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Graduate School of Library and Information Science - University of Illinois





 



New curriculum will equip students when faced with ethical dilemmas in cybersecurity

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 14:06:57 +0000

Whether you're a cybersecurity student, researcher, or professional, you are likely to confront difficult ethical dilemmas that can have significant implications. Equipped with skills like malware knowledge and hacking techniques, those in the field of cybersecurity have inside knowledge that can be powerful and potentially dangerous. There is a growing need to tether this power to an awareness of the complex web of potential consequences, critical ethical reasoning skills, and perhaps most importantly, a sense of social responsibility to ensure this power is used for the greater good.

To better prepare cybersecurity students to manage the heavy burden of responsibility that comes with access to information and technological skills, University of Illinois researchers, including iSchool Assistant Professor Masooda Bashir, are working to develop an academic curriculum focused specifically on cybersecurity ethics. A key goal is to get students to think through ethical challenges inherent in cybersecurity at the same time as they are developing technological skills.

The Illinois researchers received a $277,000 grant from the National Centers of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense, which is interested in developing innovative approaches to cybersecurity education. In addition to Bashir, who is co-principal investigator on the grant, the team includes Jane Blanken-Webb, postdoctoral research associate in the Information Trust Institute, and Roy Campbell, computer science professor and associate dean for information technology. They are working with Nicholas Burbules, education professor and education director and principal investigator at the National Center for Professional and Research Ethics.

The team plans to launch a class in 2018 that primarily will consist of case studies based on cybersecurity topics, such as misinformation, professional versus societal obligations, privacy versus security, and implications of big data. Some of the case studies will be hypothetical, but the researchers are also pulling from actual events and are working with the community, professionals in the field, and an advisory committee to develop realistic and challenging scenarios.

In the future, the entire curriculum will be adapted for community colleges, graduate colleges, or as continuing education for those currently working in the field. 




Hoiem awarded NEH Fellowship

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:06:04 +0000

Assistant Professor Elizabeth Massa Hoiem is one of six Illinois faculty members who have been awarded National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships for 2018. It is the third year in the last four that the Urbana campus has garnered more fellowship awards than any other single institution.

In addition to Hoiem, fellowship recipients include Donna Buchanan, a professor of music; Candice Jenkins, a professor of English; Paul Kapp, a professor of architecture; D. Fairchild Ruggles, a professor of landscape architecture; and Craig Williams, a professor of classics.

"Congratulations to our NEH Fellowship recipients. It is gratifying to see these exceptional scholars recognized for their academic achievements," said Chancellor Robert J. Jones. "These prestigious fellowships are highly competitive, and for Illinois to have six faculty members named NEH fellows this year indicates the excellence of the scholarship in humanities on our campus."

The U. of I. fellowships were among $12.8 million in grants awarded by the NEH for 253 humanities projects across the nation. The fellowship program supports advanced research in the humanities, and the recipients produce articles, books, digital materials, or other scholarly resources.

The NEH has received an average of 1,178 applications per year for fellowships in the last five rounds of competition, according to the NEH website. Over that time, it awarded an average of 80 fellowships per year for a funding rate of 7 percent, making the fellowships among the most competitive humanities awards in the country.

Hoiem received the fellowship for her book project, "The Education of Things: Mechanical Literacy in British Culture, 1752-1860." Using children's literature and material culture, this book investigates ways that children learned directly from the physical world through object learning or "the education of things." This mode of learning promised to develop what Hoiem calls mechanical literacy, a fusion of reading and writing with manual tinkering and scientific observation that was mythologized during the industrial era as indispensable for social advancement. She argues that learning-by-doing also blurred boundaries between educational play and work, and thus offered an empowering pedagogy for affluent children while justifying child labor as educational.

Hoiem teaches in the areas of reading and literacy, history of children's literature, and fantasy literature. In her research and teaching, she explores the history of technological innovations in children's literature—from early children's books and toys to contemporary applications of digital pedagogy—analyzing lesser materials discovered through archival research. In addition to her book project, she is currently investigating how information is organized in nineteenth-century children's nonfiction according to children's cognitive development and spatial orientation, as well as how children's nonfiction addresses ethical questions about who makes things, under what conditions, and for whom. Hoiem holds a PhD in English from Illinois.

The National Endowment for the Humanities is an independent federal agency, and one of the largest funders of humanities programs in the United States.




Get to Know Amanda Weber, MS student

Tue, 12 Dec 2017 19:08:40 +0000

(image) Last month, first-year master's student Amanda Weber presented her research at the Guadalajara International Book Fair (FIL). During FIL's International Librarian's Colloquium, she talked about the power of bilingual children's literature and how it plays a role in identity formation and affirmation. Weber had researched and written about the topic for her undergraduate thesis at DePauw University, where she earned her bachelor’s degree in Spanish. "When picture books are culturally and linguistically appropriate, accurate, and affirming, they represent children's realities and inspire them to discover, create, and celebrate their identities," she said. It was this interest in children's literacy that led her to the iSchool.

Why did you decide to pursue an LIS degree?

I am passionate about literacy and education, and an LIS degree will allow me to use my diverse interests and talents in order to serve people and help them find their voice and write their own story.
 
Why did you choose the iSchool at Illinois?

I chose the iSchool at Illinois because I felt comfortable here, and it allowed me flexibility with classes so that I could explore what interested me.
 
What particular LIS topics interest you the most?

Generally, I am interested in youth services as well as serving the Spanish speaking population. I'm in my first semester, so I haven't really had a chance to delve deeply into topics yet.
 
What do you do outside of class?

I work at Facilities and Services in the Information Resources Department, and this semester I am also the graduate assistant (GA) for the Less Commonly Taught Languages program. Next semester, I will be the School Collection GA for the Social Sciences, Health, and Education Library. When I'm not working or doing homework, I like to read, run, and talk to my best friend.
 
What career plans or goals do you have?
 
I don’t have any concrete plans yet, but I want to be able to use the knowledge I learn here at the iSchool to help connect people to their libraries and provide a place for them to learn and grow. 




Alumni receive Up and Comer Awards

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 20:15:16 +0000

Four iSchool alumni have received the Up and Comer Award from ATG Media. Sarah E. Crissinger (MS '15), Hailley Fargo (MS '16), Maoria Kirker (MS '11), and Katrina Spencer (MS '16) are among the twenty individuals who were selected for the award, which is intended for early-career librarians and information professionals.

ATG Media is the umbrella group that includes the Charleston Conference, Against the Grain, and a new series of short, open access ebooks titled "Charleston Briefings: Trending Topics for Information Professionals." The 2017 Up and Comers will be profiled in the December/January issue of Against the Grain and featured in a series of scheduled podcast interviews that will be posted on ATGthePodcast.com




Downs Award Reception

Tue, 05 Dec 2017 22:23:53 +0000

A reception to honor the 2017 recipient of the Downs Intellectual Freedom Award, the Kansas City Public Library, will take place during the Midwinter Meeting of the American Library Association in Denver.

Location: 

Crowne Plaza Downtown Denver
Ellingwood Rooms A and B
1450 Glenarm Place
Denver, Colorado 80202

Sponsor: 

iSchool & Libraries Unlimited

Event Date: 

Sat, 02/10/2018 -
5:30pm to 7:00pm