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Preview: History of podcasting - Revision history

History of podcasting - Revision history



Revision history for this page on the wiki



Last Build Date: Wed, 26 Apr 2017 16:00:17 GMT

 



Rsigfrit: /* The name */ changed to correct spelling of February

Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:45:49 GMT

‎The name: changed to correct spelling of February ← Previous revision Revision as of 14:45, 18 April 2017 Line 51: Line 51:       ===The name===   ===The name=== − Writing for [[The Guardian]] in Fbreuary of 2004, journalist [[Ben Hammersley]] suggested the term "podcasting" as a name for the nascent technology.{{cite web|url=https://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia |title=Why online radio is booming |publisher=The Guardian |date= |accessdate=2014-03-30}} Seven months later, Dannie Gregoire used the term "podcasting" to describe the automatic downloadGregoire, Dannie J. 2004. "[https://groups.yahoo.com/group/ipodder-dev/message/41 How to handle getting past episodes?]" In the ''ipodder-dev'' mailing list, Thu, 2004-09-16. and synchronization of audio content; he also registered several 'podcast' related domains (e.g. [[podcast.net]]). + Writing for [[The Guardian]] in February of 2004, journalist [[Ben Hammersley]] suggested the term "podcasting" as a name for the nascent technology.{{cite web|url=https://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia |title=Why online radio is booming |publisher=The Guardian |date= |accessdate=2014-03-30}} Seven months later, Dannie Gregoire used the term "podcasting" to describe the automatic downloadGregoire, Dannie J. 2004. "[https://groups.yahoo.com/group/ipodder-dev/message/41 How to handle getting past episodes?]" In the ''ipodder-dev'' mailing list, Thu, 2004-09-16. and synchronization of audio content; he also registered several 'podcast' related domains (e.g. [[podcast.net]]).       The use of 'podcast' by Gregoire was picked up by podcasting evangelists such as Dave Slusher,David Slusher's [http://www.evilgeniuschronicles.org/wordpress/category/technology/computers/podcasting/ Podcasts]. WinerWiner, Dave, 2004-09-24 ''Scripting News: [http://www.scripting.com/2004/09/24.html#When:1:51:29PM I've been lurking on the ipodder-dev list...]'' and Curry, and entered common usage. Also in September, Adam Curry launched a mailing list, then [[Slashdot]] had a 100+ message discussion,{{cite web|author=Slashdot|year=2004|url=http://apple.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/09/15/1414206&tid=176&tid=180&tid=182&tid=3|title=Time-shifting for the iPod|display-authors=etal}} bringing even more attention to the podcasting developer projects in progress.   The use of 'podcast' by Gregoire was picked up by podcasting evangelists such as Dave Slusher,David Slusher's [http://www.evilgeniuschronicles.org/wordpress/category/technology/computers/podcasting/ Podcasts]. WinerWiner, Dave, 2004-09-24 ''Scripting News: [http://www.scripting.com/2004/09/24.html#When:1:51:29PM I've been lurking on the ipodder-dev list...]'' and Curry, and entered common usage. Also in September, Adam Curry launched a mailing list, then [[Slashdot]] had a 100+ message discussion,{{cite web|author=Slashdot|year=2004|url=http://apple.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/09/15/1414206&tid=176&tid=180&tid=182&tid=3|title=Time-shifting for the iPod|display-authors=etal}} bringing even more attention to the podcasting developer projects in progress. [...]



Rubbish computer: /* Podcast Movement */typo fixing, replaced: industy → industry using AWB

Tue, 11 Apr 2017 14:01:09 GMT

‎Podcast Movement: typo fixing, replaced: industy → industry using AWB ← Previous revision Revision as of 14:01, 11 April 2017 Line 105: Line 105:       ===Podcast Movement===   ===Podcast Movement=== − Veteran podcaster Gary Leland joined forces with Dan Franks and Jared Easley to form a new international conference for podcasters in early 2014 called Podcast Movement.{{cite web | url = http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-corcoran/how-dan-franks-helped-lau_b_6014558.html | title = How The First National Podcasting Conference Launched With A $30,000 Kickstarter Campaign | date = October 21, 2014}} Unlike other new media events, Podcast Movement was the first conference of its size in over a decade that was focused specifically on podcasting, and has tracks for both new and experienced podcast creators, as well as industy professionals. The fourth annual conference is scheduled for August 2017 in Anaheim, California. {{cite web | url = http://podcasternews.com/2016/07/09/podcast-movement-2017-will-be-in-anaheim/ | title = Podcast Movement 2017 Will Be in Anaheim | date = July 9, 2016}} + Veteran podcaster Gary Leland joined forces with Dan Franks and Jared Easley to form a new international conference for podcasters in early 2014 called Podcast Movement.{{cite web | url = http://www.huffingtonpost.com/john-corcoran/how-dan-franks-helped-lau_b_6014558.html | title = How The First National Podcasting Conference Launched With A $30,000 Kickstarter Campaign | date = October 21, 2014}} Unlike other new media events, Podcast Movement was the first conference of its size in over a decade that was focused specifically on podcasting, and has tracks for both new and experienced podcast creators, as well as industry professionals. The fourth annual conference is scheduled for August 2017 in Anaheim, California. {{cite web | url = http://podcasternews.com/2016/07/09/podcast-movement-2017-will-be-in-anaheim/ | title = Podcast Movement 2017 Will Be in Anaheim | date = July 9, 2016}}       == Coping with growth ==   == Coping with growth == [...]



InternetArchiveBot: Rescuing 2 sources and tagging 0 as dead. #IABot (v1.3beta4)

Mon, 03 Apr 2017 11:56:35 GMT

Rescuing 2 sources and tagging 0 as dead. #IABot (v1.3beta4) ← Previous revision Revision as of 11:56, 3 April 2017 Line 29: Line 29:   In October 2000, the concept of using enclosures in [[RSS]] feeds was proposed in a draft by [[Tristan Louis]],Louis, Tristan, 2000-10-13. ''[https://groups.yahoo.com/group/syndication/message/698 Suggestion for RSS 0.92 specification]'' The idea was implemented (in a somewhat different form) by [[Dave Winer]], a software developer and an author of the [[RSS (file format)|RSS format]]. Winer had received other customer requests for "audioblogging" features and had discussed the enclosure concept (also in October 2000), with [[Adam Curry]],Curry, Adam, 2000-10-27 [http://adamcurry.editthispage.com/broadband/ The Bandwidth Issue]; server discontinued by Userland, late 2005. a user of Userland's Manila and Radio blogging and RSS aggregator software.   In October 2000, the concept of using enclosures in [[RSS]] feeds was proposed in a draft by [[Tristan Louis]],Louis, Tristan, 2000-10-13. ''[https://groups.yahoo.com/group/syndication/message/698 Suggestion for RSS 0.92 specification]'' The idea was implemented (in a somewhat different form) by [[Dave Winer]], a software developer and an author of the [[RSS (file format)|RSS format]]. Winer had received other customer requests for "audioblogging" features and had discussed the enclosure concept (also in October 2000), with [[Adam Curry]],Curry, Adam, 2000-10-27 [http://adamcurry.editthispage.com/broadband/ The Bandwidth Issue]; server discontinued by Userland, late 2005. a user of Userland's Manila and Radio blogging and RSS aggregator software.     − Winer included the new functionality in RSS 0.92Winer, Dave, 2000-12-25 ''[http://backend.userland.com/rss092 RSS 0.92 Specification]'' by defining a new elementWiner, Dave, 2000-12-27 ''Scripting News:[http://www.scripting.com/2000/12/27.html Heads-up, I'm working on new features for RSS that build on 0.91. Calling it 0.92...]'' called "enclosure",Winer, Dave, 2000-10-31 ''[http://davenet.scripting.com/2000/10/31/virtualBandwidth Virtual Bandwidth]''; and 2001-01-11 ''[http://www.thetwowayweb.com/payloadsforrss Payloads for RSS].'' which would simply pass the address to a media aggregator. On January 11, 2001, Winer demonstrated the RSS enclosure feature by enclosing a [[Grateful Dead]] song in his [[Scripting News]] weblog.Winer, Dave, 2001-01-11 ''Scripting News: [http://www.scripting.com/2001/01/11.html Tonight's song on the Grateful Dead audio weblog is Truckin...]'' + Winer included the new functionality in RSS 0.92Winer, Dave, 2000-12-25 ''[http://backend.userland.com/rss092 RSS 0.92 Specification] {{webarchive|url=https://web.archive.org/web/20110131184230/http://backend.userland.com/rss092 |date=2011-01-31 }}'' by defining a new elementWiner, Dave, 2000-12-27 ''Scripting News:[http://www.scripting.com/2000/12/27.html Heads-up, I'm working on new features for RSS that build on 0.91. Calling it 0.92...]'' called "enclosure",Winer, Dave, 2000-10-31 ''[http://davenet.scripting.com/2000/10/31/virtualBandwidth Virtual Bandwidth]''; and 2001-01-11 ''[http://www.thetwowayweb.com/payloadsforrss Payloads for RSS].'' which would simply pass the address to a media aggregator. On January 11, 2001, Winer demonstrated the RSS enclosure feature by enclosing a [[Grateful Dead]] song in his [[Scripting News]] weblog.Winer, Dave, 2001-01-11 ''Scripting News: [http://www.scripting.com/2001/01/11.html Tonight's song on the Grateful Dead audio weblog is Truckin...]''       For its first two years, the enclosure element had relatively few users and many[...]



Snori: /* The name */ date

Sun, 02 Apr 2017 21:49:58 GMT

‎The name: date ← Previous revision Revision as of 21:49, 2 April 2017 Line 51: Line 51:       ===The name===   ===The name=== − Writing for [[The Guardian]], journalist [[Ben Hammersley]] suggested the term "podcasting" as a name for the nascent technology.{{cite web|url=https://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia |title=Why online radio is booming |publisher=The Guardian |date= |accessdate=2014-03-30}} Seven months later, Dannie Gregoire used the term "podcasting" to describe the automatic downloadGregoire, Dannie J. 2004. "[https://groups.yahoo.com/group/ipodder-dev/message/41 How to handle getting past episodes?]" In the ''ipodder-dev'' mailing list, Thu, 2004-09-16. and synchronization of audio content; he also registered several 'podcast' related domains (e.g. [[podcast.net]]). + Writing for [[The Guardian]] in Fbreuary of 2004, journalist [[Ben Hammersley]] suggested the term "podcasting" as a name for the nascent technology.{{cite web|url=https://www.theguardian.com/media/2004/feb/12/broadcasting.digitalmedia |title=Why online radio is booming |publisher=The Guardian |date= |accessdate=2014-03-30}} Seven months later, Dannie Gregoire used the term "podcasting" to describe the automatic downloadGregoire, Dannie J. 2004. "[https://groups.yahoo.com/group/ipodder-dev/message/41 How to handle getting past episodes?]" In the ''ipodder-dev'' mailing list, Thu, 2004-09-16. and synchronization of audio content; he also registered several 'podcast' related domains (e.g. [[podcast.net]]).       The use of 'podcast' by Gregoire was picked up by podcasting evangelists such as Dave Slusher,David Slusher's [http://www.evilgeniuschronicles.org/wordpress/category/technology/computers/podcasting/ Podcasts]. WinerWiner, Dave, 2004-09-24 ''Scripting News: [http://www.scripting.com/2004/09/24.html#When:1:51:29PM I've been lurking on the ipodder-dev list...]'' and Curry, and entered common usage. Also in September, Adam Curry launched a mailing list, then [[Slashdot]] had a 100+ message discussion,{{cite web|author=Slashdot|year=2004|url=http://apple.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/09/15/1414206&tid=176&tid=180&tid=182&tid=3|title=Time-shifting for the iPod|display-authors=etal}} bringing even more attention to the podcasting developer projects in progress.   The use of 'podcast' by Gregoire was picked up by podcasting evangelists such as Dave Slusher,David Slusher's [http://www.evilgeniuschronicles.org/wordpress/category/technology/computers/podcasting/ Podcasts]. WinerWiner, Dave, 2004-09-24 ''Scripting News: [http://www.scripting.com/2004/09/24.html#When:1:51:29PM I've been lurking on the ipodder-dev list...]'' and Curry, and entered common usage. Also in September, Adam Curry launched a mailing list, then [[Slashdot]] had a 100+ message discussion,{{cite web|author=Slashdot|year=2004|url=http://apple.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=04/09/15/1414206&tid=176&tid=180&tid=182&tid=3|title=Time-shifting for the iPod|display-authors=etal}} bringing even more attention to the podcasting developer projects in progress. [...]



Snori: /* Pushing audio to a device */ tidy

Fri, 31 Mar 2017 19:48:24 GMT

‎Pushing audio to a device: tidy ← Previous revision Revision as of 19:48, 31 March 2017 Line 44: Line 44:       ===Pushing audio to a device===   ===Pushing audio to a device=== − After the conference, Curry offered his blog readers an RSS-to-iPodCurry, Adam, 2003-10-12 [http://radio.weblogs.com/0001014/2003/10/12.html#a4604 RSS2iPod] script (iPodder) that moved MP3 files from Userland Radio to iTunes, and encouraged other developers to build on the idea. In November 2003, The company AudioFeast (later renamed PodBridge, later renamed [[VoloMedia]]) files patent application for “Method for Providing Episodic Media” with the [[USPTO]][http://newteevee.com/2009/07/29/volomedia-awarded-the-patent-for-podcasting/ VoloMedia Awarded the “Patent for Podcasting”] based on its work in developing the AudioFeast service launched in September 2004. Although AudioFeast did not refer to itself as a podcasting service and was not built on RSS, it provided a way of downloading episodic audio content through desktop software and portable devices, with a system similar to the MyAudio2Go.com service four years before it. (AudioFeast shut down its service in July 2005 due to the unwillingness of its free customers to pay for its $49.95 paid annual subscription service, and a lack of a strong competitive differentiation in the market with the emergence of free RSS podcatchers.) + After the conference, Curry offered his blog readers an RSS-to-iPodCurry, Adam, 2003-10-12 [http://radio.weblogs.com/0001014/2003/10/12.html#a4604 RSS2iPod] script (iPodder) that moved MP3 files from Userland Radio to iTunes, and encouraged other developers to build on the idea.     − In September 2004, the media-in-newsfeed idea was picked up by multiple developer groups. While many of the early efforts remained command-line based, the very first podcasting client with a user interface was [[iPodderX]] (later called [[Transistr]] after a trademark dispute with Apple), developed by [[August Trometer]] and Ray Slakinski.{{cite web|url=http://www.redorbit.com/education/reference_library/technology_1/internet/1112804661/podcast/ |title=Podcast |publisher=Red Orbit |date= |accessdate=2013-05-25}} It was released first for the Mac, then for the PC. Shortly thereafter, another group (iSpider) rebranded their software as iPodder[http://web.archive.org/web/20041026134111/ipodder.sourceforge.net/team/index.html iPodder, the cross-platform Podcast receiver] and released it under that name as Free Software (under GPL). The project was terminated after a cease and desist{{cite web |url=http://www.pcmech.com/article/taking-the-pod-out-of-podcasting/ |title=Taking the "Pod" out of "Podcasting"|date=October 4, 2006 |work=PCMech.com |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20080828220835/http://www.pcmech.com/article/taking-the-pod-out-of-podcasting/ |archivedate=2008-08-28 |deadurl=no}} letter from [[Apple Inc.|Apple]] (over iPodder trademark issues). It was reincarnated as [[Juice (aggregator)|Juice]] and CastPodder. + In November 2003, the company AudioFeast (later renamed PodBridge, then [[VoloMedia]]) filed a patent application for ''“Method for Providing Episodic Media”'' with the [[USPTO]][http://newteevee.com/2009/07/29/volomedia-awarded-the-patent-for-podcasting/ VoloMedia Awarded the “Patent for Podcasting”] based on its work in developing the AudioFeast service launched in September 2004. Although AudioFeast did not refer to itself as a podcasting service and was not built on RSS, it provided a way of downloading episodic audio content through desktop software and portable de[...]



Snori: /* Bloggercon */ !

Fri, 31 Mar 2017 19:46:12 GMT

‎Bloggercon: ! ← Previous revision Revision as of 19:46, 31 March 2017 Line 41: Line 41:       ===Bloggercon===   ===Bloggercon=== − October 2003, Winer and friends organized the first [[Bloggercon]] weblogger conference at [[Harvard Law School|Berkman Center]]. CDs of Lydon's interviews were distributed as an example of the high-quality MP3 content enclosures could deliver;Andrew Grumet, 2005. [http://grumet.net/weblog/archives/2005/04/26/a_slice_of_podcasting_history.html A slice of podcasting history]. Bob Doyle demonstrated the portable studio he helped Lydon develop;[http://media.skybuilders.com/lydon/studio.html Christopher Lydon's Portable Web Studio for Blogradio Productions] [[Harold Gilchrist]] presented a history of audioblogging, including Curry's early role, and [[Kevin Marks]] demonstrated a script to download RSS enclosures and pass them to [[iTunes]] for transfer to an [[iPod]].Marks, Kevin. October 2003 [http://homepage.mac.com/kevinmarks/audiopod.m4v video excerpt of Marks's demo (MPEG-4)] [http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/ml/output.pl/35512/stream/temp.ram Real stream of full Audioblogging session (start 48 minutes in)] [http://epeus.blogspot.com/2003_10_01_epeus_archive.html#106527364652597310 blog post] Curry and Marks discussed collaborating.[https://web.archive.org/web/20040204230911/http://www.blognewsnetwork.com/members/0000001/2003/10/05.html "syncPod Channel"], October 5, 2003, Adam Curry's Weblog (via Archive.org) + October 2003, Winer and friends organized the first [[Bloggercon]] weblogger conference at [[Harvard Law School|Berkman Center]]. CDs of Lydon's interviews were distributed as an example of the high-quality MP3 content enclosures could deliver;Andrew Grumet, 2005. [http://grumet.net/weblog/archives/2005/04/26/a_slice_of_podcasting_history.html A slice of podcasting history]. Bob Doyle demonstrated the portable studio he helped Lydon develop;[http://media.skybuilders.com/lydon/studio.html Christopher Lydon's Portable Web Studio for Blogradio Productions] [[Harold Gilchrist]] presented a history of audioblogging, including Curry's early role, and [[Kevin Marks]] demonstrated a script to download RSS enclosures and pass them to [[iTunes]] for transfer to an [[iPod]].Marks, Kevin. October 2003 [http://homepage.mac.com/kevinmarks/audiopod.m4v video excerpt of Marks's demo (MPEG-4)] [http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/ml/output.pl/35512/stream/temp.ram Real stream of full Audioblogging session (start 48 minutes in)] [http://epeus.blogspot.com/2003_10_01_epeus_archive.html#106527364652597310 blog post] Curry and Marks discussed collaborating.[https://web.archive.org/web/20040204230911/http://www.blognewsnetwork.com/members/0000001/2003/10/05.html "syncPod Channel"], October 5, 2003, Adam Curry's Weblog (via Archive.org)       ===Pushing audio to a device===   ===Pushing audio to a device===   After the conference, Curry offered his blog readers an RSS-to-iPodCurry, Adam, 2003-10-12 [http://radio.weblogs.com/0001014/2003/10/12.html#a4604 RSS2iPod] script (iPodder) that moved MP3 files from Userland Radio to iTunes, and encouraged other developers to build on the idea. In November 2003, The company AudioFeast (later renamed PodBridge, later renamed [[VoloMedia]]) files patent application for “Method for Providing Episodic Media” with the [[USPTO]][http://newteevee.com/2009/07/29/volomedia-awarded-the-patent-for-podcasting/ VoloMedia Awarded the “Patent for Podcasting”] based on its work in developing the AudioFeast service launched in September 2004. Although AudioFe[...]



Snori: /* Bloggercon */ ref

Fri, 31 Mar 2017 19:45:49 GMT

‎Bloggercon: ref ← Previous revision Revision as of 19:45, 31 March 2017 Line 41: Line 41:       ===Bloggercon===   ===Bloggercon=== − October 2003, Winer and friends organized the first [[Bloggercon]] weblogger conference at [[Harvard Law School|Berkman Center]]. CDs of Lydon's interviews were distributed as an example of the high-quality MP3 content enclosures could deliver;Andrew Grumet, 2005. [http://grumet.net/weblog/archives/2005/04/26/a_slice_of_podcasting_history.html A slice of podcasting history]. Bob Doyle demonstrated the portable studio he helped Lydon develop;[http://media.skybuilders.com/lydon/studio.html Christopher Lydon's Portable Web Studio for Blogradio Productions] [[Harold Gilchrist]] presented a history of audioblogging, including Curry's early role, and [[Kevin Marks]] demonstrated a script to download RSS enclosures and pass them to [[iTunes]] for transfer to an [[iPod]].Marks, Kevin. October 2003 [http://homepage.mac.com/kevinmarks/audiopod.m4v video excerpt of Marks's demo (MPEG-4)] [http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/ml/output.pl/35512/stream/temp.ram Real stream of full Audioblogging session (start 48 minutes in)] [http://epeus.blogspot.com/2003_10_01_epeus_archive.html#106527364652597310 blog post] Curry and Marks discussed collaborating. + October 2003, Winer and friends organized the first [[Bloggercon]] weblogger conference at [[Harvard Law School|Berkman Center]]. CDs of Lydon's interviews were distributed as an example of the high-quality MP3 content enclosures could deliver;Andrew Grumet, 2005. [http://grumet.net/weblog/archives/2005/04/26/a_slice_of_podcasting_history.html A slice of podcasting history]. Bob Doyle demonstrated the portable studio he helped Lydon develop;[http://media.skybuilders.com/lydon/studio.html Christopher Lydon's Portable Web Studio for Blogradio Productions] [[Harold Gilchrist]] presented a history of audioblogging, including Curry's early role, and [[Kevin Marks]] demonstrated a script to download RSS enclosures and pass them to [[iTunes]] for transfer to an [[iPod]].Marks, Kevin. October 2003 [http://homepage.mac.com/kevinmarks/audiopod.m4v video excerpt of Marks's demo (MPEG-4)] [http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/ml/output.pl/35512/stream/temp.ram Real stream of full Audioblogging session (start 48 minutes in)] [http://epeus.blogspot.com/2003_10_01_epeus_archive.html#106527364652597310 blog post] Curry and Marks discussed collaborating.[https://web.archive.org/web/20040204230911/http://www.blognewsnetwork.com/members/0000001/2003/10/05.html "syncPod Channel"], October 5, 2003, Adam Curry's Weblog (via Archive.org)       ===Pushing audio to a device===   ===Pushing audio to a device=== [...]



Snori: /* Timeline */ make this easier to read with some sub-heads

Fri, 31 Mar 2017 19:37:30 GMT

Timeline: make this easier to read with some sub-heads

Show changes



Bender the Bot: clean up; http→https for The New York Times. using AWB

Wed, 08 Feb 2017 12:40:09 GMT

clean up; http→https for The New York Times. using AWB ← Previous revision Revision as of 12:40, 8 February 2017 Line 13: Line 13:   | publisher = The New York Times   | publisher = The New York Times   | date = February 8, 1995   | date = February 8, 1995 − | url = http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CE6DF123FF93BA35751C0A963958260 + | url = https://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CE6DF123FF93BA35751C0A963958260   | accessdate = 2009-02-09   | accessdate = 2009-02-09   | first=Peter H.   | first=Peter H. Line 48: Line 48:   On September 28, 2004, Blogger and technology columnist [[Doc Searls]] began keeping track of how many "hits" [[Google]] found for the word "podcasts". His first query reportedly returned 24 results.Searls, Doc. 2004-09-28. Doc Searls' IT Garage, "[http://www.itgarage.com/node/462 DIY Radio with PODcasting.]" On September 28, 2004, there were 526 hits on Google's search engine for the word "podcasts".{{Citation needed|date=January 2009}} [[Google Trends]] marks the beginning of searches for 'podcast' at the end of September.[http://www.google.com/trends?q=podcast&ctab=0&geo=all&date=2004 Google Trends] On October 1, 2004, there were 2,750 hits on Google's search engine for the word "podcasts". This number continued to double every few days.   On September 28, 2004, Blogger and technology columnist [[Doc Searls]] began keeping track of how many "hits" [[Google]] found for the word "podcasts". His first query reportedly returned 24 results.Searls, Doc. 2004-09-28. Doc Searls' IT Garage, "[http://www.itgarage.com/node/462 DIY Radio with PODcasting.]" On September 28, 2004, there were 526 hits on Google's search engine for the word "podcasts".{{Citation needed|date=January 2009}} [[Google Trends]] marks the beginning of searches for 'podcast' at the end of September.[http://www.google.com/trends?q=podcast&ctab=0&geo=all&date=2004 Google Trends] On October 1, 2004, there were 2,750 hits on Google's search engine for the word "podcasts". This number continued to double every few days.     − October 11, 2004 Capturing the early distribution and variety of podcasts was more difficult than counting [[Google hit]]s, but before the end of October, The New York Times had reported podcasts across the United States and in Canada, Australia and Sweden, mentioning podcast topics from technology to veganism to movie reviews.{{cite news|last=Farivar|first=Cyrus|date=October 28, 2004|url=http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CE3D6153DF93BA15753C1A9629C8B63|title=Food for IPods: Audio by Subscription|newspaper=The New York Times}} + October 11, 2004 Capturing the early distribution and variety of podcasts was more difficult than counting [[Google hit]]s, but before the end of October, The New York Times had reported podcasts across the United States and in Canada, Australia and Sweden, mentioning podcast topics from technology to veganism to movie reviews.{{cite news|last=Farivar|first=Cyrus|date=October 28, 2004|url=https://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=990CE3D6153DF93BA15753C1A9629C8B63|title=Food for IPods: Audio by Subscription|newspaper=The New York Times}}       [[USA Today]] told its readers about the "free amateur chatfests" the following February,{{cite news|last=Acohido|first=Byron|date=February 9, 2005|url=http://www.usatoday.com/money/media/2005-02-09-podcasting-usat-money-cover_x.htm|title=Radio to the MP3 degree: Podcasting|newspaper=U[...]



Bender the Bot: /* Timeline */HTTP→HTTPS for Yahoo! using AWB

Sat, 14 Jan 2017 15:17:59 GMT

‎Timeline: HTTP→HTTPS for Yahoo! using AWB ← Previous revision Revision as of 15:17, 14 January 2017 Line 26: Line 26:   In September 2000, the first system that enabled the selection, automatic downloading and storage of serial episodic audio content on PCs and portable devices was launched http://www.mp3newswire.net/stories/2000/ego.html from early MP3 player manufacturer, i2Go.{{cite news|url=http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2001/09/10/newscolumn1.html|title=2Go is gone after burning through $7 million|newspaper=Atlanta Business Chronicle|first=Mary Jane|last=Credeur|date=September 10, 2001}} To supply content for its portable MP3 players, i2Go introduced a digital audio news and entertainment service called MyAudio2Go.com that enabled users to download episodic news, sports, entertainment, weather, and music in audio format for listening on a PC, the eGo portable audio player, or other MP3 players. The i2GoMediaManager and the eGo file transfer application could be programmed to automatically download the latest episodic content available from user selected content types to a PC or portable device as desired. The service lasted over a year, but succumbed when the i2Go company ran out of capital during the [[Dot-com bubble#The bubble bursts|dot-com crash]] and folded.   In September 2000, the first system that enabled the selection, automatic downloading and storage of serial episodic audio content on PCs and portable devices was launched http://www.mp3newswire.net/stories/2000/ego.html from early MP3 player manufacturer, i2Go.{{cite news|url=http://www.bizjournals.com/atlanta/stories/2001/09/10/newscolumn1.html|title=2Go is gone after burning through $7 million|newspaper=Atlanta Business Chronicle|first=Mary Jane|last=Credeur|date=September 10, 2001}} To supply content for its portable MP3 players, i2Go introduced a digital audio news and entertainment service called MyAudio2Go.com that enabled users to download episodic news, sports, entertainment, weather, and music in audio format for listening on a PC, the eGo portable audio player, or other MP3 players. The i2GoMediaManager and the eGo file transfer application could be programmed to automatically download the latest episodic content available from user selected content types to a PC or portable device as desired. The service lasted over a year, but succumbed when the i2Go company ran out of capital during the [[Dot-com bubble#The bubble bursts|dot-com crash]] and folded.     − In October 2000, the concept of using enclosures in [[RSS]] feeds was proposed in a draft by [[Tristan Louis]],Louis, Tristan, 2000-10-13. ''[http://groups.yahoo.com/group/syndication/message/698 Suggestion for RSS 0.92 specification]'' The idea was implemented (in a somewhat different form) by [[Dave Winer]], a software developer and an author of the [[RSS (file format)|RSS format]]. Winer had received other customer requests for "audioblogging" features and had discussed the enclosure concept (also in October 2000), with [[Adam Curry]],Curry, Adam, 2000-10-27 [http://adamcurry.editthispage.com/broadband/ The Bandwidth Issue]; server discontinued by Userland, late 2005. a user of Userland's Manila and Radio blogging and RSS aggregator software. + In October 2000, the concept of using enclosures in [[RSS]] feeds was proposed in a draft by [[Tristan Louis]],Louis, Tristan, 2000-10-13. ''[https://groups.yahoo.com/group/syndication/message/698 Suggestion for RSS 0.92 specification]'' The idea was implemented (in a somewhat different form) by [[Dave Winer]], a software developer a[...]