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Spend less time CD'ing around directories with the PowerShell Z shortcut

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 02:28:10 GMT

Everyone has a trick for moving around their computer faster. It might be a favorite shell, a series of aliases or shortcuts. I like using popd and pushd to quickly go deep into a directory structure and return exactly where I was.

Another fantastic utility is simply called "Z." There is a shell script for Z at https://github.com/rupa/z that's for *nix, and there's a PowerShell Z command (a fork of the original) at https://github.com/vincpa/z.

As you move around your machine at the command line, Z is adding the directories you usually visit to a file, then using that file to give you instant autocomplete so you can get back there FAST.

(image)

If you have Windows 10, you can install Z in seconds like this:

C:\> Install-Module z -AllowClobber

Then just add "Import-Module z" to the end of your Profile, usually at $env:USERPROFILE\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1

Even better, Z works with pushd, cd, or just "z c:\users\scott" if you like. All those directory changes and moves will be recorded it the Z datafile that is stored in ~\.cdHistory.

What do you think? Do you have a favorite way to move around your file system at the command line?


Sponsor: Get the latest JetBrains Rider preview for .NET Core 2.0 support, Value Tracking and Call Tracking, MSTest runner, new code inspections and refactorings, and the Parallel Stacks view in debugger.


© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.



Azure Cosmos DB: Get the Most Out of Provisioned Throughput

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 21:00:00 GMT

Azure Cosmos DB is a globally distributed database with limitless elastic scale. To take advantage of elastic scale, you first need to choose a partition key. Kirill Gavrylyuk stops by Azure Friday to talk with Scott Hanselman about the choice of partition key, and how to use the new metrics charts to troubleshoot a poor partition key choice (e.g., "hot partitions").

For more information, see:

(image) Azure Cosmos DB is a globally distributed database with limitless elastic scale. To take advantage of elastic scale, you first need to choose a partition key. Kirill Gavrylyuk stops by Azure Friday to talk with Scott Hanselman about the choice of partition key, and how to use the new metrics charts to troubleshoot a poor partition key choice (e.g., "hot partitions"). For more information, see: Try Azure Cosmos DBHow to partition and scale in Azure Cosmos DB (docs)Monitor Azure Cosmos DB requests, usage, and storage (docs)Request Units in Azure Cosmos DB (docs)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday Follow @kirillg_msft


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/e410/7a54effc-8b6f-4f8d-b4e4-d0928498e410/AzFrCosmosDBMetricsAndHotPartitionsGavrylyuk.mp4




What would a cross-platform .NET UI Framework look like? Exploring Avalonia

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 04:34:47 GMT

Many years ago before WPF was the "Windows Presentation Foundation" and introduced XAML as a UI markup language for .NET, Windows, and more, there was a project codenamed "Avalon." Avalon was WPF's codename. XAML is everywhere now, and the XAML Standard is a vocabulary specification. Avalonia is an open source project that clearly takes its inspiration from Avalon and has an unapologetic love for XAML. Steven Kirk (GitHubber by day) and a team of nearly 50 contributors are asking what would a cross-platform .NET UI Framework look like. WPF without the W, if you will. Avalonia (formerly known as Perspex) is a multi-platform .NET UI framework. It can run on Windows, Linux, Mac OS X, iOS and Android. YOU can try out the latest build of Avalonia available for download here:https://ci.appveyor.com/project/AvaloniaUI/Avalonia/branch/master/artifacts and probably get the "ControlCatalog.Desktop" zip file at the bottom. It includes a complete running sample app that will let you explore the available controls. It's important note that while Avalonia may smell like WPF, it's not WPF. It's not cross-platform WPF - it's Avalonia. Make sense? Avalonia does styles differently than WPF, and actually has a lot of subtle but significant syntax improvements. Avalonia is a multi-platform windowing toolkit - somewhat like WPF - that is intended to be multi- platform. It supports XAML, lookless controls and a flexible styling system, and runs on Windows using Direct2D and other operating systems using Gtk & Cairo. It's in an alpha state but there's an active community excited about it and there's even a Visual Studio Extension (VSIX) to help you get File | New Project support and create an app fast. You can check out the source for the sample apps here https://github.com/AvaloniaUI/Avalonia/tree/master/samples. Just in the last few weeks you can see commits as they explore what a Linux-based .NET Core UI app would look like. You can get an idea of what can be done with a framework like this by taking a look at how someone forked the MSBuildStructuredLog utility and ported it to Avalonia - making it cross-platform - in just hours. You can see a video of the port in action on Twitter. There is also a cross-platform REST client you can use to call your HTTP Web APIs at https://github.com/x2bool/restofus written with Avalonia. The project is active but also short on documentation. I'm SURE that they'd love to hear from you on Twitter or in the issues on GitHub. Perhaps you could start contributing to open source and help Avalonia out! What do you think? Sponsor: Get the latest JetBrains Rider preview for .NET Core 2.0 support, Value Tracking and Call Tracking, MSTest runner, new code inspections and refactorings, and the Parallel Stacks view in debugger.© 2017 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.      [...]



HashiCorp Terraform on Azure

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 19:30:00 GMT

Hariharan Jayaraman joins Scott Hanselman to talk about how HashiCorp Terraform provides an easy way to define and deploy cloud infrastructure using HashiCorp Configuration Language (HCL). This custom language is easy to write and easy to understand, and Hariharan gives you the steps to start using Terraform with Azure.

For more information, see:

(image) Hariharan Jayaraman joins Scott Hanselman to talk about how HashiCorp Terraform provides an easy way to define and deploy cloud infrastructure using HashiCorp Configuration Language (HCL). This custom language is easy to write and easy to understand, and Hariharan gives you the steps to start using Terraform with Azure. For more information, see: Install and configure Terraform to provision VMs and other infrastructure into Azure (docs)Terraform-providers/terraform-provider-azurerm (GitHub)Microsoft Azure Provider (Terraform site)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday Follow @hariharan_msft


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/8832/6c893c44-339d-4216-bb1b-1663b27c8832/HashiCorpTerraformOnAzure.mp4




Profiling Live Azure Web Apps with Application Insights

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 22:30:00 GMT

Dan Taylor joins Scott Hanselman to talk about being able to get a code-level analysis of slow requests in production using the Application Insights profiler for Azure App Service. Dan shows Scott how to use the Application Insights Profiler to quickly get to the bottom of two different performance issues in an ASP.NET Web App.

For more information, see:

(image) Dan Taylor joins Scott Hanselman to talk about being able to get a code-level analysis of slow requests in production using the Application Insights profiler for Azure App Service. Dan shows Scott how to use the Application Insights Profiler to quickly get to the bottom of two different performance issues in an ASP.NET Web App. For more information, see: Application Insights OverviewProfiling live Azure web apps with Application Insights (docs)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday Follow @dandttaylor


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/df35/20438525-2d1d-47d8-9abf-c05c46a9df35/AzFrProfilingWithAppInsightsTaylor.mp4




Virtual Machine Planned Maintenance

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 17:00:00 GMT

Ziv Rafalovich joins Scott Hanselman to talk about improvements to the planned maintenance experience in Azure, including better visibility and control of maintenance events that impact virtual machine availability. Learn how to create alerts, discover which virtual machines are scheduled for maintenance, and proactively start the maintenance using the Azure portal, REST API, Azure PowerShell, or Azure CLI.

Note: During September 2017, you can try the new experience by creating new VMs in the US West Central region using this special link to the Azure portal: http://aka.ms/PlannedMaintenancePreview.

For more information, see:

(image) Ziv Rafalovich joins Scott Hanselman to talk about improvements to the planned maintenance experience in Azure, including better visibility and control of maintenance events that impact virtual machine availability. Learn how to create alerts, discover which virtual machines are scheduled for maintenance, and proactively start the maintenance using the Azure portal, REST API, Azure PowerShell, or Azure CLI. Note: During September 2017, you can try the new experience by creating new VMs in the US West Central region using this special link to the Azure portal: http://aka.ms/PlannedMaintenancePreview. For more information, see: Planned maintenance for Linux virtual machinesPlanned maintenance for Windows virtual machines in AzureFollow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/021f/37a6e886-541b-4ced-a254-e1f98dac021f/AzFrVMPlannedMaintenanceRafalovich.mp4




A Functional Web with ASP.NET Core and F#'s Giraffe

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 06:25:45 GMT

I was watching Ody Mbegbu's YouTube Channel - it's filled with .NET Core and ASP.NET Tutorial Videos - and was checking out one in particular, "Getting Started with ASP.NET Core Giraffe." Dane Vinson pointed me to it. There is such a great open source renaissance happening right now with new framework's and libraries popping up in the .NET Core space. I hope you check them out AND support the creators by getting involved, writing docs, filing (kind) issues, and even doing pull requests and fixing bugs or writing tests. Ody's video was about Dustin Morris' "Giraffe" web framework. Dustin's description is "A native functional ASP.NET Core web framework for F# developers." You can check it out over at https://github.com/dustinmoris/Giraffe. Even better, it uses the "dotnet new" templating system so you can check it out and get started in seconds.c:> md \mygiraffeeapp & cd \mygiraffeeappc:\mygiraffeeapp> dotnet new -i "giraffe-template::*"c:\mygiraffeeapp> dotnet new giraffeThe template "Giraffe Web App" was created successfully.c:\mygiraffeeapp> dotnet runHosting environment: ProductionContent root path: C:\mygiraffeappNow listening on: http://localhost:5000Application started. Press Ctrl+C to shut down.Boom. Now I'm checking out Giraffe's "Hello World."Because ASP.NET Core is very modular and built on "middleware" pipelines, that means that other frameworks like Giraffe can use the bits they want and remove the bits they down. Remembering that this is F#, not C#, here you can see Giraffe adding itself to the pipeline while still using the StaticFileMiddleware.let configureApp (app : IApplicationBuilder) = app.UseGiraffeErrorHandler errorHandler app.UseStaticFiles() |> ignore app.UseGiraffe webAppThe initial readme.md for Giraffe is the docs for now, and frankly, they are excellent and easy to read. The author says:It is not designed to be a competing web product which can be run standalone like NancyFx or Suave, but rather a lean micro framework which aims to complement ASP.NET Core where it comes short for functional developers. The fundamental idea is to build on top of the strong foundation of ASP.NET Core and re-use existing ASP.NET Core building blocks so F# developers can benefit from both worlds.Here is a smaller Hello World. Note the use of choose and the clear and terse nature of F#:open Giraffe.HttpHandlersopen Giraffe.Middlewarelet webApp = choose [ route "/ping" >=> text "pong" route "/" >=> htmlFile "/pages/index.html" ]type Startup() = member __.Configure (app : IApplicationBuilder) (env : IHostingEnvironment) (loggerFactory : ILoggerFactory) = app.UseGiraffe webAppIs terse an insult? Absolutely not, it's a feature! Check out this single line exampe...and the fish >=> operator! Some people don't like it but I think it's clever.let app = route "/" >=> setStatusCode 200 >=> text "Hello World"Making more complex:let app = choose [ GET >=> route "/foo" >=> text "GET Foo" POST >=> route "/foo" >=> text "POST Foo" route "/bar" >=> text "Always Bar" ]Or requiring certain headers:let app = mustAccept [ "text/plain"; "application/json" ] >=> choose [ route "/foo" >=> text "Foo" route "/bar" >=> json "Bar" ]And you can continue to use Razor views as you like, passing in models written in F#open Giraffe.Razor.HttpHandlerslet model = { WelcomeText = "Hello World" }let app = choose [ // Assuming there is a view called "Index.cshtml" route "/" >=> razorHtmlView "Index" model ]There are samples at https://github.com/dustinmoris/Giraffe/tree/master/samples you can check out as well* Giraffe photo by Kurt Thomas Hunt, used under CCSponsor: A third of teams don’t version control their da[...]



Azure Service Health

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 16:28:46 GMT

Dushyant Gill joins Scott Hanselman to talk about Azure Service Health. When issues in Azure services affect your business-critical resources, Azure Service Health notifies you and your teams, helps you understand the impacts of the issue, and keeps you updated as the issue is resolved. It also helps you prepare for planned maintenance and changes that could affect the availability of your resources.

[01:34] - Personalizing your view of Azure Service Health

[03:32] - Tracking issues and keeping your stakeholders informed

[04:48] - Filter Azure Service Health issues

[05:30] - Pinning filtered world maps to your dashboard

[07:05] - Azure Service Health is more than just up/down status

[08:05] - Setting up notifications

[10:30] - Integration with PagerDuty

For more information, see:

(image) Dushyant Gill joins Scott Hanselman to talk about Azure Service Health. When issues in Azure services affect your business-critical resources, Azure Service Health notifies you and your teams, helps you understand the impacts of the issue, and keeps you updated as the issue is resolved. It also helps you prepare for planned maintenance and changes that could affect the availability of your resources. [01:34] - Personalizing your view of Azure Service Health [03:32] - Tracking issues and keeping your stakeholders informed [04:48] - Filter Azure Service Health issues [05:30] - Pinning filtered world maps to your dashboard [07:05] - Azure Service Health is more than just up/down status [08:05] - Setting up notifications [10:30] - Integration with PagerDuty For more information, see: Azure Service Health (overview)Azure Service Health (docs)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday Follow @dushyantgill


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/4db8/1e3d4b86-b1fd-40e5-a5be-e642b26a4db8/AzFrAzureServiceHealthGill.mp4




Announcing SignalR for ASP.NET Core 2.0

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 05:25:09 GMT

Glenn Condron announces an alpha release of SignalR for ASP.NET Core 2.0, the first official release of a new SignalR that is compatible with ASP.NET Core.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/5245256/glenncondron.jpg




Announcing SignalR for ASP.NET Core 2.0

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 23:41:29 +0000

Today we are glad to announce an alpha release of SignalR for ASP.NET Core 2.0. This is the first official release of a new SignalR that is compatible with ASP.NET Core. It consists of a server component, a .NET client targeting .NET Standard 2.0 and a JavaScript/TypeScript client. What’s New? SignalR for ASP.NET Core is... Read more



The ASP.NET Interns ship their project - A basic blog template for .NET Core

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 21:58:29 GMT

The Visual Studio Tools team had some great interns this summer. Juliet Daniel, Lucas Isaza, and Uma Lakshminarayan have been working all summer and one of their projects was to make something significant with ASP.NET Core and .NET Core. They decided to write a blog template. This is interesting as none of them had written C# or .NET before. Python, C, JavaScript, but not C#. This was a good exercise for them to not only learn C#/.NET but also give the team real feedback on the entire process. The ASP.NET Community Standup had the interns on the show to give us a walkthrough of their process and what they thought of VS. They did their work over at https://github.com/VenusInterns/BlogTemplate so I'd encourage you to star their repository...and maybe get involved! This is a great starter application to explore ASP.NET and possibly do a pull request (make sure to give them a heads up in an issue before refactoring/changing everything ;) ) and contribute. The interns used ASP.NET Core's new Razor Pages as well. Razor Pages sits on (is just) MVC so while it might initially look unfamiliar, remember that it's all still using the ASP.NET Core "MVC" pattern under the hood. When you install the  .NET Core SDK you'll get a bunch of standard templates so you can: dotnet new console dotnet new mvc dotnet new console --language F# etc There are lots of 3rd party and community templates and the beginnings of a website to search them. I expect this to be more formal and move into docs.microsoft.com in time. The interns made "dotnet new blog" where blog is the short name of their template. They haven't yet released their template into NuGet for folks to easily install "dotnet new -I blogtemplate.whatever," For now you'll need to clone their repo as if you were developing a template yourself. It's actually a decent way for you to learn how to make templates. Try this, using the .NET Core 2.0 SDK.C:\> git clone https://github.com/VenusInterns/BlogTemplate.gitC:\> dotnet new -i C:\BlogTemplate -o C:\myblogC:\> cd \myblog\BlogTemplateC:\myblog\BlogTemplate> dotnet runC:\myblog\BlogTemplate (master) > dotnet runUsing launch settings from C:\myblog\BlogTemplate\Properties\launchSettings.json...Hosting environment: DevelopmentContent root path: C:\myblog\BlogTemplateNow listening on: http://localhost:59938Application started. Press Ctrl+C to shut down.And here's my nice local new blog. It's got admin, login, comments, the basics. At this point you're running a blog. You'll see there is a Solution in there and a project, and because it's a template rather than a packaged project, you can open it up in Visual Studio Code and start making changes. This is an important point. This is an "instance" that you've created. At this point you're on your own. You can expand it, update it, because it's yours. Perhaps that's a good idea, perhaps not. Depends on your goals, but the intern's goal was to better understand the "dotnet new" functionality while making something real.Here's some of the features the interns used, in their words.Entity Framework provides an environment that makes it easy to work with relational data. In our scenario, that data comes in the form of blog posts and comments for each post. The usage of LINQ (Language Integrated Query) enables the developer to store (query) items from the blog into a variety of targets like databases, xml documents (currently in use), and in-memory objects without having to redesign how things are queried, but rather where they are stored. The blog is built on Razor Pages from ASP.NET Core. Because of this, developers with some knowledge of ASP.NET Core can learn about the pros and cons of building with Razor Pages as opposed to the previously established MVC schema. The template includes a user authentication f[...]



IntelliJ Community Edition: 1-Click to Run Java Containers on Azure

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 08:00:04 Z

The blog announces a new feature in IntelliJ Community Edition that enables the One-Click experience to run containerized Java applications on Azure.



.NET API Browser

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 05:00:27 GMT

.NET Core 2.0 and ASP.NET Core 2.0 are now part of the .NET API Browser.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/1738626/aspnet-logo.png




Embedder

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 06:58:50 GMT

Mark Rendle shares Embedder, a cross-platform .NET resource embedder.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/4554635/mark-rendle.jpg




Debug .NET Apps in Production with the Snapshot Debugger in Application Insights

Tue, 12 Sep 2017 19:00:00 GMT

Dan Taylor joins Scott Hanselman to talk about how the Snapshot Debugger in Application Insights can help you identify the root cause of issues in your production environment without having to repro them locally. Dan shows how by adding the Microsoft.ApplicationInsights.SnapshotCollector NuGet package to your app, you can get view full-process snapshots containing local variables the moment exceptions are thrown in production.

For more information, see:

(image) Dan Taylor joins Scott Hanselman to talk about how the Snapshot Debugger in Application Insights can help you identify the root cause of issues in your production environment without having to repro them locally. Dan shows how by adding the Microsoft.ApplicationInsights.SnapshotCollector NuGet package to your app, you can get view full-process snapshots containing local variables the moment exceptions are thrown in production. For more information, see: Application Insights OverviewDebug snapshots on exceptions (docs)Follow @SHanselman Follow @AzureFriday Follow @dandttaylor


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/e084/1df7457f-04f8-4b2f-9555-340e23ede084/AzFrSnapshotDebuggerInAppInsightsTaylor.mp4