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Diatomaceous earth - Revision history



Revision history for this page on the wiki



Last Build Date: Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:35:23 GMT

 



Deli nk: Reverted edits by 2405:204:5404:12FF:409F:2557:B2B3:DA18 (talk) to last version by Bender the Bot

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 19:12:21 GMT

Reverted edits by 2405:204:5404:12FF:409F:2557:B2B3:DA18 (talk) to last version by Bender the Bot ← Previous revision Revision as of 19:12, 28 September 2016 Line 153: Line 153:   * [[Silica aerogel]]   * [[Silica aerogel]]   * [[Zeolite]]   * [[Zeolite]]   +   + == References ==   + {{Reflist|30em}}       == External links ==   == External links == [...]



2405:204:5404:12FF:409F:2557:B2B3:DA18: CENGAGE Learning

Wed, 28 Sep 2016 18:34:17 GMT

CENGAGE Learning

← Previous revision Revision as of 18:34, 28 September 2016
Line 153: Line 153:
 
* [[Silica aerogel]]
 
* [[Silica aerogel]]
 
* [[Zeolite]]
 
* [[Zeolite]]
 
== References ==
 
{{Reflist|30em}}
 
   
 
== External links ==
 
== External links ==



Bender the Bot: http→https for Google Books and Google News using AWB

Fri, 23 Sep 2016 09:23:06 GMT

http→https for Google Books and Google News using AWB ← Previous revision Revision as of 09:23, 23 September 2016 Line 73: Line 73:   === Filtration ===   === Filtration ===   The [[Celle]] engineer Wilhelm Berkefeld recognized the ability of diatomaceous earth to filter, and he developed tubular filters (known as filter candles) fired from diatomaceous earth.[http://www.berkefeld.com/en/company/history/ ELGA Berkefeld Water Treatment History] During the [[cholera]] [[epidemic]] in [[Hamburg]] in 1892, these [[Berkefeld filter]]s were used successfully.   The [[Celle]] engineer Wilhelm Berkefeld recognized the ability of diatomaceous earth to filter, and he developed tubular filters (known as filter candles) fired from diatomaceous earth.[http://www.berkefeld.com/en/company/history/ ELGA Berkefeld Water Treatment History] During the [[cholera]] [[epidemic]] in [[Hamburg]] in 1892, these [[Berkefeld filter]]s were used successfully. − One form of diatomaceous earth is used as a [[filter (chemistry)|filter]] medium, especially for swimming pools. It has a high porosity because it is composed of microscopically small, hollow particles. Diatomaceous earth (sometimes referred to by trademarked brand names such as Celite) is used in chemistry as a filtration aid, to filter very fine particles that would otherwise pass through or clog [[filter paper]]. It is also used to filter water, particularly in the [[drinking water]] treatment process and in [[aquarium|fish tanks]], and other liquids, such as [[beer]] and [[wine]]. It can also filter [[syrup]]s, [[sugar]], and honey without removing or altering their color, taste, or nutritional properties.{{Cite journal|last=Root|first=A.I.|authorlink=|author2=E.R. Root|author-separator=|editorn=|editorn-last=|editorn-first=|editor-link=|editorn-link=|others=|title=The ABC and xyz of bee culture|type=|url=http://books.google.com/?id=i0PoSYNEsh0C&pg=PA387&lpg=PA387&dq=diatomaceous+earth+%22does+not+remove%22#v=onepage&q=diatomaceous%20earth%20%22does%20not%20remove%22&f=false|archiveurl=|archivedate=|format=|accessdate=March 8, 2011|edition=|series=|volume=|date=March 1, 2005|origyear=|publisher=Kessinger Publishing|location=|language=|isbn=978-1-4326-2685-3|oclc=|doi=|doi_inactivedate=|bibcode=|id=|page=387|pages=|nopp=|at=|chapter=|chapterurl=|quote=|laysummary=|laydate=|separator=|postscript={{inconsistent citations}}|lastauthoramp=|ref=}} + One form of diatomaceous earth is used as a [[filter (chemistry)|filter]] medium, especially for swimming pools. It has a high porosity because it is composed of microscopically small, hollow particles. Diatomaceous earth (sometimes referred to by trademarked brand names such as Celite) is used in chemistry as a filtration aid, to filter very fine particles that would otherwise pass through or clog [[filter paper]]. It is also used to filter water, particularly in the [[drinking water]] treatment process and in [[aquarium|fish tanks]], and other liquids, such as [[beer]] and [[wine]]. It can also filter [[syrup]]s, [[sugar]], and honey without removing or altering their color, taste, or nutritional properties.{{Cite journal|last=Root|first=A.I.|authorlink=|author2=E.R. Root|author-separator=|editorn=|editorn-last=|editorn-first=|editor-link=|editorn-link=|others=|title=The ABC and xyz of bee culture|type=|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=i0PoSYNEsh0C&pg=PA387&lpg=PA387&dq=diatomaceous+earth+%22does+not+remove%22#v=onepage&q=diatomaceous%20earth%20%22does%20not%20remove%22&f=false|archiveurl=|archivedate=|format=|accessdate=March 8, 2011|edition=|series=|volume=|date=March 1, 2005|origyear=|publisher=Kessinger Publishing|location=|language=|is[...]



74.103.167.165: Diatoms are protozoa. Not algae. (Although, they are both heterotrophic and autotrophic so I can see where this confusion came from)

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 18:41:05 GMT

Diatoms are protozoa. Not algae. (Although, they are both heterotrophic and autotrophic so I can see where this confusion came from) ← Previous revision Revision as of 18:41, 19 September 2016 Line 4: Line 4:   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}     − Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of [[diatom]]s, a type of hard-shelled [[algae]]. It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]]. + Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of [[diatom]]s, a type of hard-shelled [[protozoa]]. It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]].       == Geology and occurrence ==   == Geology and occurrence == [...]



GeoWriter: Undid revision 736465467 by 74.81.130.230 (talk)

Sat, 27 Aug 2016 18:02:14 GMT

Undid revision 736465467 by 74.81.130.230 (talk) ← Previous revision Revision as of 18:02, 27 August 2016 Line 4: Line 4:   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}     − Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of human fecies, a type of hard-shelled fixture. It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]]. Historians have found evidence of diatomaceous earth has sexual enhancement molecules that stimulate female vaginal glands. Professionals also use this product for pubic hair growth for cancer patients. + Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of [[diatom]]s, a type of hard-shelled [[algae]]. It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]].       == Geology and occurrence ==   == Geology and occurrence == [...]



74.81.130.230 at 17:58, 27 August 2016

Sat, 27 Aug 2016 17:58:39 GMT

← Previous revision Revision as of 17:58, 27 August 2016 Line 4: Line 4:   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}     − Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of [[diatom]]s, a type of hard-shelled [[algae]]. It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]]. + Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of human fecies, a type of hard-shelled fixture. It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]]. Historians have found evidence of diatomaceous earth has sexual enhancement molecules that stimulate female vaginal glands. Professionals also use this product for pubic hair growth for cancer patients.       == Geology and occurrence ==   == Geology and occurrence == [...]



Julietdeltalima: /* Safety considerations */ hyphenated compound modifier "long-term" per MOS:HYPHEN

Fri, 08 Jul 2016 16:14:31 GMT

‎Safety considerations: hyphenated compound modifier "long-term" per MOS:HYPHEN ← Previous revision Revision as of 16:14, 8 July 2016 Line 138: Line 138:   The crystalline silica content of D.E. is regulated in the United States by the [[Occupational Safety and Health Administration]] (OSHA), and there are guidelines from the [[National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health]] setting maximum amounts allowable in the product (1%) and in the air near the breathing zone of workers, with a [[recommended exposure limit]] at 6 mg/m3 over an 8-hour workday.[http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/grsc_subi/Teaching/GRSC651/GRSC651_Courses_Material/lecture_slides/GRSC651_lect_20(1)_Inert_Dusts.pdf Inert Dusts] at [[Kansas State University]] OSHA has set a [[permissible exposure limit]] for diatomaceous earth as 20 mppcf (80 mg/m3/%SiO2). At levels of 3000 mg/m3, diatomaceous earth is immediately dangerous to life and health.{{Cite web|title = CDC - NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards - Silica, amorphous|url = http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/npgd0552.html|website = www.cdc.gov|accessdate = 2015-11-21}}   The crystalline silica content of D.E. is regulated in the United States by the [[Occupational Safety and Health Administration]] (OSHA), and there are guidelines from the [[National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health]] setting maximum amounts allowable in the product (1%) and in the air near the breathing zone of workers, with a [[recommended exposure limit]] at 6 mg/m3 over an 8-hour workday.[http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/grsc_subi/Teaching/GRSC651/GRSC651_Courses_Material/lecture_slides/GRSC651_lect_20(1)_Inert_Dusts.pdf Inert Dusts] at [[Kansas State University]] OSHA has set a [[permissible exposure limit]] for diatomaceous earth as 20 mppcf (80 mg/m3/%SiO2). At levels of 3000 mg/m3, diatomaceous earth is immediately dangerous to life and health.{{Cite web|title = CDC - NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards - Silica, amorphous|url = http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/npgd0552.html|website = www.cdc.gov|accessdate = 2015-11-21}}     − In the 1930s, long term occupational exposure among workers in the cristobalite D.E. industry who were exposed to high levels of airborne crystalline silica over decades were found to have an increased risk of [[silicosis]].{{cite journal |last1=Hughes |first1=Janet M. |last2=Weill |first2=Hans |last3=Checkoway |first3=Harvey |last4=Jones |first4=Robert N. |last5=Henry |first5=Melanie M. |last6=Heyer |first6=Nicholas J. |last7=Seixas |first7=Noah S. |last8=Demers |first8=Paul A. |title=Radiographic Evidence of Silicosis Risk in the Diatomaceous Earth Industry |journal=American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine |volume=158 |issue=3 |year=1998 |pages=807–814 |issn=1073-449X |doi=10.1164/ajrccm.158.3.9709103}} + In the 1930s, long-term occupational exposure among workers in the cristobalite D.E. industry who were exposed to high levels of airborne crystalline silica over decades were found to have an increased risk of [[silicosis]].{{cite journal |last1=Hughes |first1=Janet M. |last2=Weill |first2=Hans |last3=Checkoway |first3=Harvey |last4=Jones |first4=Robert N. |last5=Henry |first5=Melanie M. |last6=Heyer |first6=Nicholas J. |last7=Seixas |first7=Noah S. |last8=Demers |first8=Paul A. |title=Radiographic Evidence of Silicosis Risk in the Diatomaceous Ea[...]



Julietdeltalima: /* Pest control */ punctuation corrections

Fri, 08 Jul 2016 16:13:47 GMT

‎Pest control: punctuation corrections ← Previous revision Revision as of 16:13, 8 July 2016 Line 79: Line 79:       === Pest control ===   === Pest control === − Diatomite is used as an [[insecticide]], due to its abrasive and physico-[[sorptivity|sorptive]] properties.{{cite conference|url= http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~fieldspg/fields/de-test-p.pdf |title= Standardized testing for diatomaceous earth |last1= Fields |first1= Paul |last2= Allen |first2= Sylvia |first3= Zlatko |last3= Korunic |first4= Alan |last4= McLaughlin |first5= Tanya |last5= Stathers |date= July 2002 |publisher= Entomological Society of Manitoba |booktitle= Proceedings of the Eighth International Working Conference of Stored-Product Protection |pages= |location= York, U.K. |id= }} The fine powder absorbs [[lipids]] from the waxy outer layer of insects' [[exoskeleton]]s, causing them to dehydrate. [[Arthropod]]s die as a result of the water pressure deficiency, based on [[Fick's law of diffusion]]. This also works against [[gastropod]]s and is commonly employed in gardening to defeat [[slug]]s. However, since slugs inhabit humid environments, efficacy is very low. It is sometimes mixed with an attractant or other additives to increase its effectiveness. The shape of the diatoms contained in a deposit has not been proven to affect their functionality when it comes to the absorption of liquids, however certain applications, such as that for slugs and snails, do work best when a particular shaped diatom is used. For example, in the case of slugs and snails large, spiny diatoms work best to lacerate the epithelium of the mollusk. Diatom shells will work to some degree on the vast majority of animals that undergo [[ecdysis]] in shedding [[cuticle]], such as [[arthropod]]s or [[nematodes]]. It may have some effect also on [[lophotrochozoan]]s, such as [[mollusk]]s or [[annelid]]s. + Diatomite is used as an [[insecticide]], due to its abrasive and physico-[[sorptivity|sorptive]] properties.{{cite conference|url= http://home.cc.umanitoba.ca/~fieldspg/fields/de-test-p.pdf |title= Standardized testing for diatomaceous earth |last1= Fields |first1= Paul |last2= Allen |first2= Sylvia |first3= Zlatko |last3= Korunic |first4= Alan |last4= McLaughlin |first5= Tanya |last5= Stathers |date= July 2002 |publisher= Entomological Society of Manitoba |booktitle= Proceedings of the Eighth International Working Conference of Stored-Product Protection |pages= |location= York, U.K. |id= }} The fine powder absorbs [[lipids]] from the waxy outer layer of insects' [[exoskeleton]]s, causing them to dehydrate. [[Arthropod]]s die as a result of the water pressure deficiency, based on [[Fick's law of diffusion]]. This also works against [[gastropod]]s and is commonly employed in gardening to defeat [[slug]]s. However, since slugs inhabit humid environments, efficacy is very low. It is sometimes mixed with an attractant or other additives to increase its effectiveness. The shape of the diatoms contained in a deposit has not been proven to affect their functionality when it comes to the absorption of liquids; however, certain applications, such as that for slugs and snails, do work best when a particular shaped diatom is used. For example, in the case of slugs and snails large, spiny diatoms work best to lacerate the epithelium of the mollusk. Diatom shells will work to some degree on the vast majority of animals that undergo [[ecdysis]] in shedding [[cuticle]], such as [[arthropod]]s or [[nematodes]]. It may have some effect also on [[lophotrochozoan]]s, such as [[mollusk]]s or [[annelid]]s.       Medical-grade diatomite has been studied for its efficacy as a [[deworming]] agent in cattle; in both studies cited the gro[...]



208.81.212.224: /* Specific varieties */ WP:OVERLINK again

Thu, 07 Jul 2016 20:08:58 GMT

‎Specific varieties: WP:OVERLINK again ← Previous revision Revision as of 20:08, 7 July 2016 Line 121: Line 121:       == Specific varieties ==   == Specific varieties == − * '''Tripolite''' is the variety found in [[Tripoli]], [[Libya]]. + * '''Tripolite''' is the variety found in [[Tripoli]], Libya. − * '''Bann clay''' is the variety found in the [[River Bann|Lower Bann valley]] in [[Northern Ireland]]. + * '''Bann clay''' is the variety found in the [[River Bann|Lower Bann valley]] in Northern Ireland. − * '''Moler''' ('''Mo-clay''') is the variety found in northwestern [[Denmark]], especially on the islands of [[Fur (island)|Fur]] and [[Mors (island)|Mors]]. + * '''Moler''' ('''Mo-clay''') is the variety found in northwestern Denmark, especially on the islands of [[Fur (island)|Fur]] and [[Mors (island)|Mors]].   * '''Freshwater-derived food grade''' diatomaceous earth is the type used in United States agriculture for grain storage, as feed supplement, and as an insecticide. It is produced [[calcination|uncalcinated]], has a very fine particle size, and is very low in crystal silica (<2%).   * '''Freshwater-derived food grade''' diatomaceous earth is the type used in United States agriculture for grain storage, as feed supplement, and as an insecticide. It is produced [[calcination|uncalcinated]], has a very fine particle size, and is very low in crystal silica (<2%).   * '''Salt-water-derived pool/ beer/ wine filter grade''' is not suitable for human consumption or effective as an insecticide. Usually [[calcinated]] before being sold to remove impurities and undesirable volatile contents, it is composed of larger particles than the freshwater version and has a high crystalline silica content (>60%).   * '''Salt-water-derived pool/ beer/ wine filter grade''' is not suitable for human consumption or effective as an insecticide. Usually [[calcinated]] before being sold to remove impurities and undesirable volatile contents, it is composed of larger particles than the freshwater version and has a high crystalline silica content (>60%). [...]



208.81.212.224: /* Other deposits */ linking again

Thu, 07 Jul 2016 20:06:31 GMT

‎Other deposits: linking again ← Previous revision Revision as of 20:06, 7 July 2016 Line 47: Line 47:   In Germany, diatomaceous earth was also extracted at [[Altenschlirf]]http://www2.natpa.de/bonifatius/senken/p7.htm Über den früheren Abbau von Kieselgur im Vogelsberg/Hessen {{wayback|url=http://www2.natpa.de/bonifatius/senken/p7.htm |date=20070928020701 }} on the [[Vogelsberg]] ([[Upper Hesse]]) and at [[Klieken]][http://homepages.compuserve.de/tmby100/kieselgur.htm Geschichte des Kieselgurabbaus in Klieken] {{wayback|url=http://homepages.compuserve.de/tmby100/kieselgur.htm |date=20080420063824 }} ([[Saxony-Anhalt]]).   In Germany, diatomaceous earth was also extracted at [[Altenschlirf]]http://www2.natpa.de/bonifatius/senken/p7.htm Über den früheren Abbau von Kieselgur im Vogelsberg/Hessen {{wayback|url=http://www2.natpa.de/bonifatius/senken/p7.htm |date=20070928020701 }} on the [[Vogelsberg]] ([[Upper Hesse]]) and at [[Klieken]][http://homepages.compuserve.de/tmby100/kieselgur.htm Geschichte des Kieselgurabbaus in Klieken] {{wayback|url=http://homepages.compuserve.de/tmby100/kieselgur.htm |date=20080420063824 }} ([[Saxony-Anhalt]]).     − There is a layer of diatomaceous earth up to {{convert|4|m|ft}} thick in the nature reserve of [[Soos (Nature reservation)|Soos]] in the [[Czech Republic]]. + There is a layer of diatomaceous earth up to {{convert|4|m|ft}} thick in the nature reserve of [[Soos (Nature reservation)|Soos]] in the Czech Republic.     − Deposits on the isle of [[Skye]], off the west coast of Scotland, were mined until 1960.[http://www.stornowaygazette.co.uk/what-s-on/leisure/skye-diatomite-a-lost-industry-1-118249] + Deposits on the isle of [[Skye]], off the west coast of Scotland, were mined until 1960.http://www.stornowaygazette.co.uk/what-s-on/leisure/skye-diatomite-a-lost-industry-1-118249       In [[Colorado]] and in [[Clark County, Nevada]], United States, there are deposits that are up to several hundred metres thick in places. Marine deposits have been worked in the [[Sisquoc Formation]] in [[Santa Barbara County, California]] near [[Lompoc, California|Lompoc]] and along the [[Southern California]] [[coast]]. Additional marine deposits have been worked in [[Maryland]], [[Virginia]], [[Algeria]] and the [[MoClay]] of Denmark. Freshwater lake deposits occur in Nevada, [[Oregon]], [[Washington (U.S. state)|Washington]] and [[California]]. Lake deposits also occur in [[interglacial]] lakes in the eastern United States, in Canada and in Europe in Germany, France, Denmark and the Czech Republic. The worldwide association of diatomite deposits and [[volcanic]] deposits suggests that the availability of silica from [[volcanic ash]] may be necessary for thick diatomite deposits.   In [[Colorado]] and in [[Clark County, Nevada]], United States, there are deposits that are up to several hundred metres thick in places. Marine deposits have been worked in the [[Sisquoc Formation]] in [[Santa Barbara County, California]] near [[Lompoc, California|Lompoc]] and along the [[Southern California]] [[coast]]. Additional marine deposits have been worked in [[Maryland]], [[Virginia]], [[Algeria]] and the [[MoClay]] of Denmark. Freshwater lake deposits occur in Nevada, [[Oregon]], [[Washington (U.S. state)|Washington]] and [[California]]. Lake deposits also occur in [[interglacial]] lakes in the eastern United States, in Canada and in Europe in Germany, France, Denmark and the Czech Republic. The worldwide association of diatomite deposits and [[volcanic]] depos[...]