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Comments for A Motley Vision



Mormon literature and culture



Last Build Date: Wed, 21 Dec 2016 21:02:11 +0000

 



Comment on Association for Mormon Letters 2017 Conference Call for Papers by William Morris

Wed, 21 Dec 2016 21:02:11 +0000

Interesting topic, Scott. I hope you get a lot of great proposals.



Comment on Announcing the States of Deseret table of contents by William Morris

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 18:43:02 +0000

Right. No 's' on the end. Sorry about that. Fixed!









Comment on On Sheldon Lawrence’s Hearts of the Fathers and Categories of Relgious Fiction (with a most inappropriate comparison) by Andrew Hall

Wed, 05 Oct 2016 03:18:03 +0000

Another review and an interview with Sheldon about the book. https://beccachopra.com/2016/10/04/bookreview-and-interview-on-a-novel-about-the-afterlife-hearts-of-the-fathers/



Comment on On Sheldon Lawrence’s Hearts of the Fathers and Categories of Relgious Fiction (with a most inappropriate comparison) by Th.

Tue, 04 Oct 2016 17:39:00 +0000

. I think Emily should write that post. I think you've found a fruitful vein, Sarah.









Comment on On Sheldon Lawrence’s Hearts of the Fathers and Categories of Relgious Fiction (with a most inappropriate comparison) by Sarah Dunster

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 19:40:14 +0000

Yes, Jonathan. My reviews tend to ramble and lean more to philosophizing :) this story is a first person account of life after death. I don't think it's marketed very heavily. Independently published, it is. Yes. One of my critique group buddies once said that religion and sex go together like chocolate and peanut butter. Not sure that's the case, but the two do seem heavily connected, in so many ways. And they are both losses content, in need of some justification to be included in a novel directed at a GE week audience, I think.



Comment on On Sheldon Lawrence’s Hearts of the Fathers and Categories of Relgious Fiction (with a most inappropriate comparison) by Emily M.

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 04:30:11 +0000

Okay, this is super interesting to me because I've been reading a lot of Carla Kelly lately. I first read her Cedar Fort books, which are pretty clean. Then I read a few of her Harlequins, which have some sexual content. What interested me, though, is that the way she introduced erotic elements felt really similar to the way she talked about religion in some of her other books. She's very matter-of-fact about both sex and religion, so that both seem like a normal and natural part of life. I could go back and compare the way she talked about religion in... oh, that one where the girl goes to be a cook in Wyoming or something, I forget the name of it ... and the way she talked about sex in one of these more racy Regencies, and the tone is very similar. It makes both feel more believable. Which isn't really what this post is about, but I think the comparison between writing religion and writing sex/romance is very apt.