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Diatomaceous earth - Revision history



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173.161.166.180: /* Use in agriculture */

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 18:12:22 GMT

‎Use in agriculture ← Previous revision Revision as of 18:12, 15 September 2017 Line 94: Line 94:       === Use in agriculture ===   === Use in agriculture === − Natural freshwater diatomaceous earth is used in agriculture for grain storage as an [[anticaking agent]], as well as an insecticide.{{cite web |url=https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |title=Prevention and Management of Insects and Mites in Farm-Stored Grain |publisher=Province of Manitoba |accessdate=July 7, 2013 |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20131018021402/http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |archivedate=October 18, 2013 |df=mdy }} It is approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a feed additive{{cite web | url=https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2001-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2001-title21-vol6-sec573-340.pdf | title=21 CFR 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | publisher=[[Food and Drug Administration]]/U.S. Government Publishing Office | work=Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition)—Title 21 - Food and Drugs—Part 573 - Food additives permitted in feed and drinking water of animals—Section 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | date=April 1, 2001 | accessdate=February 9, 2016}} to prevent caking. + Natural freshwater diatomaceous earth is used in agriculture for grain storage as an [[anticaking agent]], as well as an insecticide.{{cite web |url=https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |title=Prevention and Management of Insects and Mites in Farm-Stored Grain |publisher=Province of Manitoba |accessdate=July 7, 2013 |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20131018021402/http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |archivedate=October 18, 2013 |df=mdy }} It is approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a feed additive{{cite web | url=https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2001-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2001-title21-vol6-sec573-340.pdf | title=21 CFR 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | publisher=[[Food and Drug Administration]]/U.S. Government Publishing Office | work=Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition)—Title 21 - Food and Drugs—Part 573 - Food additives permitted in feed and drinking water of animals—Section 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | date=April 1, 2001 | accessdate=February 9, 2016}} to prevent caking.       Some believe it may be used as a natural [[anthelmintic]] (dewormer), although studies have not shown it to be effective. Some farmers add it to their livestock and [[Chicken|poultry]] feed to prevent the caking of feed.[http://www.sgggc.org/insect-management-food-processing-facilities-heat-diatomaceous-earth/ Diatomaceous Earth (DE)] "Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth" is widely available in agricultural feed supply stores.   Some believe it may be used as a natural [[anthelmintic]] (dewormer), although studies have not shown it to be effective. Some farmers add it to their livestock and [[Chicken|poultry]] feed to prevent the caking of feed.[http://www.sgggc.org/insect-management-food-processing-facilities-heat-diatomaceous-earth/ Diatomaceous Earth (DE)] "Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth" is widely available in agricultural feed supply stores. [...]



InternetArchiveBot: Rescuing 1 sources and tagging 0 as dead. #IABot (v1.5.1)

Sun, 10 Sep 2017 05:47:30 GMT

Rescuing 1 sources and tagging 0 as dead. #IABot (v1.5.1) ← Previous revision Revision as of 05:47, 10 September 2017 Line 94: Line 94:       === Use in agriculture ===   === Use in agriculture === − Natural freshwater diatomaceous earth is used in agriculture for grain storage as an [[anticaking agent]], as well as an insecticide.{{cite web|url=https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |title=Prevention and Management of Insects and Mites in Farm-Stored Grain |publisher=Province of Manitoba |accessdate=July 7, 2013 |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20131018021402/http://www.gov.mb.ca:80/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |archivedate=October 18, 2013 |df=mdy}} It is approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a feed additive{{cite web | url=https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2001-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2001-title21-vol6-sec573-340.pdf | title=21 CFR 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | publisher=[[Food and Drug Administration]]/U.S. Government Publishing Office | work=Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition)—Title 21 - Food and Drugs—Part 573 - Food additives permitted in feed and drinking water of animals—Section 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | date=April 1, 2001 | accessdate=February 9, 2016}} to prevent caking. + Natural freshwater diatomaceous earth is used in agriculture for grain storage as an [[anticaking agent]], as well as an insecticide.{{cite web |url=https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |title=Prevention and Management of Insects and Mites in Farm-Stored Grain |publisher=Province of Manitoba |accessdate=July 7, 2013 |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20131018021402/http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |archivedate=October 18, 2013 |df=mdy }} It is approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a feed additive{{cite web | url=https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2001-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2001-title21-vol6-sec573-340.pdf | title=21 CFR 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | publisher=[[Food and Drug Administration]]/U.S. Government Publishing Office | work=Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition)—Title 21 - Food and Drugs—Part 573 - Food additives permitted in feed and drinking water of animals—Section 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | date=April 1, 2001 | accessdate=February 9, 2016}} to prevent caking.       Some believe it may be used as a natural [[anthelmintic]] (dewormer), although studies have not shown it to be effective. Some farmers add it to their livestock and [[Chicken|poultry]] feed to prevent the caking of feed.[http://www.sgggc.org/insect-management-food-processing-facilities-heat-diatomaceous-earth/ Diatomaceous Earth (DE)] "Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth" is widely available in agricultural feed supply stores.   Some believe it may be used as a natural [[anthelmintic]] (dewormer), although studies have not shown it to be effective. Some farmers add it to their livestock and [[Chicken|poultry]] feed to prevent the caking of feed.[http://www.sgggc.org/insect-management-food-processing-facilities-heat-diatomaceous-earth/ Diatomaceous Earth (DE)] "Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth" is widely available in agricultural feed supply stores. [...]



Thnidu: /* Catalyst support */

Sat, 09 Sep 2017 16:11:53 GMT

‎Catalyst support ← Previous revision Revision as of 16:11, 9 September 2017 Line 91: Line 91:       === Catalyst support===   === Catalyst support=== − Diatomaceous earth also finds some use as a [[Catalyst support|support]] for [[catalyst]]s, generally serving to maximize a catalyst's [[surface area]] and [[Activity (chemistry)|activity]]. For example, [[nickel]], referred to as Ni–Kieselguhr, can be supported on the material to improve its activity as a [[hydrogenation]] catalyst.{{cite book|last1=Nishimura|first1=Shigeo|title=Handbook of Heterogeneous Catalytic Hydrogenation for Organic Synthesis|date=2001|publisher=Wiley-Interscience|location=Newyork|isbn=9780471396987|pages=2–5|edition=1st|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=RjZRAAAAMAAJ&q=0471396982&dq=0471396982&hl=en&sa=X&ei=BCacVMTgN5LmoASd34KQCQ&ved=0CB8Q6AEwAA}} + Diatomaceous earth also finds some use as a [[Catalyst support|support]] for [[catalyst]]s, generally serving to maximize a catalyst's [[surface area]] and [[Activity (chemistry)|activity]]. For example, [[nickel]] can be supported on the material{{snd}}the combination is called Ni–Kieselguhr{{snd}}to improve its activity as a [[hydrogenation]] catalyst.{{cite book|last1=Nishimura|first1=Shigeo|title=Handbook of Heterogeneous Catalytic Hydrogenation for Organic Synthesis|date=2001|publisher=Wiley-Interscience|location=Newyork|isbn=9780471396987|pages=2–5|edition=1st|url=https://books.google.com/books?id=RjZRAAAAMAAJ&q=0471396982&dq=0471396982&hl=en&sa=X&ei=BCacVMTgN5LmoASd34KQCQ&ved=0CB8Q6AEwAA}}       === Use in agriculture ===   === Use in agriculture === [...]



KolbertBot: Bot: HTTP→HTTPS

Sat, 09 Sep 2017 06:07:05 GMT

Bot: HTTP→HTTPS ← Previous revision Revision as of 06:07, 9 September 2017 Line 133: Line 133:       == Safety considerations ==   == Safety considerations == − Inhalation of ''crystalline'' silica is harmful to the lungs, causing [[silicosis]]. ''Amorphous'' silica is considered to have low toxicity, but prolonged inhalation causes changes to the lungs.http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/pel88/68855-54.html Diatomaceous earth is mostly [[Silicon dioxide|amorphous silica]], but contains some crystalline silica, especially in the saltwater forms.http://www.spca.bc.ca/assets/documents/welfare/professional-resources/farmer-resources/diatomaceous-earth-factsheet.pdf In a study of workers, those exposed to natural D.E. for over 5 years had no significant lung changes, while 40% of those exposed to the calcined form had developed [[pneumoconiosis]].http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/81-123/pdfs/0552.pdf Today's common D.E. formulations are safer to use as they are predominantly made up of amorphous silica and contain little or no crystalline silica. + Inhalation of ''crystalline'' silica is harmful to the lungs, causing [[silicosis]]. ''Amorphous'' silica is considered to have low toxicity, but prolonged inhalation causes changes to the lungs.https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/pel88/68855-54.html Diatomaceous earth is mostly [[Silicon dioxide|amorphous silica]], but contains some crystalline silica, especially in the saltwater forms.http://www.spca.bc.ca/assets/documents/welfare/professional-resources/farmer-resources/diatomaceous-earth-factsheet.pdf In a study of workers, those exposed to natural D.E. for over 5 years had no significant lung changes, while 40% of those exposed to the calcined form had developed [[pneumoconiosis]].https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/81-123/pdfs/0552.pdf Today's common D.E. formulations are safer to use as they are predominantly made up of amorphous silica and contain little or no crystalline silica.     − The crystalline silica content of D.E. is regulated in the United States by the [[Occupational Safety and Health Administration]] (OSHA), and there are guidelines from the [[National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health]] setting maximum amounts allowable in the product (1%) and in the air near the breathing zone of workers, with a [[recommended exposure limit]] at 6 mg/m3 over an 8-hour workday.[http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/grsc_subi/Teaching/GRSC651/GRSC651_Courses_Material/lecture_slides/GRSC651_lect_20(1)_Inert_Dusts.pdf Inert Dusts] at [[Kansas State University]] OSHA has set a [[permissible exposure limit]] for diatomaceous earth as 20 mppcf (80 mg/m3/%SiO2). At levels of 3000 mg/m3, diatomaceous earth is immediately dangerous to life and health.{{Cite web|title = CDC - NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards - Silica, amorphous|url = http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/npgd0552.html|website = www.cdc.gov|accessdate = 2015-11-21}} + The crystalline silica content of D.E. is regulated in the United States by the [[Occupational Safety and Health Administration]] (OSHA), and there are guidelines from the [[National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health]] setting maximum amounts allowable in the product (1%) and in the air near the breathing zone of workers, with a [[recommended exposure limit]] at 6 mg/m3 over an 8-hour workday.[http://www.oznet.ksu.edu/grsc_subi/Teaching/GRSC651/GRSC651_Courses_Material/lecture_slides/GRSC651_lect_20(1)_Inert_Dusts.pdf Inert Dusts][...]



KolbertBot: Bot: HTTP→HTTPS

Sat, 26 Aug 2017 14:58:43 GMT

Bot: HTTP→HTTPS ← Previous revision Revision as of 14:58, 26 August 2017 Line 94: Line 94:       === Use in agriculture ===   === Use in agriculture === − Natural freshwater diatomaceous earth is used in agriculture for grain storage as an [[anticaking agent]], as well as an insecticide.{{cite web|url=http://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |title=Prevention and Management of Insects and Mites in Farm-Stored Grain |publisher=Province of Manitoba |accessdate=July 7, 2013 |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20131018021402/http://www.gov.mb.ca:80/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |archivedate=October 18, 2013 |df=mdy}} It is approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a feed additive{{cite web | url=https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2001-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2001-title21-vol6-sec573-340.pdf | title=21 CFR 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | publisher=[[Food and Drug Administration]]/U.S. Government Publishing Office | work=Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition)—Title 21 - Food and Drugs—Part 573 - Food additives permitted in feed and drinking water of animals—Section 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | date=April 1, 2001 | accessdate=February 9, 2016}} to prevent caking. + Natural freshwater diatomaceous earth is used in agriculture for grain storage as an [[anticaking agent]], as well as an insecticide.{{cite web|url=https://www.gov.mb.ca/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |title=Prevention and Management of Insects and Mites in Farm-Stored Grain |publisher=Province of Manitoba |accessdate=July 7, 2013 |deadurl=yes |archiveurl=https://web.archive.org/web/20131018021402/http://www.gov.mb.ca:80/agriculture/crops/cropproduction/faa06s00.html |archivedate=October 18, 2013 |df=mdy}} It is approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a feed additive{{cite web | url=https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2001-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2001-title21-vol6-sec573-340.pdf | title=21 CFR 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | publisher=[[Food and Drug Administration]]/U.S. Government Publishing Office | work=Code of Federal Regulations (annual edition)—Title 21 - Food and Drugs—Part 573 - Food additives permitted in feed and drinking water of animals—Section 573.340 - Diatomaceous earth | date=April 1, 2001 | accessdate=February 9, 2016}} to prevent caking.       Some believe it may be used as a natural [[anthelmintic]] (dewormer), although studies have not shown it to be effective. Some farmers add it to their livestock and [[Chicken|poultry]] feed to prevent the caking of feed.[http://www.sgggc.org/insect-management-food-processing-facilities-heat-diatomaceous-earth/ Diatomaceous Earth (DE)] "Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth" is widely available in agricultural feed supply stores.   Some believe it may be used as a natural [[anthelmintic]] (dewormer), although studies have not shown it to be effective. Some farmers add it to their livestock and [[Chicken|poultry]] feed to prevent the caking of feed.[http://www.sgggc.org/insect-management-food-processing-facilities-heat-diatomaceous-earth/ Diatomaceous Earth (DE)] "Food Grade Diatomaceous Earth" is widely available in agricultural feed supply stores. [...]



Jim1138: /* top */ link, format

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 01:23:12 GMT

‎top: link, format ← Previous revision Revision as of 01:23, 23 August 2017 Line 4: Line 4:   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}     − Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of [[diatom]]s, a type of hard-shelled protists(Chrysophytes).It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]]. + Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of [[diatom]]s, a type of hard-shelled [[protist]]s ([[chrysophytes]]). It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]].       == Geology and occurrence ==   == Geology and occurrence == [...]



47.9.14.131: Protists_ chrysophytes

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 01:19:05 GMT

Protists_ chrysophytes ← Previous revision Revision as of 01:19, 23 August 2017 Line 4: Line 4:   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}   '''Diatomaceous earth''' ({{IPAc-en|pron|ˌ|d|aɪ|.|ə|t|ə|ˌ|m|eɪ|ʃ|ə|s|_|ˈ|ɜr|θ}}), also known as '''D.E.''', '''diatomite''', or '''kieselgur'''/'''kieselguhr''', is a naturally occurring, soft, [[siliceous]] [[sedimentary rock]] that is easily crumbled into a fine [[Shades of white|white to off-white]] powder. It has a particle size ranging from less than 3 [[micrometres]] to more than 1 millimetre, but typically 10 to 200 micrometres. Depending on the granularity, this powder can have an [[abrasive]] feel, similar to [[pumice]] powder, and has a low [[density]] as a result of its high [[porosity]]. The typical chemical composition of oven-dried diatomaceous earth is 80 to 90% [[silica]], with 2 to 4% [[alumina]] (attributed mostly to [[clay mineral]]s) and 0.5 to 2% [[iron oxide]].{{cite book |last=Antonides |first=Lloyd E. |title=Diatomite |year=1997 |publisher=[[U.S.G.S.]] |url=http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/diatomite/250497.pdf |accessdate=December 12, 2010 |format=PDF}}     − Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of [[diatom]]s, a type of hard-shelled [[algae]]. It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]]. + Diatomaceous earth consists of fossilized remains of [[diatom]]s, a type of hard-shelled protists(Chrysophytes).It is used as a [[filtration]] aid, mild abrasive in products including metal polishes and [[toothpaste]], mechanical [[insecticide]], [[absorption (chemistry)|absorbent]] for liquids, matting agent for coatings, reinforcing filler in plastics and rubber, anti-block in plastic films, porous support for chemical catalysts, [[cat litter]], activator in [[blood clotting]] studies, a stabilizing component of [[dynamite]], and a [[thermal insulation|thermal insulator]].       == Geology and occurrence ==   == Geology and occurrence == [...]



Howardlhoffman: /* Climatologic importance */ "all the dust" makes no sense. Suggest that original author may want to edit again.

Tue, 08 Aug 2017 17:33:36 GMT

‎Climatologic importance: "all the dust" makes no sense. Suggest that original author may want to edit again. ← Previous revision Revision as of 17:33, 8 August 2017 Line 130: Line 130:       == Climatologic importance ==   == Climatologic importance == − The Earth's [[climate]] is affected by [[dust]] in the [[atmosphere]], so locating major sources of atmospheric dust is important for [[climatology]]. Recent research indicates that surface deposits of diatomaceous earth play an important role. Research shows all the dust comes from this [[Bodélé depression]] in [[Chad]], where storms push diatomite gravel over [[dune]]s, generating dust by [[abrasion (geology)|abrasion]].{{cite journal |last1=Washington |first1=R. |last2=Todd |first2=M. C. |last3=Lizcano |first3=G. |last4=Tegen |first4=I. |last5=Flamant |first5=C. |last6=Koren |first6=I. |last7=Ginoux |first7=P. |last8=Engelstaedter |first8=S. |last9=Bristow |first9=C. S. |last10=Zender |first10=C. S. |last11=Goudie |first11=A. S. |last12=Warren |first12=A. |last13=Prospero |first13=J. M. |title=Links between topography, wind, deflation, lakes and dust: The case of the Bodélé Depression, Chad |journal=Geophysical Research Letters |volume=33 |issue=9 |year=2006 |issn=0094-8276 |doi=10.1029/2006GL025827 |bibcode=2006GeoRL..33.9401W}} + The Earth's [[climate]] is affected by [[dust]] in the [[atmosphere]], so locating major sources of atmospheric dust is important for [[climatology]]. Recent research indicates that surface deposits of diatomaceous earth play an important role. Research shows that significant dust comes from the [[Bodélé depression]] in [[Chad]], where storms push diatomite gravel over [[dune]]s, generating dust by [[abrasion (geology)|abrasion]].{{cite journal |last1=Washington |first1=R. |last2=Todd |first2=M. C. |last3=Lizcano |first3=G. |last4=Tegen |first4=I. |last5=Flamant |first5=C. |last6=Koren |first6=I. |last7=Ginoux |first7=P. |last8=Engelstaedter |first8=S. |last9=Bristow |first9=C. S. |last10=Zender |first10=C. S. |last11=Goudie |first11=A. S. |last12=Warren |first12=A. |last13=Prospero |first13=J. M. |title=Links between topography, wind, deflation, lakes and dust: The case of the Bodélé Depression, Chad |journal=Geophysical Research Letters |volume=33 |issue=9 |year=2006 |issn=0094-8276 |doi=10.1029/2006GL025827 |bibcode=2006GeoRL..33.9401W}}       == Safety considerations ==   == Safety considerations == [...]



Pi: /* Composition */ correcting spelling

Mon, 10 Jul 2017 01:09:54 GMT

‎Composition: correcting spelling ← Previous revision Revision as of 01:09, 10 July 2017 Line 10: Line 10:       === Composition ===   === Composition === − EEach deposit of diatomaceous earth is different, with varying blends of pure diatomaceous earth combined with other natural clays and minerals. The diatoms in each deposit contain different amounts of silica, depending on the age of the deposit. The species of diatom may also differ among deposits. The species of diatom is dependent upon the age and paleo-environment of the deposit. In turn, the shape of a diatom is determined by its species. + Each deposit of diatomaceous earth is different, with varying blends of pure diatomaceous earth combined with other natural clays and minerals. The diatoms in each deposit contain different amounts of silica, depending on the age of the deposit. The species of diatom may also differ among deposits. The species of diatom is dependent upon the age and paleo-environment of the deposit. In turn, the shape of a diatom is determined by its species.       Many deposits throughout British Columbia, Canada, such as Red Lake Earth, are from the [[Miocene]] age and contain a species of diatom known as ''Melosira granulata''. These diatoms are approximately 12 to 13 million years old and have a small globular shape.   Many deposits throughout British Columbia, Canada, such as Red Lake Earth, are from the [[Miocene]] age and contain a species of diatom known as ''Melosira granulata''. These diatoms are approximately 12 to 13 million years old and have a small globular shape. [...]



2A02:C7D:B91:3600:BDF9:B82F:90E7:8C60: /* Composition */

Mon, 10 Jul 2017 01:08:22 GMT

‎Composition ← Previous revision Revision as of 01:08, 10 July 2017 Line 10: Line 10:       === Composition ===   === Composition === − Each deposit of diatomaceous earth is different, with varying blends of pure diatomaceous earth combined with other natural clays and minerals. The diatoms in each deposit contain different amounts of silica, depending on the age of the deposit. The species of diatom may also differ among deposits. The species of diatom is dependent upon the age and paleo-environment of the deposit. In turn, the shape of a diatom is determined by its species. + EEach deposit of diatomaceous earth is different, with varying blends of pure diatomaceous earth combined with other natural clays and minerals. The diatoms in each deposit contain different amounts of silica, depending on the age of the deposit. The species of diatom may also differ among deposits. The species of diatom is dependent upon the age and paleo-environment of the deposit. In turn, the shape of a diatom is determined by its species.       Many deposits throughout British Columbia, Canada, such as Red Lake Earth, are from the [[Miocene]] age and contain a species of diatom known as ''Melosira granulata''. These diatoms are approximately 12 to 13 million years old and have a small globular shape.   Many deposits throughout British Columbia, Canada, such as Red Lake Earth, are from the [[Miocene]] age and contain a species of diatom known as ''Melosira granulata''. These diatoms are approximately 12 to 13 million years old and have a small globular shape. [...]