Subscribe: University of Chicago Press Books: New books
http://www.press.uchicago.edu/rss/newbooks.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
art  book  century  contemporary  cultural  history  life  new  offers  political  social  time  work  works  world  years 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Tue, 21 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

 



Reliquary Effect

Sun, 19 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

From skeletons to strips of cloth to little pieces of dust, reliquaries can be found in many forms, and while sometimes they may seem grotesque on their surface, they are nonetheless invested with great spiritual and memorial value. In this book, Cynthia Hahn offers the first full survey in English of the societal value of reliquaries, showing how they commemorate religious and historical events and, more important, inspire awe, faith, and, for many, the miraculous.             Hahn looks deeply into the Christian tradition, examining relics and reliquaries throughout history and around the world, going from the earliest years of the cult of saints through to the post-Reformation response. She looks at relic footprints, incorrupt bodies, the Crown of Thorns, the Shroud of Turin, and many other renowned relics, and she shows how the architectural creation of sacred space and the evocation of the biblical tradition of the temple is central to the reliquary’s numinous power. She also discusses relics from other traditions—especially from Buddhism and Islam—and she even looks at how reliquaries figure in contemporary art. Fascinatingly illustrated throughout, this book is a must-read for anyone interested in the enduring power of sacred objects.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/80/23/9781780236551.jpg




Philosophy Between the Lines

Fri, 17 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Philosophical esotericism—the practice of communicating one’s unorthodox thoughts “between the lines”—was a common practice until the end of the eighteenth century. The famous Encyclopédie of Diderot, for instance, not only discusses this practice in over twenty different articles, but admits to employing it itself. The history of Western thought contains hundreds of such statements by major philosophers testifying to the use of esoteric writing in their own work or others’. Despite this long and well-documented history, however, esotericism is often dismissed today as a rare occurrence. But by ignoring esotericism, we risk cutting ourselves off from a full understanding of Western philosophical thought.             Arthur M. Melzer serves as our deeply knowledgeable guide in this capacious and engaging history of philosophical esotericism. Walking readers through both an ancient (Plato) and a modern (Machiavelli) esoteric work, he explains what esotericism is—and is not. It relies not on secret codes, but simply on a more intensive use of familiar rhetorical techniques like metaphor, irony, and insinuation. Melzer explores the various motives that led thinkers in different times and places to engage in this strange practice, while also exploring the motives that lead more recent thinkers not only to dislike and avoid this practice but to deny its very existence. In the book’s final section, “A Beginner’s Guide to Esoteric Reading,” Melzer turns to how we might once again cultivate the long-forgotten art of reading esoteric works.Philosophy Between the Lines is the first comprehensive, book-length study of the history and theoretical basis of philosophical esotericism, and it provides a crucial guide to how many major writings—philosophical, but also theological, political, and literary—were composed prior to the nineteenth century.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/17/9780226175096.jpg




Global Work of Art

Thu, 16 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Global biennials have proliferated in the contemporary art world, but artists’ engagement with large-scale international exhibitions has a much longer history that has influenced the present in important ways. Going back to the earliest world’s fairs in the nineteenth century, this book argues that “globalism” was incubated in a century of international art contests and today constitutes an important tactic for artists. As world’s fairs brought millions of attendees into contact with foreign cultures, products, and processes, artworks became juxtaposed in a “theater of nations,” which challenged artists and critics to think outside their local academies. From Gustave Courbet’s rebel pavilion near the official art exhibit at the 1855 French World’s Fair to curator Beryl Madra’s choice of London-based Cypriot Hussein Chalayan for the off-site Turkish pavilion at the 2006 Venice Biennale, artists have used these exhibitions to reflect on contemporary art, speak to their own governments back home, and challenge the wider geopolitical realm—changing art and art history along the way. Ultimately, Caroline A. Jones argues, the modern appetite for experience and event structures, which were cultivated around the art at these earlier expositions, have now come to constitute contemporary art itself, producing encounters that transform the public and force us to reflect critically on the global condition.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/29/9780226291741.jpg




Yours for the Union

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Yours for the Union stands as a landmark history of the making of the black working class in South Africa. Drawing on a wide range of sources, it covers the crucial period between 1930 and 1947, when South Africa's rapid industrialization led to the dramatic growth of the working class, and uncontrolled urbanization resulted in the creation of vast shanty towns that became a focal point for resistance and protest.   Renowned scholar and activist Baruch Hirson was one of the first historians to go beyond the traditional focus on the mines and factory workplaces, broadening his account to include the lesser known community struggles of the urban ghettoes and rural reserves. Drawing on Hirson’s first-hand involvement in South African labor struggles, Yours for the Union broke new ground with its account of the effort to mobilize urban squatters, domestic workers, and rural peasants, and it remains indispensable today as a resource for the study of the South African labor movement.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/86/99/9781786990648.jpg




Yours for the Union

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Yours for the Union stands as a landmark history of the making of the black working class in South Africa. Drawing on a wide range of sources, it covers the crucial period between 1930 and 1947, when South Africa's rapid industrialization led to the dramatic growth of the working class, and uncontrolled urbanization resulted in the creation of vast shanty towns that became a focal point for resistance and protest.   Renowned scholar and activist Baruch Hirson was one of the first historians to go beyond the traditional focus on the mines and factory workplaces, broadening his account to include the lesser known community struggles of the urban ghettoes and rural reserves. Drawing on Hirson’s first-hand involvement in South African labor struggles, Yours for the Union broke new ground with its account of the effort to mobilize urban squatters, domestic workers, and rural peasants, and it remains indispensable today as a resource for the study of the South African labor movement.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/86/99/9781786990648.jpg




Unpopular Culture

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This volume introduces a new concept, one that boldly breaks through the traditional dichotomy of high and low culture while offering a fresh approach to both: unpopular culture. From the works of David Foster Wallace and Ernest Hemingway to fanfiction and The Simpsons, from natural disasters to 9/11 and beyond, the essays find the unpopular across media and genres, analyzing the politics and aesthetics of a side to culture that has been overlooked by previous theories and methods in cultural studies.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/89/64/9789089649669.jpg




Zoran Music

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Zoran Music (1909–2005) was a Slovenian painter and graphic artist. A survivor of the Holocaust, he is best known for “We Are Not the Last,” a series of paintings for which he drew on his experience as a prisoner at Dachau as a way to work through the terrible human tragedy. Music’s later work is characterized by intense concentration on just a few subjects: deeply shadowed portraits, stark landscapes of Dalmatia and Italy, and bright cityscapes depicting his adopted home city of Venice. With sixty-eight works from the exceptional collection of Gabriele and Anna Braglia, Zoran Music: The Braglia Collection provides extremely informative insight into the Music’s unusual and moving body of work. Through the juxtaposition of these works, there emerges a common thread: the artist’s remarkable ability to evoke reflection on the human essence and condition. With a wealth of color illustrations and contributions by prominent art historians, artists, and critics, Zoran Music: The Braglia Collection will be welcomed by the many admirers and collectors of the work of this extraordinary artist.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777426860.jpg




Kama Sutra Colouring Book

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Coloring books for adults are all the rage these days, with people everywhere taking up their colored pencils and crayons and letting go of the stress and worries of the day, letting go their inhibitions and just having fun. That vaguely reminds us of another great stress-relieving activity . . . well, it’ll come to us eventually. In the meantime, here’s an unprecedented addition to the ranks of adult coloring books: The Kama Sutra Coloring Book. This ancient Hindu text has fascinated and titillated Western readers since Richard Francis Burton first translated it in 1883, and it’s lost none of its power to inspire intimate exploration. This coloring book presents a carefully chosen selection of illustrations from the Kama Sutra, redrawn from original artwork from the mid-nineteenth century, to make them easy for amorous readers to color and share. Publishing just in time for Valentine’s Day, The Kama Sutra Coloring Book will be the perfect gift for your seductive sweetie.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/19/10/78/9781910787311.jpg




Great West Ukrainian Prison Massacre of 1941

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

After Germany invaded the Soviet Union in 1941, the Soviet secret police, the NKVD, executed a staggering number of political prisoners in Western Ukraine—somewhere between 10,000 and 40,000—in the space of eight days, in one of the greatest atrocities perpetrated by the Soviet state. Yet the Great West Ukrainian Prison Massacre of 1941 is largely unknown. This sourcebook aims to change that, offering detailed scholarly analysis, eyewitness testimonies and profiles of known victims, and a selection of fiction, memoirs, and poetry that testifies to the lasting impact of the massacre in the collective memory of Ukrainians.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/89/64/9789089648341.jpg




Grimanesa Amorós

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The work of the prize-winning Peruvian-American light artist Grimanesa Amorós is characterized by organic forms and an instinctive, poetic approach. However, the inspirations for her fascinating sculptures can be found in the natural sciences, social history, and critical theory, which creates a dialogue between research and emotion in her work. Grimanesa Amorós: Ocupante is the first presentation of her latest works, while offering a thorough overview of her work to date. As this beautifully illustrated book demonstrates, Amorós creates playful light installations that are engaging and enigmatic, allowing for many interpretations on different levels. Here expansive works are rendered here in large format in order to best reproduce their fluidity and luminosity. It will be an important addition to the library of anyone fascinated by the latest in contemporary sculpture and installation.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777426488.jpg




Gert & Uwe Tobias

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The twins Gert and Uwe Tobias are among the most famous German artists in the field of printed graphics, and to this day their inimitable signature remains as radical as ever. Their large-format woodcuts, luminous collages, and nuanced typewriter drawings are frequently characterized by exuberant imagination, craftsman-like perfection, and humorous depth, and their most recent group of works, Grisaille, is in keeping with the creative and entertaining pieces we’ve come to expect from them. In Grisaille, created exclusively for an exhibition at the Staatlichen Graphischen Sammlung in Munich, the artists reinvigorate the centuries-old technique of “grey-in-grey painting,” while simultaneously interpreting it in a fresh manner through woodcuts. Presenting a twilight, monochrome color scheme hitherto unseen in their work, the realm of shadows in their fabulous pictorial inventions is at once ambiguous and extreme. Richly illustrated with eighty color plates, this book presents a critical addition to their oeuvre.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777427270.jpg




Garden State

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In this beautifully illustrated book, artist Corinne Silva offers a new way to think about gardens: like maps, as a way of allocating space. Using images that she made on a series of visits to Israeli-occupied territories between the Mediterranean and the Jordan River, Silva shows how the gardens in these lands are simultaneously material and symbolic evidence of continuing colonization. Featuring photographs taken in twenty-two different Israeli settlements, Garden State also includes a taxonomic table of common colonizing plants assembled by botanist Sabina Knees, an essay by Val Williams, and a conversation between Silva and architect Eyal Weizman on the little-known link between gardens and colonization that can be traced from the eighteenth century to the present. A book that, like a garden itself, is both beautiful and political, Garden State will change the way we think about cultivation and colonization.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/18/72/77/9781872771588.jpg




All the Boats on the Ocean

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Most current fishing practices are neither economically nor biologically sustainable. Every year, the world spends $80 billion buying fish that cost $105 billion to catch, even as heavy fishing places growing pressure on stocks that are already struggling with warmer, more acidic oceans. How have we developed an industry that is so wasteful, and why has it been so difficult to alter the trajectory toward species extinction? In this transnational, interdisciplinary history, Carmel Finley answers these questions and more as she explores how government subsidies propelled the expansion of fishing from a coastal, in-shore activity into a global industry. While nation states struggling for ocean supremacy have long used fishing as an imperial strategy, the Cold War brought a new emphasis: fishing became a means for nations to make distinct territorial claims. A network of trade policies and tariffs allowed cod from Iceland and tuna canned in Japan into the American market, destabilizing fisheries in New England and Southern California. With the subsequent establishment of tuna canneries in American Samoa and Puerto Rico, Japanese and American tuna boats moved from the Pacific into the Atlantic and Indian Oceans after bluefin. At the same time, government subsidies in nations such as Spain and the Soviet Union fueled fishery expansion on an industrial scale, with the Soviet fleet utterly depleting the stock of rosefish (or Pacific ocean perch) and other groundfish from British Columbia to California. This massive global explosion in fishing power led nations to expand their territorial limits in the 1970s, forever changing the seas. Looking across politics, economics, and biology, All the Boats on the Ocean casts a wide net to reveal how the subsidy-driven expansion of fisheries in the Pacific during the Cold War led to the growth of fisheries science and the creation of international fisheries management. Nevertheless, the seas are far from calm: in a world where this technologically advanced industry has enabled nations to colonize the oceans, fish literally have no place left to hide, and the future of the seas and their fish stocks is uncertain.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/02/26/44/9780226443379.jpg




Animal Rights Activism

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

We’re in an era of ever increasing attention to animal rights, and activism around the issue is growing more widespread and prominent. In this volume, Kerstin Jacobsson and Jonas Lindblom use the animal rights movement in Sweden to offer the first analysis of social movements through the lens of Emile Durkheim’s sociology of morality. By positing social movements as essentially a moral phenomenon—and morality itself as a social fact—the book complements more structural, cultural, or strategic action–based approaches, even as it also demonstrates the continuing value of classical sociological approaches to understanding contemporary society.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/89/64/9789089647641.jpg




Albrecht Gehse--Turmoil

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Albrecht Gehse has an unmistakable style rooted in illusionistic representationalism. Drawing widely on past and present real-world events, his paintings depict a broad range of subjects, from bustling crowds to lone political figures like former German chancellor Helmut Kohl, from built spaces like theaters and apartment buildings to scenes of seething natural disaster. Yet these rapidly sketched scenes, stripped of traditional iconography, reveal a rich world of nightmares and dreamscapes bubbling beneath if one only cares to look. Gehse’s painterly renderings of the world are by turns frightening and funny, with his role as an interpreter underscored by the fact that he paints himself into many of his scenes. With Albrecht Gehse—Turmoil, Christoph Stölzl has brought together the fifty paintings that comprise Gehse’s most recent series, Turmoil. Among the more than one hundred illustrations are many full-page reproductions, as well as detail shots that show points of special interest in the painting. Stölzl’s commentary sheds light on both the paintings and their subjects. Masterfully composed with explosive touches of color, Turmoil opens a strange, new window onto the world that will be of great interest to students and scholars of contemporary art.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777426747.jpg




Atlas of Another America

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Owning a home is the pinnacle of the American Dream, the ultimate status symbol of the middle class. But is the dream in crisis? As the suburban single-family home has been endlessly multiplied and mass-marketed, it has become entwined with environmental catastrophe and economic crisis. Never before have we been so badly in need of a reconsideration of our cultural values and consumption from an architectural perspective. With An Atlas of Another America, Keith Krumwiede has written a bold and highly original work of speculative architectural fiction that calls on Americans—and, increasingly, the rest of the world—to seriously reconsider the concept of the single-family home. Krumwiede’s “Freedomland” is a fictional utopia of communal superhomes constructed from the remains of the suburban metropolis. Eschewing formal innovation for its own sake, Freedomland’s radical architects rely on artful appropriation and the reorganization of found forms. Krumwiede produces the complete plans for Freedomland in the style of a historical architectural treatise, supplemented with more than two hundred plans and drawings and five essays that draw on a long lineage of architectural thought—from Piranesi to Ledoux, Branzi, and Koolhaas. Among the essays, “Atypical Plans” is a redaction of Koolhaas’s landmark text “Typical Plan,” “Supermodel Homes” looks at the mad genius of developer David Weekley,” and “New Homes for America” is a short story in which a young architect produces new forms of communal living.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/30/38/60/9783038600022.jpg




Association of American University Presses Directory 2017

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This comprehensive directory offers detailed information on the publishing programs and personnel of the more than 130 member presses of the Association of American University Presses. Its many useful features include a convenient subject guide indicating which presses publish in specific disciplines; separate entries for each member press that include complete addresses, telephone and fax numbers, and email addresses of key staffers within each press as well as details about their editorial programs; guidelines for submitting manuscripts; and information about AAUP corporate partners.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/09/45/10/9780945103370.jpg




Alberto Giacometti--Beyond Bronze

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Although he is best known for his signature bronze sculptures, Alberto Giacometti (1901–66) worked in a variety of other media such as marble, plaster, and wood. Plaster was of particularly great importance to Giacometti’s work. It offered many advantages as a medium, the foremost being that it allowed the artist to rework or repaint his sculptures in a variety of ways. More than an intermediate stage between clay model and bronze cast, plaster was therefore often regarded by Giacometti as a primary medium, and many of his works exist only in plaster.            Alberto Giacometti—Beyond Bronze is based on a gift by Bruno Giacometti of seventy-five plaster sculptures to Kunsthaus Zürich, which have been extensively restored and researched. With more than two hundred illustrations, including many in large format and full color, the book features masterpieces from every stage of Giacometti’s career. Apart from the book’s main focus—the place of plaster in the artist’s oeuvre—it also includes sculptures in marble, bronze, and wood. Together, the sculptures show how Giacometti approached the material properties of these different media and offer insight into the creative process of one of the twentieth century’s greatest artists.             Published to accompany a major exhibition at Kunsthaus Zürich, Alberto Giacometti—Beyond Bronze celebrates a lesser-known yet fundamentally important aspect of the artist’s work.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/38/58/81/9783858817853.jpg




Admiral Matelieff's Singapore and Johor, 1606-1616

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Cornelis Matelieff de Jonge (c.1570‒1632) was admiral of the Dutch East India Company when it sailed to Asia in 1605 and besieged Portuguese Melaka in 1606 with the help of Malay allies. A massive Portuguese armada then arrived from Goa to fight the Dutch and succeeded in breaking the siege on the Portuguese colony. Throughout this time, Matelieff penned a series of letters in which he provided a candid assessment of trading opportunities and politics in Asia. Admiral Matelieff's Singapore and Johor offers an edited selection of Matelieff’s most important writings from this period, focusing on his experience and interest in Singapore and the Straits of Melaka.   In his letters, Matelieff advised the government officials of the Dutch Republic to take a long term view of Dutch involvement in Asia, and as a result, he fundamentally changed their approach to trade, with Singapore, the Straits region, and Johor taking on a more significant role. The rediscovery of Matelieff’s writings have helped to reshape the way local history is taught and understood in Singapore and Malaysia, and this collection will be essential to scholars of the region.    


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/98/14/72/9789814722186.jpg




Activist Film Festivals

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Film festivals are an ever-growing part of the film industry, but most considerations of them focus almost entirely on their role in the business of filmmaking. This book breaks new ground by bringing scholars from a range of disciplines together with industry professionals to explore the concept of festivals as spaces through an activist lens, as spaces where the sociopolitical identities of communities and individuals are confronted and shaped. Tracing the growth of activist and human rights-focused films from the 1970s to the present, and using case studies from San Francisco, Brazil, Bristol, and elsewhere, the book addresses such contentious topics as whether activist films can achieve humanitarian aims or simply offer “cinema of suffering.” Ultimately, the contributors attack the question of just how effective festivals are at producing politically engaged spectators?  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/20/9781783206346.jpg




Bizarre Botany

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The world of plants is endlessly fascinating and full of surprises, even for an experienced horticulturalist or gardener. This book celebrates that bounty through a tour of its stranger precincts, a beautifully illustrated A-to-Z compendium of fascinating facts, quirky stories, and unusual adaptations.Flipping through this elegant, approachable book, you’ll encounter oddities like the breathing knees of the swamp cypress or the illicit whiskey distilleries once fueled by juniper wood. Do you know what a vegetable sheep is, or what plants the Egyptians used in embalming? That poison dart frogs raise their young in tank bromeliads in the upper reaches of the forest canopy? Or that oak galls can be used as a source of ink? You’ll learn all that and more before you get to Z in this lovely gift book. Full of fascinating floral facts, Bizarre Botany will appeal to plant lovers and gardeners old and young, experienced or just starting out—and its bounty of oddities are sure to make you a hit at your next garden party.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/18/42/46/9781842466148.jpg




Business and Society

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Our society is dominated by corporations that employ us, sell to us, and influence local, national, and global agendas. Though we may take for granted the role of corporate business and capitalism in our day to day lives and assume it is inescapable, this hasn’t always been the case. Business and Society provides a broad historical analysis of the spread of capitalism and the foundation of the corporate revolution in the late nineteenth century, while examining the challenges of regulation and ethics in contemporary business. In addition, it examines how corporate power and capitalism might be resisted, outlining a range of alternatives, from the social economy to new forms of open access or commons ownership.   Written in a clear, accessible style, Business and Society offers an approachable introduction to  a variety of perspectives from sociological, geographical, heterodox economic, ethical, political, legal and historical contexts.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783604494.jpg




Business and Society

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Our society is dominated by corporations that employ us, sell to us, and influence local, national, and global agendas. Though we may take for granted the role of corporate business and capitalism in our day to day lives and assume it is inescapable, this hasn’t always been the case. Business and Society provides a broad historical analysis of the spread of capitalism and the foundation of the corporate revolution in the late nineteenth century, while examining the challenges of regulation and ethics in contemporary business. In addition, it examines how corporate power and capitalism might be resisted, outlining a range of alternatives, from the social economy to new forms of open access or commons ownership.   Written in a clear, accessible style, Business and Society offers an approachable introduction to  a variety of perspectives from sociological, geographical, heterodox economic, ethical, political, legal and historical contexts.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783604494.jpg




Aftermath of War

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Aftermath of War brings together essays written in Sartre’s most creative period, just after World War II. Sartre’s extraordinary range of engagement is manifest, with writings on post-war America, the social impact of war in Europe, contemporary philosophy, race, and avant garde art. Carefully structured into sections, the essays range across Sartre’s reflections on collaboration, resistance and liberation in post-war Europe, his thoughts and observations after his extended trip to the USA in 1945, an examination of the failings of philosophical materialism, his analysis of the new revolutionary poetry of ‘negritude’, and his meditations on the visual arts, with essays on the work of Giacometti and Calder, both of whom Sartre knew well.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/19/05/42/9781905422883.jpeg




Popular Romance in Iceland

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

A late medieval Icelandic romance about the maiden-king of France, the Nítíða saga was well received in its day and grew in popularity throughout post-Reformation Iceland. It has not, however, received the comprehensive scholarly analysis it deserves, or that other Icelandic sagas have received. Sheryl McDonald Werronen corrects that here, offering a detailed study of the saga and its presentation of women and the Icelandic worldview, including questions of identity, gender, female solidarity, and the romance genre itself.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/89/64/9789089647955.jpg




Painting and Publishing as Cultural Industries

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Dutch Republic was a cultural powerhouse in the modern era, producing lasting masterpieces in painting and publishing—in the process transforming those fields from modest trades to booming industries. This book asks the question of how such a small nation could become such a major player in those fields. Claartje Rasterhoff shows how industrial organizations played a role in shaping patterns of growth and innovation—as early modern Dutch cultural industries were concentrated geographically, highly networked, and institutionally embedded, they were able to reduce uncertainty in the marketplace and stimulate the commercial and creative potential of painters and publishers—though those successes eventually came up against the limits of a saturated domestic market and an aversion to risk on the part of producers that ultimately brought an end to the boom.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/89/64/9789089647023.jpg




Profit Doctrine

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The profession of economics has a lot to answer for. Since the late 1970s, the ideas of influential economists have justified policies that have made the world more prone to economic crisis, remarkably less equal, more polluted, and less secure than it might be. How did ideas and policies that have proved to be such an abject failure come to dominate the economic landscape?   By critically examining the work of the most famous economists of the neoliberal period including Alan Greenspan, Milton Friedman, and Robert Lucas, Robert Chernomas and Ian Hudson demonstrate that many of those who rose to prominence did so primarily because of their defense of, and contribution to, rising corporate profits, rather thantheir ability to predict or explain economic events.   An important and controversial book, The Profit Doctrine exposes the uses and abuses of mainstream economic canons, identifies those responsible, and reaffirms the primacy of political economy.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/07/45/33/9780745335865.jpg




Portraits

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre counted among his friends and associates some of the most esteemed intellectuals, writers, and artists of the twentieth century. In Portraits (Situations IV), Sartre collected his impressions and accounts of many of his notable acquaintances, in addition to some of his most important writings on art and literature during the early 1950s.Portraits includes Sartre’s preface to Nathalie Sarraute’s Portrait of a Man Unknown and his homages to André Gide, Albert Camus, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. The essay on Merleau-Ponty casts considerable light on the recent history of French philosophy, particularly with regard to dominant post-war political conceptions. Featured as well are lengthy studies of Sartre’s close friend Paul Nizan and of the young André Gorz that are no less revealing, as well as Sartre’s “Reply to Albert Camus,” which sealed the ideological and personal break between the two writers on its publication in 1952. Alongside these major writings are fascinating articles on Tintoretto and a number of contemporary artists, including Giacometti and Masson. Finally, Portraits concludes with two travelogue-style accounts of Sartre’s time in Italy.This new translation by Chris Turner presents these essays in their complete form as originally intended by Sartre when he first published Situations IV in France and is thus essential reading for anyone interested in the artistic and intellectual history of the time.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/19/06/49/9781906497170.jpeg




Placing John Haines

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

  John Haines arrived in Alaska, fresh out of the Navy, in 1947, and established a homestead seventy miles southeast of Fairbanks. He stayed there nearly twenty-five years, learning to live off the country: hunting, trapping, fishing, gathering berries, and growing vegetables. Those years formed him as a writer—the interior of Alaska, and especially its boreal forest—marking his poetry and prose and helping him find his unique voice.  Placing John Haines, the first book-length study of his work, tells the story of those years, but also of his later, itinerant life, as his success as a writer led him to hold fellowships and teach at universities across the country. James Perrin Warren draws out the contradictions inherent in that biography—that this poet so indelibly associated with place, and authentic belonging, spent decades in motion—and also sets Haines’s work in the context of contemporaries like Robert Bly, Donald Hall, and his close friend Wendell Berry. The resulting portrait shows us a poet who was regularly reinventing himself, and thereby generating creative tension that fueled his unforgettable work. A major study of a sadly neglected master, Placing John Haines puts his achievement in compelling context.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/16/02/23/9781602233096.jpg




Policy Analysis in Mexico

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This is the first detailed examination of the practice of policy analysis in Mexico. In addition to contributing to a better knowledge of the nature of policy making in the country, it promotes evidence-based policy analysis and better policy results. Policy Analysis in Mexico studies the nature of policy analysis at different sectors and levels of government as well as by nongovernmental actors, such as unions, business, NGOs, and the media.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/14/47/32/9781447329152.jpg




Jacy

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This book describes the fundamentals of Jacy, an implementation of a Japanese head-driven phrase structure grammar with many useful linguistic implications. Jacy presents sound information about the Japanese language (syntax, semantics, and pragmatics) based on implementation and tested on large quantities of data. As the grammar development was done in a multilingual environment, Jacy also showcases both multilingual concepts and differences among the languages and demonstrates the usefulness of semantic analysis in language technology applications.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/16/9781684000180.jpg




Linguistic and Cultural Foreign Policies of European States

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The policies relating to language pursued by European monarchies and states have been widely studied, but far less attention has been given to their linguistic and cultural policies in territories outside their own borders. This volume takes an interdisciplinary approach to filling that gap, distinguishing and analyzing several different types of linguistic and foreign cultural policies. Such policies, the contributors show, tended not to be proclaimed officially, but they nonetheless had lasting effects on both language and culture in Europe and beyond.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/94/62/98/9789462980600.jpg




Looking to Heaven

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Stanley Spencer (1891–1959) was one of the most influential English painters of the twentieth century. His paintings are detailed and vibrant and often depict his deep, but eccentric, Christian beliefs. A native of Cookham in Berkshire, England, he often used his hometown as the setting for his paintings, recreating biblical stories and placing them in his small village along the Thames.  Drawing directly from Spencer’s journals, Looking to Heaven, Volume I, is the first of three volumes collecting Spencer’s own notes and telling his life story through his observations and sketches. The journals give previously unavailable insight into how Spencer thought about and approached his work. Included in this volume are Spencer’s reflections on his time as a volunteer in the Army Medical Corps during WWI, experiences that inspired one of Spencer’s most-celebrated works, a mural painted in the Sandham Memorial Chapel in Burghclere depicting realistic scenes of everyday life in a war zone alongside dreamlike visions drawn from his imagination. The vast majority of the writings collected in Looking to Heaven have never before been published, and carefully assembled here by Spencer’s grandson John Spencer, they offer a significant and powerful peek into the mind of a great artist at work.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/19/10/06/9781910065594.jpg




Lure of the Key

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The keys in your pocket right now are probably pretty boring. Mass-produced, stamped out without care, and used without thought, they’re nothing more these days than a tool. ​But that hasn’t always been the case—and the large numbers of key collectors the world over know better than anyone. In Lure of the Key, William Wallace draws on more than thirty-five years of collecting keys to offer a richly illustrated history of the key from the Middle Ages to 1900. Paying particular attention to the incredible innovations and craftsmanship of the period around 1700, the zenith of creative keymaking, Wallace invests his history with a clear sense of the pleasure and excitement of key collecting (or cagophily)—after reading his account, you’ll never take even your dull modern keys for granted again.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/19/10/78/9781910787250.jpg




Ludwig Meidner

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

A master of the expressionist portrait, Ludwig Meidner (1884–1966) painted numerous portraits during the 1910s and ’20s of his many acquaintances in German-Jewish intellectual circles, evidencing his broad literary and artistic networks. This book brings them all vividly together to offer a full picture of Meidner’s life and influences.Ludwig Meidner: Encounters examines Meidner’s portraits during this period and reveals the many writers, musicians, and fellow artists who were his friends during the years before and during the Weimar Republic. Among the two hundred color plates included are portraits of such significant figures as Leo Baeck, Bella Chagall, Max Herrmann-Neiße, and Max Reinhardt. The selected works reveal the impressive breadth of the scope of Meidner’s work and are essential for understanding his oeuvre as a whole.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777426839.jpg




Law Beyond the State

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Law beyond the State brings together contributions by renowned experts on international and European Union law to celebrate the centennial of Goethe‒Universität Frankfurt. The essays explore Frankfurt’s contribution to the development of international law; the historical development of international law; how this form of law can be used as a tool to improve the world and create a better future for all; the essential relevance of the spiritual dimension of legal orders, including the European Union, to ensuring their values will be taken seriously; and the possibility, offered by the Internet, for all persons concerned with global lawmaking to participate effectively in relevant decision-making processes.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/35/93/50/9783593506500.jpg




Leading with the Brain

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

How do business leaders inspire their employees so deeply that employees strive to surpass their own best work, helping managers and their staff to achieve mutual success? Sebastian Purps-Pardigol has figured it out—and the answer starts with the brain. Based on insights from neuroscience, psychology, and behavioral economics, as well as one hundred and fifty interviews with employees and CEOs, he has devised a new, innovative approach to the meaning of leadership today and what it takes to make businesses unbeatable. In Leading with the Brain, Purps-Pardigol presents seven factors all business leaders should keep in mind to not only make their workforce feel more satisfied, but also to increase the overall health and well-being of their staff. Drawing on real-life examples of businesses that succeed by managing according to scientific findings, Purps-Pardigol shows that by leading in a people-oriented, humane way, managers can release their employees’ hidden energies to the benefit of all.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/35/93/50/9783593506685.jpg




L'Affichomania

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Bright and bold and found everywhere in fin-de-siècle Paris, the poster was a brilliant fusion of art and commerce. New printing methods made it possible to distribute and post vivid full-color prints, spurring both artists and advertisers to take advantage of these public canvases. During its golden age in Paris, the poster was acclaimed for enlivening city streets, even as it was decried for its raucous colors, overt commodification, sexualized female figures, and oversized imagery. Collectors raced to snap up these ephemeral art pieces, sparking a frenzied demand dubbed affichomania, complete with its own experts and specialized publications containing small-scale prints for the home.L’Affichomania: The Passion for French Posters is a lavishly illustrated collection of these posters focusing on the work of five masters: Jules Chéret, the acknowledged founder of the field, Eugène Grasset, Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, Alphonse Mucha, and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. All are drawn from the collection of Richard H. Driehaus. With rising auction prices and the popularity of modern reprints, it is clear that affichomania is here to stay.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/05/78/9780578168029.jpg




Thomas Huber

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Thomas Huber: On the Horizon presents a collection of meticulously composed, surreal architectural scenarios by the Swiss-born, Berlin-based painter that circle around an oft-considered question in contemporary art: What is becoming of the role of painting as our relationship to the visual world grows increasingly complex? How can such pieces continue to be relevant?             Bringing together Huber’s most recent paintings, the culmination of some thirty years of theoretically ambitious, practically engaged artistic practice, the book focuses on the horizon as a constant in Huber’s practice—a compelling metaphor for the boundary between the visibility of motif and the invisibility of dialogue in pictorial space. In the paintings, which are mostly devoid of people, paradoxical combinations of symbolic forms converge to challenge our ideas about the world, to thought-provoking and often disquieting effect. In addition to more than one hundred illustrations, the book includes several essays by the artist and an interview with him by the book’s editor, Stephan Berg, and art historian Wolfgang Ullrich, discussing in greater depth the theoretical concerns that direct his creative practice. Beautifully produced, the book is also itself a collector’s object, printed in intense color on high-quality linen paper.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777426846.jpg




Welsh Life of Saint David

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

St. David was one of the earliest Christian missionaries of West Wales, and his story told in the medieval Welsh-language Life of Saint David. This book presents an annotated version of the text based on the one found in the Book of the Anchorite of Llanddewibrefi (c. 1350). The volume also features a substantial introduction that gathers early references to the saint and historical details and compares the Welsh Life to an earlier Latin version.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/16/9781783169535.jpg




Welsh Gentry 1536-1640

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Stretching from the establishment of Tudor control over Wales through the disruptions of the Civil War, The Welsh Gentry tracks the ways that the Welsh nobility and upper classes reacted to the ever-changing political and religious circumstances of their day.  John Gwynfor Jones analyzes the attitudes of the gentry not only in the context of the increasingly complicated administrative state of the Tudors but also of the humanist ideas that were rapidly spreading across Europe at the time. Rooted in deep research in primary and secondary sources, The Welsh Gentry will be indispensable to those studying Wales or Britain in this period.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/16/9781783169849.jpg




World

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

What do we mean when we refer to the world? How does the world relate to the human person? Are the two interdependent and, if so, in what way? What does the world mean for the ethnographer and the anthropologist? Much has been said of worlds and worldviews, but are we really certain we know what we mean when use these words? Asking these questions and many more, this book explores the conditions of possibility for the ethnographic gesture and how those possibilities can shed light on the relationship between humans and the world in which they are found. As João de Pina-Cabral shows, important changes have occurred over the past decades concerning the way in which we relate the way we think to the way we are—as a humanity—embodied. Exploring new confrontations with a new conceptualization of the human condition, Cabral sketches a new anthropology, one that contributes to an ongoing separation from the socio-centric and representationalist constraints that have plagued the social sciences over the past century.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/09/97/36/9780997367508.jpg




Wales and Socialism

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The late Victorian and early Edwardian eras were crucial to the spread of socialism throughout Britain, including Wales. This book offers the first full-scale study of the growth of the movement in the period, looking at it specifically in terms of the spread of ideas and the development of a political culture rather than at its structural growth. It culminates in a discussion of attempts in the years right before World War I to create a specifically Welsh socialist tradition.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/16/9781783169160.jpg




Women's Activism in Africa

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Throughout Africa, growing numbers of women are coming together and making their voices heard, mobilizing around causes ranging from democracy and land rights to campaigns against domestic violence. In countries such as Senegal and Tunisia, women have made major gains in their struggle for equal rights, and in Liberia and South Sudan women have been at the forefront of efforts to promote peace and reconciliation. While some of these movements have been influenced by international feminism and external donors, African women themselves are also increasingly shaping the global struggle for women’s rights, particularly in areas such as political representation and peace-building.  Composed of works by African authors who are themselves members of the activist groups, this collection represents the only comprehensive and up-to-date overview of women’s movements in contemporary Africa. Drawing on case studies and fresh empirical material from across the continent, the contributors challenge the prevailing assumption that notions of women’s rights have trickled down from the global north to the south, showing instead that these movements have above all been shaped by the unique experiences and concerns of the local women involved.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783609093.jpg




Women's Activism in Africa

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Throughout Africa, growing numbers of women are coming together and making their voices heard, mobilizing around causes ranging from democracy and land rights to campaigns against domestic violence. In countries such as Senegal and Tunisia, women have made major gains in their struggle for equal rights, and in Liberia and South Sudan women have been at the forefront of efforts to promote peace and reconciliation. While some of these movements have been influenced by international feminism and external donors, African women themselves are also increasingly shaping the global struggle for women’s rights, particularly in areas such as political representation and peace-building.  Composed of works by African authors who are themselves members of the activist groups, this collection represents the only comprehensive and up-to-date overview of women’s movements in contemporary Africa. Drawing on case studies and fresh empirical material from across the continent, the contributors challenge the prevailing assumption that notions of women’s rights have trickled down from the global north to the south, showing instead that these movements have above all been shaped by the unique experiences and concerns of the local women involved.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783609093.jpg




Twenty Chapters

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The literary works of ninth-century scholar Dawud al-Muqammas, who converted from Judaism to Christianity and then back to Judaism, reflect his pioneering approaches during a formative time in Jewish and Muslim medieval philosophy. A master of diverse genres, he composed in the ninth century, among other works, the thoughtful Twenty Chapters, which is not only the first known Jewish Kalam text, but also the earliest extant theological summa written in Arabic. This authoritative edition includes the full Judeo-Arabic text in Arabic letter transcription with a facing English translation, as well as an introduction, notes, bibliography, and index.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/08/42/52/9780842529358.jpg




Time Traveller Artist Man

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Known only by his tag, RUN, the true identity of this internationally renowned mural artist has been kept secret for fifteen years. We now know him as Giacomo Bufarini—a London-based man behind some of the most innovative graffiti art in recent years and an inspiration to young artists worldwide.   Exploring the artist and the man behind RUN in equal measure, Time Traveller Artist Man follows his rise from a self-taught graffiti artist in Italy in the 1980’s to his current work depicting large-scale, distinctive roller-painted figures. It details his first experiments in abandoned factories and various urban spaces in Ancona, Bologna, and Florence, as well as how the early influences of hip hop, art deco, and contemporary painting have shaped the nature of his art throughout his career. Through a showcase of his tools, studio, sketchbooks, photographs, paintings, stories, and prints, Time Traveller Artist Man explores the remarkable journey of the life and work of RUN.



Three Christian Martyrdoms from Early Islamic Palestine

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

A distinctive feature of Christian culture in early Islamic Syria and Palestine was a renewed interest in literature on martyrs, which represented a potential reaction among some Christian communities to the rise of Islam in the region. The adaption of this early Christian genre to the new circumstances of political domination during the early Middle Ages offers a revealing, yet until now largely unexplored, window onto how Christians responded culturally to Islamic imperialism. This bilingual edition of three martyrdoms provides a new opportunity to understand this historical phenomenon. These writings, composed at the Mar Saba monastery in the Judean Desert and attributed to famous members of that community, share a common high literary style, although each portrays Christian martyrdom at the hands of the Muslims very differently. This parallel-text edition offers the only English translations available of these important works, making it an invaluable resource for both students and scholars of religious history.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/08/42/52/9780842529884.jpg




Traces of the Future

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This book presents a close look at the vestiges of twentieth-century medical work at five key sites in Africa: Senegal, Nigeria, Cameroon, Kenya, and Tanzania. The authors aim to understand the afterlife of scientific institutions and practices and the “aftertime” of scientific modernity and its attendant visions of progress and transformation. Straightforward scholarly work is juxtaposed here with altogether more experimental approaches to fieldwork and analysis, including interview fragments; brief, reflective essays; and a rich photographic archive. The result is an unprecedented view of the lingering traces of medical science from Africa’s past.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/20/9781783207251.jpg




Trashing the Train Set

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The early years of this century have not been an easy one for the BBC. Already facing long-standing questions about its mission and place in UK culture and media, it was rocked by allegations of journalistic malfeasance during the run-up to the Iraq War. Those allegations eventually brought down Greg Dyke, the head of the BBC. In this book, Chris Moore tells of the troubles faced by Dyke’s successor, Mark Thompson. Loudly trumpeting an agenda of radical change on his arrival, Thompson soon found himself presiding over what can only be called a disaster, as attempts to refocus resources and attention went awry, alienating tens of millions of listeners and countless experienced BBC journalists and staff members in the process. Moore pulls no punches in this hard-hitting account of what’s gone wrong at the BBC, revealing predictable mistakes and costly oversights, to say nothing of endless ego clashes and stunning short-sightedness.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/09/93/24/9780993242458.jpg




Walter Ruttmann and the Cinema of Multiplicity

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

A key figure in early avant-garde cinema, Walter Ruttmann was a pioneer of experimental animation and the creative force behind one of the silent era’s most celebrated montage films, Berlin: Symphony of a Great City. Yet even as he was making experimental films, Ruttmann had a day job. He worked regularly in advertising—and he would go on to make industrial films, medical films, and even Nazi propaganda films. Michael Cowan offers here the first study of Ruttmann in English, not only shedding light on his commercial, industrial, and propaganda work, but also rethinking his significance in light of recent transformations in film studies. Cowan brilliantly teases out the linkages between the avant-garde and industrial society in the early twentieth century, showing how Ruttmann’s films incorporated and enacted strategies for managing the multiplicities of mass society. Winner of the 2014 Willy Haas Award for an outstanding contribution to the study of German cinema.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/89/64/9789089645852.jpg




Vulnerability and Young People

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Policies to assist or protect vulnerable youth play a crucial role in welfare and criminal justice processes, but what role does the discourse surrounding these policies play in how they are put into action? Bringing together real-life examples with academic and practical applications, this book explores the implications of a “vulnerability zeitgeist” in policy and practice. It draws on in-depth research with marginalized young people and the professionals who support them to question whether the rise of the concept of vulnerability serves the interests of those who are most disadvantaged. Vulnerability and Young People will be important reading for scholars, students, and policy makers interested in the care and protection of young people.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/14/47/31/9781447318170.jpg




History of Africa

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Spanning more than two thousand years of African history, from the African Iron Age to the collapse of colonialism and the beginnings of independence, Hosea Jaffe’s magisterial work remains one of the only books to fully capture the continent’s complex and diverse past.  The great strength of Jaffe’s work lies in its unique theoretical perspective, which stresses the distinctive character of Africa’s social structures and historical development. Crucially, Jaffe rejects all efforts to impose Eurocentric models of history onto Africa, whether it be liberal notions of progress or Marxist theories of class struggle, and he argues instead that the key dynamics underpinning African history are unique to the continent itself, and rooted in conflicts between different modes of production.  This edition of Jaffe’s authoritative history includes a new foreword by the distinguished economist and political theorist Samir Amin, which outlines the contribution of Jaffe’s work to our understanding of African history and its ongoing post-colonial struggles.   


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/86/99/9781786990655.jpg




History of Africa

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Spanning more than two thousand years of African history, from the African Iron Age to the collapse of colonialism and the beginnings of independence, Hosea Jaffe’s magisterial work remains one of the only books to fully capture the continent’s complex and diverse past.  The great strength of Jaffe’s work lies in its unique theoretical perspective, which stresses the distinctive character of Africa’s social structures and historical development. Crucially, Jaffe rejects all efforts to impose Eurocentric models of history onto Africa, whether it be liberal notions of progress or Marxist theories of class struggle, and he argues instead that the key dynamics underpinning African history are unique to the continent itself, and rooted in conflicts between different modes of production.  This edition of Jaffe’s authoritative history includes a new foreword by the distinguished economist and political theorist Samir Amin, which outlines the contribution of Jaffe’s work to our understanding of African history and its ongoing post-colonial struggles.   


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/86/99/9781786990655.jpg




Hokusai x Manga

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Anime and manga are powerful pop-culture phenomena, capturing people’s imaginations in the pages of comic books, on television and smartphone screens, and at cosplay festivals, where children and adults alike don elaborate costumes and share creations based on the original art. Somewhere along the way, many of these cute, stylized characters jumped the Pacific, and we too became smitten with Hello Kitty and collecting adorable Pokémon. But this isn’t the first time artists embraced popular culture and enjoyed enormous commercial success. In the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, Hokusai, Kuniyoshi, and their contemporaries produced colored woodblock prints of beautiful courtesans and brave samurai for the masses.Hokusai x Manga offers fascinating insight into the most widely consumed examples of popular culture in the history of Japanese art. Woodblock prints, or ukiyo-e, were a central medium of early mass culture, and they served as a fantastical escape from everyday life. As Japan transformed into a modern nation and society, the demand for popular art didn’t disappear, and the forms were merely adapted from one cultural context to another, changing to reflect the high-energy urban streets of Tokyo, but retaining many of the basic elements. Dozens of lively, colorful images—from shunga sheets to selected excerpts from manga by Jirō Taniguchi, Inio Asano, and more—are interspersed throughout the book, making Hokusai x Manga as fun to read as it is informative.Hokusai x Manga will give Japanophiles and pop-culture enthusiasts everywhere an entirely new perspective and on these captivating chapters in the history of Japanese art.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777426679.jpg




Human Being Songs

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The public image of Alaska for those who live elsewhere tends to be bound up with the outdoors. But while that’s not necessarily false, it’s a far from complete picture. This collection of stories shows us what we’re missing: set in Alaska’s cities and suburbs, homes and back roads, cars and kitchens and bedrooms, it offers not tales of adventures, but quietly powerful psychological dramas, introspective explorations of the private triumphs and failures of personal life played out in an extraordinary place.   Jean Anderson delicately balances the lyrical and the experimental to tell the stories of hardworking Alaskans—teachers, laborers, dental hygienists, artists—worrying over fairness and equity and meaning, falling in and out of love, and pondering elusive, long-dreamed-of goals. Powered by a rich empathy, Human Being Songs shows us life in Alaska as it’s actually lived today—its successes, failures, and moments of transcendent beauty.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/16/02/23/9781602233133.jpg




Haiti

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Haiti has long been known as a benighted place of poverty and corruption. Even before the 2010 earthquake destroyed much of the country, it was beset by difficulties inextricably rooted in its history of rebellion and revolution. Since gaining independence from France in 1804, following the only successful slave revolt in the history of the world, Haiti’s past has been characterized by dictatorships, serious conflict, and near-constant social and political unrest, as the country struggles to define its independence and realize its promise.Haiti: The Perpetual Liberation collects 140 photographs of Haiti by Swiss photographer Thomas Kern, taken in black and white with an analog camera over the course of twenty years of travel there. As the photographs demonstrate, the people of Haiti remain determined to realize the country’s promise in the face of crushing poverty and crisis, and, behind the barrage of bad news that dominates its public image, it is a country full of hope and life. The photographs, which make up the first part of a four-part boxed set, are joined by three separate text booklets—each in one of three languages: English, German, and Creole—that feature texts by Kern on his work and his approach to the country, as well as two essays by Swiss journalist Georg Brunold and Haitian novelist Yanick Lahens that provide context and commentary for the images and discuss the country’s people and culture, and its enduring political conflict. A powerful photographic portrait, Haiti: The Perpetual Liberation shows a different, more personal and therefore also more “ordinary” view of the troubled country that reaches beyond what we think we know about Haiti.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/38/58/81/9783858815156.jpg




Indefensible

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Although there is often opposition to individual wars, many people continue to believe that the arms industry is necessary in some form: to safeguard our security, provide jobs, or stimulate the economy. For these reasons, not only conservatives, but many progressives and liberals, are able to rationalize supporting it. But is the arms industry truly as essential as we’ve been led to believe?   Indefensible puts forward a devastating challenge to this conventional wisdom, debunking many myths about the industry that has somehow managed to normalize the existence of the most savage weapons of mass destruction ever known.   Editor Paul Holden, who himself has written extensively about arms deals, has compiled the essential handbook for those who want to counter the arguments put forth by the industry and its supporters. Deploying statistics, case studies, and irrefutable evidence to demonstrate how the arguments in favor of the arms trade are fundamentally flawed, both factually and logically, the contributors to this volume clearly show that far from protecting us, the arms trade undermines our security by fanning the flames of war, terrorism, and global instability.   Bringing together a range of distinguished experts and activists, including Andrew Feinstein, author of After the Party and The Shadow World, Indefensible not only reveals the complex dangers associated with the arms trade but offers positive ways in which we can combat the arms trade’s malignant influence, reclaim our democracies, and reshape our economies in the interests of peace and human well-being.    


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783605668.jpg




Indefensible

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Although there is often opposition to individual wars, many people continue to believe that the arms industry is necessary in some form: to safeguard our security, provide jobs, or stimulate the economy. For these reasons, not only conservatives, but many progressives and liberals, are able to rationalize supporting it. But is the arms industry truly as essential as we’ve been led to believe?   Indefensible puts forward a devastating challenge to this conventional wisdom, debunking many myths about the industry that has somehow managed to normalize the existence of the most savage weapons of mass destruction ever known.   Editor Paul Holden, who himself has written extensively about arms deals, has compiled the essential handbook for those who want to counter the arguments put forth by the industry and its supporters. Deploying statistics, case studies, and irrefutable evidence to demonstrate how the arguments in favor of the arms trade are fundamentally flawed, both factually and logically, the contributors to this volume clearly show that far from protecting us, the arms trade undermines our security by fanning the flames of war, terrorism, and global instability.   Bringing together a range of distinguished experts and activists, including Andrew Feinstein, author of After the Party and The Shadow World, Indefensible not only reveals the complex dangers associated with the arms trade but offers positive ways in which we can combat the arms trade’s malignant influence, reclaim our democracies, and reshape our economies in the interests of peace and human well-being.    


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783605668.jpg




Islam and Social Work

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Social services have typically addressed equality and diversity issues through the lens of race and ethnicity, while the faith identities of minority ethnic communities have been largely bypassed. But in our contemporary world, there is a strong need for policies and services that are sensitive to faith in general and to Islam in particular. This unique book enables social work practitioners to gain a deeper understanding of how Islamic principles inform and influence the lives of Muslim populations. Designed to support work with families and faith communities, it examines religious precepts, cosmologies, philosophies, and daily practices, while acknowledging cultural variants and population heterogeneity. The second edition includes a comprehensive update of the research literature; detailed description and explanation of contemporary social work practice with Muslim service users, using an updated and expanded collection of international case studies; and new sections on religious extremism, aging, and end-of-life care. The only book specifically addressing social work with Muslim communities, Islam and Social Work provides an essential toolkit for culturally sensitive social work practice.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/14/47/33/9781447330097.jpg




Islam and Social Work

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Social services have typically addressed equality and diversity issues through the lens of race and ethnicity, while the faith identities of minority ethnic communities have been largely bypassed. But in our contemporary world, there is a strong need for policies and services that are sensitive to faith in general and to Islam in particular. This unique book enables social work practitioners to gain a deeper understanding of how Islamic principles inform and influence the lives of Muslim populations. Designed to support work with families and faith communities, it examines religious precepts, cosmologies, philosophies, and daily practices, while acknowledging cultural variants and population heterogeneity. The second edition includes a comprehensive update of the research literature; detailed description and explanation of contemporary social work practice with Muslim service users, using an updated and expanded collection of international case studies; and new sections on religious extremism, aging, and end-of-life care. The only book specifically addressing social work with Muslim communities, Islam and Social Work provides an essential toolkit for culturally sensitive social work practice.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/14/47/33/9781447330097.jpg




Journey into Russia

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

When German journalist Jens Mühling met Juri, a Russian television producer selling stories about his homeland, he was mesmerized by what he heard: the real Russia and Ukraine were more unbelievable than anything he could have invented. The encounter changed Mühling’s life, triggering a number of journeys to Ukraine and deep into the Russian heartland on a quest for stories of ordinary and extraordinary people. Away from the bright lights of Moscow, Mühling met and befriended a Dostoevskian cast of characters, including a hermit from Tayga who had only recently discovered the existence of a world beyond the woods, a Ukrainian Cossack who defaced the statue of Lenin in central Kiev, and a priest who insisted on returning to Chernobyl to preach to the stubborn few determined to remain in the exclusion zone. Unveiling a portion of the world whose contradictions, attractions, and absurdities are still largely unknown to people outside its borders, A Journey into Russia is a much-needed glimpse into one of today’s most significant regions.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/19/09/96/9781909961128.jpg




Hygiene, Sociality, and Culture in Contemporary Rural China

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This book presents a new perspective on attempts by the contemporary Chinese government to transform the diverse conditions found in countless rural villages into what the state’s social welfare program deems “socialist new villages.” Lili Lai argues that an ethnographic focus on the specifics of village life can help destabilize China’s persistent rural-urban divide and help contribute to more effective welfare intervention to improve health and hygienic conditions of village life.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/89/64/9789089648464.jpg




Holocaust, Israel and the "Jew"

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This book is the first comprehensive study of postwar antisemitism in the Netherlands. It focuses on the way stereotypes are passed on from one decade to the next, as reflected in public debates, the mass media, protests and commemorations, and everyday interactions. The Holocaust, Israel and ‘the Jew’ explores the ways in which old stories and phrases relating to "the stereotypical Jew" are recycled and modified for new uses, linking the antisemitism of the early postwar years to its enduring manifestations in today’s world.   The chapters cover themes including soccer-related antisemitism, Jewish responses, philosemitism, antisemitism in Dutch-Moroccan and Dutch-Turkish communities, contentious acts of remembrance, the neo-Nazi tradition, and the legacy of Theo van Gogh. The book concludes with a lengthy epilogue on "the Jew" in the politics of the radical right, the attacks in Paris in 2015, and the refugee crisis.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/89/64/9789089648488.jpg




Histories of Violence

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Though we can all agree that violence is a devastating plague upon human existence and that  peace would lead to more prosperous relations around the world, violence still continues to be deployed by a wide range of groups for numerous political and social ends. And though we all fear violence, what actually constitutes violence, who perpetuates it, and why, are questions of great debate, which have drawn the attention of the world’s foremost thinkers for centuries. Offering an accessible introduction to post-war critical thought on the topic, Histories of Violence examines how many prominent theorists from Hannah Arendt to Frantz Fanon, Michel Foucault, and Slavoj Žižek have grappled with these questions.  Offering an insightful and thought-provoking guide to the work of many famous writers who continue to influence and inform contemporary political, philosophical, sociological, and cultural study, Histories of Violence is an essential interrogation of critical thought as it relates to an ever-present topic.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783602391.jpg




Histories of Violence

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Though we can all agree that violence is a devastating plague upon human existence and that  peace would lead to more prosperous relations around the world, violence still continues to be deployed by a wide range of groups for numerous political and social ends. And though we all fear violence, what actually constitutes violence, who perpetuates it, and why, are questions of great debate, which have drawn the attention of the world’s foremost thinkers for centuries. Offering an accessible introduction to post-war critical thought on the topic, Histories of Violence examines how many prominent theorists from Hannah Arendt to Frantz Fanon, Michel Foucault, and Slavoj Žižek have grappled with these questions.  Offering an insightful and thought-provoking guide to the work of many famous writers who continue to influence and inform contemporary political, philosophical, sociological, and cultural study, Histories of Violence is an essential interrogation of critical thought as it relates to an ever-present topic.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783602391.jpg




Somme

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Few battles in all of world history are as well-known as the Somme—and almost none were as tragically costly. Over 141 days in the summer and fall of 1916, the French and British drove the German lines back six miles, at a combined cost on all sides of more than one million men killed or wounded. This book presents a highly illustrated day-by-day account of the battle designed to help historians and military history fans alike see and understand how the battle developed and evolved. Fifty full-color maps and a large number of photographs, many previously unpublished, help readers locate key trenches, fortresses, and strongholds, and together with Chris McCarthy's detailed daily narrative, enable us to understand the battle perhaps better than anyone—including its architects—ever has.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/19/10/50/9781910500514.jpg




So There's Hope

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

For centuries, East London has been one of the most vibrant and complex areas of the city—a place where newly arrived immigrants, striving locals, and ethnic and religious minorities live and work side by side in a cross-cultural mixture unlike any other. ​For the past two years, Deborah Rolt has made it her project to photograph East London and its residents, capturing powerful images of daily life and work in this iconic area. Street scenes and celebrations, a charity Christmas lunch and a low-level boxing match—through Rolt’s lens we see the individual lives and dreams that come together to make the city an ever-changing, always compelling place.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/19/10/78/9781910787335.jpg




Science Fiction, New Space Opera, and Neoliberal Globalism

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

New Space Opera is a recent subgenre within science fiction that displays a canny engagement with contemporary cultural politics in the age of globalization. This book offers close readings of the evolving canon of the genre to show how its complex political allegories can be seen as a response to the powerful contemporary ideology of neoliberalism and its championing of free-market ideas. A timely look at a branch of science fiction that is deeply engaged with the problems of the present even as it casts its eye to far futures, Science Fiction, New Space Opera, and Neoliberal Globalism offers readers and scholars alike a chance to appreciate a thriving area of popular literature.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/16/9781783169443.jpg




Saturday's Silence

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

R. S. Thomas (1913–2000) was one of the major poets of the twentieth century, an Anglican priest who fiercely disliked the spread of Anglicanism in Wales and was called “the Solzhenitsyn of Wales” for his ability to force attention to matters of conscience. This book reveals his poetry’s deep indebtedness to key features of the classic Christian tradition through a focus on the three days at the center of the story of the resurrection and how they are reflected in and treated through Thomas’s work.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/16/9781783169207.jpg




Story of an African Working Class

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Vividly telling the story of Ghana’s gold miners, one of the oldest and most militant groups of workers in Africa, Jeff Crisp details the workers’ struggle against exploitative mining companies, repressive governments, and authoritarian trade union leaders.   Drawing on a wide range of original sources, including previously secret government and company records, Crisp explores the changing nature of life and work in the gold mines from the colonial era through the 1980s, and he examines the distinctive forms of political consciousness and organization that the miners developed in response to their conditions. He also provides a detailed account of the changing techniques of labor control employed by mining capital and the state, and shows how they failed to curb the workers' solidarity and tradition of militant resistance.  Combining lively historical narrative with original analysis, this book remains a unique contribution to the history of Africa and its working class.    


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/86/99/9781786990679.jpg




Sin and Secession

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

German artist Franz von Stuck (1863–1928) is best known for his erotic paintings, especially Sin. His paintings drew many of their themes from mythology and were considered extremely provocative for their subject matter and presentation. Von Stuck, who was one year younger than Gustav Klimt, become famous at an early age for works such as Allegories and Emblems and Cards and Vignettes, but, though he received significant critical and public acclaim during this time, Von Stuck’s oeuvre and his influence on Viennese art have not been given serious treatment—until now.Sin and Secession fills this gap. Presenting 350 lush color images, this book offers an opportunity to fully examine Von Stuck’s entire career as an artist, not only his celebrated paintings, but his graphic works, sculpture, and photographs.  A must-have for fans for Von Stuck, Sin and Secession showcases the scope of his work and celebrates his lasting influence on Viennese art.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777426938.jpg




Sovak. Clear Vision[s]

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Pravoslav Sovak is a renowned graphic artist, his inimitable technical skill matched by a keen eye for critiquing both self and society. Over the years, he has turned his hand to a wide variety of subjects, from travel and the experience of nature to the cold sterility of mass media society and even his own life story. Sovak excels in photographic etching, further embellishing his images through the use of watercolor and collage.            Published to accompany a major exhibition at the Kunsthalle Mannheim marking the ninetieth anniversary of Sovak’s birth, Sovak. Clear Vision(s) offers a comprehensive catalog of his work from 1994 to the present. Bringing together more than one hundred images from among his complete body of work, the book establishes him as a key proponent of postmodernism, with a predilection for clear, minimalist forms arranged as though within a grid. The book also showcases Sovak’s continual drive for experimentation and the diverse techniques he expertly employed, including the difficult and nearly forgotten process of photogravure. Sovak’s pieces continue to be widely sought, with works in the collections of many museums, including the British Museum, London; the Albertina, Austria; and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, and this book brings his groundbreaking graphic designs to a wider audience than ever before.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777426877.jpg




Social Dynamics in the Northwest Frontiers of the Late Roman Empire

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This volume explores the final phase of the West Roman Empire, particularly the changing interactions between the imperial authority and external “barbarian” groups in the northwest frontiers of the empire during the fourth and fifth centuries. The contributions present valuable overviews of recent archaeological research combined with innovative theoretical discussions. Key topics include the movement of precious metals, trajectories of imperial power, the archaeology of migration, and material culture in relation to debates about ethnicity.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/94/62/98/9789462983601.jpg




Steiner's Diary

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

For forty years, Dietmar Steiner has been a leading voice in contemporary architecture. The founding director of the national architecture museum of Austria, the Architekturzentrum Wien; he has served as a consultant, on the jury of many prestigious architecture and urban design prizes, and as commissioner of the Austrian Pavilion at the International Architecture Exhibition of the 2002 Venice Biennale. Throughout his career, he has also lectured at universities and written widely as a scholar and critic. Capping a remarkable and still influential career, Steiner’s Diary is the most comprehensive collection of his writings to date, including some previously unpublished pieces. The book includes lectures; interviews; articles published in daily newspapers and magazines, and longer essays on a variety of topics. Steiner brings to his work a keen critical acumen that draws on decades of travel, research, and contact with renowned international architects, such as Rob Krier, Hermann Czech, Herzog & de Meuron, Rem Koolhaas, Lacaton + Vassal, Jon Jerde, Rural Studio, Wang Shu, and Alexander Brodsky. At the same time, his articles and essays are often amplified by personal observations and experiences. While paying tribute to a prolific scholar and critic, Steiner’s Diary takes readers through four decades of architectural history that represent some of the discipline’s most fascinating historical developments, and it will be welcomed by architects, architectural historians, and anyone with an interest in architecture’s role in society today.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/30/38/60/9783038600329.jpg




Staging Asia

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In the early modern Dutch Republic, three playwrights wrote dramas based on political revolutions that were occurring at that same time in Asia. Reflecting on this remarkable phenomenon, Staging Asia traces the transmission of the stories surrounding the seventeenth-century Asian events and their ultimate appearance in Europe as Dutch dramas. Manjusha Kuruppath explores the nature of the representation of the Orient in these works and evaluates how this characterization was influenced by the channels, including some connected to the Dutch East India Company, that the dramatists relied on to gather information for their plays.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/87/28/9789087282578.jpg




Secret Life of a Black Aspie

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Anand Prahlad was born on a former plantation in Virginia in 1954. This memoir, vividly internal, powerfully lyric, and brilliantly impressionistic, is his story.   For the first four years of his life, Prahlad didn’t speak. But his silence didn’t stop him from communicating—or communing—with the strange, numinous world he found around him. Ordinary household objects came to life; the spirits of long-dead slave children were his best friends. In his magical interior world, sensory experiences blurred, time disappeared, and memory was fluid. Ever so slowly, he emerged, learning to talk and evolving into an artist and educator. His journey takes readers across the United States during one of its most turbulent moments, and Prahlad experiences it all, from the heights of the Civil Rights Movement to West Coast hippie enclaves to a college town that continues to struggle with racism and its border state legacy.   Rooted in black folklore and cultural ambience, and offering new perspectives on autism and more, The Secret Life of a Black Aspie will inspire and delight readers and deepen our understanding of the marginal spaces of human existence.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/16/02/23/9781602233218.jpg




Strategy

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The development of Fredmund Malik’s strategic framework was a result of his early realization that both business and society are experiencing one of the greatest transformations in history—a process he calls “The Great Transformation21.” One of the first to notice and address the financial and debt crisis, Malik concluded that its primary causes were neoliberalism and a misplaced focus on shareholder value. This focus caused leaders to pursue the wrong strategies, eventually resulting in one of the greatest misallocations of economic and social resources in history. In response, Malik devised innovative strategic tools that allow the crisis to be used as a springboard for repositioning organizations and enacting structural reform—tools contained in this fully revised second edition of Strategy. Precisely addressing the complexity of strategic challenges, Malik’s comprehensive management framework helps organizations and businesses successfully navigate any economic environment. Exploring the technological innovations that have revolutionized business, Malik outlines the problems confronting companies in this novel era. He then discusses the many effective cybernetic systems for strategic navigation and the patterns of transformations to come, along with the economic dynamics that will accompany them. Strategy also lays out revolutionary new methods that allow leaders around the world to master these new strategies with precision, ease, and unprecedented speed.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/35/93/50/9783593506111.jpg




Secessionist Rule

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In this timely investigation of secessionist entities in post-Soviet territories, Smolnik explores how political authority is organized, produced, and reproduced in conditions of violent conflict. Drawing on case studies of unrecognized or only partially recognized states in the South Caucasus, she shows that so-called low-level violent conflicts may significantly influence the form and functioning of political rule and thereby have a considerable impact on the empowerment and disempowerment of local actors. Offering fresh insight into the connections between violence and political power, Secessionist Rule not only contributes to the political sociology of violent conflict, but also adds to our knowledge of the largely understudied internal dynamics of de facto states.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/35/93/50/9783593506296.jpg




Serge Fruehauf - Extra Normal

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

For two decades, Swiss photographer Serge Fruehauf has documented fascinating architectural details cast in concrete. Yet his focus lies not only in the beauty of the built environment but also in the surprising and sometimes absurd puzzles created by later interventions—stairways that lead to dead ends, disfigured garden walls that have long outlived their purpose. Serge Fruehauf—Extra Norma  brings together the best and most interesting of the more than one thousand images in the artist’s most recent series.             Taken in Paris, Geneva, Grenoble, and Lyon, Fruehauf’s photographs constitute a critical reflection on architectural modernity mitigated by the photographer’s love of the spaces he has photographed and his deep sympathy for the architects and planners that have been drawn  to concrete as a useful, multifaceted building material in the latter part of the twentieth century. Despite their promising qualities, the buildings or clusters of buildings that are the product of modern construction methods with concrete appear today as bland monstrosities or grotesque hybrids of traditional and modern architecture. Fruehauf’s photographs are joined by a preface by curator Martino Stierli, who offers an insightful discussion of how Fruehauf’s work highlights these structures as allegories of today’s cultural situation.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/38/58/81/9783858815279.jpg




Swiss

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The Swiss collects the work of Swedish photographer Christian Nilson, who has lived in Switzerland for more than ten years. During that time, he has traveled hundreds of miles throughout the country, camera in hand, capturing countless people and places through his inimitable self-taught technique, which involves using flash to ensure every detail is perfectly visible. Nilson brings his perspective as an immigrant in Switzerland to a wide variety of subjects that show his love of his adopted country in all its conflicted complexity—the traditional and the innovative, the spectacular and the mundane. By turns pensive and humorous, Nilson’s photographic journey through Switzerland will be of interest to anyone who has called a new place home, while also introducing new audiences to one of the most exciting young voices in European photography. With sixty-seven full-color images, the book also includes an essay by Jon Bollmann.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/38/58/81/9783858815293.jpg




Social Entrepreneurship

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Outstanding social entrepreneurs inspire students, transform communities, and ignite innovative approaches to solving social needs—and although social enterprises remain small, their impact is growing globally. This timely second edition of Social Entrepreneurship has been inspired by the increasing interest both in social entrepreneurship scholarship and in entrepreneurs’ power to deliver novel solutions to social issues as they endeavor to respond to increasingly complex social problems and demands for welfare at a time of government cutbacks. Additional chapters and international case studies explore new developments in the health and social care landscape, such as the rise of the social investment market, the use of design thinking, and the increasing importance of social impact measurement. An accessibly written, in-depth introduction which clearly links theory to practice in stakeholder engagement, financial options, leadership management, and organizational challenges, this book will be essential reading for students, scholars, practitioners, and entrepreneurs eager to expand their knowledge, skills, and passion and bring about real, sustainable social change.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/14/47/33/9781447331698.jpg




Social Entrepreneurship

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Outstanding social entrepreneurs inspire students, transform communities, and ignite innovative approaches to solving social needs—and although social enterprises remain small, their impact is growing globally. This timely second edition of Social Entrepreneurship has been inspired by the increasing interest both in social entrepreneurship scholarship and in entrepreneurs’ power to deliver novel solutions to social issues as they endeavor to respond to increasingly complex social problems and demands for welfare at a time of government cutbacks. Additional chapters and international case studies explore new developments in the health and social care landscape, such as the rise of the social investment market, the use of design thinking, and the increasing importance of social impact measurement. An accessibly written, in-depth introduction which clearly links theory to practice in stakeholder engagement, financial options, leadership management, and organizational challenges, this book will be essential reading for students, scholars, practitioners, and entrepreneurs eager to expand their knowledge, skills, and passion and bring about real, sustainable social change.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/14/47/33/9781447331698.jpg




Studies in Weak Arithmetics

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The field of weak arithmetics is an application of logical methods to number theory that was developed by mathematicians, philosophers, and theoretical computer scientists. This third volume in the weak arithmetics collection contains nine substantive papers based on lectures delivered during the two last meetings of the conference series Journées sur les Arithmétiques, held in 2014 at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and in 2015 at the City University of New York Graduate Center.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/15/75/86/9781575869537.jpg




Street Fashion Moscow

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Few cities in the world offer the diversity of stunning visuals that can be found on the streets of Moscow, from famous landmarks like Red Square to the Boulevard Ring and Kamergersky Lane and the residential areas beyond the Garden Ring. For this book, former Moscow resident Elena Siemens traveled them all as an urban flâneur, taking photographs of contemporary fashion in action and setting it alongside explorations of modern and historic representations of fashion and beauty as seen in a wide variety of products of Russian culture. Through her photos and analysis, Siemens considers the question of how contemporary Russians understand their post-Soviet identity and express it through the ways they present themselves in public.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/20/9781783206131.jpg




Stigmata of Bliss

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Klaus Merz is one of the most prominent, prolific, and versatile Swiss writers working today. Celebrated as a master of concise, condensed sentences, Merz brings depth and resonance to spare narratives with lyrical prose and striking images. Stigmata of Bliss brings together three of Merz’s critically acclaimed novellas, offering English readers the perfect introduction to his work.Jacob Asleep introduces a family marked by illness, eccentricity, and a child’s death. In A Man’s Fate, a moment of inattention on a mountainous hike upends a teacher’s life and his understanding of mortality. And finally, The Argentine traces the fluctuations of memory and desire in a man’s journey around the world. In each novella, Merz takes readers on a profound and intimate journey. Read as a whole, the works complement, enrich, and echo each other.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/08/57/42/9780857423719.jpg




Shanghai Intrigue

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

When a Chinese American intelligence officer at the US Embassy in Beijing intercepts complex coded messages, the race is on to decipher their meaning. When she finally succeeds in decoding them, the messages seem to indicate a targeted assault on the Japanese financial market. Puzzled, the officer digs deeper and uncovers more intrigue—a large, state-owned Chinese company, which has recently discovered oil in Benin seems to be involved, and. . . what’s this about a kidnapping? As the complex plot to bring down a major financial institution unfolds at a rapid pace, American and Japanese officials scramble to prevent a crisis with international implications. Set against the backdrop of the political and financial practices of Japan, China, and the US, The Shanghai Intrigue brings with it murder, betrayal, romance, even a natural disaster, as the plot races to a most unpredictable outcome. The book’s breakneck speed and thrilling twists and turns will leave readers spellbound from the first page.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/08/57/42/9780857423832.jpg




Supporting Victims of Hate Crime

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This practical handbook provides user-friendly, concise, expert, and up-to-date guidance for both new and experienced hate crime caseworkers and advocates, whether professionals or volunteers. Filling a gap in the growing debates and research literature on hate crime, it takes as its starting point a values-based casework practice that advocates providing assistance and support to the victims of hate crimes in order to promote empowerment. Featuring core casework standards, direction on how to respond from a person-centered perspective to a victim’s point of view, and an overview of current legislation in relation to the prosecution of hate crimes and the current EU directive on victim support, this book is full of the most relevant, up-to-date information offered by both the research and policy communities. It will enable practitioners to be confident and knowledgeable in supporting victims of hate crime.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/14/47/32/9781447329725.jpg




Discursive Construction of Southeast Asia in 19th-Century Colonial-Capitalist Discourse

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The nations of Southeast Asia today are rapidly integrating economically and politically, but that integration is also counterbalanced by forces ranging from hypernationalism to disputes over cultural ownership throughout the region. Those forces, Farish A. Noor argues in this book, have their roots in the region’s failure to come to a critical understanding of how current national and cultural identities in the region came about. To remedy that, Noor offers a close account of the construction of Southeast Asia in the nineteenth century by the forces of capitalism and imperialism, and he shows how that construct remains a potent aspect of political, economic, and cultural disputes today.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/90/89/64/9789089648846.jpg




Divine Golden Ingenious

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

What do the shells of nautilus snails, pineapples, Marilyn Monroe’s face, and an Aston Martin all have in common? Is it the same mystic, divine formula that lies behind everything that is beautiful? For centuries this formula, often referred to as the golden mean, has been a subject of endless fascination. The ratio of proportion that formulates the golden mean can be found in nature, artistic design processes, and in how we perceive our surroundings. But how much of this universal formula is true, and how much of it is myth? Here with the answer is Divine Golden Ingenious, a collection of essays from contributors in many fields—architecture, mathematics, science, art, and design—who explore the history and applications of the golden mean. The search for the mean dates back to Euclid in the third century BC, but it was only in the nineteenth century that it reached fame as a universal constant of beauty. From this point onwards the “golden section” was described in flora and fauna, established as the foundation for the Fibonacci number, and optimized by Le Corbusier in architecture. Sorting the fact from the faction, the essays gathered here analyze the golden mean with regard to function and relevance while exploring its use in current examples from art and design. Together, they reveal the extent to which this art-historical phenomenon plays a role in the organization and presentation of the world around us.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/37/77/42/9783777426921.jpg




Challenging the Third Sector

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

The third sector, or the voluntary, civic sector of society, is taking on increasing prominence in the face of retrenchment, austerity, and decreasing confidence in government. This book is the first to offer an up-close look at the relationship between active citizenship and civil society and how that relates to third-sector activities. Drawing on a wide range of theory and case studies, the book explores questions of social connectedness, changing forms of political engagement, and the increasing complexity of the social and environmental problems that the third sector confronts. It will be invaluable for theorists, scholars, and organizers.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/14/47/31/9781447316916.jpg




Elect Methodists

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

This is the first full-length study of Calvinistic Methodism, a movement that emerged in the eighteenth century as an alternative to the better-known Wesleyan branch. While the Wesleyan grouping has received significant historical attention, Calvinistic Methodism, especially in England, has not. This book locates the source of the eighteenth-century Methodist revival in the Protestant evangelical movement that emerged in continental Europe and colonial North America and then charts the history of the Calvinistic branch in both England and Wales.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/07/08/32/9780708325018.jpg




Children of the Welfare State

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Children of the Welfare State uses the case of Denmark—employed as emblematic of the European state—to consider the ways in which children are “civilized” within child-focused institutions, such as schools, daycare, and the family unit, under the auspices of the welfare state. Through deep ethnographic studies, the authors build a clear account of children’s experiences at a variety of ages, different genders, and from differing ethnic and social backgrounds. Ultimately they show that even though Danish welfare institutions are marked by a strong egalitarian ideal, they nonetheless tend to reproduce dominant norms of social class and distinctions of ethnicity and religion.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/07/45/33/9780745336091.jpg




China's Asian Dream

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

“China,” Napoleon once remarked, “is a sleeping lion. Let her sleep, for when she wakes she will shake the world.” In 2014, President Xi Jinping triumphantly declared that the lion had indeed awoken, and “China’s Asian Dream” became his signature slogan. Under Xi, China has pursued an increasingly ambitious foreign policy with the aim of restoring its historical status as the dominant power in Asia. Journalist Tom Miller has been on the ground in Asia watching this unfold for over a decade and in China’s Asian Dream he offers an approachable, exciting, and in-depth look at China’s growth and ascendant power.   As Miller shows, from the Mekong Basin to the Central Asian steppe, the country is wooing its neighbors with promises of new roads, railways, dams, and power grids; Chinese trade and investment presents huge opportunities for these nations, and its ability to build much-needed infrastructure could assist in the development of some of the world’s poorest countries. Yet China’s rise also threatens to exploit its neighbors’ vulnerability and make them wholly reliant on Chinese resources. In Vietnam and Myanmar, as Miller explains, resentment of Chinese encroachment has already incited anti-Chinese protests, and many countries in the region are seeking to counterbalance its influence by turning to the United States or Japan.  Combining a concise overview of the situation with in-depth reportage, China’s Asian Dream offers a fresh perspective on one of the most important questions of our time: [...]


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783609246.jpg




China's Asian Dream

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

“China,” Napoleon once remarked, “is a sleeping lion. Let her sleep, for when she wakes she will shake the world.” In 2014, President Xi Jinping triumphantly declared that the lion had indeed awoken, and “China’s Asian Dream” became his signature slogan. Under Xi, China has pursued an increasingly ambitious foreign policy with the aim of restoring its historical status as the dominant power in Asia. Journalist Tom Miller has been on the ground in Asia watching this unfold for over a decade and in China’s Asian Dream he offers an approachable, exciting, and in-depth look at China’s growth and ascendant power.   As Miller shows, from the Mekong Basin to the Central Asian steppe, the country is wooing its neighbors with promises of new roads, railways, dams, and power grids; Chinese trade and investment presents huge opportunities for these nations, and its ability to build much-needed infrastructure could assist in the development of some of the world’s poorest countries. Yet China’s rise also threatens to exploit its neighbors’ vulnerability and make them wholly reliant on Chinese resources. In Vietnam and Myanmar, as Miller explains, resentment of Chinese encroachment has already incited anti-Chinese protests, and many countries in the region are seeking to counterbalance its influence by turning to the United States or Japan.  Combining a concise overview of the situation with in-depth reportage, China’s Asian Dream offers a fresh perspective on one of the most import[...]


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/17/83/60/9781783609246.jpg




CARTHA - On Relations In Architecture

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Since 2014, CARTHA has provided a platform for critical thinking on architecture and society. Founded by an international team of architects and designers, it aims to bridge the gap between theoretical and practical approaches to contemporary architecture. Each year, CARTHA initiates research and the publication of four issues on a topic in its online magazine, which are then brought together in an annual book.             In 2015, CARTHA’s topic was relations within the architectural spectrum. Contributions explore models of collaboration and the ways in which architects relate to other architects, clients, workers, and users of space. Each of the four issues—Worth Sharing, Confrères, Mannschaft, and Santisima Trinidad—features an introductory interview with a renowned architect or firm, including Diogo Seixas Lopes, Grafton Architects, Samuel Schulze, and Marco Serra. Photography in the 2015 edition of CARTHA includes series by Guido Guidi, Rasmus Norlander, Joël Tettamanti, and Onnis Luque.  


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/30/38/60/9783038600374.jpg




Cities as Multiple Landscapes

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

Cities are composed of a combination of urban and rural spaces, buildings and boundaries, and human bodies engaged in political, social, and cultural discourses. Together, these combine to create what the contributors to this volume call multiple landscapes. Developing a new theoretical conceptualization of cities, this book unites American and European approaches to comparative urban studies by investigating the concept of multiple landscapes in two sister cities: New Orleans and Innsbruck. As the essays reveal, both New Orleans and Innsbruck have long been centers of multicultural exchange, have strong senses of historical heritage, and profit from the spectacular geographies in which they are situated. Geography, in particular, links both cities to environmental, technological, and security challenges that must be considered in connection with aesthetic, cultural, and ecological debates. Exploring the many connections between New Orleans and Innsbruck, the interdisciplinary essays in this book will change the way we think about cities both local and abroad.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/35/93/50/9783593506470.jpg




Competing Norms

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

States in sub-Saharan Africa, as anywhere else, are vested with the authority to implement laws and sanction their application. But in spite of a growing emphasis in Africa on participatory approaches to legislation, little research has focused on the extent to which the public has become involved in policy making and whether the state regulations that have been produced have proven publicly beneficial. Offering a new anthropological perspective, Competing Norms fills that gap by exploring how people in sub-Saharan Africa view new regulations in the light of preexisting local norms with which new regulations often compete. A collection of international, interdisciplinary contributors discusses the competing local, state, and international norms as they have evolved over time, unfolding the intricate ambivalences and contradictions that often characterize state regulations.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/35/93/50/9783593506531.jpg




Classical Chinese Furniture from Weiyang

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

In recent decades, Chinese classical furniture from the sixteenth through the nineteenth centuries has become a major focus of international collectors and design scholars, who recognize a contemporary appeal in the furniture’s grace and simplicity. In Classical Chinese Furniture from Weiyang, Zhang Jinhua uncovers an overlooked genre of material from the Weiyang region, made of local zhazhen wood.   Zhang, who is a scholar and restorer of antique Chinese furniture, provides a broad introductory view of the literary, historical, aesthetic, social, and economic context in which the furniture was created, and expertly charts specific differences of details in design. At the heart of the book is the furniture itself, from bonsai stands to painting tables and elaborate canopy beds, which have been superbly photographed for this collection, presenting many pieces for the first time in publication. In addition, detailed drawings provide an intimate look at the ingenuity of many of the pieces. Classical Chinese Furniture from Weiyang is the first book to look exclusively at furniture from this region and will be essential for collectors and scholars with an interest in this vital time and place in Chinese art history.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/19/09/96/9781909631229.jpg




Classicisms

Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:00:00 GMT

As an aesthetic ideal, classicism is often associated with a conventional set of rules founded on supposedly timeless notions such as order, reason, and decorum. As a result, it is sometimes viewed as rigid, outdated, or stodgy. But in actuality, classicism is far from a stable concept—throughout history, it has given rise to more debate than consensus, and at times has been put to use for subversive ends. With contributions from an interdisciplinary group of scholars, this volume explodes the idea of classicism as an unchanging ideal. The essays trace the shifting parameters of classicism from antiquity to the twentieth century, documenting an exhibition of seventy objects in various media from the collection of the Smart Museum of Art and other American and international institutions. With its impressive historical and conceptual reach—from ancient literature to contemporary race relations and beyond—this colorfully illustrated book is a dynamic exploration of classicism as a fluctuating stylistic and ideological category.


Media Files:
http://press.uchicago.edu/dam/ucp/books/jacket/978/09/35/57/9780935573572.jpg