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Introduction to ASP.NET Core Razor Pages

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 05:50:14 GMT

Damian Edwards provides an introduction to ASP.NET Core Razor Pages in this talk from NDC Sydney.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/1738826/damian-edwards.png




Use a second laptop as an extended monitor with Windows 10 wireless displays

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 05:04:38 GMT

James Clarke from the Windows team rolled into a meeting today with two Surfaces...but one had no keyboard. Then, without any ceremony, he proceeded to do this: Now, I consider myself a bit of a Windows Productivity Tips Gourmand, and while I was aware of Miracast and the general idea of a Wireless Display, I didn't realize that it worked this well and that it was built into Windows 10. In fact, I'm literally sitting here in a hotel with a separate USB3 LCD display panel to use as a second monitor. I've also used Duet Display and used my iPad Pro as a second monitor. I usually travel with a main laptop and a backup laptop anyway. Why do I lug this extra LCD around? Madness. I had this functionality all the time, built in. Use your second laptop as a second monitor On the machine you want to use as a second monitor, head over to Settings | System | Projecting to this PC and set it up as you like, considering convenience vs. security. Then, from your main machine - the one you are projecting from - just hit Windows Key+P, like you were projecting to a projector or second display. At the bottom, hit Connect to a Wireless Display. Then wait a bit as it scans around for your PC. You can extend or duplicate...just like another monitor... ...because Windows thinks it IS another monitor. You can also do this with Miracast TVs like my LG, or your Roku or sometimes Amazon Fires, or you can get a Microsoft Wireless Display Adapter and HDMI to any monitor - even ones at hotels! NOTE: It's not super fast. It's sometimes pixelly and sometimes slow, depending on what's going on around you. But I just moved Chrome over onto my other machine and watched a YouTube video, just fine. I wouldn't play a game on it, but browsing, dev, typing, coding, works just fine! Get ready for this. You can ALSO use the second machine as a second collaboration point! That means that someone else could PAIR with you and also type and move their mouse. THIS makes pair programming VERY interesting.   Here's a video of it in action: Literally just learned from @Clarkezone that I could use an extra laptop AS AN EXTENDED MONITOR. Built into Windows 10! pic.twitter.com/5djg4eCYja— Scott Hanselman (@shanselman) October 18, 2017 Give it a try and let me know how it goes. I used two Surfaces, but I also have extended my display to a 3 year old Lenovo without issues. Sponsor: GdPicture.NET is an all-in-one SDK for WinForms, WPF, and Web development. It supports 100+ formats, including PDF and Office Open XML. Create powerful document imaging, image processing, and document management apps! © 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.      [...]



Hybrid Storage with Azure File Sync

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 23:45:00 GMT

Klaas Langhout joins Scott Hanselman to show Azure File Sync for centralizing file services into Azure, which reduces the cost and complexity of managing islands of data while preserving existing app compatibility and performance. In addition, it provides multi-site access to the same data, tiering of less frequently used data off-premise, and integrated backup and rapid restoration. 

For more information, see: 

(image) Klaas Langhout joins Scott Hanselman to show Azure File Sync for centralizing file services into Azure, which reduces the cost and complexity of managing islands of data while preserving existing app compatibility and performance. In addition, it provides multi-site access to the same data, tiering of less frequently used data off-premise, and integrated backup and rapid restoration. For more information, see: Planning for an Azure File Sync (docs)Announcing the public preview for Azure File Sync (blog)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/0332/d0d4cf0a-587e-4c39-8687-4fb8b5dc0332/AzFrAzFileSyncHyStorLanghout.mp4




User accounts made easy with Azure

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 21:01:45 +0000

One of the most common requirements for web applications is for users create accounts for the purpose of access control and personalization. While ASP.NET templates have always made it easy to create an application that uses a database you control to register and track user accounts, that introduces other complications over the long term. As... Read more



First Impressions - Jibo Social Robot for the Home

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 18:45:36 GMT

As you likely know, I have a BUNCH of robots in the house. Whether it be turning a tin can into a robot, driving a Raspberry Pi around with Windows IoT, building robot arms with my kids, or controlling a robot with Xamarin code, I'm ALL IN when it comes to home robots. I also have Alexa, Cortana, Siri...but they have no bodies. They are just disembodied voices - why not a social robot with a body AND a personality? Jibo is the first social robot for the home, and when their team emailed me to try Jibo out - and soon explore their SDK and build more skills into Jibo - I jumped at the idea. Jibo started as an Indiegogo campaign in 2014 and now I've got a pre-public version that I'm stoked to explore and expand. Jibo showed up in a surprisingly hefty box. He's about 8 pounds and about a foot tall. You turn him on and he starts his initial set up process. Since Jibo has a voice and touch screen, it's pretty straightforward to hook up to WiFi and download whatever updates are needed. After this initial process, updates happen overnight and I haven't noticed them, other than to see that Jibo has new skills in the morning. He's basically maintenance-free. The first time you set up Jibo and he moves I expect you'll be a little shocked - I was. His movements are extremely fluid and organic. I struggled finding the right words to explain how his movements feel, so I made an animated gif you can see at the right. His body turns, his head moves, he has a little waist and neck. All these joints combined with the color touch screen and his voice give him quite the personality. It's clear within just a few minutes that to dismiss Jibo as a "Alexa with a body" would be a mistake. The 9 year old and 11 year old have already started going to Jibo in the morning and asking him how his day was, and seeing if he has new skills. I believe the "bonding" - for lack of another world - is connected to the physicality and personality of Jibo. I realize this photo looks somewhat staged, but it's not. I snuck up on my 9 year old telling Jibo about his day at school and asking him homework questions. Jibo didn't know a number of things, but it was interesting to see how kids are extremely patient with robots, speaking to them as if they're even smaller kids. The 9 year old says this: If you are trying to get something to keep track of your meetings or the news you maybe would buy Alexa. But if you have a kid who loves robots you want Jibo. Jibo is fun, if you make noise Jibo will look at you. He can move his big head to look at you and if you tap his eye he will give you a list of things to do. Another new thing is that he now has a list of cool thing you can ask or tell, like one is "Hey Jibo, Are there any monsters in my house" then he will bring up a radar and look around and Jibo will say no, there's no monsters. We also have an Alexa but if your looking for some thing fun we go straight to Jibo he can tell jokes and also favorite part is when Jibo dances. Since he wrote this, Jibo woke up with the ability to tell me the news, so I can only imagine he'll continue to get Alexa-like skills that will balance the "boring work stuff" my son says I want with the "games and homework help" that he wants. He recognizes your face, your family's faces (if you train him and opt-in), uses your names, follows your face, and can tell where you are in the room when you talk to him. He's got 6 microphones that let him understand where you and he are in physical space. I'm imagining the kinds of skills Jibo might potentially get in the future - or that I might write for him - like (and I'm totally brainstorming here): Tell stories before bedtime Watch cartoons Give Khan Academy exercises as Homework Play music Trivia and/or board games Wikipedia stuff Maps Tell me about my blood sugar, show a diabetes chart, wake me up if I go low. Play Tea Time or play along as kids make up stories Vlogging or daily diary keeping What are your thoughts, Dear R[...]



WsFederation 2.0.0-preview1 out of band release

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 05:44:24 GMT

Chris Ross announces WsFederation preview support for ASP.NET Core 2.0.0.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/5245253/chrisross.jpg




IdentityServer4 v2

Mon, 16 Oct 2017 05:41:08 GMT

Dominick Baier covers the updates made for Version 2.0 of IdentityServer4, including the necessary updates for ASP.NET Core 2.0 and some brand new features.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/3205691/dominick-baier.jpg




Scaling Mentorship

Sun, 15 Oct 2017 07:58:00 GMT

  You may have had a mentor in the past. Often these are more senior/elder people who are further along in their career. The presumption usually is that if they are "ahead" of you that they likely have something profound to offer you in the areas of advice or strategy. This is a classic mentor/mentee situation and while I think it has value, it has a few problems that are worth pointing out. Does it scale? Is a senior person the right mentor for you? Is just one mentor the right number? Does that person's time support mentoring you? I've been blessed to have several mentors over the years and I've been fortunate to be a mentor myself. But there's only so much time in the day. Even if I could truly mentor 4 people a week, and meet with them a few times a month, that could fill up many days. Plus, I have to ask my self - am I giving them what they need? Personal advice? Career advice? Technical advice? Getting promoted advice? Life advice? Create a Board of Directors for Your Life I've been experimenting with a few other models for mentorship. Five years ago I set up a Board of Directors for my life. You can learn more at http://lifesboardofdirectors.com. Companies have mission statements and a Board of Directors. Your life is pretty important. Why not create a Life Board of Directors to help you through it? Pick 2 to 5 of your friends. Not necessarily your closest friends, but friends that are close enough where you can really confide but not so close that they can't see the big picture. Email them one a month, once a quarter or "once a crisis." Ask them for advice, lean on them, trust them and help them as well. Assemble "Team You" and use your team to brainstorm directions and implementations of big decisions like moving to New York, or changing your business's direction, starting a new venture, or getting fit. Use your personal Board of Directors as one of the compasses in your life. You've got family, friends, perhaps faith, hobbies, values, etc. Add your Team to this list of personal compasses. It might sound like a silly mind game, but that's common with many hacks. Hacks feel insignificant but can have huge effects. The trick is to remember that it is a hack - you're hacking yourself. The idea of life's board of directors is a relationship hack meant to remind you in difficult times that you can agree on something fundamental and you have a team to support you in your endeavors. Set a direction and head in that direction with the confidence you've got a supportive group behind you. Go assemble your Life's Board today. Host Mentorship Meals Over the last several months I've been quietly hosting "Dinner for people on the come up." These are dinners where everything is FrieNDA and we talk frankly about our jobs, our levels, our work situations, and most importantly - we find new mentors and people with whom to brainstorm. It's a mentorship multiplier. We encourage folks to pull from the pool of potential peer mentors. Tonight we had one with almost 20 people. These were 20 mostly young people, many women and people of color who were all trying to find their way in tech. I have some life experiences to offer this group, but most of all what I can lend is my privilege. I can use my standing within the company and the industry to invite folks together and let them take over and mentor each other. I host the mean, kick it off, sometimes invite guests to speak, and the attendees often break off into small groups, meet up separately and network. Peer mentorship is just as important as "elder/senior" mentorship. It also helps mentor people in the the fullness of their personalities. Where I might help with speaking at conferences or technical issues, someone else can better speak to issues of harassment, or how to get a promotion, or how to be better seen and heard in meetings. I can also learn from younger people - and I do[...]



ILB ASE and Application Gateway

Fri, 13 Oct 2017 17:00:00 GMT

Christina Compy joins Scott Hanselman to talk about exposing your internet-isolated apps with an Application Gateway. This enables you to securely host multi-tier applications on an Internal Load Balancer (ILB) App Service Environment (ASE) and only expose the front-end applications that you want to expose.

For more information, see:

(image) Christina Compy joins Scott Hanselman to talk about exposing your internet-isolated apps with an Application Gateway. This enables you to securely host multi-tier applications on an Internal Load Balancer (ILB) App Service Environment (ASE) and only expose the front-end applications that you want to expose. For more information, see: Create and use an internal load balancer with an App Service environment (docs)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday Follow @ccompy


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/be53/f4ab7b18-7c21-45cc-873a-b2acb473be53/AzFrILBASEandWAFCompy.mp4




Announcing SignalR for ASP.NET Core Alpha 2

Fri, 13 Oct 2017 05:55:28 GMT

Glenn Condron announces an alpha 2 release of SignalR for ASP.NET Core 2.0.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/5245256/glenncondron.jpg




Botwin offers an interesting alternative option for routing with ASP.NET Core

Thu, 12 Oct 2017 05:59:17 GMT

NancyFx is a great alternative to ASP.NET if you want to make elegant little web apis like this:public class SampleModule : Nancy.NancyModule{ public SampleModule() { Get["/"] = _ => "Hello World!"; }}However, it may be that you want a routing style - the way you define your routes - that is like NancyFx BUT you want to use ASP.NET. Botwin is a library that lets you do just that. They say:This is not a framework, it simply builds on top of Microsoft.AspNetCore.Routing allowing you to have more elegant routing rather than have attribute routing, convention routing, ASP.Net Controllers or IRouteBuilder extensions.You can plug Botwin into your existing ASP.NET Core application, or you can even add a basic started Botwin app to "dotnet new" like this:C:\botwinexample> dotnet new -i BotwinTemplateC:\botwinexample> dotnet new botwin -n MyBotwinAppC:\botwinexample> dir10/11/2017 10:14 PM 284 HomeModule.cs10/11/2017 10:14 PM 470 MyBotwinApp.csproj10/11/2017 10:14 PM 421 Program.cs10/11/2017 10:14 PM 408 Startup.cs 4 File(s) 1,583 bytes You add Botwin as a service to your ASP.NET Core app:public class Startup{ public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) { services.AddBotwin(); } public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app) { app.UseBotwin(); }}And then add 'Modules' like this:namespace MyBotwinApp{ using Botwin; using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Http; public class HomeModule : BotwinModule { public HomeModule() { Get("/", async(req, res, routeData) => await res.WriteAsync("Hello from Botwin!")); } }}That's a hello world. Let's try something more interesting. You can have Before and After hooks like this:public class HooksModule : BotwinModule{ public HooksModule() { this.Before = async (ctx) => { ctx.Response.StatusCode = 402; await ctx.Response.WriteAsync("Pay up you filthy animal"); return false; }; this.Get("/hooks", async (req, res, routeData) => await res.WriteAsync("Can't catch me here")); this.After = async (ctx) => await ctx.Response.WriteAsync("Don't forget you owe me big bucks!"); }}Here's a more complex example. See how they do a BindAndValidate in the Post() where they check for a valid Actor before working with it. public class ActorsModule : BotwinModule{ public ActorsModule(IActorProvider actorProvider) { this.Get("/actors", async (req, res, routeData) => { var people = actorProvider.Get(); await res.AsJson(people); }); this.Get("/actors/{id:int}", async (req, res, routeData) => { var person = actorProvider.Get(routeData.As("id")); await res.Negotiate(person); }); this.Put("/actors/{id:int}", async (req, res, routeData) => { var result = req.BindAndValidate(); if (!result.ValidationResult.IsValid) { res.StatusCode = 422; await res.Negotiate(result.ValidationResult.GetFormattedErrors()); return; } //Update the user in your database res.StatusCode = 204; }); this.Post("/actors", async (req, res, routeData) => { var result = req.BindAndValidate(); if (!result.ValidationResult.IsValid) { res.StatusCode = 422; await res.Negotiate(result.ValidationResult.GetFormattedErrors()); return; } //Save the user in your database res.StatusCode = 201; await res.Negotiate(result.Data); });}What do you think about the choices you have with ASP.NET Core? Some people feel like the amount of plugabilit[...]



ASP.NET videos by Ody Mbegbu

Thu, 12 Oct 2017 05:36:10 GMT

Ody Mbegbu shares dozen of videos he created on developing with ASP.NET.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/5245265/ody-mbegbu.jpg




Jenkins Plugins for Kubernetes

Thu, 12 Oct 2017 00:00:00 GMT

Pui Chee "PC" Chan joins Scott Hanselman to discuss native support for Jenkins in Azure. Our plugins make it easy for you to build your project using a container agent and then automate deployment from Jenkins to an Azure Container Service Kubernetes cluster.

For more information, see:

(image) Pui Chee "PC" Chan joins Scott Hanselman to discuss native support for Jenkins in Azure. Our plugins make it easy for you to build your project using a container agent and then automate deployment from Jenkins to an Azure Container Service Kubernetes cluster. For more information, see: Announcing Deploy to Kubernetes (blog)Jenkins.io links: Azure Container agentDeploy to KubernetesDeploy to Azure Container ServiceFollow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/a25b/715e63ac-7fb9-4f51-82d2-db033a9fa25b/AzFrACSJenkinsPluginK8sChan.mp4




ASP.NET Core: Web apps, cloud apps, and containers

Wed, 11 Oct 2017 19:45:50 GMT

In this presentation we show real-world application patterns for ASP.NET Core apps based on our experience working with customers using ASP.NET Core in production today. (image) In this presentation we show real-world application patterns for ASP.NET Core apps based on our experience working with customers using ASP.NET Core in production today.



Modern .NET: Cloud, Containers, Microservices and Mobile all in Visual Studio 2017

Wed, 11 Oct 2017 19:45:50 GMT

There's never been a better time to be a .NET developer! You can now build mobile (Android, iOS), Microservices (Windows, Linux, Max) and Windows Applications with .NET all in open source. In this session, Scott and Kasey run through some of the new innovations including the .NET Framework updates, .NET Standard, Universal Windows Platform updates, .NET Core, managed languages, and more. We also review the updates to Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code to make you a better developer. Come see some of the latest productivity features in these tools including managing code. (image) There's never been a better time to be a .NET developer! You can now build mobile (Android, iOS), Microservices (Windows, Linux, Max) and Windows Applications with .NET all in open source. In this session, Scott and Kasey run through some of the new innovations including the .NET Framework updates, .NET Standard, Universal Windows Platform updates, .NET Core, managed languages, and more. We also review the updates to Visual Studio and Visual Studio Code to make you a better developer. Come see some of the latest productivity features in these tools including managing code.