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Azure CDN: Dynamic Site Acceleration

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 23:00:00 GMT

Richard Li joins Scott Hanselman to discuss the new Dynamic Site Acceleration (DSA) optimization for Azure CDN, and how it can be used in combination with standard CDN caching features to measurably improve the performance of web pages with dynamic content. 

For more information, see:

(image) Richard Li joins Scott Hanselman to discuss the new Dynamic Site Acceleration (DSA) optimization for Azure CDN, and how it can be used in combination with standard CDN caching features to measurably improve the performance of web pages with dynamic content. For more information, see: Dynamic Site Acceleration via Azure CDN (docs)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday Follow @richyli


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/a500/15e0ae50-8087-4cc4-b03a-a9ba488aa500/AzureFridayAzureCDNDynamicSiteAccelerationv2.mp4




Announcing .NET 4.7.1 Tools for the Cloud

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 17:41:35 +0000

Today we are releasing a set of providers for ASP.NET 4.7.1 that make it easier than ever to deploy your applications to cloud services and take advantage of cloud-scale features.  This release includes a new CosmosDb provider for session state and a collection of configuration builders. A Package-First Approach With previous versions of the .NET... Read more



Progressive Web Apps made easy with ASP.NET Core

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 12:47:20 PST

Earlier this week I wrote about some experiments I was doing with Service Workers in ASP.NET Core. This is an update to that. So, what is a Progressive Web App (PWA)? A Progressive Web App uses modern web capabilities to deliver an app-like user experience – Progressive Web Apps The benefits of PWAs are many. My personal favorites include: They are faster than regular websites They are more reliable They work offline They can be installed on the desktop or phone Most major browsers already support them (Safari and Edge coming soon) Any website or web application can add the capabilities that turns them into PWAs. The capabilities to add are: The website must be served over HTTPS Add a Web App Manifest (it’s a simple JSON file) Add a Service Worker (a JavaScript file) With ASP.NET Core we can automate a lot of this to make it easier and more integrated with the rest of the application. Getting started So, let’s get started turning our ASP.NET Core web application into a full fledged PWA by following a few easy steps. This will make your site work offline, be faster and installable by supporting browsers. Step 1 – install a NuGet package Install the NuGet package WebEssentials.AspNetCore.PWA into your ASP.NET Core project. Step 2 – add a manifest and icons Add a file called manifest.json in the wwwroot folder as well as 2 image icons. You can have as many image icons as you want as long as you have one in the size of 192x192 and one 512x512 pixels. Fill in the manifest.json file similar to this: { "name": "Awesome Application", "short_name": "Awesome", "description": "The most awesome application in the world", "icons": [ { "src": "/img/icon192x192.png", "sizes": "192x192" }, { "src": "/img/icon512x512.png", "sizes": "512x512" } ], "display": "standalone", "start_url": "/"}Step 3 – register a serviceInside the ConfigureServices method in Startup.cs, add a call to services.AddProgressiveWebApp() like so:public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services){ services.AddMvc(); services.AddProgressiveWebApp();}Voila! The app is now a full blown PWA.To verify it works and your web app now behaves like a PWA in supported browsers, check out the verification step on the project readme.Also see how it is implemented in the Miniblog.Core source code which is a production web app. This very website (madskristensen.net) is also running it. ConfigurationThere are plenty of ways to configure the behavior of the Web App Manifest as well as the service worker. Read the documentation for more info.I do want to call out that the NuGet package creates a strongly typed object (WebEssentials.AspNetCore.Pwa.WebManifest) out of the manifest.json file and makes it available in the dependency injection system. That way you can have a single source of truth for meta data properties such as application name, description and icon list.Next stepsRead the full description of using the NuGet package where you’ll also find links to the various specifications and videos about PWAs.  ContributeIf this is of interest to you and you’d like to contribute to the project on GitHub then you are more than welcome to do so. Open bugs, suggest features and send pull requests are all appreciated.[...]



Improvements to Azure Functions in Visual Studio

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 19:00:43 +0000

We’re excited to announce several improvements to the Azure Functions experience in Visual Studio as part of the latest update to the Azure Functions tools on top of Visual Studio 2017 v15.5. (Get the preview now.) New Function project dialog, including storage account support .NET Core support Manage Azure app settings Detect mismatching functions runtime... Read more



Azure App Service Diagnostic and Troubleshooting Experience

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 17:00:00 GMT

Steve Ernst joins Scott Hanselman to introduce App Service diagnostics, which is the home for diagnosing and troubleshooting problems with your app. This intelligent service was built to diagnose many different problems and suggest targeted solutions for the customer. 

For more information, see: 

(image) Steve Ernst joins Scott Hanselman to introduce App Service diagnostics, which is the home for diagnosing and troubleshooting problems with your app. This intelligent service was built to diagnose many different problems and suggest targeted solutions for the customer. For more information, see: Announcing the general availability of Azure App Service diagnostics (blog)New App Service Support Center (blog)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday Follow @stevenernst131


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/3441/5d004d56-37a5-410c-8baa-9c7eeaba3441/AzFrAppSvcDxAndTS.mp4




Announcing Visual Studio and Kubernetes – Visual Studio Connected Environment

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 15:03:44 GMT

I've been having all kinds of fun lately with Kubernetes, exploring building my own Kubernetes Cluster on the metal, as well as using a managed Kubernetes cluster in Azure with AKS. Today at the Connect() conference in NYC I was happy to announce Visual Studio Connected Environment. How would one take the best of Visual Studio and the best of managed Kubernetes and create something useful for development teams? Ecosystem momentum behind containers is amazing right now with support for containers across clouds, operating systems, and development platforms. Additionally, while microservices as an architectural pattern has been around for years, more and more developers are discovering the advantages every day. You can check out videos of the Connect() conference at https://www.microsoft.com/connectevent, but you should check out my practice video where I show a live demo of Kubernetes in Visual Studio: height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-shPHJIBL_8?rel=0" frameborder="0" width="560" allowfullscreen> The buzzword "cloud native" is thrown around a lot. It's a meaningful term, though, as it means "architecture with the cloud in mind." Applications that are cloud-native should consider these challenges: Connecting to and leveraging cloud services Use the right cloud services for your app, don't roll your own DB, Auth, Discovery, etc. Dealing with complexity and staying cognizant of changes Stubbing out copies of services can increase complexity and hide issues when your chain of invocations grows. K.I.S.S. Setting up and managing infrastructure and dealing with changing pre-requisites Even though you may have moved to containers for production, is your dev environment as representative of prod as possible? Establishing consistent, common environments Setting up private environments can be challenging, and it gets messier when you need to manage your local env, your team dev, staging, and ultimately prod. Adopting best practices such as service discovery and secrets management Keep secrets out of code, this is a solved problem. Service discovery and lookup should be straightforward and reliable in all environments. A lot of this reminds us to use established and mature best practices, and avoid re-inventing the wheel when one already exists. The announcements at Connect() are pretty cool because they're extending both VS and the Azure cloud to work like devs work AND like devops works. They're extending the developers’ IDE/editor experience into the cloud with services built on top of the container orchestration capabilities of Kubernetes on Azure. Visual Studio, VS Code and Visual Studio for Mac AND and through a CLI (command line interface) - they'll initially support .NET Core, node and Java on Linux. As Azure adds more support for Windows containers in Kubernetes, they'll enable .NET Full Framework applications. Given the state of Windows containers support in the platform, the initial focus is on green field development scenarios but lift-shift and modernize will come later. It took me a moment to get my head around it (be sure to watch the video!) but it's pretty amazing. Your team has a shared development environments with your containers living in, and managed by Kubernetes. However, you also have your local development machine which then can reserve its own spaces for those services and containers that you're working on. You won't break the team with the work you're doing, but you'll be able to see how your services work and interact in an environment that is close to how it will look in production. PLUS, you can F5 debug from Visual Studio or Visual Studio Code and debug, live in the cloud, in Kubernetes, as fast as you could locally. This positions Kubernetes as the underlayment for your containers, with the backplane managed by Azure/AKS, and the development experience behaving the way it always has. You use Visual Studio, or Visual Studio code, or the [...]



Announcing the general availability of Azure App Service diagnostics

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 09:30:08 Z

Today, we are pleased to announce the general availability of App Service diagnostics. It provides an intelligent and interactive experience, analyzes what’s wrong with your web apps and quickly guides you to the right information to help troubleshoot and resolve issues faster.



ASP.NET Core Caching in Practice

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 05:45:45 GMT

Muhammad Rehan Saeed describes some caching strategies which can be used with ASP.NET Core.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/4547466/muhammad_rehan_saeed.jpg




A day in the life of a modern .NET developer

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 08:13:11 GMT

A series of .NET applications shows how you can use the cloud to streamline .NET development. See how to move existing investments to modern build and deployment pipelines with containers, without changing your application code base. Then learn the new libraries and tools available to integrate .NET Core microservice patterns. Finally, see how to build, debug, deploy, and monitor applications in the cloud.

(image) A series of .NET applications shows how you can use the cloud to streamline .NET development. See how to move existing investments to modern build and deployment pipelines with containers, without changing your application code base. Then learn the new libraries and tools available to integrate .NET Core microservice patterns. Finally, see how to build, debug, deploy, and monitor applications in the cloud.



Running Blazor on Mono in the browser

Tue, 14 Nov 2017 05:42:10 GMT

Steve Sanderson runs C# on the client-side using Blazor, an experimental SPA framework that runs on .NET in the browser.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/3273558/steve-sanderson.jpg




Offline ASP.NET Core apps with service workers

Mon, 13 Nov 2017 11:04:02 PST

Update: The information in the blog post is outdated. Instead check out Progressive Web Apps made easy with ASP.NET Core.

What if you could make your ASP.NET Core web app faster to load and work offline without changing you code? You now can with the WebEssentials.AspNetCore.ServiceWorker NuGet package.

It registers a service worker that instructs the browsers how to cache resources and enable an offline experience. Most modern browsers support service workers with Edge and Safari currently implementing it.

Note, Service workers require HTTPS (except for localhost) to work.

Service workers are scripts that your browser runs in the background and act as a network proxy in the web browser to manage the web/HTTP requests programmatically

After installing the NuGet package, simply register the service in Startup.cs like so:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services){    services.AddMvc();    services.AddServiceWorker();}

That is all you have to do to enable service workers in your application. Here’s what it looks like with custom configuration:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services){    services.AddMvc();    services.AddServiceWorker(new PwaOptions    {        Strategy = ServiceWorkerStrategy.CacheFirst,
CacheId = "v3", RoutesToPreCache = "foo.css, bar" });}

Read more on the WebEssentials.AspNetCore.ServiceWorker GitHub repo about custom configuration and see how Miniblog.Core implemented it.

Progressive Web Apps

After implementing a service worker, you are now half way to turn your web app into a Progressive Web App (PWA). All you need to do is to add a JSON file called a Web App Manifest which is nothing but a few meta properties about your app such as name, description and list of icons. Here’s mine.




Miniblog.Core is a new blog engine built using ASP.NET Core 2.0

Mon, 13 Nov 2017 05:37:24 GMT

Mads Kristensen shares a new and powerful blog platform built on ASP.NET Core 2.0 which provides an excellent reading experience across devices.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/1738886/madskristensen1_2012_square_400x400.jpg




Java in Azure Functions

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 20:30:00 GMT

Xiaokai He joins Scott Hanselman to discuss how easy it is for you to use Java to create an Azure Function, and then test & debug it locally before pushing it to the cloud. You can also use VS Code to implement lightweight Java applications such as Azure Functions.

For more information, see: 

(image) Xiaokai He joins Scott Hanselman to discuss how easy it is for you to use Java to create an Azure Function, and then test & debug it locally before pushing it to the cloud. You can also use VS Code to implement lightweight Java applications such as Azure Functions. For more information, see: Announcing the preview of Java support for Azure Functions (blog)Create your first function with Java and Maven (docs)Azure Functions Java developer guide (docs)GitHub repositoryJava in VS Code (docs)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday Follow @XiaokaiHe


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/1d65/950b1c0c-020c-47ec-99d9-b30c6c3d1d65/AzFrJavaAzureFunctions.mp4




IdentityServer4 Localization with the OIDC Implicit Flow

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 05:36:22 GMT

Damien Bowden implements localization in IdentityServer4 when using the Implicit Flow with an Angular client.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/5245234/damien-bowden.jpg




Creating a Minimal ASP.NET Core Windows Container

Thu, 09 Nov 2017 16:18:48 +0000

This is a guest post by Mike Rousos One of the benefits of containers is their small size, which allows them to be more quickly deployed and more efficiently packed onto a host than virtual machines could be. This post highlights some recent advances in Windows container technology and .NET Core technology that allow ASP.NET... Read more