-dominated schools to independent schools and communal groups of teachers. Lyon, long a crossroad of ideas from north and south, was home to a particularly interesting blend of approaches, and in this book Sarah Lynch offers a close analysis of the educational landscape of the city, showing how schools and teachers were organized and how they interacted with each other and with ecclesiastical and municipal authorities.  


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Eagle Day

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In August of 1940, the Luftwaffe launched an air assault on Britain of unprecedented power and violence. The only thing standing in their way were a few hundred pilots, navigators, and gunners who took to the skies and faced death night after night for six crucial weeks as the summer of 1940 wore away into autumn. Originally published in 1966, Eagle Day tells the story of those weeks and the men who fought and died to keep Britain free. Richard Collier, an RAF pilot himself, draws on more than four hundred eyewitness accounts to give us a startlingly close-up view of life in the air during the Battle of Britain. His accounts of that long moment when Britain's back was against the wall are unforgettable.  


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Emerging Socialities in 21st Century Health Care

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The landscape of health care is changing rapidly, both on an organizational and a technological level. This book gathers medical anthropologists to examine the ways that both patients and health care workers are being affected by new policies, market, and technologies. Contributors cover a wide range of topics, including vaccination, disability, migration, and self-medication, making clear that not only are changing circumstances leading to the emergence of new socialities, but they are also driving new ethics and moralities.  


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Early Film Theories in Italy 1896-1922

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This collection for the first time brings together scholars to explore the ways that various people and groups in Italian society reacted to the advent of cinema. Looking at the responses of writers, scholars, clergymen, psychologists, philosophers, members of parliament, and more, the pieces collected here from that period show how Italians developed a common language to describe and discuss this invention that quickly exceeded all expectations and transcended existing categories of thought and artistic forms. The result is a close-up picture of a culture in transition, dealing with a “scandalous” new technology that appeared poised to thoroughly change everyday life.


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Echoes of Valhalla

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Tolkien’s wizard Gandalf, Wagner’s Valkyrie Brünnhilde, Marvel’s superhero the Mighty Thor, the warrior heading for Valhalla in Led Zeppelin’s “Immigrant Song,” and Donald Crisp’s portrayal of Leif Eriksson in the classic film The Viking—these are just a few examples of how Icelandic medieval literature has shaped human imagination during the past 150 years. Echoes of Valhalla is a unique look at modern adaptations of the Icelandic eddas (poems of Norse mythology) and sagas (ancient prose accounts of Viking history, voyages, and battles) across an astonishing breadth of art forms. Jón Karl Helgason looks at comic books, plays, travel books, music, and films in order to explore the reincarnations of a range of legendary characters, from the Nordic gods Thor and Odin to the saga characters Hallgerd Long-legs, Gunnar of Hlidarendi, and Leif the Lucky. Roaming the globe, Helgason unearths echoes of Nordic lore in Scandinavia, Britain, America, Germany, Italy, and Japan. He examines the comic work of Jack Kirby and cartoon work of Peter Madsen; reads the plays of Henrik Ibsen and Gordon Bottomley; engages thought travelogues by Frederick Metcalfe and Poul Vad; listens to the music of Richard Wagner, Edward Elgar, and the metal band Manowar; and watches films by directors such as Roy William Neill and Richard Fleischer, outlining the presence of the eddas and sagas in these nineteenth- and twentieth-century works.   Altogether, Echoes of Valhalla tel[...]


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Exist Otherwise

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the turmoil of the 1920s and ’30s, Claude Cahun challenged gender stereotypes with her powerful photographs, montages, and writings, works that appear to our twenty-first-century eyes as utterly contemporary, or even from the future. She wrote poetry and prose for major French literary magazines, worked in avant-garde theater, and was both comrade of and critical outsider to the Surrealists. Exist Otherwise is the first work in English to the tell the full story of Claude Cahun’s art and life, one that celebrates and makes accessible Cahun’s remarkable vision.              Jennifer L. Shaw embeds Cahun within the exciting social and artistic milieu of Paris between the wars. She examines her relationship with Marcel Moore—Cahun’s stepsister, lover, and life partner—who was a central collaborator helping make some of the most compelling photographs and photomontages of Cahun’s oeuvre, dreamscapes of disassembled portraiture and scenes that simultaneously fascinate and terrify. Shaw follows Cahun into the horrors of World War II and the Nazi occupation of the island of Jersey off the coast of Normandy, and she explores the powerful and dangerous ways Cahun resisted it. Reading through her letters and diaries, Shaw brings Cahun’s ideas and feelings to the foreground, offering an intimate look at how she thought about photography, surrealism, the histories of women artists, an[...]


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End of Development

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Across the world, millions remain trapped in debilitating poverty, while international aid and development projects have seemingly done little to close the gap between developed and developing nations. Why have some countries grown so rich while others remain so poor? And, how can we account for the persistence of global poverty?  In The End of Development, Andrew Brooks answers these questions with a provocative argument that inequality is rooted in the very nature of our approach to development itself.   Tracing the long arc of human history, Brooks rejects popular environmental explanations for the divergence of nations, showing that the prosperity of the West and poverty of “the rest” stems not from environmental factors but from the dynamics of capitalism and colonialism, which enriched the powers of the global North at the expense of the South. Rather than address the root causes of this inequality, international development strategies have so far only served to exacerbate them, by imposing crippling debts and destructive policies on developing nations.      But, Brooks suggests that this disastrous form of development is now coming to an end, as the emerging economies of Asia and Africa begin to assert themselves on the world stage. In The End of Development he urges that we must seize this opportunity to transform attitudes towards inequality and to develop radical new approach[...]


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Fan Phenomena: Game of Thrones

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Winter is coming. Every Sunday night, millions of fans gather around their televisions to take in the spectacle that is a new episode of Game of Thrones. Much is made of who will be gruesomely murdered each week on the hit show, though sometimes the question really is who won’t die a fiery death. The show, based on the Song of Ice and Fire series written by George R. R. Martin, is a truly global phenomenon. With the seventh season of the HBO series in production, Game of Thrones has been nominated for multiple awards, its cast has been catapulted to celebrity, and references to it proliferate throughout popular culture. Often positioned as the grittier antithesis to J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, Martin’s narrative focuses on the darker side of chivalry and heroism, stripping away these higher ideals to reveal the greed, amorality, and lust for power underpinning them.Fan Phenomena: Game of Thrones is an exciting new addition to the Intellect series, bringing together academics and fans of Martin’s universe to consider not just the content of the books and HBO series, but fan responses to both. From trivia nights dedicated to minutiae to forums speculating on plot twists to academics trying to make sense of the bizarre climate of Westeros, everyone is talking about Game of Thrones. Edited by Kavita Mudan Finn, the book focuses on the communities created by the books and television [...]


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Flatness

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

There are few truths about the modern world that are more self-evident than this: it is flat. We write on flat paper laid atop flat desks. We look at flat images on flat screens mounted on flat walls, or we press flat icons on flat phones while we navigate flat streets. Everywhere we go it seems the structures around us at one time or another had a level placed upon them to ensure they were perfectly flat. Yet such engineered planar surfaces have become so pervasive and fundamental to our lives that we barely notice their existence. In this highly original study, B. W. Higman employs a wide variety of approaches to better understand flatness, that level platform upon which the dramas of modern life have played out. Higman looks at the ways that humans have perceived the natural world around them, moving from Flat Earth theories to abstract geometric concepts to the flatness problem of modern cosmology. Along the way he shows that we have simultaneously sought flatness in our everyday lives and also disparaged it as a featureless, empty, and monotonous quality. He discusses the ways flatness figures as a metaphor for those things or people who are boring, dull, or lacking energy or inspiration, and he shows how the construction of flat surfaces has contributed to a degradation of visual diversity. At the same time, he also shows how we have pursued flatness as an enginee[...]


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