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Preview: University of Chicago Press Books: New books

University of Chicago Press Books: New books



The latest scholarly and general books from the University of Chicago Press.



Published: Wed, 28 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

 



I in Team

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

There is one sound that will always be loudest in sports. It isn’t the squeak of sneakers or the crunch of helmets; it isn’t the grunts or even the stadium music. It’s the deafening roar of sports fans. For those few among us on the outside, sports fandom—with its war paint and pennants, its pricey cable TV packages and esoteric stats reeled off like code—looks highly irrational, entertainment gone overboard. But as Erin C. Tarver demonstrates in this book, sports fandom has become extraordinarily important to our psyche, a matter of the very essence of who we are.             Why in the world, Tarver asks, would anyone care about how well a total stranger can throw a ball, or hit one with a bat, or toss one through a hoop? Because such activities and the massive public events that surround them form some of the most meaningful ritual identity practices we have today. They are a primary way we—as individuals and a collective—decide both who we are who we are not. And as such, they are also one of the key ways that various social structures—such as race and gender hierarchies—are sustained, lending a dark side to the joys of being a sports fan. Drawing on everything from philosophy to sociology to sports history, she offers a profound exploration of the significance of sports in contemporary life, showing us just how high the stakes of the game are.  


Media Files:
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I in Team

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

There is one sound that will always be loudest in sports. It isn’t the squeak of sneakers or the crunch of helmets; it isn’t the grunts or even the stadium music. It’s the deafening roar of sports fans. For those few among us on the outside, sports fandom—with its war paint and pennants, its pricey cable TV packages and esoteric stats reeled off like code—looks highly irrational, entertainment gone overboard. But as Erin C. Tarver demonstrates in this book, sports fandom has become extraordinarily important to our psyche, a matter of the very essence of who we are.             Why in the world, Tarver asks, would anyone care about how well a total stranger can throw a ball, or hit one with a bat, or toss one through a hoop? Because such activities and the massive public events that surround them form some of the most meaningful ritual identity practices we have today. They are a primary way we—as individuals and a collective—decide both who we are who we are not. And as such, they are also one of the key ways that various social structures—such as race and gender hierarchies—are sustained, lending a dark side to the joys of being a sports fan. Drawing on everything from philosophy to sociology to sports history, she offers a profound exploration of the significance of sports in contemporary life, showing us just how high the stakes of the game are.  


Media Files:
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Matatu

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Drive the streets of Nairobi, and you are sure to see many matatus—colorful minibuses that transport huge numbers of people around the city. Once ramshackle affairs held together with duct tape and wire, matatus today are name-brand vehicles maxed out with aftermarket detailing. They can be stately black or extravagantly colored, sporting names, slogans, or entire tableaus, with airbrushed portraits of everyone from Kanye West to Barack Obama. In this richly interdisciplinary book, Kenda Mutongi explores the history of the matatu from the 1960s to the present.             As Mutongi shows, matatus offer a window onto the socioeconomic and political conditions of late-twentieth-century Africa. In their diversity of idiosyncratic designs, they reflect multiple and divergent aspects of Kenyan life—including, for example, rapid urbanization, organized crime, entrepreneurship, social insecurity, the transition to democracy, and popular culture—at once embodying Kenya’s staggering social problems as well as the bright promises of its future. Offering a shining model of interdisciplinary analysis, Mutongi mixes historical, ethnographic, literary, linguistic, and economic approaches to tell the story of the matatu and explore the entrepreneurial aesthetics of the postcolonial world.  


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Matatu

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Drive the streets of Nairobi, and you are sure to see many matatus—colorful minibuses that transport huge numbers of people around the city. Once ramshackle affairs held together with duct tape and wire, matatus today are name-brand vehicles maxed out with aftermarket detailing. They can be stately black or extravagantly colored, sporting names, slogans, or entire tableaus, with airbrushed portraits of everyone from Kanye West to Barack Obama. In this richly interdisciplinary book, Kenda Mutongi explores the history of the matatu from the 1960s to the present.             As Mutongi shows, matatus offer a window onto the socioeconomic and political conditions of late-twentieth-century Africa. In their diversity of idiosyncratic designs, they reflect multiple and divergent aspects of Kenyan life—including, for example, rapid urbanization, organized crime, entrepreneurship, social insecurity, the transition to democracy, and popular culture—at once embodying Kenya’s staggering social problems as well as the bright promises of its future. Offering a shining model of interdisciplinary analysis, Mutongi mixes historical, ethnographic, literary, linguistic, and economic approaches to tell the story of the matatu and explore the entrepreneurial aesthetics of the postcolonial world.  


Media Files:
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Supreme Court Review 2016

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For more than fifty years, The Supreme Court Review has won acclaim for providing a sustained and authoritative survey of the implications of the Court’s most significant decisions. The Supreme Court Review is an in-depth annual critique of the Supreme Court and its work, keeping up on the forefront of the origins, reforms, and interpretations of American law. It is written by and for legal academics, judges, political scientists, journalists, historians, economists, policy planners, and sociologists.  


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Socialist Peace?

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For the last twenty years, the West African nation of Guinea has exhibited all of the conditions that have led to civil wars in other countries, and Guineans themselves regularly talk about the inevitability of war. Yet the country has narrowly avoided conflict again and again. In A Socialist Peace?, Mike McGovern asks how this is possible, how a nation could beat the odds and evade civil war.               Guinea is rich in resources, but its people are some of the poorest in the world. Its political situation is polarized by fiercely competitive ethnic groups. Weapons flow freely through its lands and across its borders. And, finally, it is still recovering from the oppressive regime of Sékou Touré. McGovern argues that while Touré’s reign was hardly peaceful, it was successful—often through highly coercive and violent measures—at establishing a set of durable national dispositions, which have kept the nation at peace. Exploring the ambivalences of contemporary Guineans toward the afterlife of Touré’s reign as well as their abiding sense of socialist solidarity, McGovern sketches the paradoxes that undergird political stability.  


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Socialist Peace?

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

For the last twenty years, the West African nation of Guinea has exhibited all of the conditions that have led to civil wars in other countries, and Guineans themselves regularly talk about the inevitability of war. Yet the country has narrowly avoided conflict again and again. In A Socialist Peace?, Mike McGovern asks how this is possible, how a nation could beat the odds and evade civil war.               Guinea is rich in resources, but its people are some of the poorest in the world. Its political situation is polarized by fiercely competitive ethnic groups. Weapons flow freely through its lands and across its borders. And, finally, it is still recovering from the oppressive regime of Sékou Touré. McGovern argues that while Touré’s reign was hardly peaceful, it was successful—often through highly coercive and violent measures—at establishing a set of durable national dispositions, which have kept the nation at peace. Exploring the ambivalences of contemporary Guineans toward the afterlife of Touré’s reign as well as their abiding sense of socialist solidarity, McGovern sketches the paradoxes that undergird political stability.  


Media Files:
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Maps and Civilization

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In this concise introduction to the history of cartography, Norman  J. W. Thrower charts the intimate links between maps and history from antiquity to the present day. A wealth of illustrations, including the oldest known map and contemporary examples made using Geographical Information Systems (GIS), illuminate the many ways in which various human cultures have interpreted spatial relationships. For the fourth edition of Maps and Civilization, Thrower has added an additional chapter that serves to bring the volume completely up to date.



Rights on Trial

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Gerry Handley faced years of blatant race-based harassment before he filed a complaint against his employer: racist jokes, signs reading “KKK” in his work area, and even questions from coworkers as to whether he had sex with his daughter as slaves supposedly did. He had an unusually strong case, with copious documentation and coworkers’ support, and he settled for $50,000, even winning back his job. But victory came at a high cost. Legal fees cut into Mr. Handley’s winnings, and tensions surrounding the lawsuit poisoned the workplace. A year later, he lost his job due to downsizing by his company. Mr. Handley exemplifies the burden plaintiffs bear in contemporary civil rights litigation. In the decades since the civil rights movement, we’ve made progress, but not nearly as much as it might seem. On the surface, America’s commitment to equal opportunity in the workplace has never been clearer. Virtually every company has antidiscrimination policies in place, and there are laws designed to protect these rights across a range of marginalized groups. But, as Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson, and Laura Beth Nielsen compellingly show, this progressive vision of the law falls far short in practice. When aggrieved individuals turn to the law, the adversarial character of litigation imposes considerable personal and financial costs that make plaintiffs feel like they’ve lost regardless of the outcome of the case. Employer defendants also are dissatisfied with the system, often feeling “held up” by what they see as frivolous cases. And even when the case is resolved in the plaintiff’s favor, the conditions that gave rise to the lawsuit rarely change. In fact, the contemporary approach to workplace discrimination law perversely comes to reinforce the very hierarchies that antidiscrimination laws were created to redress. Based on rich interviews with plaintiffs, attorneys, and representatives of defendants and an original national dataset on case outcomes, Rights on Trial reveals the fundamental flaws of workplace discrimination law and offers practical recommendations for how we might better respond to persistent patterns of discrimination.


Media Files:
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Rights on Trial

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Gerry Handley faced years of blatant race-based harassment before he filed a complaint against his employer: racist jokes, signs reading “KKK” in his work area, and even questions from coworkers as to whether he had sex with his daughter as slaves supposedly did. He had an unusually strong case, with copious documentation and coworkers’ support, and he settled for $50,000, even winning back his job. But victory came at a high cost. Legal fees cut into Mr. Handley’s winnings, and tensions surrounding the lawsuit poisoned the workplace. A year later, he lost his job due to downsizing by his company. Mr. Handley exemplifies the burden plaintiffs bear in contemporary civil rights litigation. In the decades since the civil rights movement, we’ve made progress, but not nearly as much as it might seem. On the surface, America’s commitment to equal opportunity in the workplace has never been clearer. Virtually every company has antidiscrimination policies in place, and there are laws designed to protect these rights across a range of marginalized groups. But, as Ellen Berrey, Robert L. Nelson, and Laura Beth Nielsen compellingly show, this progressive vision of the law falls far short in practice. When aggrieved individuals turn to the law, the adversarial character of litigation imposes considerable personal and financial costs that make plaintiffs feel like they’ve lost regardless of the outcome of the case. Employer defendants also are dissatisfied with the system, often feeling “held up” by what they see as frivolous cases. And even when the case is resolved in the plaintiff’s favor, the conditions that gave rise to the lawsuit rarely change. In fact, the contemporary approach to workplace discrimination law perversely comes to reinforce the very hierarchies that antidiscrimination laws were created to redress. Based on rich interviews with plaintiffs, attorneys, and representatives of defendants and an original national dataset on case outcomes, Rights on Trial reveals the fundamental flaws of workplace discrimination law and offers practical recommendations for how we might better respond to persistent patterns of discrimination.


Media Files:
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Evolution of Imagination

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Consider Miles Davis, horn held high, sculpting a powerful musical statement full of tonal patterns, inside jokes, and thrilling climactic phrases—all on the fly. Or think of a comedy troupe riffing on a couple of cues from the audience until the whole room is erupting with laughter. Or maybe it’s a team of software engineers brainstorming their way to the next Google, or the Einsteins of the world code-cracking the mysteries of nature. Maybe it’s simply a child playing with her toys. What do all of these activities share? With wisdom, humor, and joy, philosopher Stephen T. Asma answers that question in this book: imagination. And from there he takes us on an extraordinary tour of the human creative spirit.             Guided by neuroscience, animal behavior, evolution, philosophy, and psychology, Asma burrows deep into the human psyche to look right at the enigmatic but powerful engine that is our improvisational creativity—the source, he argues, of our remarkable imaginational capacity. How is it, he asks, that a story can evoke a whole world inside of us? How are we able to rehearse a skill, a speech, or even an entire scenario simply by thinking about it? How does creativity go beyond experience and help us make something completely new? And how does our moral imagination help us sculpt a better society? As he shows, we live in a world that is only partly happening in reality. Huge swaths of our cognitive experiences are made up by “what-ifs,” “almosts,” and “maybes,” an imagined terrain that churns out one of the most overlooked but necessary resources for our flourishing: possibilities. Considering everything from how imagination works in our physical bodies to the ways we make images, from the mechanics of language and our ability to tell stories to the creative composition of self-consciousness, Asma expands our personal and day-to-day forms of imagination into a grand scale: as one of the decisive evolutionary forces that has guided human development from the Paleolithic era to today. The result is an inspiring look at the rich relationships among improvisation, imagination, and culture, and a privileged glimpse into the unique nature of our evolved minds.  


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Decolonizing the Map

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Almost universally, newly independent states seek to affirm their independence and identity by making the production of new maps and atlases a top priority. For formerly colonized peoples, however, this process neither begins nor ends with independence, and it is rarely straightforward. Mapping their own land is fraught with a fresh set of issues: how to define and administer their territories, develop their national identity, establish their role in the community of nations, and more. The contributors to Decolonizing the Map explore this complicated relationship between mapping and decolonization while engaging with recent theoretical debates about the nature of decolonization itself.   These essays, originally delivered as the 2010 Kenneth Nebenzahl, Jr., Lectures in the History of Cartography at the Newberry Library, encompass more than two centuries and three continents—Latin America, Africa, and Asia. Ranging from the late eighteenth century through the mid-twentieth, contributors study topics from mapping and national identity in late colonial Mexico to the enduring complications created by the partition of British India and the racialized organization of space in apartheid and post-apartheid South Africa. A vital contribution to studies of both colonization and cartography, Decolonizing the Map is the first book to systematically and comprehensively examine the engagement of mapping in the long—and clearly unfinished—parallel processes of decolonization and nation building in the modern world.


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Violence of Austerity

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the aftermath of the global financial crisis in 2008, Britain’s government put into effect a hotly contested series of major cuts in public expenditure with the stated aim of restoring economic security. Since then, this reign of austerity continues to devastate contemporary Britain through a disconnected and unaffected political elite.   In The Violence of Austerity, David Whyte and Vickie Cooper bring together the passionate voices of campaigners and academics to show that rather than stimulating economic growth, austerity policies have led to a dismantling of the social systems that operated as a buffer against economic hardship. Chapters from major contributors—including Danny Dorling, Mary O’Hara and Rizwaan Sabir—show how austerity is a form of institutional violence more socially harmful and far-reaching than other more politicized and publicized forms of violence, such as terrorism or gun violence. Contributors expose highly significant cases of this institutional violence driven by public sector cuts: police attacks on the homeless, violent evictions of the rented sector, risks faced by people on workfare, and more. The Violence of Austerity is a devastating, authoritative study of the myriad ways austerity policies harm people in Britain that will resonate with anyone concerned with the increasing power of the political elite and the future of social welfare.


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Valuing Interdisciplinary Collaborative Research

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Universities are increasingly being asked to take an active role as research collaborators with citizens, public bodies, and community organizations beyond their walls. Such collaborations, advocates argue, will provide a host of benefits, from making universities more accountable to improving and developing real world activity. In short, these collaborations will help change the world for the better. This is the theory, and this theory is driving thousands of new research collaborations and partnerships. But as this book reveals, the reality is that these thousands of research collaborators, as well as the funders and institutions that are supporting them, are struggling to articulate the value of their work. Valuing Interdisciplinary Collaborative Research addresses this key challenge head-on. With a particular focus on research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, contributors draw on nine contemporary case studies from fields as diverse as cultural anthropology and international development to explore the tensions that surround the evaluation and assessment of research both generally and in the context of more recent discussions of collaborative research. Accessibly written and featuring a glossary of key terms, traditions, concepts, and resources, this book moves beyond tired, polarized debates about the relative power of scholars and participants to judge the true value of collaborative research and helps develop the methods needed for all to reflect upon, enrich, and challenge their assumptions about the quality of this work.


Media Files:
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Valuing Interdisciplinary Collaborative Research

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Universities are increasingly being asked to take an active role as research collaborators with citizens, public bodies, and community organizations beyond their walls. Such collaborations, advocates argue, will provide a host of benefits, from making universities more accountable to improving and developing real world activity. In short, these collaborations will help change the world for the better. This is the theory, and this theory is driving thousands of new research collaborations and partnerships. But as this book reveals, the reality is that these thousands of research collaborators, as well as the funders and institutions that are supporting them, are struggling to articulate the value of their work. Valuing Interdisciplinary Collaborative Research addresses this key challenge head-on. With a particular focus on research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, contributors draw on nine contemporary case studies from fields as diverse as cultural anthropology and international development to explore the tensions that surround the evaluation and assessment of research both generally and in the context of more recent discussions of collaborative research. Accessibly written and featuring a glossary of key terms, traditions, concepts, and resources, this book moves beyond tired, polarized debates about the relative power of scholars and participants to judge the true value of collaborative research and helps develop the methods needed for all to reflect upon, enrich, and challenge their assumptions about the quality of this work.


Media Files:
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Voices from the "Jungle"

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Often called the Calais Jungle, the refugee camp in Northern France epitomises for many the suffering, uncertainty, and violence that characterizes the lives of many refugees in Europe today. Migrants from ravaged countries, such as Syria, Sudan, Afghanistan, and Eritrea, arrive by the hundreds every day hoping for sanctuary from their war-torn homelands and a chance to settle in Europe. Going beyond superficial media reports, Voices from the “Jungle” gives voice to the unique individuals living in the camp—people who have made the difficult journey from devastated countries simply looking for peace.   In this moving collection of individual testimonies, Calais refugees speak directly in powerful and vivid stories, offering their memories up with stunning honesty. They tell of their childhood dreams and struggles for education; the genocides, wars, and persecution that drove them from home; the simultaneous terror and strength that filled their extraordinary journeys; the realities of living in the Calais refugee camp; and their deepest hopes for the future.    Through their stories, these refugees paint a picture of a different kind of Jungle—a powerful sense of community that has grown despite evictions and attacks and a solidarity that crosses national and religious boundaries. Interspersed with photos taken by the camp's inhabitants, taught by award-winning photographers Gideon Mendel and Crispin Hughes, original artwork by inhabitants, and powerful poems, Voices from the “Jungle” must be read by anyone seeking to understand the human consequences of our current world crisis.


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Understanding Housing Policy

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What are the major housing problems in contemporary Britain, and how effective are the policies designed to tackle them? Since the second edition of Understanding Housing Policy was published in 2011, political and financial circumstances have transformed the answers to these questions. In this fully updated third edition, Brian Lund both explores how these policies developed and were implemented under the UK Coalition Government and looks ahead to the possible revisions under the new Conservative Government. Integrating the previous edition with new discussions of such subjects as the austerity agenda following the credit crunch, the impact of the Coalition Government’s housing policies, and new policy ideas, Lund offers keen insight into the pervasive impact of need, demand, and supply as applied to the housing market and austerity policies.


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Understanding Housing Policy

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

What are the major housing problems in contemporary Britain, and how effective are the policies designed to tackle them? Since the second edition of Understanding Housing Policy was published in 2011, political and financial circumstances have transformed the answers to these questions. In this fully updated third edition, Brian Lund both explores how these policies developed and were implemented under the UK Coalition Government and looks ahead to the possible revisions under the new Conservative Government. Integrating the previous edition with new discussions of such subjects as the austerity agenda following the credit crunch, the impact of the Coalition Government’s housing policies, and new policy ideas, Lund offers keen insight into the pervasive impact of need, demand, and supply as applied to the housing market and austerity policies.


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Joseph Beuys

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Joseph Beuys is one of the most important and controversial German artists of the late twentieth century, an artist whose persona and art is so tightly interwoven with Germany’s fascist past—Beuys was, after all, a former soldier in the Third Reich—that he has been a problematic figure for postwar and post-reunification Germany. In illuminating the centrality of trauma and the sustained investigation of the notion of art as the two defining threads in Beuys's life and art, this book offers a critical biography that deepens our understanding of his many works and their contribution.              Claudia Mesch analyzes the aspects of Beuys’s works that have most offended audiences, especially the self-woven legend of redemption that many have felt was a dubious and inappropriate fantasy for a former Nazi soldier to engage. As she argues, however, Beuys’s self-mythology confronted post-traumatic life head on, foregrounding a struggle for psychic recovery. Following Beuys’s exhibitions in the 1970s, she traces how he both expanded the art world beyond the established regional centers and paved the way for future artists interested in activism-as-art. Exploring Beuys’s expansive conceptions of what art is and following him into the realms of science, politics, and spirituality, Mesch ultimately demonstrates the ways that his own myth-making acted as a positive force in the Germany’s postwar reckoning with its past.


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Kurdish Hizbullah in Turkey

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Hizbullah is commonly misunderstood in the west, and the differences between Hizbullah in Lebanon, whose followers are mainly adherents of the Shiite sect of Islam, and Hizbullah in Turkey, which is made up of Sunnis, specifically Shafii Kurds, are even less known. In Kurdish Hizbullah in Turkey, Mehmet Kurt seeks to change this, by charting the development of this powerful and misconstrued Islamist social movement from its origins in violent militancy to a more civic mode of engagement—an engagement that nonetheless provides a rationale for disenchanted young Islamists to engage in political violence. In this book, Kurt offers unique insight into Kurdish Hizbullah’s political rise and its integration of Kurdish Islamism in the region, showing how the group has successfully co-opted Kurdish nationalist discourses into an Islamist framework. Through ethnographic field work and extensive interviews with members, leaders, and supporters of Hizbullah, Kurt details how Islamic civil society managed to take root in a region where ethnic identity had been the primary factor in challenging a repressive and violent state.   


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Kant's Political Legacy

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Though Immanuel Kant wrote his seminal works more than two centuries ago, his philosophy still has much to offer us when we consider the problems we face today. Kant’s Political Legacy presents an informed and original reading of Kant’s work as applied to key questions relating to human rights, dignity, and respect on the individual level and the nature of democracy, security, peace, and political interactions at the national and international level. The result is a reading of Kant that could not be more timely, one that opens up countless new avenues of thought for grappling with some of the most pressing problems of our time.  


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Elementary and Grammar Education in Late Medieval France

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The fourteenth and fifteenth centuries saw a marked increase in the availability of elementary and grammar education in Europe. In France, that rise took the form of a unique blend of trends seen elsewhere in Europe, ranging from Church-dominated schools to independent schools and communal groups of teachers. Lyon, long a crossroad of ideas from north and south, was home to a particularly interesting blend of approaches, and in this book Sarah Lynch offers a close analysis of the educational landscape of the city, showing how schools and teachers were organized and how they interacted with each other and with ecclesiastical and municipal authorities.  


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Dutch National Research Agenda in Perspective

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Dutch National Research Agenda is a set of national priorities that are set by scientists working in conjunction with corporations, civil society organizations, and interested citizens. The agenda consolidates the questions that scientific research will be focused on in the coming year. This book covers the current status of the Dutch National Research Agenda and considers what changes and adjustments may need to be made to the process in order to keep Dutch national research at the top of the pack.  


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Designing Prostitution Policy

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Most discussions about approaches to regulating prostitution occur at the national level—battles, for example, between prohibition and legalization. In reality, however, the impact of prostitution is felt most keenly at the local level, and it is local measures that can have the greatest effect. This book explores various approaches to regulating prostitution and other sex work at the local level, analyzing their aims and outcomes and offering guidance on designing effective regulations through available policy instruments.


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Discovering Dylan Thomas

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This volume is a comprehensive companion to Dylan Thomas's published and notebook poems. It features previously unpublished material from the recently discovered fifth notebook, alongside poems, drafts, and critical material, including summaries of the reception of individual poems. Thomas's juvenilia, the relationship between plagiarism and parody in his work, critical histories for each poem, and variants of a number of poems are all featured, with rich analysis. Closing appendices deal with text and publication details for the collections Thomas published in his lifetime, the provenance and contents of the fifth notebook, and errata for the hardback edition of the Collected Poems.


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Arthurian Place Names of Wales

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book for the first time ever gathers all the place names related to King Arthur that are found within Wales. It offers full details on the history and mythology of more than one hundred and fifty sites in Wales, drawing on sources from the ninth to the nineteenth century; Latin, French, English, and Welsh; and even tourist literature and folklore. The result is a comprehensive look at the extensive traces of the Arthurian legacy on Wales and Welsh culture, a landmark book that fills a significant gap.  


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African, American

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From the Edenic wilderness of Edgar Rice Burroughs’s Tarzan novels to Marcus Garvey’s Back to Africa movement, Africa has gripped the imaginations of Americans, white or black, male or female. But why is this? In African, American, David Peterson del Mar uncovers the answer, exploring the ways in which American fantasies of Africa have evolved over time and how Africans themselves have played a role in subverting American attitudes toward the continent.    In this remarkable, panoramic work, Peterson del Mar draws on a wide range of sources from literature, film, and music, in addition to accounts by missionaries, aid workers, and travel writers, incorporating pop culture references as well as historical perspectives from Ernest Hemingway to Richard Wright, from the African Queen to the Lion King, in order to trace our continued fascination with Africa. The book spans several decades, beginning in the postwar period and continuing to the present, addressing such topical events as American responses to the Ebola crisis and reactions to Obama’s Kenyan roots, and it compares white and African American views on Africa, looking at how they have changed in light of the increased prominence enjoyed by African writers in America, including Teju Cole and Chimamanda Adichie.   All together, African, American provides a fascinating deconstruction of the idea of Africa as it exists in the American mind.  


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African, American

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From the Edenic wilderness of Edgar Rice Burroughs’s Tarzan novels to Marcus Garvey’s Back to Africa movement, Africa has gripped the imaginations of Americans, white or black, male or female. But why is this? In African, American, David Peterson del Mar uncovers the answer, exploring the ways in which American fantasies of Africa have evolved over time and how Africans themselves have played a role in subverting American attitudes toward the continent.    In this remarkable, panoramic work, Peterson del Mar draws on a wide range of sources from literature, film, and music, in addition to accounts by missionaries, aid workers, and travel writers, incorporating pop culture references as well as historical perspectives from Ernest Hemingway to Richard Wright, from the African Queen to the Lion King, in order to trace our continued fascination with Africa. The book spans several decades, beginning in the postwar period and continuing to the present, addressing such topical events as American responses to the Ebola crisis and reactions to Obama’s Kenyan roots, and it compares white and African American views on Africa, looking at how they have changed in light of the increased prominence enjoyed by African writers in America, including Teju Cole and Chimamanda Adichie.   All together, African, American provides a fascinating deconstruction of the idea of Africa as it exists in the American mind.  


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Attention

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

If there is one thing we are short on these days, it’s attention. Attention is central to everything we do and think, yet it is mostly an intangible force, an invisible thing that connects us as subjects with the world around us. We pay attention to this or that, let our attention wander—we even stand at attention from time to time—yet rarely do we attend to attention itself. In this book, Gay Watson does just that, musing on attention as one of our most human impulses.             As Watson shows, the way we think about attention is usually through its instrumentality, by what can be achieved if we give something enough of it—say, a crisply written report, a newly built bookcase, or even a satisfied child who has yearned for engagement. Yet in losing ourselves to the objects of our fixation, we often neglect the process of attention itself. Exploring everything from attention’s effects on our neurons to attention deficit disorder, from the mindfulness movement to the relationship between attention and creativity, Watson examines attention in action through many disciplines and ways of life. Along the way, she offers interviews with an astonishing cast of creative people—from composers to poets to artists to psychologists—including John Luther Adams, Stephen Batchelor, Sue Blackmore, Guy Claxton, Edmund de Waal, Rick Hanson, Jane Hirshfield, Wayne Macgregor, Iain McGilchrist, Garry Fabian Miller, Alice and Peter Oswald, Ruth Ozeki, and James Turrell.             A valuable and timely account of something central to our lives yet all too often neglected, this book will appeal to anyone who has felt their attention under threat in the clamors of modern life.  


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Amaryllidaceae of Southern Africa

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Southern Africa has long been recognized as a major center of diversity for the Amaryllidaceae, and this is the first comprehensive, illustrated account of the family in the region, covering all eighteen genera and more than 263 taxa. Graham Duncan provides a botanical description for each species, along with synonyms, as well as notes on distinguishing features, life cycles, distribution, habitat, cultivation, and conservation status. Maps, identification keys, color photographs, and botanical paintings by Barbara Jeppe and Leigh Voigt round out the entries, making this the definitive work on Amaryllidaceae in the region.


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Arthur of the Italians

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The Arthurian legend reached all levels of society in medieval and Renaissance Italy, from princely courts, with their luxury books and frescoed palaces, to the merchant classes and popular audiences in the piazza, who enjoyed shorter retellings in verse and prose. The Arthur of the Italians offers an overview of the Arthurian fiction and art created in Italy during this time, with chapters examining, among other topics, the transmission of the French romances across Italy; the reworking of Arthurian tales in various Italian regional dialects; the textual relations of the story of Tristan; the narrative structures employed by Italian writers; later ottava rima poetic versions in the new medium of printed books; and the Arthurian-themed art of the Middle Ages and Renaissance.


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Photography and Germany

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The idea of photography in Germany evokes everything from the pioneering modernist pictures of the Weimar era to the colossal digital prints that define art photography today. But it also recalls horrifying documents of wartime atrocities and the relentless surveillance of East German citizens. Photography and Germany broadens these perceptions by examining the medium’s multi-faceted relationship with Germany’s turbulent cultural, political, and social history while rethinking the notion of German photography with fresh insights on its historical context.             Andrés Mario Zervigón covers this history from the region’s pre-photographic experiments with light-sensitive chemicals to today’s tension between analog and digital technologies. Rather than simply providing a survey of German photography, however, he focuses on how the medium, as a product of the modern age, has intervened in a fraught project of national imagining, often to productive ends but sometimes to catastrophic results. Richly illustrated with numerous previously unpublished images, Photography and Germany is the first single-authored history of photography in Germany ever published, one that deepens our broader understanding of how photography cultivates notions of a nation and its inhabitants.  


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Pomegranate

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Supple but crunchy, sweet but tart—with its strange construction of seeds filled with delicious garnet juice so vibrant it’s hard not think it is some otherworldly blood—no wonder the pomegranate has appealed so much to the human imagination throughout the centuries. Holding aloft this singular fruit in the light of human history, Damien Stone offers a unique look at an alluring fruit that has figured in our culinary consciousness from the gardens of the ancient world to the health-food section of supermarkets.               Stone takes us back to the early polytheistic religions and the important role that pomegranates had in their rituals. From there he shows how they came to be held in high esteem in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam alike, examining exciting new findings that further cement their importance: for instance, many historians believe now that it was a pomegranate, not an apple, that was the forbidden fruit in the Garden of Eden. Stone examines the allure that the pomegranate has had to a fascinating cast of famous figures, from ancient Assyrian King Ashurnasirpal to Tudor Queen Anne Boleyn, from Sandro Botticelli to Salvador Dalí. Drawing on text, image, and taste, Pomegranate is a cornucopia of strange and fascinating stories about a very special fruit.   


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Political Thought of Abdullah Öcalan

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Abdullah Öcalan actively led the Kurdish liberation struggle as the head of the PKK from its foundation in 1978 until his abduction on February 15, 1999. Now, writing from isolation in Turkey’s Imrali Island Prison, he has shaped a new political movement in the Middle East called Democratic Confederalism, which is rapidly developing and spreading across the Middle East because it combats powerful religious sectarianism while also providing the blueprints for a burgeoning democratic society.   Bringing together Öcalan’s ideas in one slim volume for the first time, The Political Thought of Abdullah Öcalan contains a selection of his most influential writings over his lifetime. These ideas can be read in light of Öcalan’s continuing legacy during the ongoing revolution and the battle against conservatism and religious extremism. As the political situation in Syria intensifies, this book offers a timely and essential introduction for anyone wanting to come to grips with his political ideas on the Kurdish question, gender, Democratic Confederalism, and nationalism.  


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Private Security in Africa

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Across Africa, growing economic inequality, instability, and urbanization have led to the rapid rise of private security providers. While these private security providers have already had a significant impact on African societies, their impact has so far received little in the way of comprehensive analysis—until now. Drawing on a wide range of disciplinary approaches, and encompassing anthropology, sociology, and political science, Private Security in Africa offers unique insight into the lives and experiences of security providers and those affected by them, as well as into the fragile state context which has allowed them to thrive.    Featuring original research and case studies ranging from private policing in South Africa to the recruitment of Sierra Leonean men for private security work in Iraq, the book considers the full implications of private security providers on security and the state, not only within Africa but for the world as a whole.  


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Poetry and Photography

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The international community of letters mourned the recent death of Yves Bonnefoy, universally acclaimed as one of France’s greatest poets of the last half century. A prolific author, he was often considered a candidate for the Nobel Prize and published a dozen major collections of poetry in verse and prose, several books of dream-like tales, and numerous studies of literature and art. His oeuvre has been translated into scores of languages, and he himself was a celebrated translator of Shakespeare, Yeats, Keats, and Leopardi. Poetry and Photography is Bonnefoy’s seminal essay on the intricate connections between the two fields as they play out against a background of major works in the history of literature. Bonnefoy is concerned not just with new concepts that photography introduces to the world of images, but also with the ways in which works like Maupassant’s “The Night” perpetuate these concepts. A short, critical text on different forms of artistic creation, masterfully translated by Chris Turner, the volume is an invigorating read.


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Protest Camps in International Context

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In recent years, protest camps have become increasingly prominent, seen in mass protests around the world, with camps erected everywhere from a park in Istanbul to a Mexico City street. Though these movements, like the countless others that have adopted this tactic, have differing goals, they’ve all found protest camps to be an effective tactic for getting and holding attention from media and government alike. This collection offers a number of interdisciplinary case studies of protest camps as unique organizational forms that transcend the contexts of particular social movements, looking at relations, connections, and similarities and differences among camps from widely varied locations and movements. Written by a wide range of experts in the field, the book offers a critical assessment of current protest events and will help better understanding of new global forms of democracy in action.


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Points of Convergence

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Thanks to its very nature, performance enters into natural dialogue with art, new media, politics, and the social sphere as a whole. Always happening in the here and now, and with a unique freedom and openness to the unknown, performance is a medium with a special ability to question its own subjects, materials, and languages. As a result, it is often best reflected in the dynamic character of contemporary art and contemporaneity in the broadest sense of the word. Points of Convergence explores these ideas and investigates critical approaches to performance, ultimately aiming to stimulate new discussion between theorists and practitioners. With twelve essays by leading figures in the field of performance arts, this illustrated volume is structured in two parts. The first, authored by academics in the discipline, features an introduction to key areas of scholastic research. The second part, authored by curators and other researchers, then focuses on an account of individual traditions of performance. Taken together, the contributions identify new possibilities for interaction between the theoretical aspects of performance art and the ways performance plays out within local contexts.


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Melting the Ice Curtain

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Just five years after a Soviet missile blew a civilian airliner out of the sky over the North Pacific, an Alaska Airlines jet braved Cold War tensions to fly into tomorrow. Crossing the Bering Strait between Alaska and the Russian Far East, the 1988 Friendship Flight reunited Native peoples of common languages and cultures for the first time in four decades. It and other dramatic efforts to thaw what was known as the Ice Curtain launched a thirty-year era of perilous, yet prolific, progress. Melting the Ice Curtain tells the story of how inspiration, courage, and persistence by citizen-diplomats bridged a widening gap in superpower relations. David Ramseur was a first-hand witness to the danger and political intrigue, having flown on that first Friendship Flight, and having spent thirty years behind the scenes with some of Alaska’s highest officials. As Alaska celebrates the 150th anniversary of its purchase, and as diplomatic ties with Russia become perilous, Melting the Ice Curtain shows that history might hold the best lessons for restoring diplomacy between nuclear neighbors.


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Lived Experience of Improvisation

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Improvisation is crucial to a wide range of artistic activities—most prominently, perhaps, in music, but extending to other fields of experience such as literature and pedagogy. Yet it gets short shrift in both appreciation and analysis of art within education. This is in no small part due to our tendency to view the world in fixed categories and structures that belie our ability to generate creative, groundbreaking responses within and between those structures.             The Lived Experience of Improvisation draws on an analysis of interviews with highly regarded improvisers, including Roscoe Mitchell, Pauline Oliveros, and George Lewis. Simon Rose also exploits his own experience as a musician and teacher, making a compelling case for bringing back improvisation from the margins. He argues that improvisation is a pervasive aspect of being human and that it should be at the heart of our teaching and understanding of the world.  


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Land, Freedom and Fiction

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

David Maughan-Brown’s authoritative work on the Mau Mau Uprising during the 1950s in Kenya, examines how the Mau Mau struggle for land and independence has been mirrored, and often distorted, in accounts by English and white Kenyan writers, as well as by indigenous Kenyan novelists. Against the turbulent background of the Mau Mau Uprising, Maughan-Brown explores the relationship between history, literary creation, and the myths that societies cultivate. Spanning the breadth of colonial and post-colonial African literature, his subjects range from the colonialist authors Robert Ruark and Elspeth Huxley, to the post-independence novels of Meja Mwangi and Ngugi wa Thiong’o.  By presenting a concise account of the uprising and its place in Kenyan identity, Land, Freedom and Fiction significantly increases our understanding of settler attitudes and the role of literature within colonial ideology.   


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Land, Freedom and Fiction

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

David Maughan-Brown’s authoritative work on the Mau Mau Uprising during the 1950s in Kenya, examines how the Mau Mau struggle for land and independence has been mirrored, and often distorted, in accounts by English and white Kenyan writers, as well as by indigenous Kenyan novelists. Against the turbulent background of the Mau Mau Uprising, Maughan-Brown explores the relationship between history, literary creation, and the myths that societies cultivate. Spanning the breadth of colonial and post-colonial African literature, his subjects range from the colonialist authors Robert Ruark and Elspeth Huxley, to the post-independence novels of Meja Mwangi and Ngugi wa Thiong’o.  By presenting a concise account of the uprising and its place in Kenyan identity, Land, Freedom and Fiction significantly increases our understanding of settler attitudes and the role of literature within colonial ideology.   


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Labour Exploitation and Work-Based Harm

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Though it barely registers in public political discussions, labor exploitation is a substantial and growing problem worldwide. This innovative book looks at the issue through the lens of social harm, analyzing the effects of labor exploitation in different contexts, critiquing existing approaches to the study of workplace exploitation, abuse, and forced labor, and showing the potential for using a social harm–focused approach to attempt to effect political and social change in this area. Mapping out a new subdiscipline, Sam Scott aims to shift the power from employers to workers and reduce labor exploitation and work-based harm across the globe.


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Legal Aid in Crisis

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

One of the many areas of social support affected by the recent austerity measures in Britain is legal aid, which has suffered under cuts so substantial that, this book argues, the result is the most radical set of changes in the sixty-year history of legal aid in the nation, a transformation of its very meaning and purpose. From an original position as a form of social welfare to which nearly anyone could get access, it is now seen as a benefit, outside the legal system, and almost wholly cast in economic terms. This book looks at this shift and its far-reaching consequences not just for individuals but for the whole of the court system.


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Modelscapes of Nationalism

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Modelscapes are clusters of miniature architectural models that represent entire environments; they’re frequently found in museums as representations of heritage, architecture, and collective identity. This book offers a critical analysis of modelscapes, using case studies from Israel, to show how miniature representations of contested physical space participate in the construction of a sense of national identity and appropriation of the land and its history. What, Yael Padan asks, is the meaning of such models, and what role do they play within the context of an ongoing violent conflict over territory and history?


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Michelangelo and the Viewer in His Time

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Today most of us enjoy the work of famed Renaissance artist Michelangelo by perusing art books or strolling along the galleries of a museum—and the luckier of us have had a chance to see his extraordinary frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. But as Bernadine Barnes shows in this book, even a visit to a well-preserved historical sight doesn’t quite afford the experience the artist intended us to have. Bringing together the latest historical research, she offers us an accurate account of how Michelangelo’s art would have been seen in its own time.             As Barnes shows, Michelangelo’s works were made to be viewed in churches, homes, and political settings, by people who brought their own specific needs and expectations to them. Rarely were his paintings and sculptures viewed in quiet isolation—as we might today in the stark halls of a museum. Instead, they were an integral part of ritual and ceremonies, and viewers would have experienced them under specific lighting conditions and from particular vantages; they would have moved through spaces in particular ways and been compelled to relate various works with others nearby. Reconstructing some of the settings in which Michelangelo’s works appeared, Barnes reassembles these experiences for the modern viewer. Moving throughout his career, she considers how his audience changed, and how this led him to produce works for different purposes, sometimes for conventional religious settings, but sometimes for more open-minded patrons. She also shows how the development of print and art criticism changed the nature of the viewing public, further altering the dynamics between artist and audience.             Historically attuned, this book encourages today’s viewers to take a fresh look at this iconic artist, seeing his work as they were truly meant to be seen.  


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Manhattan Project

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Internationally celebrated Hungarian novelist László Krasznahorkai has been heralded by Susan Sontag as “the Hungarian master of the apocalypse” and compared favorably to Gogol by W. G. Sebald. A new work by Krasznahorkai is always an event, and The Manhattan Project is no less. As part of Krasznahorkai’s fellowship at the Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers at the New York Public Library, he has been working on a novella inspired by a reading of Moby-Dick. Yet, as he follows in Herman Melville’s footsteps, a second book alongside the original novella took shape. The Manhattan Project is that book.   Offering a unique account of a great literary mind at work, Krasznahorkai reveals here the incidences and coincidences that shape his process of writing and creating. The Manhattan Project explores the act of creation through the lens of Krasznahorkai’s encounter with Melville, and it places this vision alongside the work of others who have crossed Melville’s path, both literally and fictionally.   Presented alongside Krasznahorkai’s text are photographs by Ornan Rotem, which trace the encounters of writers and artists with Melville as they crisscross Manhattan, driven by a hunger to unlock the city’s inscrutable ways. As Krasznahorkai goes in search of Melville, we journey along with him on the quest for the secret of creativity. The Manhattan Project provides a rare understanding of great literature in the making.


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Men Who Lost Singapore, 1938-1942

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The British military failure against the Japanese invasion of Singapore in 1942 is a well-documented and closely examined episode. But far less attention has been paid to the role of the colonial governor and his staff during this period, an oversight Ronald McCrum corrects with this insightful history. As McCrum shows, the failure of the civil authorities in conjunction with the military to fully prepare the country for the possibility of war was a key factor in the defeat.   In The Men Who Lost Singapore, McCrum closely examines the role and responsibilities of the colonial authorities before and during the war. He argues that the poor and occasionally hostile relations that developed between the local government and the British military hierarchy prevented the development and implementation of a strategic and unified plan of defense against the growing threat of the Japanese. Consequently, this indecisive and ineffective leadership led to significant losses and civilian casualties that could have been prevented.  


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Making Sense of Child Sexual Exploitation

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Recent scandals throughout the United Kingdom have lifted the problem of child sexual exploitation to near the top of the social policy agenda. But amid the furor, some key questions have been ignored. What makes child sexual exploitation different from other forms of child abuse? What do we know about why it happens? And what approaches are most effective for stopping it? In this book, Sophie Hallett argues that we need to use the exchange model—an approach lost in the current focus on "grooming"—to answer these questions. The book draws heavily on the voices of children and young people who have experienced sexual exploitation and the social work practitioners who have worked with them, to challenge mainstream discourse around child sexual exploitation, arguing that it is much more widespread than thought and that we must reorient our thinking about it if we want to succeed in preventing it.


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Making Sense of Child Sexual Exploitation

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Recent scandals throughout the United Kingdom have lifted the problem of child sexual exploitation to near the top of the social policy agenda. But amid the furor, some key questions have been ignored. What makes child sexual exploitation different from other forms of child abuse? What do we know about why it happens? And what approaches are most effective for stopping it? In this book, Sophie Hallett argues that we need to use the exchange model—an approach lost in the current focus on "grooming"—to answer these questions. The book draws heavily on the voices of children and young people who have experienced sexual exploitation and the social work practitioners who have worked with them, to challenge mainstream discourse around child sexual exploitation, arguing that it is much more widespread than thought and that we must reorient our thinking about it if we want to succeed in preventing it.


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Insatiable

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Hurling our financial markets through tempests of speculation, driving our businesses into practices of simultaneous austerity (for those on the bottom) and lavish expenditure (for those on the top), and flying high as a banner for outspoken bankers, brokers, and politicians alike has been a prevailing ethos: greed is good. In this book, Stuart Sim calls for an end to this madness, exposing the massively damaging effects that greed has had on both public and private life and showing how the actions of a socially irresponsible “greedocracy” have systematically undermined our democratic institutions. Ranging across politics, economic theory, finance, healthcare, the food industry, sports, religion, and the arts, Sim demonstrates how deeply embedded the greed imperative is in human psychology. As he shows, all of us as individuals are capable of greed—usually in small and insignificant ways—but some embrace it to the extreme, and moreover it has thrived as a powerful force in our wider culture and institutions, asserting itself everywhere we go. The food industry encourages us to overeat. The medical industry has increasingly been driven by profits rather than well-being. Corporations hypocritically claim fiscal responsibility, driving down workers’ wages while paying executives—even those who drive the business into the ground—record sums. Looking at larger phenomena such as the increasing wealth gap and exponential population growth, Sim also proffers various ways we can deal with greed in our day-to-day lives. And as he shows, we must deal with it. Insatiable is a wakeup call to recognize the horrible effects that greed is having on our relationships, institutions, cultures, environment—even on our own bodies—and that we must resist it wherever we can.  


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In Search of Utopia

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Thomas More’s Utopia marked its five-hundredth year in 2016, and it remains as fascinating and influential as ever. More wrote the book out of frustration at the conditions of his time, in an England where corruption and misrule were rampant. But from the very earliest days it resonated far beyond England’s borders, challenging and inspiring readers from all over Europe, and, eventually, throughout the world. This book offers an unusual perspective on Utopia: it gathers masterworks by a large number of prominent northern European artists who were inspired by the book, including Hans Holbein, Jan Gossaert, Albrecht Dürer, and Quentin Matsys, into a stunning volume that reveals the power of More’s imagination and ideas.


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Held's History of Sumbawa

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Sumbawa is a medium-sized island in eastern Indonesia that has a particularly interesting past. In the premodern era it lay on the trade routes that connected the north coasts of the islands of Melaka and Java with the spice-producing areas in Maluku, while Sumbawa itself exported horses, sappan wood, and rice. Its recorded history covers periods of Hindu-Javanese influence, the Southeast Asian Age of Commerce, early Islamization, and Dutch colonialism. Dutch Indologist Gerrit Jan Held wrote this book in 1955 but died before it could be published; this volume represents its first translation into English, and it includes extensive footnotes that set it in context of current research.


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Hayek vs Keynes

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Few thinkers better encapsulate the two polarities of economic and social thought in the twenty-first century than Friedrich Hayek and John Maynard Keynes. Wrestling with the horrors of world wars, the atrocities of fascist regimes, the hungers of the Great Depression, and the turbulence of political ideologies as they grew evermore pitted against one another, both sought a cure for modernity’s terrible problems and a safeguard against future catastrophes—a task that would leave them with completely different conclusions. In this book, Thomas Hörber offers a clear historical account of the work of these two great figures of modern economic thought.             Hoerber looks at the two central works that would alter the course of economic thought: Keynes’s The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money and Hayek’s The Road to Serfdom. Placing them within the context of the devastation that followed World War I, he explains how the historical conditions in which these books were written help us better understand how their lessons can illuminate the economic and political phenomena of our own era, such as the recent financial crisis, globalization, and European integration. He shows how Keynes’s emphasis on government regulation through monetary and fiscal policy and Hayek’s great cautions against the tyrannies that can so easily arise from central planning have led to competing schools of economic thought. Making accessible classic economic theory and employing a qualitative method of economics, he offers an articulated account of how history has led to our current economic environment.             With a broad perspective and incisive but clear examinations of important economic theories, this book places the two great economists of the twentieth-century within their historical context, illuminating how much we have learned—and can still learn—from them both.  


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Honey

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Whether drizzled into our tea or spread atop our terms of endearment, there’s one thing that is always true about honey: it is sweet. As Lucy M. Long shows in this book, while honey is definitely the natural sweetener par excellence, it has a long history in our world as much more, serving in different settings as a food, tonic, medicine, and even preservative. It features in many religions as a sacred food of the gods. In this luscious history, she traces the uses and meanings of honey in myriad cultures throughout time.             Long points to a crucial fact about honey: it can be enjoyed with very little human processing, which makes it one of the most natural foods we consume. Its nutritional qualities and flavors dramatically reflect the surroundings in which it is produced, and those who produce it—bees—are some of the most important insects in the world, the chief pollinators of wild plants and domesticated crops alike. Showing how honey has figured in politics, religion, economics, and popular culture, Long also directly explores its tastiest use—in our food and drink—offering a history of its culinary place in the world, one sweetened with an assortment of delicious recipes. Lively and engaged, her account will give even the saltiest of us an insatiable sweet tooth.  


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Hemingway in Italy

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Ernest Hemingway is most often associated with Spain, Cuba, and Florida, but Italy was equally important in his life and work. This book, the first full-length study on the subject, explores Hemingway’s visits throughout his life to such places as Sicily, Genoa, Rapallo, Cortina, and Venice. Richard Owen describes how Hemingway first visited Italy during World War I, an experience that set the scene for A Farewell to Arms. The writer then returned after World War II, where he would find inspiration for Across the River and into the Trees. When Men without Women was published, some reviewers declared Hemingway to be at heart a reporter preoccupied with bullfighters, soldiers, prostitutes, and hard drinkers, but their claims failed to note that he also wrote sensitively and passionately about love and loss against an Italian backdrop. Owen highlights the significance of Italy in the writer’s life. On the night he shot himself in July 1961, for example, Hemingway sang a song he had once learned in Cortina d’Ampezzo. Hemingway returned to Italy again and again, and the places he visited or used as inspiration for his work are many. At the same time, the inspiration goes both ways: Owen describes how the fifteenth century villa Ca’ Erizzo at Bassano del Grappa, where the American Red Cross ambulances were stationed, is now a museum devoted to the writer and World War I. Showing how the Italian landscape, from the Venetian lagoon to the Dolomites and beyond, deeply affected one of the greatest writers of the twentieth century, Hemingway in Italy demonstrates that this country belongs alongside Spain as a key influence on his writing—and why the Italian themselves took Hemingway and his writing to heart.  


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Heritage and Identity in Contemporary Thailand

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Using Thailand as a case study, Ross King examines the role of place in the formation of identity through memory. Employing the idea of French historian Pierre Nora that because we no longer live in environments of memory—places where the past is still vividly alive—we compensate by attaching ourselves to sites of memory, King explores whether Thailand offers an alternative vision, a place where modernity and heritage coexist. He looks closely at the myths of ancient Thai cities, the remaining royal palaces, historical monuments, small towns and villages, and the proliferating slums of Bangkok in order to create a unique and nuanced perspective of contemporary Thailand and its many ideas of Thai identity.  


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Infrastructure in Africa

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book presents a comprehensive account and analysis of the current state of infrastructure in Africa with an unprecedented level of detail. Covering nearly twenty specific topical issues for the ongoing development of African infrastructure—including the economic and political aspects of infrastructure development, financing and the mobilization of domestic resources, and the potential for social inclusion—the volume explicitly challenges current policy, practice, and thinking in this area.


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Infrastructure in Africa

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book presents a comprehensive account and analysis of the current state of infrastructure in Africa with an unprecedented level of detail. Covering nearly twenty specific topical issues for the ongoing development of African infrastructure—including the economic and political aspects of infrastructure development, financing and the mobilization of domestic resources, and the potential for social inclusion—the volume explicitly challenges current policy, practice, and thinking in this area.


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Narrative Concepts in the Study of Eighteenth-Century Literature

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This collection of essays studies the encounter between allegedly ahistorical concepts of narrative and eighteenth-century literature from across Europe. At issue is the question of whether the theoretical concepts underpinning narratology are, despite their appearance of ahistorical generality, actually derived from the historical study of a particular period and type of literature. The essays take on aspects of eighteenth-century texts such as plot, genre, character, perspective, temporality, and more, coming at them from both a narratological and a historical perspective.  


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On Rules

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Justice is simultaneously a practical and an ideal concept: when we think of justice, we refer to its day-to-day administration, involving police, lawyers, judges, and politicians—but we also refer to a larger ideal, a set of basic values that guide our attempts to live together and balance competing interests, obligations, and freedoms. If we lose sight of the practical, the ideal will fail—but if we forget the ideal, the practical becomes pointless. On Rules is the culmination of decades of thinking about and working within the law as both an ideal and a realm of practical action. Gherardo Colombo brings to his rich philosophical analysis of the culture of justice thirty years of experience in the Italian judiciary, which saw him head up numerous important and sensitive commissions and inquiries. His exploration of the concept and application of rules of justice is powerful and clear: if we don’t root our experience in a fundamental respect for rules, we cannot have a functioning, just society.  


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On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and Other Displacements

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Defying the binary and Eurocentric view of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Ella Shohat’s work, as a whole, dares to engage the deeper historical and cultural questions swirling around colonialism, Orientalism, and nationalism. Spanning several decades, Shohat’s work has introduced conceptual frameworks that have fundamentally challenged the conventional understandings of Arabs and Jews, Palestine, Zionism, and the Middle East. Collected now in a single volume, this book gathers together some of her most influential political essays, interviews, speeches, testimonies, and memoirs for the first time.   As a renowned academic, orator, and activist, Shohat’s work unpacks complexly fraught issues: anomalies of the national and colonial in Zionist discourse; narrating of Jewish pasts in Muslim spaces; links and distinctions between the expulsion of Palestinians during the 1948 war and the dislocation of Arab-Jews; traumatic memories triggered by partition and border-crossing; echoes within Islamophobia of the anti-Semitic figure of the Jew; and efforts to imagine a possible united and peaceful future. Shohat’s trans-disciplinary perspective illuminates the contemporary cultural politics in and around the Middle East. A transdisciplinary work engaging history, literature, sociology, film, media, and cultural studies, Selected Writings offers a vivid sense of Shohat’s unique intellectual journey and field-defining career.   


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On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and Other Displacements

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Defying the binary and Eurocentric view of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, Ella Shohat’s work, as a whole, dares to engage the deeper historical and cultural questions swirling around colonialism, Orientalism, and nationalism. Spanning several decades, Shohat’s work has introduced conceptual frameworks that have fundamentally challenged the conventional understandings of Arabs and Jews, Palestine, Zionism, and the Middle East. Collected now in a single volume, this book gathers together some of her most influential political essays, interviews, speeches, testimonies, and memoirs for the first time.   As a renowned academic, orator, and activist, Shohat’s work unpacks complexly fraught issues: anomalies of the national and colonial in Zionist discourse; narrating of Jewish pasts in Muslim spaces; links and distinctions between the expulsion of Palestinians during the 1948 war and the dislocation of Arab-Jews; traumatic memories triggered by partition and border-crossing; echoes within Islamophobia of the anti-Semitic figure of the Jew; and efforts to imagine a possible united and peaceful future. Shohat’s trans-disciplinary perspective illuminates the contemporary cultural politics in and around the Middle East. A transdisciplinary work engaging history, literature, sociology, film, media, and cultural studies, Selected Writings offers a vivid sense of Shohat’s unique intellectual journey and field-defining career.   


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One Day a Year

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

During a 1960 interview, East German writer Christa Wolf was asked a curious question: would she describe in detail what she did on September 27th? Fascinated by considering the significance of a single day over many years, Wolf began keeping a detailed diary of September 27th, a practice which she carried on for more than fifty years until her death in 2011. The first volume of these notes covered 1960 through 2000 was published to great acclaim more than a decade ago. Now translator Katy Derbyshire is bringing the September 27th collection up to date with One Day a Year—a collection of Wolf’s notes from the last decade of her life. The book is both a personal record and a unique document of our times. With her characteristic precision and transparency, Wolf examines the interplay of the private, subjective, and major contemporary historical events. She writes about Germany after 9/11, about her work on her last great book City of Angels, and also about her exhausting confrontation with old age. One Day a Year is a compelling and personal glimpse into the life of one of the world’s greatest writers.


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Open Data and the Knowledge Society

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

While there is a lot of talk about how we now live in a knowledge society, the reality has been less impressive: we have yet to truly transition to a knowledge society—in part, this book argues, because discussion mostly focuses on a knowledge economy and information society rather than on ways to mobilize to create an actual knowledge society. That all may change, however, with the rise of open data and big data. This book considers the role of the open data movement in fostering transformation, showing that at the heart of any successful mobilization will be an emerging open data ecosystem and new ways for societal actors to effectively produce and use data.


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Fan Phenomena: Game of Thrones

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Winter is coming. Every Sunday night, millions of fans gather around their televisions to take in the spectacle that is a new episode of Game of Thrones. Much is made of who will be gruesomely murdered each week on the hit show, though sometimes the question really is who won’t die a fiery death. The show, based on the Song of Ice and Fire series written by George R. R. Martin, is a truly global phenomenon. With the seventh season of the HBO series in production, Game of Thrones has been nominated for multiple awards, its cast has been catapulted to celebrity, and references to it proliferate throughout popular culture. Often positioned as the grittier antithesis to J. R. R. Tolkien’s Lord of the Rings, Martin’s narrative focuses on the darker side of chivalry and heroism, stripping away these higher ideals to reveal the greed, amorality, and lust for power underpinning them. Fan Phenomena: Game of Thrones is an exciting new addition to the Intellect series, bringing together academics and fans of Martin’s universe to consider not just the content of the books and HBO series, but fan responses to both. From trivia nights dedicated to minutiae to forums speculating on plot twists to academics trying to make sense of the bizarre climate of Westeros, everyone is talking about Game of Thrones. Edited by Kavita Mudan Finn, the book focuses on the communities created by the books and television series and how these communities envision themselves as consumers, critics, and even creators of fanworks in a wide variety of media, including fiction, art, fancasting, and cosplay.


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Flatness

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

There are few truths about the modern world that are more self-evident than this: it is flat. We write on flat paper laid atop flat desks. We look at flat images on flat screens mounted on flat walls, or we press flat icons on flat phones while we navigate flat streets. Everywhere we go it seems the structures around us at one time or another had a level placed upon them to ensure they were perfectly flat. Yet such engineered planar surfaces have become so pervasive and fundamental to our lives that we barely notice their existence. In this highly original study, B. W. Higman employs a wide variety of approaches to better understand flatness, that level platform upon which the dramas of modern life have played out. Higman looks at the ways that humans have perceived the natural world around them, moving from Flat Earth theories to abstract geometric concepts to the flatness problem of modern cosmology. Along the way he shows that we have simultaneously sought flatness in our everyday lives and also disparaged it as a featureless, empty, and monotonous quality. He discusses the ways flatness figures as a metaphor for those things or people who are boring, dull, or lacking energy or inspiration, and he shows how the construction of flat surfaces has contributed to a degradation of visual diversity. At the same time, he also shows how we have pursued flatness as an engineering ideal and how we have used it conceptually in art, music, and literature. Written with wit and wisdom, and splendidly illustrated throughout, this book will appeal to all those who are interested in the topography of the modern world, to anyone who has ever marveled at the feel of its smooth surfaces or felt oppressed by the tyranny of its featurelessness.  


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For Whose Benefit?

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Welfare reform in the United Kingdom has been underway for years now, but there has been little reflection on how it has been experienced and thought about by the people who are directly affected by it. This book draws on extended, repeat interviews with single parents, disabled people, and young job seekers to consider how they experience the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and whether the welfare state still offers meaningful protection and security for those who rely on it. This analysis enables the author to highlight the gap between the lived experience of welfare and the policy rhetoric surrounding it.


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For Whose Benefit?

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Welfare reform in the United Kingdom has been underway for years now, but there has been little reflection on how it has been experienced and thought about by the people who are directly affected by it. This book draws on extended, repeat interviews with single parents, disabled people, and young job seekers to consider how they experience the rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and whether the welfare state still offers meaningful protection and security for those who rely on it. This analysis enables the author to highlight the gap between the lived experience of welfare and the policy rhetoric surrounding it.


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Eagle Day

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In August of 1940, the Luftwaffe launched an air assault on Britain of unprecedented power and violence. The only thing standing in their way were a few hundred pilots, navigators, and gunners who took to the skies and faced death night after night for six crucial weeks as the summer of 1940 wore away into autumn. Originally published in 1966, Eagle Day tells the story of those weeks and the men who fought and died to keep Britain free. Richard Collier, an RAF pilot himself, draws on more than four hundred eyewitness accounts to give us a startlingly close-up view of life in the air during the Battle of Britain. His accounts of that long moment when Britain's back was against the wall are unforgettable.  


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Emerging Socialities in 21st Century Health Care

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The landscape of health care is changing rapidly, both on an organizational and a technological level. This book gathers medical anthropologists to examine the ways that both patients and health care workers are being affected by new policies, market, and technologies. Contributors cover a wide range of topics, including vaccination, disability, migration, and self-medication, making clear that not only are changing circumstances leading to the emergence of new socialities, but they are also driving new ethics and moralities.  


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Early Film Theories in Italy 1896-1922

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This collection for the first time brings together scholars to explore the ways that various people and groups in Italian society reacted to the advent of cinema. Looking at the responses of writers, scholars, clergymen, psychologists, philosophers, members of parliament, and more, the pieces collected here from that period show how Italians developed a common language to describe and discuss this invention that quickly exceeded all expectations and transcended existing categories of thought and artistic forms. The result is a close-up picture of a culture in transition, dealing with a “scandalous” new technology that appeared poised to thoroughly change everyday life.


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Echoes of Valhalla

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Tolkien’s wizard Gandalf, Wagner’s Valkyrie Brünnhilde, Marvel’s superhero the Mighty Thor, the warrior heading for Valhalla in Led Zeppelin’s “Immigrant Song,” and Donald Crisp’s portrayal of Leif Eriksson in the classic film The Viking—these are just a few examples of how Icelandic medieval literature has shaped human imagination during the past 150 years. Echoes of Valhalla is a unique look at modern adaptations of the Icelandic eddas (poems of Norse mythology) and sagas (ancient prose accounts of Viking history, voyages, and battles) across an astonishing breadth of art forms. Jón Karl Helgason looks at comic books, plays, travel books, music, and films in order to explore the reincarnations of a range of legendary characters, from the Nordic gods Thor and Odin to the saga characters Hallgerd Long-legs, Gunnar of Hlidarendi, and Leif the Lucky. Roaming the globe, Helgason unearths echoes of Nordic lore in Scandinavia, Britain, America, Germany, Italy, and Japan. He examines the comic work of Jack Kirby and cartoon work of Peter Madsen; reads the plays of Henrik Ibsen and Gordon Bottomley; engages thought travelogues by Frederick Metcalfe and Poul Vad; listens to the music of Richard Wagner, Edward Elgar, and the metal band Manowar; and watches films by directors such as Roy William Neill and Richard Fleischer, outlining the presence of the eddas and sagas in these nineteenth- and twentieth-century works.   Altogether, Echoes of Valhalla tells the remarkable story of how disparate, age-old poetry and prose originally recorded in remote areas of medieval Iceland have come to be a part of our shared cultural experience today—how Nordic gods and saga heroes have survived and how their colorful cast of characters and adventures they went on are as vibrant as ever.  


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End of Development

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Across the world, millions remain trapped in debilitating poverty, while international aid and development projects have seemingly done little to close the gap between developed and developing nations. Why have some countries grown so rich while others remain so poor? And, how can we account for the persistence of global poverty?  In The End of Development, Andrew Brooks answers these questions with a provocative argument that inequality is rooted in the very nature of our approach to development itself.   Tracing the long arc of human history, Brooks rejects popular environmental explanations for the divergence of nations, showing that the prosperity of the West and poverty of “the rest” stems not from environmental factors but from the dynamics of capitalism and colonialism, which enriched the powers of the global North at the expense of the South. Rather than address the root causes of this inequality, international development strategies have so far only served to exacerbate them, by imposing crippling debts and destructive policies on developing nations.      But, Brooks suggests that this disastrous form of development is now coming to an end, as the emerging economies of Asia and Africa begin to assert themselves on the world stage. In The End of Development he urges that we must seize this opportunity to transform attitudes towards inequality and to develop radical new approaches to addressing global poverty.    


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Epidemic Subjects - Radical Ontology

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Modern philosophy continues to grapple with the idea of subjectivity—and, as the concept of subjectivity has consequently been repeatedly refined and redefined, the struggle has spread to the ways we conceive of sovereignty, collectivity, nationality, and identity as a result. Yet, in the absence of an authoritative account of these central philosophical concepts, exciting new ways of thinking have emerged which continue to develop and evolve.             Epidemic Subjects—Radical Ontology brings together a renowned team of contributors, including  Levi Bryant, Angela Melitopoulos, and Susan Stryker, who together forge a radically inclusive definition of subjectivity. Drawing on Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari’s concept of the “girl” as a heuristic device for examining modern society and its foundations, they tie together recent trends in philosophy and offer a concrete way forward from the conception of the “thing” or “object” privileged by new materialism, speculative realism, and other theories of subjectivity.


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Supporting Struggling Students on Placement

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Focusing on practice placement programs in the United Kingdom, this useful guide provides the resources needed to support students who are struggling with or failing their placements. Drawing on her own experiences training practice educators, Jo Finch offers advice to social work practitioners, placement supervisors, practice educators, mentors, and university tutors alike. Chapters examine the signs and symptoms of a struggling student, the emotional impact and emotional processes of decision making, and strategies for working effectively with students and academic institutions. Reflection exercises also enable readers to bring these methods to their own work. Together, Finch’s ideas and insights will further knowledge and engender confidence for any teachers, assessors, and supervisors working in programs with a practice learning component.


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Shifting Ethnic Identities in Spain and Gaul, 500–700

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Traditional scholarship on post-Roman western culture has tended to examine the ethnic identities of Goths, Franks, and similar groups while neglecting the Romans themselves, in part because modern scholars have viewed the concept of being Roman as one denoting primarily a cultural or legal affiliation. As this book demonstrates, however, early medieval “Romanness” also encompassed a sense of belonging to an ethnic group, which allowed Romans in Iberia and Gaul to adopt Gothic or Frankish identities in a more nuanced manner than has been previously acknowledged in the literature.


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Seaweed

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Some might be put off by its texture, aroma, or murky origins, but the fact of the matter is seaweed is one of the oldest human foods on earth. And prepared the right way, it can be absolutely delicious. Long a staple in Asian cuisines, seaweed has emerged on the global market as one of our new superfoods, a natural product that is highly sustainable and extraordinarily nutritious. Illuminating seaweed’s many benefits through a fascinating history of its culinary past, Kaori O’Connor tells a unique story that stretches along coastlines the world over.             O’Connor introduces readers to some of the 10,000 kinds of seaweed that grow on our planet, demonstrating how seaweed is both one of the world’s last great renewable resources and a culinary treasure ready for discovery. Many of us think of seaweed as a forage food for the poor, but various kinds were often highly prized in ancient times as a delicacy reserved for kings and princes. And they ought to be prized: there are seaweeds that are twice as nutritious as kale and taste just like bacon—superfood, indeed. Offering recipes that range from the traditional to the contemporary—taking us from Asia to Europe to the Americas—O’Connor shows that sushi is just the beginning of the possibilities for this unique plant.  


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Silver

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

From spoons to bullets to sterling coins, silver permeates our everyday culture and language. For millennia we’ve used it to buy what we need, adorn our bodies, or trumpet our social status, and likewise it’s been useful to vanquish werewolves, vampires, and even our own smelly socks.  This book captures all of these facets of silver and more, telling the fascinating story of one of our most hardworking precious metals.             As Lindsay Shen shows, while always valued for its beauty and rarity—used to bolster dowries and pay armies alike—silver today is also exploited for its chemistry and can be found in everything from the clothes we wear to the electronics we use to the medical devices that save our lives. Born in the supernovae of stars and buried deep in the earth, it has been mined by many different societies, traded throughout the world, and been the source of wars and the downfall of empires. It is also a metal of pure reflection, a shining symbol of purity. Featuring many glistening illustrations of silver in nature, art, jewelry, film, advertising, and popular culture, this is a superb overview of a metal both precious and useful, one with a rich and eventful history.


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Sovereignty and the Sea

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Until the mid-1950s nearly all of the sea between the far-flung islands of the Indonesian archipelago was open to ships of all nations, but in 1957, the Indonesian government declared that it had absolute sovereignty over all the waters lying within straight baselines drawn between the outermost islands of Indonesia.  In this single step, Indonesia made its lands and seas a unified entity for the first time, a claim formally recognized in 1982 by the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. Sovereignty and the Sea explores how Indonesia succeeded in its extraordinary claim despite its low international profile. John G. Butcher and R. E. Elson reveal that at the heart of Indonesia’s archipelagic campaign was a small group of Indonesian diplomats whose dogged persistence, negotiating skills, and willingness to make difficult compromises resulted in Indonesia becoming the greatest archipelagic state in the world.  


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Stories Set Forth With Fair Words

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book details the foundation and evolution of the romance genre in Iceland, tracing it from the introduction of French narratives and showing how they were acculturated into indigenous literary traditions. Marianne E. Kalinke focuses in particular on the oldest Icelandic copies of three chansons de geste and four of the earliest indigenous literary traditions, all found in an Icelandic codex from around 1300. She breaks considerable new ground in tracing the impact of the translated epic poems, which have largely been neglected by scholars in favor of the courtly romances.


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Shipbuilding and Ship Repair Workers around the World

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Maritime trade is the backbone of the world’s economy. Around ninety percent of all goods are transported by ship, and since World War II shipbuilding has undergone major changes in response to new commercial pressures and opportunities. Early British dominance, for example, was later undermined by competition from the Japanese, who have since been overtaken by South Korea and, most recently, China. The case studies in this volume trace these and other important developments in the shipbuilding and ship repair industries, as well as workers’ responses to these historic transformations.


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Social Protection After the Crisis

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

One of the most important, yet least publicly prominent, aspects of recent austerity policies in the United Kingdom is the accompanying antiregulatory pressure put forth amid claims that regulation rollbacks would free up private capital and increase economic activity. This book offers a powerful counterargument, showing clearly how economic and social welfare are inconsistent with the sort of corporate freedom imagined by antiregulatory activists and offering an empirical and theoretical analysis of regulatory reform within the context of large-scale social change. Ultimately, Steve Tombs argues, we need to radically rethink regulation in order to address key conceptual, practical, and policy issues.


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Tourist Utopias

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Released on the 500-year anniversary of the publication of Sir Thomas More's Utopia, this volume seeks to adapt and apply More's fecund imagination to the contemporary leisure landscape. The contributors to this volume theorize and analyze a variety of "tourist utopias"—a nascent socio-spatial form crucial to a post-industrial global economy. From Disney World to Dubai, "Middle Earth" to Marina Bay, Macau to Abu Dhabi, these sites share common characteristics that include their respective status as "spaces of exception"; entrepreneurial governance regimes that rely on cooperation among state and non-state actors; transient, multinational populations; immaterial and affective forms of labor and consumption; superlative and iconic architecture; and economies devoted to such leisure activities as shopping, gambling, and spectacle. These locales are not only popular destinations for migrant workers and mobile tourists from around the globe, but also serve as cultural laboratories for testing new formats and protocols of an emergent post-Fordist form-of-life.


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Troy House

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Perched on a hill overlooking the River Trothy in Monmouthshire, Troy House was built in the late seventeenth century as a wedding present for Charles Somerset by his father, Henry Somerset, first Duke of Beaufort. A magnificent house with a neoclassical façade and three striking Jacobean painted ceilings, Troy House remained in the Somerset family until the end of the nineteenth century, when it was auctioned off and eventually turned into a convent school.             This richly illustrated book tells the story of the house, its owners, and its architecture, showing how the house and the landscape around it were transformed by the house’s owners over the centuries to suit fashion and reflect their influential positions at court.  


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Theatre and Cultural Struggle in South Africa

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In Theatre and Cultural Struggle in South Africa, South African performer and activist Robert Mshengu Kavanagh reveals the complex and conflicting interplay of class, nation, and race in South African theater under Apartheid. Evoking an era when theater itself became a political battlefield, Kavanagh displays how the struggle against Apartheid was played out on the stage as well as in the streets. Kavanagh’s account spans three very different areas of South African theater and assesses the merits and limitations of the multi-racial theater projects created by white liberals, the popular commercial musicals staged for black audiences by emergent black entrepreneurs, and the efforts of the Black Consciousness Movement to forge a distinctly African form of revolutionary theater in the 1970s.   The result is a highly readable, pioneering study of the theater at a time of unprecedented upheaval, diversity, and innovation. Kavanagh’s cogent analysis demonstrates the subtle ways in which culture and the arts can become an effective means of challenging oppression.  


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Theatre and Cultural Struggle in South Africa

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In Theatre and Cultural Struggle in South Africa, South African performer and activist Robert Mshengu Kavanagh reveals the complex and conflicting interplay of class, nation, and race in South African theater under Apartheid. Evoking an era when theater itself became a political battlefield, Kavanagh displays how the struggle against Apartheid was played out on the stage as well as in the streets. Kavanagh’s account spans three very different areas of South African theater and assesses the merits and limitations of the multi-racial theater projects created by white liberals, the popular commercial musicals staged for black audiences by emergent black entrepreneurs, and the efforts of the Black Consciousness Movement to forge a distinctly African form of revolutionary theater in the 1970s.   The result is a highly readable, pioneering study of the theater at a time of unprecedented upheaval, diversity, and innovation. Kavanagh’s cogent analysis demonstrates the subtle ways in which culture and the arts can become an effective means of challenging oppression.  


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Three Months in Mao's China

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

In the fall of 1964, sinologist Erik Zürcher traveled for the first time to China, a country he had been studying since 1947. A collection of Zürcher’s personal writings from his trip, including letters and diary entries, Three Months in Mao’s China offers not only new insights about the great scholar, but also a rich picture of communist China, which was in those days still almost completely inaccessible to Westerners. During a tumultuous time in world politics, as Nikita Khrushchev was deposed, Lyndon Johnson won the US presidential election against Barry Goldwater, and China became a nuclear power, Zürcher experienced the reality of China under Mao Zedong. Only recently discovered, these documents portray through an expert’s eye a land in the midst of its own massive political, social, and economic change. Both a fascinating account by an informed outsider and a reminder of just how much China and the rest of the world have changed over the last fifty years, this is essential reading for anyone interested in East Asia and Asian history as a whole.


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Toussaint Louverture

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

“In overthrowing me, you have done no more than cut down the trunk of the tree of the black liberty in St. Domingue—it will spring back from the roots, for they are numerous and deep.”   These are Toussaint Louverture’s last words before being taken to prison in France. Heroic leader of the only successful slave revolt in history, Louverture is one of the greatest anti-imperialist fighters who ever lived. Born into slavery on a Caribbean plantation, he was able to break from his bondage to lead an army of freed African slaves to victory against the professional armies of France, Spain, and Britain in the Haitian Revolution of 1791-1804.   In this lively narrative biography, Louverture’s fascinating life is explored through the prism of his radical politics. Charles Forsdick and Christian Høgsbjerg champion the “black Robespierre,” whose revolutionary legacy has inspired people and movements in the two centuries since his death. For anyone interested in the roots of modern resistance movements and black political radicalism, Louverture’s extraordinary life provides the perfect groundwork.  


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Theory of African Literature

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This groundbreaking work was one of the first to challenge the conventional critical assessment of African literature, and, it remains as highly influential on our understanding of African literature as when it was first published. In it, Chidi Amuta argues that African literature is best approached within the wider framework of the dismantling of colonial rule and Western hegemony in Africa. Amuta draws upon both classical Marxist aesthetics and the theories of African culture espoused by Frantz Fanon, Amilcar Cabral, and Ngugi wa Thiong'o in order to establish a new language of criticism, which he then applies to a diverse array of works by modern African writers such as Chinua Achebe, Ousmane Sembène, Agostinho Neto, and Dennis Brutus.    Amuta’s highly original and innovative approach remains relevant not only as a way to assess the literature of developing countries, but for Marxist and postcolonial theories of literary criticism more generally. Theory of African Literature is a distinguished and lasting contribution to debates around cultural expression in post-colonial Africa.


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Theory of African Literature

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This groundbreaking work was one of the first to challenge the conventional critical assessment of African literature, and, it remains as highly influential on our understanding of African literature as when it was first published. In it, Chidi Amuta argues that African literature is best approached within the wider framework of the dismantling of colonial rule and Western hegemony in Africa. Amuta draws upon both classical Marxist aesthetics and the theories of African culture espoused by Frantz Fanon, Amilcar Cabral, and Ngugi wa Thiong'o in order to establish a new language of criticism, which he then applies to a diverse array of works by modern African writers such as Chinua Achebe, Ousmane Sembène, Agostinho Neto, and Dennis Brutus.    Amuta’s highly original and innovative approach remains relevant not only as a way to assess the literature of developing countries, but for Marxist and postcolonial theories of literary criticism more generally. Theory of African Literature is a distinguished and lasting contribution to debates around cultural expression in post-colonial Africa.


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Women in Silent Cinema

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This magisterial book offers one of the most comprehensive accounts yet of the place of women in silent film in Europe. Annette Förster presents a careful assessment of the long career of Dutch stage and film actress Adriënne Solser; an exploration of the careers of French actress Musidora and Canadian actress Nell Shipman; an analysis of the interaction between the popular stage and early cinema and the role of women in both realms; fresh insights into Dutch comedy of the silent era; and much more, all grounded in a wealth of archival research.  


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What Is Anthropology?

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

When it was first published, What Is Anthropology? immediately ignited the discipline, proving how anthropology can be a revolutionary way of thinking about the modern human world. In this fully updated second edition, Thomas Hylland Eriksen brings together examples from current events as well as within anthropological research in order to explain how to see the world from below and from within—emphasizing the importance of adopting an insider's perspective.   The first section of the book presents the history of anthropology, and the second discusses core issues in greater detail, covering economics, morals, human nature, ecology, cultural relativism, and much more. Throughout, he reveals how seemingly enormous cultural differences actually conceal the deep unity of humanity. Perfect not only for students, but also for those who have never encountered anthropology before, What is Anthropology? presents the discipline in an exciting and innovative way.


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Writing African Women

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How does our understanding of Africa shift when we approach it from the perspective of women? And, what can this African perspective contribute to more general theories of culture and of gender difference?  To answer these questions, Writing African Women brings together a wide variety of African scholars to explore the links between literature, popular culture, and theories of gender. Beginning with a ground-breaking overview of African gender theory, this volume goes on to analyze specific works, uncovering the ways different women writers have approached issues of female creativity and colonial history, as well as the ways in which they have subverted popular stereotypes around African women. This major analysis of gender in popular and postcolonial cultural production remains essential reading for students and academics in women’s studies, cultural studies, and literature.    


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Writing African Women

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

How does our understanding of Africa shift when we approach it from the perspective of women? And, what can this African perspective contribute to more general theories of culture and of gender difference?  To answer these questions, Writing African Women brings together a wide variety of African scholars to explore the links between literature, popular culture, and theories of gender. Beginning with a ground-breaking overview of African gender theory, this volume goes on to analyze specific works, uncovering the ways different women writers have approached issues of female creativity and colonial history, as well as the ways in which they have subverted popular stereotypes around African women. This major analysis of gender in popular and postcolonial cultural production remains essential reading for students and academics in women’s studies, cultural studies, and literature.    


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Where Academia and Policy Meet

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Though academia has the reputation of being removed from the world, in reality the worlds of the academy and politics meet frequently, and in a variety of ways—productive and unproductive. This book presents the results of the first major crossnational comparative study of academic engagement in the creation of social policy. It offers new empirical data from twelve countries across Europe, North America, and the Middle East, with each chapter providing a brief overview of social work and social work education in the country under consideration, then presenting new data on the interactions between scholars and policy makers there.


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Why Detroit Matters

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

The decline of Motor City, USA, may simply seem to be symptomatic of the decline of industrial cities across the world. But as this book shows us, what happens in Detroit matters for other cities globally—and always has. Why Detroit Matters bridges the academic and nonacademic worlds to examine how the story of Detroit offers powerful and universally applicable lessons on urban decline, planning, urban development, race relations, revitalization, and governance. Reflecting the diversity of the city, Why Detroit Matters includes contributions both from leading scholars and some of the city’s most influential writers, planners, artists, and activists—including author George Galster, activist and author Grace Lee Boggs, author John Gallagher, and artist Tyree Guyton—who have all contributed chapters drawing on their rich experience and ideas. Also featuring edited transcripts of interviews with prominent visionaries who are developing innovative solutions to the challenges in Detroit, this book will be of keen interest to urban scholars and students in a variety of disciplines—from geography to economics, sociology, and urban and planning studies—as well as practitioners, including urban and regional planners, urban designers, community activists, and politicians and policy makers. Detroit, this book makes clear, could be a model of renewal and hope for the many cities suffering from similar problems, both in America and beyond.


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Japanese Reflections on World War II and the American Occupation

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

This book presents an unforgettable up-close account of the effects of World War II and the subsequent American occupation on Oita prefecture, through firsthand accounts from more than forty Japanese men and women who lived there. The interviewees include students, housewives, nurses, midwives, teachers, journalists, soldiers, sailors, Kamikaze pilots, and munitions factory workers. Their stories range from early, spirited support for the war through the devastating losses of friends and family members to air raids and into periods of hunger and fear of the American occupiers. The personal accounts are buttressed by archival materials; the result is an unprecedented picture of the war as experienced in a single region of Japan.


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Ginger Lacey

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Squadron Leader James Harry “Ginger” Lacey (1917–1989) was one of the top Royal Air Force pilots of World War II, shooting down twenty-eight enemy aircraft (plus another five classed as probables and nine damaged), a total that made him the second most-effective pilot to fly in the Battle of Britain.         Originally published in 1962 and now available in a new illustrated edition, this book tells the story of Lacey’s life and daring career in the air. In the process, Richard Townshend Bickers reveals what it was like not just for Lacey, but for all the young men charged with defending Britain’s skies at the nation’s most desperate hour.  Bickers, who served as an office in the RAF himself and knew Lacey in his later years, brings to life the danger, adventures, risks, and achievements that made up the daily lives of RAF pilots during the war; his book will thrill any military or aviation buff.  


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Gilles Deleuze

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:00:00 GMT

Although less of a public figure than many of his contemporaries, philosopher Gilles Deleuze was an important leader of twentieth-century thought. His life and philosophy were bound up in numerous friendships, collaborations, and disputes with several of the period’s most influential thinkers—not to mention writers, artists, and filmmakers. In this book, Frida Beckman traces Deleuze’s remarkable intellectual journey, mapping the many rich encounters from which his life and work emerged. Beckman follows Deleuze from the salons of his early student years through his popularity as a young teacher to the extraordinarily productive phases of his philosophical work. She examines his life at the experimental University of Paris VIII and his friendships with people like Michel Foucault and Félix Guattari, and she considers how Deleuze’s philosophical developments resonate with historical, political, and philosophical events from World War II to the student uprisings in the 1960s to the Israeli/Palestinian conflict. Beckman ultimately highlights the ways that Deleuze’s legacy has influenced many branches of contemporary philosophy, offering a rich portrait of a contemporary philosopher who wrestled with some of philosophy’s most fundamental questions in fresh and necessary ways. 


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