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Preview: History of podcasting - Revision history

History of podcasting - Revision history



Revision history for this page on the wiki



Last Build Date: Wed, 22 Mar 2017 22:36:19 GMT

 



Bender the Bot: clean up; http→https for The New York Times. using AWB

Wed, 08 Feb 2017 12:40:09 GMT

clean up; http→https for The New York Times. using AWB ← Previous revision Revision as of 12:40, 8 February 2017 Line 13: Line 13:   | publisher = The New York Times   | publisher = The New York Times   | date = February 8, 1995   | date = February 8, 1995 − | url = http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CE6DF123FF93BA35751C0A963958260 + | url = https://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CE6DF123FF93BA35751C0A963958260   | accessdate = 2009-02-09   | accessdate = 2009-02-09   | first=Peter H.   | first=Peter H. Line 48: Line 48:   On September 28, 2004, Blogger and technology columnist [[Doc Searls]] began keeping track of how many "hits" [[Google]] found for the word "podcasts". His first query reportedly returned 24 results.Searls, Doc. 2004-09-28. Doc Searls' IT Garage, "[http://www.itgarage.com/node/462 DIY Radio with PODcasting.]" On September 28, 2004, there were 526 hits on Google's search engine for the word "podcasts".{{Citation needed|date=January 2009}} [[Google Trends]] marks the beginning of searches for 'podcast' at the end of September.[http://www.google.com/trends?q=podcast&ctab=0&geo=all&date=2004 Google Trends] On October 1, 2004, there were 2,750 hits on Google's search engine for the word "podcasts". This number continued to double every few days.   On September 28, 2004, Blogger and technology columnist [[Doc Searls]] began keeping track of how many "hits" [[Google]] found for the word "podcasts". His first query reportedly returned 24 results.Searls, Doc. 2004-09-28. Doc Searls' IT Garage, "[http://www.itgarage.com/node/462 DIY Radio with PODcasting.]" On September 28, 2004, there were 526 hits on Google's search engine for the word "podcasts".{{Citation needed|date=January 2009}} [[Google Trends]] marks the beginning of searches for 'podcast' at the end of September.[http://www.google.com/trends?q=podcast&ctab=0&geo=all&date=2004 Google Trends] On October 1, 2004, there were 2,750 hits on Google's search engine for the word "podcasts". This number continued to double every few days.     − October 11, 2004 Capturing the early distribution and variety of podcasts was more difficult than counting [[Google hit]]s, but before the end of October, The New York Times had reported podcasts across the United States and in Canada, Australia and Sweden, mentioning podcast topics from technology to veganism to movie reviews.{{cite news|last=Farivar|first=Cyrus|date=October 28, 2004|url=http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CE3D6153DF93BA15753C1A9629C8B63|title=Food for IPods: Audio by Subscription|newspaper=The New York Times}} + October 11, 2004 Capturing the early distribution and variety of podcasts was more difficult than counting [[Google hit]]s, but before the end of October, The New York Times had reported podcasts across the United States and in Canada, Australia and Sweden, mentioning podcast topics from technology to veganism to movie reviews.{{cite news|last=Farivar|first=Cyrus|date=October 28, 2004|url=https://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CE3D6153DF93BA15753C1A9629C8B63|title=Food for IPods: Audio by Subscription|newspaper=The New York Times}}       [[USA Today]] told its readers about the "free amateur chatfests" the following February,{{cite news|last=Acohido|first=Byron|date=February 9, 2005|url=http://www.usatoday.com/money/media/2005-02-09-podcasting-usat-money-cover_x.htm|title=Radio to the MP3 degree: Podcasting|newspaper=USA Today}}{{cite news|last=Della Cava|first=Marco R.|date=February 9, 2005|url=http://www.usatoday.com/money/media/2005-02-08-podcasting_x.htm|title=Podcasting: It's all over the dial|newspaper=US[...]



Bender the Bot: /* Timeline */HTTP→HTTPS for Yahoo! using AWB

Sat, 14 Jan 2017 15:17:59 GMT

‎Timeline: HTTP→HTTPS for Yahoo! using AWB ← Previous revision Revision as of 15:17, 14 January 2017 Line 26: Line 26:   In September 2000, the first system that enabled the selection, automatic downloading and storage of serial episodic audio content on PCs and portable devices was launched http://www.mp3newswire.net/stories/2000/ego.html from early MP3 player manufacturer, i2Go.{{cite news|url=http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2001/09/10/newscolumn1.html|title=2Go is gone after burning through $7 million|newspaper=Atlanta Business Chronicle|first=Mary Jane|last=Credeur|date=September 10, 2001}} To supply content for its portable MP3 players, i2Go introduced a digital audio news and entertainment service called MyAudio2Go.com that enabled users to download episodic news, sports, entertainment, weather, and music in audio format for listening on a PC, the eGo portable audio player, or other MP3 players. The i2GoMediaManager and the eGo file transfer application could be programmed to automatically download the latest episodic content available from user selected content types to a PC or portable device as desired. The service lasted over a year, but succumbed when the i2Go company ran out of capital during the [[Dot-com bubble#The bubble bursts|dot-com crash]] and folded.   In September 2000, the first system that enabled the selection, automatic downloading and storage of serial episodic audio content on PCs and portable devices was launched http://www.mp3newswire.net/stories/2000/ego.html from early MP3 player manufacturer, i2Go.{{cite news|url=http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2001/09/10/newscolumn1.html|title=2Go is gone after burning through $7 million|newspaper=Atlanta Business Chronicle|first=Mary Jane|last=Credeur|date=September 10, 2001}} To supply content for its portable MP3 players, i2Go introduced a digital audio news and entertainment service called MyAudio2Go.com that enabled users to download episodic news, sports, entertainment, weather, and music in audio format for listening on a PC, the eGo portable audio player, or other MP3 players. The i2GoMediaManager and the eGo file transfer application could be programmed to automatically download the latest episodic content available from user selected content types to a PC or portable device as desired. The service lasted over a year, but succumbed when the i2Go company ran out of capital during the [[Dot-com bubble#The bubble bursts|dot-com crash]] and folded.     − In October 2000, the concept of using enclosures in [[RSS]] feeds was proposed in a draft by [[Tristan Louis]],Louis, Tristan, 2000-10-13. ''[http://groups.yahoo.com/group/syndication/message/698 Suggestion for RSS 0.92 specification]'' The idea was implemented (in a somewhat different form) by [[Dave Winer]], a software developer and an author of the [[RSS (file format)|RSS format]]. Winer had received other customer requests for "audioblogging" features and had discussed the enclosure concept (also in October 2000), with [[Adam Curry]],Curry, Adam, 2000-10-27 [http://adamcurry.editthispage.com/broadband/ The Bandwidth Issue]; server discontinued by Userland, late 2005. a user of Userland's Manila and Radio blogging and RSS aggregator software. + In October 2000, the concept of using enclosures in [[RSS]] feeds was proposed in a draft by [[Tristan Louis]],Louis, Tristan, 2000-10-13. ''[https://groups.yahoo.com/group/syndication/message/698 Suggestion for RSS 0.92 specification]'' The idea was implemented (in a somewhat different form) by [[Dave Winer]], a software developer and an author of the [[RSS (file format)|RSS format]]. Winer had received other customer requests for "audioblogging" features and had discussed the enclosure concept (also in October 2000), with [[Adam Curry]],



173.52.250.194: Fixed typo

Fri, 13 Jan 2017 03:26:56 GMT

Fixed typo ← Previous revision Revision as of 03:26, 13 January 2017 Line 58: Line 58:   In July 2005, U.S. [[President]] [[George W. Bush]] became a podcaster of sorts, when the [[White House]] website added an RSS 2.0 feed to the previously downloadable files of the president's weekly radio addresses.[[White House]], 2005. [http://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/radio/ White House Radio Addresses]. Also in July, the first [[People's Choice Podcast Awards]] were held during [[Podcast Expo]]. Awards were given in 20 categories. On September 28, 2005, exactly a year after first tracking hits for the word "podcasts" on Google's search engine, Google found more than 100,000,000 hits on the word "podcasts." In November 2005, the first Portable Media Expo and Podcasting Conference was held at the [[Ontario Convention Center]] in [[Ontario, California]]. The annual conference changed its name to the [[Podcast and New Media Expo]] which stopped being held in 2015. On December 3, 2005, "Podcast" was named the word of the year in 2005 by the [[New Oxford American Dictionary]]{{cite news |url= http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/click_online/9545533.stm|title= Podcasts: Who still listens to them?|last1= Hudson|first1= Alex|date= 23 July 2011|website= BBC Click|accessdate=23 December 2013}} and would be in the dictionary in 2006.   In July 2005, U.S. [[President]] [[George W. Bush]] became a podcaster of sorts, when the [[White House]] website added an RSS 2.0 feed to the previously downloadable files of the president's weekly radio addresses.[[White House]], 2005. [http://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/news/radio/ White House Radio Addresses]. Also in July, the first [[People's Choice Podcast Awards]] were held during [[Podcast Expo]]. Awards were given in 20 categories. On September 28, 2005, exactly a year after first tracking hits for the word "podcasts" on Google's search engine, Google found more than 100,000,000 hits on the word "podcasts." In November 2005, the first Portable Media Expo and Podcasting Conference was held at the [[Ontario Convention Center]] in [[Ontario, California]]. The annual conference changed its name to the [[Podcast and New Media Expo]] which stopped being held in 2015. On December 3, 2005, "Podcast" was named the word of the year in 2005 by the [[New Oxford American Dictionary]]{{cite news |url= http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/click_online/9545533.stm|title= Podcasts: Who still listens to them?|last1= Hudson|first1= Alex|date= 23 July 2011|website= BBC Click|accessdate=23 December 2013}} and would be in the dictionary in 2006.     − In February 2006, following London radio station LBC's successful launch of the first premium-podcasting platform [[LBC Plus]], there was widespread acceptance that podcasting had considerable commercial potential. UK comedian [[Ricky Gervais]] launched a new series of his popular podcast [[The Ricky Gervais Show]]. The second series of the podcast was distributed through [[audible.com|audible.co.uk]] and was the first major podcast to charge consumers to download the show at 95 pence per half-hour episode. The first series of The Ricky Gervais Show podcast had been freely distributed by [[the Positive Internet Company]] and marketed through ''[[The Guardian]]'' newspaper's website, and had become the world's most successful podcast to date with over 4.5 million downloads two months after the show was released according to [[The Guinness Book of World Records]]. Even in its new subscription format, [[The Ricky Gervais Show]] is regularly the most-downloaded podcast on [[iTunes]]. + In February 2006, following London radio station LBC's successful launch of the first premium-podcasting platform [[LBC Plus]], there was widespread acceptanc[...]



Widr: Reverted 4 edits by 169.241.60.100 using STiki

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 19:14:48 GMT

Reverted 4 edits by 169.241.60.100 using STiki

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169.241.60.100: /* TimeLine */

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 18:42:27 GMT

TimeLine

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169.241.60.100: TimeLine

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 18:41:45 GMT

TimeLine ← Previous revision Revision as of 18:41, 5 January 2017 Line 23: Line 23:   In 2001, [[Applian Technologies]] of [[San Francisco]], [[California]] introduced Replay Radio (later renamed into [[Replay AV]]), a [[TiVo]]-like recorder for Internet Radio Shows. Besides scheduling and recording audio, one of the features was a Direct Download link, which would scan a radio publishers site for new files and copy them directly to a PC's hard disk. The first radio show to publish in this format was WebTalkGuys World Radio Show, produced by Rob and Dana Greenlee.   In 2001, [[Applian Technologies]] of [[San Francisco]], [[California]] introduced Replay Radio (later renamed into [[Replay AV]]), a [[TiVo]]-like recorder for Internet Radio Shows. Besides scheduling and recording audio, one of the features was a Direct Download link, which would scan a radio publishers site for new files and copy them directly to a PC's hard disk. The first radio show to publish in this format was WebTalkGuys World Radio Show, produced by Rob and Dana Greenlee.     − == HISTORY == + == TimeLine==   In September 2000, the first system that enabled the selection, automatic downloading and storage of serial episodic audio content on PCs and portable devices was launched http://www.mp3newswire.net/stories/2000/ego.html from early MP3 player manufacturer, i2Go.{{cite news|url=http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2001/09/10/newscolumn1.html|title=2Go is gone after burning through $7 million|newspaper=Atlanta Business Chronicle|first=Mary Jane|last=Credeur|date=September 10, 2001}} To supply content for its portable MP3 players, i2Go introduced a digital audio news and entertainment service called MyAudio2Go.com that enabled users to download episodic news, sports, entertainment, weather, and music in audio format for listening on a PC, the eGo portable audio player, or other MP3 players. The i2GoMediaManager and the eGo file transfer application could be programmed to automatically download the latest episodic content available from user selected content types to a PC or portable device as desired. The service lasted over a year, but succumbed when the i2Go company ran out of capital during the [[Dot-com bubble#The bubble bursts|dot-com crash]] and folded.   In September 2000, the first system that enabled the selection, automatic downloading and storage of serial episodic audio content on PCs and portable devices was launched http://www.mp3newswire.net/stories/2000/ego.html from early MP3 player manufacturer, i2Go.{{cite news|url=http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2001/09/10/newscolumn1.html|title=2Go is gone after burning through $7 million|newspaper=Atlanta Business Chronicle|first=Mary Jane|last=Credeur|date=September 10, 2001}} To supply content for its portable MP3 players, i2Go introduced a digital audio news and entertainment service called MyAudio2Go.com that enabled users to download episodic news, sports, entertainment, weather, and music in audio format for listening on a PC, the eGo portable audio player, or other MP3 players. The i2GoMediaManager and the eGo file transfer application could be programmed to automatically download the latest episodic content available from user selected content types to a PC or portable device as desired. The service lasted over a year, but succumbed when the i2Go company ran out of capital during the [[Dot-com bubble#The bubble bursts|dot-com crash]] and folded.     [...]



169.241.60.100: HISTORY

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 18:41:11 GMT

HISTORY ← Previous revision Revision as of 18:41, 5 January 2017 Line 23: Line 23:   In 2001, [[Applian Technologies]] of [[San Francisco]], [[California]] introduced Replay Radio (later renamed into [[Replay AV]]), a [[TiVo]]-like recorder for Internet Radio Shows. Besides scheduling and recording audio, one of the features was a Direct Download link, which would scan a radio publishers site for new files and copy them directly to a PC's hard disk. The first radio show to publish in this format was WebTalkGuys World Radio Show, produced by Rob and Dana Greenlee.   In 2001, [[Applian Technologies]] of [[San Francisco]], [[California]] introduced Replay Radio (later renamed into [[Replay AV]]), a [[TiVo]]-like recorder for Internet Radio Shows. Besides scheduling and recording audio, one of the features was a Direct Download link, which would scan a radio publishers site for new files and copy them directly to a PC's hard disk. The first radio show to publish in this format was WebTalkGuys World Radio Show, produced by Rob and Dana Greenlee.     − == Timeline == + == HISTORY ==   In September 2000, the first system that enabled the selection, automatic downloading and storage of serial episodic audio content on PCs and portable devices was launched http://www.mp3newswire.net/stories/2000/ego.html from early MP3 player manufacturer, i2Go.{{cite news|url=http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2001/09/10/newscolumn1.html|title=2Go is gone after burning through $7 million|newspaper=Atlanta Business Chronicle|first=Mary Jane|last=Credeur|date=September 10, 2001}} To supply content for its portable MP3 players, i2Go introduced a digital audio news and entertainment service called MyAudio2Go.com that enabled users to download episodic news, sports, entertainment, weather, and music in audio format for listening on a PC, the eGo portable audio player, or other MP3 players. The i2GoMediaManager and the eGo file transfer application could be programmed to automatically download the latest episodic content available from user selected content types to a PC or portable device as desired. The service lasted over a year, but succumbed when the i2Go company ran out of capital during the [[Dot-com bubble#The bubble bursts|dot-com crash]] and folded.   In September 2000, the first system that enabled the selection, automatic downloading and storage of serial episodic audio content on PCs and portable devices was launched http://www.mp3newswire.net/stories/2000/ego.html from early MP3 player manufacturer, i2Go.{{cite news|url=http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2001/09/10/newscolumn1.html|title=2Go is gone after burning through $7 million|newspaper=Atlanta Business Chronicle|first=Mary Jane|last=Credeur|date=September 10, 2001}} To supply content for its portable MP3 players, i2Go introduced a digital audio news and entertainment service called MyAudio2Go.com that enabled users to download episodic news, sports, entertainment, weather, and music in audio format for listening on a PC, the eGo portable audio player, or other MP3 players. The i2GoMediaManager and the eGo file transfer application could be programmed to automatically download the latest episodic content available from user selected content types to a PC or portable device as desired. The service lasted over a year, but succumbed when the i2Go company ran out of capital during the [[Dot-com bubble#The bubble bursts|dot-com crash]] and folded.     [...]



169.241.60.100: /* Precursors */

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 18:40:44 GMT

‎Precursors ← Previous revision Revision as of 18:40, 5 January 2017 Line 1: Line 1:   [[Podcasting]], first known as "audioblogging", has its roots dating back to the 1980s. With the advent of [[broadband internet]] and [[Portable media player|portable digital audio playback devices]] such as the [[iPod]], podcasting began to catch hold in late 2004.{{cite web|first=Ben|last=Hammersley|url=https://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia|title=Audible revolution|publisher=The Guardian| date=February 12, 2004 |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20130922040919/http://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia |archivedate=2013-09-22 |deadurl=no}} Today there are more than 115,000 English-language podcasts available on the internet, and dozens of websites available for distribution at little or no cost to the producer or listener.   [[Podcasting]], first known as "audioblogging", has its roots dating back to the 1980s. With the advent of [[broadband internet]] and [[Portable media player|portable digital audio playback devices]] such as the [[iPod]], podcasting began to catch hold in late 2004.{{cite web|first=Ben|last=Hammersley|url=https://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia|title=Audible revolution|publisher=The Guardian| date=February 12, 2004 |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20130922040919/http://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia |archivedate=2013-09-22 |deadurl=no}} Today there are more than 115,000 English-language podcasts available on the internet, and dozens of websites available for distribution at little or no cost to the producer or listener.     − == Precursors == + == RWAR   Before the advent of the [[World Wide Web]], in the 1980s, [[Radio Computing Services|RCS (Radio Computing Services)]], provided music and talk-related software to radio stations in a digital format. Before online music digital distribution, the [[MIDI]] format as well as the [[Mbone]], Multicast Network was used to distribute audio and video files. The MBone was a multicast network over the Internet used primarily by educational and research institutes, but there were audio talk programs.Miles, Peggy and Dean Sakai, Internet Age Broadcaster I and II, National Association of Broadcasters.   Before the advent of the [[World Wide Web]], in the 1980s, [[Radio Computing Services|RCS (Radio Computing Services)]], provided music and talk-related software to radio stations in a digital format. Before online music digital distribution, the [[MIDI]] format as well as the [[Mbone]], Multicast Network was used to distribute audio and video files. The MBone was a multicast network over the Internet used primarily by educational and research institutes, but there were audio talk programs.Miles, Peggy and Dean Sakai, Internet Age Broadcaster I and II, National Association of Broadcasters.     [...]



Bearcat: /* Life and work */ WP:ELNO: no offsite links in body text; if the thing doesn't have an article on en then it does not get to offlink anywhere else as a substitute.

Thu, 15 Dec 2016 16:36:13 GMT

Life and work: WP:ELNO: no offsite links in body text; if the thing doesn't have an article on en then it does not get to offlink anywhere else as a substitute.

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Bender the Bot: clean up; http→https for The Guardian using AWB

Sun, 11 Dec 2016 19:49:27 GMT

clean up; http→https for The Guardian using AWB ← Previous revision Revision as of 19:49, 11 December 2016 Line 1: Line 1: − [[Podcasting]], first known as "audioblogging", has its roots dating back to the 1980s. With the advent of [[broadband internet]] and [[Portable media player|portable digital audio playback devices]] such as the [[iPod]], podcasting began to catch hold in late 2004.{{cite web|first=Ben|last=Hammersley|url=http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia|title=Audible revolution|publisher=The Guardian| date=February 12, 2004 |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20130922040919/http://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia |archivedate=2013-09-22 |deadurl=no}} Today there are more than 115,000 English-language podcasts available on the internet, and dozens of websites available for distribution at little or no cost to the producer or listener. + [[Podcasting]], first known as "audioblogging", has its roots dating back to the 1980s. With the advent of [[broadband internet]] and [[Portable media player|portable digital audio playback devices]] such as the [[iPod]], podcasting began to catch hold in late 2004.{{cite web|first=Ben|last=Hammersley|url=https://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia|title=Audible revolution|publisher=The Guardian| date=February 12, 2004 |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20130922040919/http://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia |archivedate=2013-09-22 |deadurl=no}} Today there are more than 115,000 English-language podcasts available on the internet, and dozens of websites available for distribution at little or no cost to the producer or listener.       == Precursors ==   == Precursors == Line 42: Line 42:   After the conference, Curry offered his blog readers an RSS-to-iPodCurry, Adam, 2003-10-12 [http://radio.weblogs.com/0001014/2003/10/12.html#a4604 RSS2iPod] script (iPodder) that moved MP3 files from Userland Radio to iTunes, and encouraged other developers to build on the idea. In November 2003, The company AudioFeast (later renamed PodBridge, later renamed [[VoloMedia]]) files patent application for “Method for Providing Episodic Media” with the [[USPTO]][http://newteevee.com/2009/07/29/volomedia-awarded-the-patent-for-podcasting/ VoloMedia Awarded the “Patent for Podcasting”] based on its work in developing the [http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2004/09/13/BUGV18N97H1.DTL AudioFeast] service launched in September 2004. Although AudioFeast did not refer to itself as a podcasting service and was not built on RSS, it provided a way of downloading episodic audio content through desktop software and portable devices, with a system similar to the [https://web.archive.org/web/20001203235700/www.myaudio2go.com/asp/help_programs.asp MyAudio2Go.com] service four years before it. (AudioFeast shut down its service in [http://forums.di.fm/general-non-premium-help-and-support/di-fm-discontinued-on-audio-feast-84873/ July 2005] due to the unwillingness of its free customers to pay for its $49.95 paid annual subscription service, and a lack of a strong competitive differentiation in the market with the emergence of free RSS podcatchers.)   After the conference, Curry offered his blog readers an RSS-to-iPodCurry, Adam, 2003-10-12 [http://radio.weblogs.com/0001014/2003/10/12.html#a4604 RSS2iPod] script (iPodder) that moved MP3 files from Userland Radio to iTunes, and encouraged other developers to build on the idea. In Novem[...]