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Making Application Insights Fast & Secure

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 18:37:24 GMT

Muhammad Rehan Saeed shows how you can improve on the default implementation of Application Insights for ASP.NET Core by moving the JavaScript code to a separate file with a Content Security Policy...


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/4547466/muhammad_rehan_saeed.jpg




Monday Vision, Daily Outcomes, Friday Reflection for Remote Team Management

Sun, 15 Jan 2017 08:21:14 GMT

My friend J.D. Meier has an amazing blog called Sources of Insight and he's written a fantastic book called Getting Results the Agile Way. You can buy his book on Amazon (it's free on Kindle Unlimited!). I put J.D. up there with David Allen and Stephen Covey except J.D. is undiscovered. For real. If you've seen my own live talk on Personal Productivity and Information Overload you know I reference J.D.'s work a lot. I've been a people manager as well as an IC (individual contributor) for a while now, and while I don't yet have the confidence to tell you I'm a good manager, I can tell you that I'm trying and that I'm introspective about my efforts. My small team applies J.D.'s technique of "Monday Vision, Daily Outcomes, Friday Reflection" to our own work. As he says, this is the heart of his results system. The way it works is, on Mondays, you figure out the 3 outcomes you want for the week.  Each day you identify 3 outcomes you want to accomplish.  On Friday, you reflect on 3 things going well and 3 things to improve.  It’s that simple. - J.D. Meier We are a remote team and we are in three different time zones so the "morning standup" doesn't really work so well for us. We want a "scrum" style standup, but we're a team that lives in Email/Slack/Microsoft Teams/Skype. Here's how Monday Vision works for us as a team. We are transparent about what we're working on and we are honest about what works and when we stumble. On Monday morning each of us emails the team with: What we hope to accomplish this week. Usually 3-5 things. This isn't a complete list of everything on our minds. It's just enough to give context and a vector/direction. It's important that we are clear on what our goals are. What would it take for this week to be amazing? What kinds of things are standing in our way? As a manager I think my job is primarily as traffic cop and support. My job is to get stuff out of my team's way. That might be paperwork, other teams, technical stuff, whatever is keeping them out of their flow. These emails might be as simple as this (~real) example from a team member. Last Week: DevIntersection Conference Workshop and 2 sessions Got approval from Hunter for new JavaScript functionality This Week: Trip Report, Expenses, and general administrivia from the event last week Final planning for MVP Summit Spring Planning for ASP.NET Web Forms, IIS Express, EF4, WCF, and more  Modern ASP.NET Web Forms research paper Thursday evening – presenting over Skype to the London.NET user-group “Introduction to Microservices in ASP.NET Core” Again, the lengths and amount of detail vary. Here's the challenge part though - and my team hasn't nailed this yet and that's mostly my fault - Friday Reflection. I have an appointment on my calendar for Friday at 4:30pm to Reflect. This is literally blocked out time to look back and ask these questions.... On Friday evening on the way out, email the team with: What worked this week? Why didn't Project Foo get done? Was the problem technical? Logistical? Organizational? Did you feel amazing about this week? Why? Why not? How can we make next week feel better? What do you do to kick off and close down your week? Related J.D. Meier productivity reading The Rule of 3 Life Frame How To Use Timeboxes for Getting Results Rituals for Results Sponsor: Big thanks to Raygun! Join 40,000+ developers who monitor their apps with Raygun. Understand the root cause of errors, crashes and performance issues in your software applications. Installs in minutes, try it today! © 2016 Scott Hanselman. All rights reserved.      [...]



ASP.NET WebHooks V1 RTM (Link)

Sat, 14 Jan 2017 15:23:00 +0000

ASP.NET WebHooks V1 RTM was announced a little while back. WebHooks provide a simple pub/sub model for wiring together Web APIs and services with your code. A WebHook can be used to get notified when a file has changed in Dropbox, a code change has been committed to GitHub, a payment has been initiated in...



Url culture provider using middleware as filters in ASP.NET Core 1.1.0

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 21:44:11 GMT

Andrew Lock shows how to implement URL Culture routing using the "middleware as filtures" support in ASP.NET Core 1.1.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/5245156/andrew_lock.jpg




Kubernetes Support in Azure Container Services

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 22:00:00 GMT

In this episode of Azure Friday, Scott Hanselman is joined by Brendan Burns (Partner Architect, at Microsoft & Kubernetes co-founder) to talk about containers and support for Kubernetes orchestration in Azure Container Services. Kubernetes is an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications.

As Brendan wrote in his blog post on Kubernetes.io, Bringing Kubernetes Support to Azure Container Service, "The integration of Kubernetes into ACS means that with a few clicks in the Azure portal, or by running a single command in the new python-based Azure command line tool, you will be able to create a fully functional Kubernetes cluster that is integrated with the rest of your Azure resources."

(image) In this episode of Azure Friday, Scott Hanselman is joined by Brendan Burns (Partner Architect, at Microsoft & Kubernetes co-founder) to talk about containers and support for Kubernetes orchestration in Azure Container Services. Kubernetes is an open-source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. As Brendan wrote in his blog post on Kubernetes.io, Bringing Kubernetes Support to Azure Container Service, "The integration of Kubernetes into ACS means that with a few clicks in the Azure portal, or by running a single command in the new python-based Azure command line tool, you will be able to create a fully functional Kubernetes cluster that is integrated with the rest of your Azure resources."


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/35a3/d2ae44ba-4578-4cfb-9040-225c44f535a3/CreatingAKubernetesCluster.mp4




IdentityServer4 and ASP.NET Core 1.1

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 15:21:46 GMT

Dominick Baier announces RC5 of IdentityServer4 with support for ASP.NET Core 1.1.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/3205691/dominick-baier.jpg




Managing Cookie Lifetime with ASP.NET Core OAuth 2.0 providers

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 15:19:04 GMT

Jerrie Pelser shows three options for managing OAuth 2.0 cookie lifetime in ASP.NET Core.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/4512499/104c8b70603a77001a10beb42a2244a8_400x400.jpg




What .NET Developers ought to know to start in 2017

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 02:56:54 GMT

Many many years ago I wrote a blog post about what .NET Developers ought to know. Unfortunately what was just a list of questions was abused by recruiters and others who used it as a harsh litmus test. There's a lot going on in the .NET space so I thought it would be nice to update with a gentler list that could be used as a study guide and glossary. Jon Galloway and I sat down and put together this list of terms and resources. Your first reaction might be "wow that's a lot of stuff, .NET sucks!" Most platforms have similar glossaries or barriers to entry. There's TLAs (three letter acronyms) in every language and computer ecosystems. Don't get overwhelmed, start with Need To Know and move slowly forward. Also, remember YOU decide when you want to draw the line. You don't need to know everything. Just know that every layer and label has something underneath it and the whatever program you're dealing with may be in a level you have yet to dig into. Draw a line under the stuff you need to know. Know that, and know you can look the other stuff up.  Some of us want the details – the internals. Others don't. You may learn from the Metal Up or from the Glass Back. Know your style, and revel in it. First, you can start learning .NET and C# online at https://dot.net. You can learn F# online here http://www.tryfsharp.org. Both sites let you write code without downloading anything. You just work in your browser. When you're ready, get .NET Core and Visual Studio Code at https://dot.net and start reading!  Need To Know What's .NET? .NET has some number of key components. We'll start with runtimes and languages. Here are the three main runtimes: .NET Framework - The .NET framework helps you create mobile, desktop, and web applications that run on Windows PCs, devices and servers. .NET Core - .NET Core gives you a fast and modular platform for creating server applications that run on Windows, Linux and Mac. Mono for Xamarin - Xamarin brings .NET to iOS and Android, reusing skills and code while getting access to the native APIs and performance. Mono is an open source .NET that was created before Xamarin and Microsoft joined together. Mono will support the .NET Standard as another great .NET runtime that is open source and flexible. You'll also find Mono in the Unity game development environment. Here are the main languages: C# is simple, powerful, type-safe, and object-oriented while retaining the expressiveness and elegance of C-style languages. Anyone familiar with C and similar languages will find few problems in adapting to C#. Check out the C# Guide to learn more about C# or try it in your browser at https://dot.net F# is a cross-platform, functional-first programming language that also supports traditional object-oriented and imperative programming. Check out the F# Guide to learn more about F# or try it in your browser at http://www.tryfsharp.org  Visual Basic is an easy language to learn that you can use to build a variety of applications that run on .NET. I started with VB many years ago. Where do I start? https://dot.net is where to download .NET Core and Visual Studio Code https://docs.microsoft.com is where the documentation is https://github.com/dotnet is where the open source code starts After runtimes and languages, there's platforms and frameworks. Frameworks define the APIs you can use. There's the .NET 4.6 Framework, the .NET Standard, etc. Sometimes you'll refer to them by name, or in code and configuration files as a TFM (see below) Platform (in the context of .NET) - Windows, Linux, Mac, Android, iOS, etc. This also includes Bitness, so x86 Windows is not x64 Windows. Each Linux distro is its own platform today as well. TFMs (Target Framework Moniker) - A moniker (string) that lets you refer to target framework + version combinations. For example, net462 (.NET 4.6.2), net35 (.NET 3.5),[...]



ASP.NET Core and the Enterprise Part 3: Middleware

Tue, 10 Jan 2017 15:17:00 GMT

Scott Allen continues his series on ASP.NET Core and the enterprise by digging into how middleware changes things for enterprise developers.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/2763087/k-scott-allen.jpg




.NET Core

Mon, 09 Jan 2017 18:04:36 GMT

.NET Core

(image) .NET Core



Working with Environments and Launch Settings in ASP.NET Core

Mon, 09 Jan 2017 15:15:29 GMT

Matthew Jones explains how environments and launch settings work in ASP.NET Core and shows the different ways they can be configured.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/4554293/matthew-jones.jpg




ASP.NET Core: Globalization and Localization

Fri, 06 Jan 2017 14:28:25 GMT

Nice article by Daniel Jimenez Garcia overviewing globalization and localization support in ASP.NET Core.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/5245207/daniel_jimenez_garcia.jpg




Teaching coding from the Metal Up or from the Glass Back?

Fri, 06 Jan 2017 01:43:49 GMT

Maria on my team and I have been pairing (working in code and stuff together) occasionally in order to improve our coding and tech skills. We all have gaps and it's a good idea to go over the "digital fundamentals" every once in a while to make sure you've got things straight. (Follow up post on this topic tomorrow.) As we were whiteboarding and learning and alternating teaching each other (the best way to make sure you know a topic is to teach it to another person) I was getting the impression that, well, we weren't feeling each other's style. Now, before we get started, yes, this is a "there's two kinds of people in this world" post. But this isn't age, background, or gender related from what I can tell. I just think folks are wired a certain way.  Yes, this a post about generalities. Here's the idea. Just like there are kinesthetic learners and auditory learners and people who learn by repetition, in the computer world I think that some folks learn from the metal up and some folks learn from the glass back. Learning from Metal Up Computer Science instruction starts from the metal, most often. The computer's silicon is the metal. You start there and move up. You learn about CPUs, registers, you may learn Assembly or C, then move your way up over the years to a higher level language like Python or Java. Only then will you think about Web APIs and JSON. You don't learn anything about user interaction or user empathy. You don't learn about shipping updates or test driven development. You learn about algorithms and Turing. You build compilers and abstract syntax trees and frankly, you don't build anything useful from a human perspective. I wrote a file system driver in Minix. I created new languages and built parsers and lexers. When you type cnn.com and press enter, you can pretty much tell what happens from the address bar all the way down to electrons. AND YOU LOVE IT. You feel like you own the whole stack and you understand computers like your mechanic friends understand internal combustion engines. You'll open the hood of a car and look around before you drive it. You'll open up a decompiler and start poking around to learn. When you learn something new, you want to open it up and see what makes it tick. You want to see how it relates to what you already know. If you need to understand the implementation details then an abstraction is leaking. You know you will be successful because you can have a FEEL for the whole system from the computer science perspective. Are you this person? Were you wired this way or did you learn it? If you teach this way AND it lines up with how your students learn, everyone will be successful. Learning from the Glass Back Learning to code instruction starts from the monitor, most often. Or even the user's eyeballs. What will they experience? Let's start with a web page and move deeper towards the backend from there. You draw user interfaces and talk about user stories and what it looks like on the screen. You know the CPU is there and how it works but CPU internals don't light you up. If you wanted to learn more you know it's out there on YouTube or Wikipedia. But right now you want to build an application for PEOPLE an the nuts and bolts are less important.  When this person types cnn.com and presses enter they know what to expect and the intermediate steps are an implementation detail. You feel like you own the whole experience and you understand people and what they want from the computer. You want to drive a car around a while and get a feel for it before you pop the hood. You'll open F12 tools and start poking around to learn. When you learn something new, you want to see examples of how it's used in the real world so you can build upo[...]



DocumentDB: Database-as-a-Service for MongoDB Developers

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 22:41:01 GMT

In this episode of Azure Friday, Kirill Gavrylyuk talks with Scott Hanselman about the Azure NoSQL database-as-a-service, DocumentDB, and its support for the MongoDB API. Kirill shows how MongoDB developers can upgrade their apps to use DocumentDB without any code changes while continuing to use their favorite MongoDB tools.

(image) In this episode of Azure Friday, Kirill Gavrylyuk talks with Scott Hanselman about the Azure NoSQL database-as-a-service, DocumentDB, and its support for the MongoDB API. Kirill shows how MongoDB developers can upgrade their apps to use DocumentDB without any code changes while continuing to use their favorite MongoDB tools.


Media Files:
http://video.ch9.ms/ch9/203d/eb446d7d-b30f-43d9-83b3-e38328f5203d/DocumentDBAsAServiceForMongo.mp4




Modifying the UI based on user authorisation in ASP.NET Core

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 14:18:52 GMT

Andrew Lock demonstrates how to inject a custom service in your views to modify the display depending on the user's login state.


Media Files:
https://media-www-asp.azureedge.net/media/5245156/andrew_lock.jpg