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Volkswagen Agrees to Plead Guilty in Diesel-Emissions Scandal

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 18:32:10 +0000

Volkswagen has agreed to plead guilty to charges brought by the US Justice Department over its emissions conspiracy. VW admits relying on so-called “defeat device with algorithms that misrepresented emissions during testing. More than 11 million cars worldwide contained these devices, which allowed engines to cheat on carbon emissions tests. This conclusion to the 16-month investigation also includes charges against five managers in Germany. The pre-inauguration timing is purposeful, as both the Justice Department and Volkswagen wanted to settle before “many of the people who have been overseeing the case step down,” Bloomberg reports. The $4.3 billion dollar penalty raises the cost of the scandal for the company in North America alone to $23 billion. Still, Volkswagen’s sales have not significantly suffered. The company is “now selling more cars and trucks than ever, offsetting declines in the US with strong sales in China.” Investigations continue into other car companies reliance on similar devices designed to manipulate readings on emissions. – YaleGlobal US Justice Department investigation of Volkswagen for devices that limited emissions testing concludes with a $4.3 billion fine and multiple criminal charges The company will pay a $4.3 billion penalty Tom Schoenberg, Christoph Rauwald and David McLaughlin Tom Schoenberg, Christoph Rauwald and David McLaughlin Other Bloomberg United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 16 January 2017 Read the article. Source url:  https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-01-11/volkswagen-agrees-to-pay-4-3-billion-plead-guilty-in-u-s-case Rights:  ©2017 Bloomberg L.P. All Rights Reserved http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/vws-emissions-cheating-found-curious-clean-air-group http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/climate-change-and-risks-denying-inconvenient-truths No [...]



China Is the De Facto Leader of Globalization

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 15:53:28 +0000

China is preparing to take a leading role on the world stage as the US president-elect dismisses worries about climate change and the benefits of globalization. The rhetoric about an “America first” policy suggests that the United States could reverse US stances on global trade and climate change. Europe is in disarray, too. Some world leaders are avoiding the World Economic Forum in Davos this year, to avoid being labeled as elites, but China’s President Xi Jinping will attend for the first time to remind the audience that globalization is worthwhile and can be controlled to resolve multiple global problems. “The unobvious benefits of interdependence need to be made manifest,” writes Nathan Gardels for the World Post. “The optimal arrangement for making globalization work is for the U.S. and China to join together as “indispensable partners” based on a convergence of interests to create a world order that works for all.” Gardels suggests that China could consider working with individual US states. – YaleGlobal China’s Xi Jinping will become the foremost proponent of an open global economy and the battle against climate change Xi Jinping is ready to lead policies on shaping globalization and fighting climate change Nathan Gardels Nathan Gardels Other The World Post United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 13 January 2017 Read the article. Nathan Gardels is editor-in-chief of the World Post. Read about the World Economic Forum, “committed to improving the state of the world, is the international organization for public-private cooperation.” Source url:  http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/china-leader-globalization_us_58753fe8e4b02b5f858ba6ce Rights:  Copyright © 2017 TheHuffingtonPost.com, Inc. No [...]



Rekindled Sino-Indian Tensions Roil Geopolitics in Asia

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 19:05:56 +0000

Chinese-Indian relations are deteriorating, worsening the security environment in Asia. “New Delhi may have decided to take the Chinese challenge head-on,” explains Harsh V Pant. “To complicate matters for India, its erstwhile ally Russia, which has become a close friend of China, is showing interest in establishing closer ties with Pakistan.” The most recent slight for India: Refusal by China, alone among the 15 members of the UN Security Council, to designate a Pakistan man as terrorist. India responded by testing long-range missiles that could hit population centers in China, while China demonstrates willingness to boost Pakistan’s nuclear missile capability. China extended its China-Pakistan Economic Corridor through contested territory in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir claimed by India. India has reinserted Tibet into bilateral affairs with more public prominence for the Dalai Lama, Tibet’s exiled spiritual leader. India is marginalized as China, Russia and Pakistan cooperate on regional issues, including Afghanistan. Adding to the volatility is a reversal in US foreign policy, as the president-elect issues accusations at China and expresses hope to improve ties with Russia. – YaleGlobal India and China’s rivalry intensifies over China’s veto on UN issues, territory, Pakistan and the Dalai Lama India and China’s rivalry intensifies over China’s veto on UN issues, territory, Pakistan and the Dalai Lama NEW DELHI: After a few timid signs of warming, Sino-Indian relations seem to be headed for the freezer. While Beijing refuses to take Indian security concerns seriously, New Delhi may have decided to take the Chinese challenge head-on. To complicate matters for India, its erstwhile ally Russia, which has become a close friend of China, is showing interest in establishing closer ties with Pakistan. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2017/pant0112-140px.jpg http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2017/pant0112-75px.jpg Harsh V Pant Harsh V Pant YaleGlobal YaleGlobal Online 12 January 2017 Crushing triangle: India faces threats from the likes of Pakistani terrorist Masood Azhar, top, while being squeezed by diplomatic pressure from a budding Sino- Russian alliance NEW DELHI: After a few timid signs of warming, Sino-Indian relations seem to be headed for the freezer.  While Beijing refuses to take Indian security concerns seriously, New Delhi may have decided to take the Chinese challenge head-on.  To complicate matters for India, its erstwhile ally Russia, which has become a close friend of China, is showing interest in establishing closer ties with Pakistan. The latest move that clenches teeth in India is China refusing to lift a hold on Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammad chief Masood Azhar, accused of plotting multiple acts of terrorism against India,  and blocking him in December from being listed as a terrorist by the United Nations. Since March China has blocked India’s attempts to put a ban on Azhar, under the sanctions committee of the UN Security Council, despite support from other members of the 15-nation body. In response, India has gone beyond expressing dismay by testing its long-range ballistic missiles – Agni IV and Agni V – in recent weeks. Pak[...]



The Search for a Past

Thu, 12 Jan 2017 14:18:19 +0000

An estimated 140,000 Chinese children were adopted by families in the United States, Europe and elsewhere after China opened to the world in the 1990s while maintaining a one-child policy to eliminate poverty. Many of the children, now young adults, and birth parents search for one another. Cathy Shufro describes the search of Yale graduate Jenna Cook for Yale Alumni Magazine. Cook studied Mandarin, volunteered at the orphanage where she was placed, posted notices on streets, arranged an interview with a Wuhan newspaper that attracted national attention and met with 50 families whose details matched her own. “Cook says the families she spoke with were shocked to find out that she had grown up thousands of miles from Wuhan,” Shufro notes. “Even well-educated professionals have told Cook that they knew little or nothing about the large numbers of children adopted abroad.” Cook did not find her birth parents. Though she has ended the active search, she is a graduate student in China and co-writes a free online guide for adopted children to find birth parents in China. – YaleGlobal A Yale graduate went to China looking for her birth parents, and she found 2000 families who were looking for their daughters After a long search for birth parents in China, a woman prepares an online manual to help others Cathy Shufro Cathy Shufro Other Yale Alumni Magazine United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 12 January 2017 Read the article. Cathy Shufro teaches writing at Yale University. Source url:  https://yalealumnimagazine.com/articles/4423-jenna-cook Rights:  Copyright 2015 Yale University. All rights reserved. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/re-imagining-kinship No [...]



China Groups Take Out Insurance Against Blocking of Foreign Deals

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 18:01:56 +0000

Insurance policies cover risk, and Chinese companies anticipate more protectionism in the United States and Europe and an increasingly uncertain market for foreign investment. Chinese analysts also expect delays and increased fees associated with regulatory reviews. New policies are designed to protect against blocked takeovers in other nations: “several insurance groups, led by Aon, are marketing products that compensate foreign bidders in full for the ‘reverse break-up’ fees they would have to pay a target company if the US regulator thwarted a deal,” reports Henry Sender for the Financial Times. Critics and government regulators in Europe and the United States eye proposed Chinese acquisitions, and the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States rejects some for national security reasons. In 2014, China accounted for about 20 percent of almost 150 transactions reviewed by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States. – YaleGlobal More protectionism expected, and China firms consider insurance policies for overseas acquisitions blocked for national security reasons The firms anticipate increasing protectionism Henry Sender Henry Sender Other Financial Times United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 12 January 2017 Read the article. Source url:  https://www.ft.com/content/8d088210-c804-11e6-8f29-9445cac8966f Rights:  Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2017. All rights reserved. No [...]



China Launches Freight Train to Britain

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 16:00:18 +0000

China started the new year by dispatching the country’s first freight train to the United Kingdom, part of a larger effort to stimulate global trade. The train will depart from the city of Yiwu, a major commodities center, traverse central Asia and continental Europe, and reach its destination in London after almost 12,000 kilometers. “The railway is a major strategic development to assist Xi Jinping's multi-billion dollar 'One Belt, One Road' strategy,” reports Louise Moon for the Telegraph. As the Chinese economy begins to cool down, Chinese politicians expect the strategy to establish corridors of trade both by land and sea. China is the second-largest importer for the United Kingdom, sending more than $62 billion of goods, while Britain exports about $26 billion to the Middle Kingdom. This Yiwu-London train may boost numbers for both nations, as it will approximately halve the current required transportation time by sea. – YaleGlobal The Chinese “One Belt, One Road” strategy is expanding its reach into Europe with a new, fast train to London The milestone is part of an effort to stimulate the Chinese economy Louise Moon Louise Moon Other The Telegraph United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 11 January 2017 Read the article. Source url:  http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/01/02/china-launches-freight-train-britain/ Rights:  © Telegraph Media Group Limited 2017 http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/seizing-opportunity-post-tpp-world http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/china-and-us-two-visions-one-collaboration No [...]



Argentina Omits Falkland Islands from Map; Online Uproar Swiftly Follows

Wed, 11 Jan 2017 15:52:15 +0000

Many Argentines were outraged when the Social Development Ministry of Argentina posted a New Year’s greeting on Twitter, and a map of the country failed to include Antarctica and the Falkland Islands, or Islas Malvinas, in Spanish. Veterans of the 1982 Falklands War, in which Argentina unsuccessfully attempted to claim sovereignty over the islands, were particularly upset. The incident coincides with veterans and nationalist groups protesting on January 3rd, a date that “marks the 184th anniversary of the British occupation of the archipelago,” reports El País. The ministry blamed the design department. The card also omitted Antarctica – another area of conflict for the two nations because portions of British claims to the ice sheet overlap with Argentine claims. While apologies have been issued, territorial claims continue to be politically treacherous terrain. Some politicians have warned that they will oppose bilateral treaties that benefit the United Kingdom in the Falkland Islands. – YaleGlobal An Argentinian ministry misses the Falkland Islands and Antarctica on a Twitter card, prompting nationalist fervor over territorial disputes with Britain Longstanding territorial disputes remain controversial Federico Rivas Molina Federico Rivas Molina Other El País SPAIN(ES) YaleGlobal Online 11 January 2017 Read the article. Source url:  http://elpais.com/elpais/2017/01/03/inenglish/1483439592_601244.html Rights:  © EDICIONES EL PAÍS S.L. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/assange-asylum-raises-south-americas-ire http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/why-okinawa-matters-japan-united-states-and-colonial-past No [...]



Are Chinese Enterprises Being Taxed to Death?

Tue, 10 Jan 2017 20:30:59 +0000

Chinese firms establish overseas branches to flee high taxes. One company spokesperson suggested that China’s taxes are 35 percent higher for manufacturers in China than the United States, and Zhang Jun, a professor of economics at Fudan University, analyzes the complaint for Project Syndicate. A strict interpretation suggests that China’s tax burden is 29 percent and 10 percent less than global average. Other calculations suggest that China’s tax revenues are not exorbitant. Many firms receive tax incentives, and taxes vary across the country. Zhang offers a reason for the perception of high taxes: “China collects more taxes from producers, and less from consumers, than most developed economies,” Zhang notes, and “more than 90% of all taxes and fees are paid by Chinese enterprises, while less than 10% are paid by individuals.” Tax evasion, government surcharges and fees, and rising land and labor costs are other challenges that squeeze company profits. Zhang urges a more transparent, straightforward tax system for China and cost containment to keep Chinese firms competitive. – YaleGlobal Chinese firms must contend with varying rates across industries and regions, as well as rising land and labor costs that squeeze company profits China collects the bulk of its taxes from producers Zhang Jun Zhang Jun Other Project Syndicate United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 10 January 2017 Read the article. Source url:  https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/how-high-china-tax-burden-by-zhang-jun-2017-01 Rights:  Rights:© 1995 – 2017 Project Syndicate No [...]



We Can’t Undo Globalization, But Can Improve It

Tue, 10 Jan 2017 18:28:47 +0000

Global flows of trade and investment add economic value, and dismantling systems that rely on globalization would reduce prosperity. “While the impulse to erect trade barriers is understandable given the pain experienced by workers in a range of industries and communities in recent years, it is not the way to create lasting growth and shared prosperity,” notes a Harvard Business Review article. “During the past decade, the United States was the world’s largest recipient of foreign direct investment, with nearly $2 trillion invested in a range of sectors, companies, and workers across the country.” Still, managers and politicians cannot ignore the costs of trade and globalization, and must support communities with transition. The authors recommend solutions: Job hunters should be willing to relocate. Companies should expand export and trade capability. Globalization is more digital in nature, and firms should explore opportunities. Retraining should be customized for fields and communities, and benefits should be portable across state lines. Expanding globalization’s opportunities, rather than limiting cross-border flows, would be the better approach to boosting prosperity. – YaleGlobal The path to growth and prosperity requires expanding globalization’s opportunities, rather than limiting cross-border flows Job hunters should relocate, and companies could expand export capability Gary Pinkus, James Manyika and Sree Ramaswamy Gary Pinkus, James Manyika and Sree Ramaswamy Other Harvard Business Review United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 10 January 2017 Read the article. Gary Pinkus is a managing partner for McKinsey in North America. James Manyika is the San Francisco-based director of the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), the business and economics research arm of McKinsey & Company. Sree Ramaswamy is a senior fellow at the McKinsey Global Institute. Source url:  https://hbr.org/2017/01/we-cant-undo-globalization-but-we-can-improve-it Rights:  Copyright © 2016 Harvard Business School Publishing. All rights reserved. No [...]



Don’t Bet on Enduring Republican Reset With Russia

Tue, 10 Jan 2017 18:09:08 +0000

Donald Trump blasted critics who reject his plans to improve US ties with Russia on Twitter: “Having a good relationship with Russia is a good thing, not a bad thing. Only ‘stupid’ people, or fools, would think that it is bad!” But Congress may not go along, including Republicans who worry about aggression in Georgia, Ukraine and Syria and criticized President Barack Obama for going too easy on Russia. Concerns intensified after US intelligence agencies reported that Russians intervened in the US presidential campaign with hacking and propaganda. “Russia policy therefore poses the first test of whether Republicans in Congress will bend to the wishes of their party’s leader in foreign affairs or pull him in a direction more consistent with his party’s principles,” writes Daniel Twining, counselor at the German Marshall Fund of the United States, a thinktank and foundation in Washington, DC. Twining concludes that Putin has little choice but to convince Russians that the country “confronts an implacable foe abroad and only a strong leader can defend the motherland.” – YaleGlobal For domestic politics, Russia’s President Putin may need rivalry with the US more than Trump as friend For domestic politics, Russia’s President Putin may need rivalry with the US more than Trump as friend WASHNGTON, DC: Donald Trump won’t be the first American president to “reset” relations with Russia following an assault on Western interests and values. In March 2009 President Barack Obama launched his own version of a reset – only seven months after Russia’s brazen invasion of Georgia, an ally of the United States that had been on track for NATO membership. Yet whereas Obama’s outreach was met with the approval of his own party, Trump’s ambitions have fractured a Republican national security establishment that condemns Obama for treating American adversaries with kid gloves and favors a tougher approach. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2017/twining0110-140px.jpg http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2017/twining0110-75px.jpg Daniel Twining Daniel Twining YaleGlobal YaleGlobal Online 10 January 2017 Not “’stupid’ people or fools”: US President-elect Donald Trump seeks closer ties with Moscow; Russian President Vladimir Putin with the nominee for Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, former CEO of ExxonMobil WASHNGTON, DC: Donald Trump won’t be the first American president to “reset” relations with Russia following an assault on Western interests and values. In March 2009 President Barack Obama launched his own version of a reset – only seven months after Russia’s brazen invasion of Georgia, an ally of the United States that had been on track for NATO membership. Yet whereas Obama’s outreach was met with the approval of his own party, Trump’s ambitions have fractured a Republican national security establishment that condemns Obama for treating American adversaries with kid gloves and favors a tougher approach.  Russia policy theref[...]



Historic Chance for Myanmar Peace Probably Scuttled

Mon, 09 Jan 2017 18:11:34 +0000

Hope is dwindling for an end to Myanmar’s ethnic conflict underway since 1947. An outbreak of violence in Rakhine State has been linked to Harakah al-Yaqin, reports Michele Penna, adding that the International Crisis Group has linked the trouble with hardships and discrimination suffered by the Rohingya. “Conflict is also dragging on in Kachin and Shan States, where the army is staging offensives against insurgents,” Penna reports. “Fighting is also eroding confidence in the leadership of Aung San Suu Kyi – who may not be the formal President, but is the de-facto leader of the government – both inside and outside the country….:” The international community demands full and equal citizenship rights for the Rohingya people, though control of security matters is with the armed forces and not the government. In the meantime, fighting and violence continue to flare in the northern sections of Myanmar. – YaleGlobal Ethnic violence continues in Myanmar, as the civilian government is wary of the armed forces, which retains control over security matters Rakhine has “the hallmarks of recent past tragedies – Rwanda, Darfur, Bosnia, Kosovo” Michele Penna Michele Penna Other Asia Sentinel HONGKONG(HK) YaleGlobal Online 9 January 2017 The omens are far from rosy for a February meeting scheduled as a step forward in ending Myanmar’s seven decades-long ethnic conflict. The first meeting, held in September 2016, was named after the historic Panglong Conference in 1947 at Panglong in the Shan States between ethnic minority leaders and Aung San, the head of the interim Burmese government. Before significant progress could be made, Aung San was assassinated. Troubling developments have come to the fore in recent months, beginning with renewed violence in Rakhine State, where about 145,000 people have been displaced by intercommunal violence since 2012. On Oct.9, assailants attacked three Border Guard Police posts in Maungdaw and Rathedaung townships, stealing 62 weapons, over 10,000 rounds of ammunition and killing nine policemen, according to the authorities. A report by the International Crisis Group linked the operation to the Harakah al-Yaqin and argued that the group has connections with the Rohingya diaspora in Saudi Arabia. “The emergence of this well-organized, apparently well-funded group is a game changer in the Myanmar government’s efforts to address the complex challenges in Rakhine State,” the authors wrote, noting that the development is directly related to the hardships and the discrimination suffered by the Rohingya community in recent years. The whole area is currently under lockdown and it is hard to verify information, but in their search for the attackers, security forces have deployed scorched-earth tactics against local civilians. A report by Amnesty International details allegations of ill-treatment, arbitrary detention and sexual violence, while both Amnesty International and Human Righst Watch reported the burning of as many as 1,500 buildings. And Rakhine is hardly the government’s only problem. Conflict is also dragging on in Kachin and Shan States, where the army is staging offensives[...]



To Confront North Korea, Talk First and Get Tough Later

Mon, 09 Jan 2017 15:46:34 +0000

North Korea borders China, South Korea and Russia, respectively the world’s second, eleventh and twelfth largest economies, and the nation is a few hundred miles away from Japan, third largest economy. North Korea’s nuclear program and erratic leadership could trigger war and economic crisis. The nation is signaling that its intercontinental ballistic missile program is a priority, explains William J. Perry, former US defense secretary, in an essay for the Washington Post, but not as high as the goals of “preserving the Kim dynasty, gaining international respect and improving their economy.” Stopping the ICBM program requires careful diplomacy. “We lost the opportunity to negotiate with a non-nuclear North Korea when we cut off negotiations in 2001, before it had a nuclear arsenal,” Perry notes. “The most we can reasonably expect today is an agreement that lowers the dangers of that arsenal. The goals would be an agreement with Pyongyang to not export nuclear technology, to conduct no further nuclear testing and to conduct no further ICBM testing.” If diplomacy fails, Perry adds, additional international sanctions could be applied as well as disruption of missile tests. – YaleGlobal Diplomacy required: North Korea develops an ICBM program, but bigger priorities are protecting Kim dynasty, gaining international respect and improving economy ICBM program under development is lower priority than preserving the Kim regime William J. Perry William J. Perry Other The Washington Post United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 9 January 2017 Read the article. William J. Perry, founder of the William J. Perry Project on the threat of nuclear weapons, was U.S. defense secretary from 1994 to 1997. Source url:  https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/to-confront-north-korea-talk-first-and-get-tough-later/2017/01/06/9334aee4-d451-11e6-9cb0-54ab630851e8_story.html?utm_term=.a4d3fa396138 Rights:  © 1996-2017 The Washington Post http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/unpalatable-choices-facing-north-koreas-nuclear-reality http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/missing-big-picture-us-policy-north-korea-could-bring-disaster No [...]



The Hopes for Peace and Palestinian Statehood Fade Away

Fri, 06 Jan 2017 15:37:16 +0000

Conflicts that linger for decades are costly in many ways and threaten security and reduce trust for all concerned. The Economist reports on the speech by US Secretary of State John Kerry on the ongoing failure to end the “stubborn struggle” between Israel and Palestine. Kerry described the Netanyahu administration as “the most right-wing in Israeli history” and questioned how a hardline agenda might bring peace. The Economist explains that “the text was in line with long-held American policy that regards settlements as illegitimate and an obstacle to peace” and the United States had just approved a record $38 billion military aid package for Israel, but for the Netanyahu government, “it was an unforgivable act of betrayal by the Obama administration.” Netanyahu claims to support the two-state solution and blames failed negotiations on Palestinian leaders, but members of his party support the settlements. An attempt by Israel to annex those areas would raise alarm for the region and the international community. – YaleGlobal Israel expects the United States to shield it from criticism over long struggle with Palestinians; expanding illegal settlements would raise international alarm Israel counts on the United States to shield it from criticism Other The Economist United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 6 January 2017 Read the article. Source url:  http://www.economist.com/news/middle-east-and-africa/21712972-hope-peace-and-palestinian-statehood-fade-away Rights:  Copyright © The Economist Newspaper Limited 2017. All rights reserved. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/alternative-boycotts-or-divestment-israel http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/demographics-define-israeli-palestinian-future http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/palestinian-agreement-unity-government-troubles-israel-us No [...]



Factory Farming Blamed for Massive Bird Flu Outbreak: Experts

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 17:03:08 +0000

A highly pathogenic form of avian flu was detected in South Korea in November, and experts suggest that crowded conditions in industrial poultry farms have accelerated the spread of disease. “While the government has yet to offer clear reason for the worsening situation, casting the blame on migratory birds, experts pointed out that the battery cage-facilities at poultry farms and stockbreeding farmhouses have scaled up the damage,” reports Kim Da-sol for the Korean Herald. “Hens spend their entire lives in a sheet of A4 paper-sized cage with dust, ammonia gas and stink.” Proponents of industrial-scale farming insist such methods save money. More than 30 million birds, 70 percent egg-laying hens, have been killed in South Korea to control the spread of disease. Animal rights and health advocates urge regulations for the farms and better conditions for the animals. One researcher, quoted in the article, suggested that “it would be strange if the virus does not spread in such a filthy environment.”- YaleGlobal Animal rights activists and health researchers demand more regulations for industrial-scale poultry farms to prevent the spread of avian flu Crowded conditions for poultry accelerate the spread of disease Kim Da-sol Kim Da-sol Other The Korea Herald South Korea (KR) YaleGlobal Online 6 January 2017 Read the article. Source url:  http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20170105000661 Rights:  All materials contained on the Herald website are protected by South Korean Copyright Law and may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, displayed, published or broadcast without the prior written permission of Herald Corporation, or in the case of third party materials, the owner of that content. No [...]



Alaska Airport Is a Big Link for the Global Supply Chain

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 17:02:34 +0000

Alaska is sparsely populated with about 750,000 people. Still, the state’s largest city has emerged as a vital link along the global supply chain, and the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport takes full advantage of being within 10 hours by air to 90 percent of the industrialized world. The subarctic airport ranks fourth in the world for cargo and is a “natural place for refueling,” explains Alaskan journalist Will Swagel. “Some of the largest cargo planes have the range to fly non-stop from China to the US heartland without stopping. But more fuel means less cargo in their holds.” Air transport is on the rise – essential for the most sensitive, expensive or perishable goods – and represents about 1 percent of world trade by volume, 35 percent by value. Challenges for the airport include security, shifts in manufacturing centers and protectionist leanings that could put the brakes on cross-border trade. – YaleGlobal The subarctic airport in Anchorage airport is a natural place for refueling and ranks fourth in world for air cargo The subarctic airport in Anchorage airport is a natural place for refueling and ranks fourth in world for air cargo SITKA, ALASKA: Millions of consumers around the world who use smartphones and other electronic devices may not have heard of the subarctic Alaska city of Anchorage or its sprawling airfield. Every day, wide-body cargo jets with international shipments land to top off fuel tanks. The international airport is not exactly halfway between Beijing and New York, but close enough to be a natural place for refueling. Some of the largest cargo planes have the range to fly non-stop from China to the US heartland without stopping. But more fuel means less cargo in their holds. With more cargo comes higher revenues and the need to refuel. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2017/swagel0105-140px.png http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2017/swagel0105-75px.png Will Swagel Will Swagel YaleGlobal YaleGlobal Online 5 January 2017 Air trade: The Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska, top, ranks fourth in the world for cargo, and is an ideal stop for planes headed to or from Shanghai and other Asian airports SITKA, ALASKA: Millions of consumers around the world who enjoy smartphones and other electronic devices may not have heard of the subarctic city of Anchorage or its sprawling airfield. Every day, wide-body cargo jets with international shipments land to top off fuel tanks. The international airport is not exactly halfway between Beijing and New York, but close enough to be a natural place for refueling. Some of the largest cargo planes have the range to fly non-stop from China to the US heartland without stopping. But more fuel means less cargo in their holds. With more cargo comes higher revenues and the need to refuel. Anchorage pencils out the best, and the airport’s administrators boast that they are less t[...]



Obama: Reaching Out to Adversaries, Alienating Allies

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 14:52:33 +0000

Following the US abstention from a UN Security Council vote on Israeli settlements and Secretary of State John Kerry’s speech lambasting the policy, President Barack Obama’s foreign policy toward allies has been called into question. Uri Friedman writes in The Atlantic that Obama ran on a platform of embracing US allies as well as extending an open hand to adversarial nations such as Cuba and Iran. During his presidency, he criticized allies like Israel and Saudi Arabia when values diverged. The criticism, accompanied by clear commitment to maintaining the alliances, did not bring countries closer and instead Israel and the Philippines have balked and pushed back. President-elect Donald Trump has also criticized US allies and has not indicated whether the alliances will be maintained. Friedman categorizes Obama’s criticism as centered on shared values and Trump’s on the bottom line. The consequences of each man’s foreign policy and true assessments may require decades. – YaleGlobal Obama leaves mixed foreign policy, marked by criticism of US allies while maintaining his support for those nations Obama’s criticism of allies did not appear to shape values in Israel or the Philippines Uri Friedman Uri Friedman Other The Atlantic United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 5 January 2017 Read the article. Uri Friedman is a staff writer at The Atlantic, where he covers global affairs. Source url:  https://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/12/obama-israel-kerry-allies/511796/ Rights:  Copyright © 2017 by The Atlantic Monthly Group. All Rights Reserved. No [...]



More Chinese Are Sending Younger Children to Schools in US

Thu, 05 Jan 2017 14:15:44 +0000

Many Chinese parents regard US universities as a pinnacle in education, and the number of Chinese sending children to study in US elementary schools is rising. The numbers are still relatively small – 2450 elementary students and just over 46,000 high school students in 2015. Parents interviewed by Miriam Jordan for the article in the Wall Street Journal express appreciation for independent thinking, less pressure and numerous opportunities including studies in English from the start. Some students stay with host families arranged by agencies. Some Chinese families purchase property, often in university towns, Jordan explains. “Others have invested money in infrastructure projects, under a federal program known as EB-5, which makes them eligible for U.S. permanent residency in a few years.” One sixth-grade teacher in California describes a Chinese student as a “gift” for exposing her class to another culture, and his fellow students praise his courage for attending school so far from home. – YaleGlobal The number of Chinse parents sending their children to US elementary schools is rising as many appreciate independent thinking and less pressure Parents appreciate the independent thinking and opportunities Miriam Jordan Miriam Jordan Other The Wall Street Journal United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 5 January 2017 LAGUNA NIGUEL, Calif. – When Ken Yan’s parents were contemplating his future, they decided the best option for the 11-year-old was to send him 7,000 miles away from his home in China to Southern California. Ken didn’t speak English, and he would need to live with a host family in the U.S. he had never met. But the Yans felt it was all worth it. In their quest for a U.S. education, more Chinese families are sending their children to America – and at younger ages. The number of Chinese students at elementary schools surged from 500 in 2011 to 2,450 in 2015, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Over the same period, the number of Chinese nationals attending secondary schools in the U.S. jumped from 17,914 to 46,028. Those numbers pale compared with the tens of thousands of Chinese students enrolled at U.S. universities, but are expected to soar in the next few years. “It’s an obvious trend,” said Emily Li, an educational consultant in Irvine, Calif. who specializes in the Chinese market. “When I came in 2004, there were mainly students like me attending graduate school. A few years later, there are college students. Then high-school students. And now there are junior high and elementary school students coming.” In late August, Ken Yan left his home, family and friends in Jiangxi province for California, where his parents had found the host family to take care of him and a new school to educate him. “The first day at the school was hard,” said the boy. “I tell my mom I want to go to China.” Ken’s father, Sam Yan, said that the “U.S. education is better.” [...]



Rethinking Labor Mobility

Wed, 04 Jan 2017 19:30:17 +0000

Trade, automation and other facets of globalization have eliminated some careers. One solution is for government to provide an unconditional basic income, but that may not eliminate resentment. Historian Harold James examines how artisans recovered after losing work during the Industrial Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries: “many displaced workers emigrated – often long distances across oceans – to places where they could take on new forms of work, and even prosper.” During the 20th century, governments managed disruptions with populist policies including subsidies, price protections and other protections that shielded the agriculture industries of Europe and the United States. James points out that mobility requires skills and initiative. He urges workers “to embrace adaptability and flexibility, rather than succumb to resentment and misery,” and concludes that modern mobility is no longer limited to physical relocation but encompasses social and psychological forms, too. – YaleGlobal Mobility – physical relocation and new social and psychological mindsets – helps individual workers cope with the disruptions of globalization Mobility is not simply relocating, and requires new social and psychological mindsets Harold James Harold James Other Project Syndicate United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 4 January 2017 Read the article. Harold James is Professor of History and International Affairs at Princeton University and a senior fellow at the Center for International Governance Innovation. A specialist on German economic history and on globalization, he is a co-author of the new book The Euro and The Battle of Ideas, and the author of The Creation and Destruction of Value: The Globalization Cycle, Krupp: A History of the Legendary German Firm, and Making the European Monetary Union.   Source url:  https://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/displaced-workers-globalization-mobility-by-harold-james-2017-01 Rights:  © 1995 – 2017 Project Syndicate No [...]



Globalization Has Done a Lot of Great Things for Americans

Wed, 04 Jan 2017 16:52:07 +0000

Globalization has delivered many benefits to those living in the United States and elsewhere around the globe: Panos Mourdoukoutas offers a quick summary: “It has helped America win the war on communism. It has freed Americans from government regulations and militant unions. It has assigned America the role of the world’s best innovator. It has helped America sustain its lead as the world’s largest economy.” Mourdoukoutas goes on to add that globalization provides more product choice at lower prices, while industries including telecommunications and utilities rely on government regulations to evade global competition. Globalization rewards individuals and nations with a comparative advantage. Those who fear competition and change resist global connections and innovation. – YaleGlobal By rewarding countries and individuals with comparative advantage, globalization and new connections spur low prices and innovation Benefits include innovation and low prices Panos Mourdoukoutas Panos Mourdoukoutas Other Forbes United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 4 January 2017 Read the article. Panos Mourdoukoutas is professor and chair of the Department of Economics at LIU Post in New York. He also teaches at Columbia University. He is the author of books and has also published articles in professional journals and magazines, including Barron’s, The New York Times, Japan Times, Newsday, Plain Dealer, Edge Singapore, European Management Review, Management International Review, and Journal of Risk and Insurance. Source url:  http://www.forbes.com/sites/panosmourdoukoutas/2017/01/03/globalization-has-done-many-great-things-for-americans/#28ad6a64b197 Rights:  © 2017 Forbes Media LLC. All Rights Reserved. No [...]



Modern Servitude: Romanian Badante Care for Elders in Italy

Tue, 03 Jan 2017 21:56:17 +0000

As Europe confronts the challenges of an aging population, workers from relatively poor countries relocate to wealthier communities to provide care. “Badante” is an Italian term for caregiver that also refers to foreign women, especially the Romanians who leave home and family to work long hours for low pay in Italy. The women “voluntarily enter this modern version of servitude, caring for the elderly, many of whom might otherwise be neglected,” explains journalist Raluca Besliu. Such arrangements persist because of demographic differences among countries, strained national budgets, and uneven coverage of long-term care and home health care for the elderly. The European Union allows cross-border labor mobility, but regulations cannot contain the resentment. Many Romanian caregivers may not feel welcomed in Italy, but they also do not want to return to their homeland and limited opportunities. – YaleGlobal Despite difficult conditions, poor Romanian women relocate to care for Italy’s aging population Despite difficult conditions, poor Romanian women relocate to care for Italy’s aging population MILANO: In Europe, support is dwindling for a swelling elderly population, and immigrants, often with little qualification, have emerged as the main line of defense http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2017/besliu0103-140px.jpg http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/sites/default/files/images/2017/besliu0103-75px.jpg Raluca Besliu Raluca Besliu YaleGlobal United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 3 January 2017 Age-old dilemma: As Europe struggles with aging populations, women leave Eastern Europe to provide care for the elderly in Italy, top; in Romania, the town of Concesti tries to restore a depleted workforce by offering homes to families fleeing abuse MILANO: In Europe, support is dwindling for a swelling elderly population, and immigrants, often with little qualification, have emerged as the main line of defense against a catastrophe. Positions in Italy draw Romanian caregivers like Vasilica Baciu. For years, she took care of an elderly Italian woman who suffered from paralytic poliomyelitis and kidney failure by providing daily dialysis treatments and cleaning the woman’s infected legs. Baciu lacked basic training, but the patient’s doctor praised her care. A native of Romania, Baciu works as a badante, an Italian term for caregiver that gradually came to reference foreign women, mainly Romanians and Moldovans. Many women leave small villages for their first trips abroad to take on the intensive work at low wages. Most are high-school graduates. Reliance on home care is expanding in Europe, with varying coverage, costs and regulations. Europe’s population is aging – coupled with rising costs fo[...]



Algorithms Are Making US Small-Minded

Tue, 03 Jan 2017 20:37:49 +0000

Computer programs tackle requests and problems with sets of rules and algorithms provided by humans, but the goal to please audiences may limit creativity and lead to bland predictability. “The ubiquity of incredibly powerful algorithms designed to reinforce our interests also ensures that we see little of what’s new, different and unfamiliar,” writes Sydney Finkelstein for BBC News. “The very things that are at the heart of learning, understanding and innovation. Rather than taking us out of our comfort zone, the digital revolution is enabling each of us to live happily in our own worlds, and in the process closing down opportunities for originality, spontaneity and learning.” The algorithms place users on narrow tracks when shopping, reading news, dating, hiring and more. Finkelstein suggests that this leads to greater polarization and angst, whereas open-mindedness contributes to better decisions. He urges people to move beyond the algorithms’ choices and explore new opinions, food, books, friends and more. Embracing change with new approaches and skills prepares individuals for an unpredictable future. – YaleGlobal Life is mapped out but not how we assume – predictive algorithms in shopping, news and other programs narrow perspectives and ultimately choices Computer programs try to please but put users on narrow paths Sydney Finkelstein Sydney Finkelstein Other BBC News United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 3 January 2017 Read the article. Sydney Finkelstein is the Steven Roth Professor of Management and director of the Leadership Center at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. His latest book is Superbosses: How Exceptional Leaders Manage the Flow of Talent (Portfolio/Penguin, 2016). Source url:  http://www.bbc.com/capital/story/20161212-algorithms-are-making-us-small-minded Rights:  Copyright © 2016 BBC. No [...]



To Save Global Liberalism, Time to Look Beyond Government

Tue, 03 Jan 2017 19:52:38 +0000

Governments confront numerous challenges in 2017, ranging from a struggle to grow economies and create jobs to combatting terrorism, controlling refugees fleeing from terrorism and managing climate-related disasters. China, Russia and the United States jockey for power on the global stage. “But it’s precisely because governments are distracted or incapacitated that there is a role for non-state actors,” explains Peter Westmacott, former British ambassador to the United States and a fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School. “America always has a wealth of talented people waiting in the wings, or in thinktanks, while a president of the opposing party occupies the White House. Out of office, they undertake specialist missions, sometimes solo and sometimes in bipartisan groups, to address the big foreign and security policy issues of the day.” He urges those who embrace liberty, equality and a philosophy of liberalism to connect globally. Think tanks, universities, associations and ordinary people – can nurture global connections and resist nationalism, fear and populism. – YaleGlobal Governments may be flailing with global cooperation and governance, but think tanks and individuals should still forge global connections Global groups cannot wait for governments to solve problems Peter Westmacott Peter Westmacott Other The Guardian United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 3 January 2017 Read the article. Peter Westmacott was British ambassador to the United States from 2012 to 2016 and was previously ambassador to France. He is a fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School. Source url:  https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/jan/02/save-global-liberalism-look-beyond-government Rights:  © 2017 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. No [...]



Emerging Market Investors Prepare to Buckle Up for 2017

Mon, 02 Jan 2017 14:14:24 +0000

Emerging markets are growing, lifted by rising commodity prices and foreign investment. However, a rising dollar, higher interest rates and protectionist policies as promised from developed countries will pose challenges. “US relations with China will cause EM [emerging markets] much angst,” write Roger Blitz and Elaine Moore for Financial Times. They add that countries that have diversified economies and enacted structural reforms are better prepared to withstand new policies from developed countries. The markets anticipate rising interest rates, already started by the US Federal Reserve which could be followed by Europe and Japan as well. Countries dependent on foreign investment like South Africa and Turkey could be at risk. Countries like Indonesia and India can be expected to respond to ongoing pressures with capital controls. – YaleGlobal Sentiment towards emerging markets is better than a year ago, but a rising dollar and protectionist policies could pose a threat Worries include rising interest rates and protectionist policies from developed nations Roger Blitz and Elaine Moore Roger Blitz and Elaine Moore Other Financial Times United Kingdom (GB) YaleGlobal Online 2 January 2017 Read the article. Source url:  https://www.ft.com/content/ed112692-c2c0-11e6-9bca-2b93a6856354 Rights:  Copyright The Financial Times Limited 2016. No [...]



Google, Facebook, and Microsoft Are Remaking Themselves Around AI

Fri, 30 Dec 2016 15:53:04 +0000

Universities and corporations are rapidly developing artificial intelligence with teams of researchers. The research coincides with cloud computing, all designed to allow businesses to join, contribute and build their own applications and products. A “team inside Google’s cloud computing operation [is] building online services that any coder or company can use to build their own AI,” explains Cade Metz for Wired. “This new Cloud Machine Learning Group is the latest example of AI not only re-shaping the technology that Google uses, but also changing how the company organizes and operates its business.” Google, Microsoft, Tesla, Amazon, Twitter and other firms are adding to an array of new cloud services with image and speech recognition, translations, chatbots, data analysis, security and more. Coding and training artificial intelligence requires skills in “deep neural networking.” The companies train staff to manipulate large data banks and be open for all possibilities on the AI frontier. – YaleGlobal University and corporate research groups collaborate and rapidly develop an array of artificial-intelligence products and capabilities as new cloud services Artificial intelligence is the new way of doing business Cade Metz Cade Metz Other Wired United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 30 December 2016 Read the article. Source url:  https://www.wired.com/2016/11/google-facebook-microsoft-remaking-around-ai/ Rights:  The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. No [...]



A New Tool to Fight Genocide

Wed, 28 Dec 2016 14:46:40 +0000

Traditional methods for combatting crimes against community include United Nations peacekeeping efforts, the International Criminal Court and humanitarian aid. Ongoing prevalence of civil war and genocide in central and eastern Africa, however, indicates that the world must seek new and more effective solutions. Restrictions on money laundering may be the best way to “address the root causes of mass atrocities: the incentives for officials and their collaborators to use violence and authoritarian rule to maintain or gain power,” reports Foreign Affairs. When laundering money – say, transforming profits from smuggling oil, precious minerals and wildlife into assets like real estate – kleptocrats prefer using the US dollar. The United States could easily expand the purview of existing money laundering measures as detailed under the Patriot Act to include human rights protection in Africa. – YaleGlobal US efforts to combat money laundering from kleptocrats in central and eastern Africa could be cost-effective way to protect human rights Banking regulations could be tweaked to save dollars and lives John Prendergast and Brad Brooks-Rubin John Prendergast and Brad Brooks-Rubin Other Foreign Affairs United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 29 December 2016 Read the article. John Prendergast is founding director of the Enough Project. Brad Brooks-Rubin is director of policy and senior counsel for the Enough Project. Source url:  https://www.foreignaffairs.com/articles/central-africa/2016-12-15/new-tool-fight-genocide Rights:  ©2016 Council on Foreign Relations, Inc. All Rights Reserved. http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/domino-effect http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/pentagon-said-it-killed-islamist-militants-somalia-turns-out-they-were-allies No [...]



Ignoring Climate Change Just Got More Expensive

Tue, 27 Dec 2016 13:36:09 +0000

The costs of climate change – maintaining and insuring infrastructure, industry preparation, property damages and losses – are climbing. William Nordhaus of Yale University has updated his model for studying the effects of climate change on the global economy in an “era of minimal climate policies.” In short, the world is not doing enough to stem or prepare for climate change. “Even after adjusting for uncertainty, he writes, there is ‘virtually no chance’ that nations will prevent the world from warming more than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit), the upper bound for avoiding cascading catastrophes,” writes Eric Roston about Nordhaus’s work. “Here’s why the research is so consequential. DICE is one of three major ‘integrated assessment models’ used by governments and the private sector to estimate the cost, in today’s dollars, of the damage climate change will cause. Comments of the incoming Trump transition suggest a disdain for climate science, modeling and estimates that aid in preparation, but as Roston concludes, ignoring data will put the United States behind the rest of the world in terms of research and won’t make the warming world go away. – YaleGlobal William Nordhaus of Yale, a leading economist, looks at what the world is doing to slow global warming – his conclusion is not much The world is not doing enough to prepare Eric Roston Eric Roston Other Bloomberg United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 28 December 2016 Read the article. Source url:  https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-12-23/ignoring-climate-change-just-got-more-expensive Rights:  ©2016 Bloomberg L.P. All Rights Reserved No [...]



Chaos Theory of Donald Trump: Sowing Confusion Through Tweets

Mon, 26 Dec 2016 14:55:54 +0000

US President-elect Donald Trump follows a pattern, confounding global media and world leaders with provocative statements on Twitter, at rallies or during television programs. His staff then attempts to reassure the public with interpretations and insistence that social media messages do not reflect official policy. “But nothing has created more consternation for many foreign policy experts than Trump’s assertion Thursday on Twitter that the country should ‘greatly strengthen and expand’ its nuclear capability,” write John Wagner and Abby Phillip. Trump supporters suggest the new style is more transparent, that the world must adjust to them. Others question if the president-elect understands the issues he is writing about. They describe the communication style as “confusing” and “governance by chaos.” A former assistant secretary of defense for public affairs suggests there can be benefits in strategic unpredictability and disruptions, but not in erratic behavior when global challenges require cooperation. US officials and global leaders alike have little choice but to study the patterns and determine how they might respond to future crises. – YaleGlobal Governance by chaos? Trump suggests that the US should ‘greatly strengthen and expand’ nuclear capability and rest of the world tries to interpret the meaning US officials and global leaders must study the patterns to determine their own responses to crises John Wagner and Abby Phillip John Wagner and Abby Phillip Other The Washington Post United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 27 December 2016 Read the article. John Wagner and Abby Phillip are reporters for the Washington Post. Read about the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons from the US State Department. “It entered into force in 1970, and 190 states have subscribed.... The basic bargain at the core of the NPT is sound: Countries with nuclear weapons will move towards disarmament; countries without nuclear weapons will not acquire them; and all countries can access peaceful nuclear technology.” Source url:  https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/the-chaos-theory-of-donald-trump-sowing-confusion-through-tweets/2016/12/23/11e1315c-c928-11e6-85b5-76616a33048d_story.html?utm_term=.60d882828a68 Rights:  © 1996-2016 The Washington Post No [...]



The US: A Country That Can Be Ignored

Mon, 26 Dec 2016 13:56:52 +0000

When the United States or other powers withdraw from world affairs, other nations hurry to fill voids and build influence. “President Vladimir Putin's Russia has been at the forefront of the effort,” explains Leonid Bershidsky. “In the latest development, on Tuesday, the foreign and defense ministers of Russia, Iran and Turkey met in Moscow to discuss a plan for Syria.” Russia and the United States discuss issues, and the statement invited other countries with “influence on the ground to join,” but little comes out of the discussions. Likewise, China ignores US demands about the South China Sea, and British voters ignored warnings against leaving the European Union. Bershidsky blames Obama, and suggests that the rest of the world responds when the United States firmly acts on values-based foreign policy. “Breaking the values mold and moving to transactional diplomacy isn't an easy path, however,” Bershidsky concludes. “It requires a clear understanding of U.S. business and military interests in every part of the world and of what the U.S. is willing to give up to secure these interests.” – YaleGlobal The US is withdrawing from world affairs and may move toward transactional diplomacy, but the foreign policy community may not be prepared US may be moving toward transactional diplomacy, and its foreign-policy community is ill-prepared Leonid Bershidsky Leonid Bershidsky Other Bloomberg United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 27 December 2016 Read the article. Leonid Bershidsky is a Bloomberg View columnist. He was the founding editor of the Russian business daily Vedomosti and founded the opinion website Slon.ru. Source url:  https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2016-12-21/the-u-s-is-now-a-country-that-can-be-ignored Rights:  ©2016 Bloomberg L.P. All Rights Reserved No [...]



Analysis: Understanding the UN Resolution on Israeli Settlements: What Are the Immediate Ramifications?

Sat, 24 Dec 2016 17:58:10 +0000

The United States abstained at the UN Security Council, allowing a resolution to move forward on opposing Israeli settlements illegal under international law. “The Fourth Geneva Convention bans nations from the moving of populations into and the establishing of settlements in the territory of another nation won in war,” explains Barak Ravid for Haaretz. For now, the “resolution is a form of diplomatic message to Israel and sets the international consensus on the settlements and further isolates Israel with regard to this issue.” Ravid analyzes precedent and implications. The resolution is not the first on Israeli settlement, but it could spur action by the International Criminal Court. Other US presidents besides Barack Obama have allowed multiple resolutions on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict to proceed. Obama did veto a resolution on settlements in 2011. Obama is not alone in using the transition period between administrations to allow foreign policy measures to move forward. The Trump administration could overturn the resolution, but would require support from other nations. Some US lawmakers urge cutting US funding for the UN, but that would reduce US influence. – YaleGlobal The US abstained, and it won’t be easy for the Trump administration to overturn UN Security Council resolution on Israeli settlements – a guide US abstention isolates Israel and Netanyahu Barak Ravid Barak Ravid Other Haaretz ISRAEL(IL) YaleGlobal Online 26 December 2016 Read the article. Barak Ravid is the diplomatic correspondent for Haaretz newspaper. He joined Haaretz in April 2007, covering the prime minister's Office, the Foreign Ministry and the Ministry of Defense, dealing with issues such as US-Israeli relations, EU-Israeli relations and the peace process. Source url:  http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/.premium-1.761049 Rights:  © HAARETZ DAILY NEWSPAPER LTD. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED http://yaleglobal.yale.edu/content/alternative-boycotts-or-divestment-israel No [...]



Crackdown in Turkey Threatens a Haven of Gender Equality Built by the Kurds

Thu, 22 Dec 2016 16:36:24 +0000

Gender equality, an elusive goal for most nations, is commonly enjoyed in Kurdish towns in Turkey. Women serve alongside men in Kurdish guerrilla units, and governmental decisions concerning women are made by a panel composed solely of women. The gender equality espoused by the Kurds and the pro-Kurdish HDP party have had an impact across the country, even in religious Muslim areas of western Turkey. Yet after a failed coup over the summer, Turkey’s government has cracked down on political opponents and arrested several prominent Kurdish leaders. The crackdown also threatens the HDP’s carefully constructed gender equality, with government agents closing women’s centers and restoring privileges for domestic abusers. The Kurds’ admirable gender equality serves a reminder of the complex political climate in Turkey: The militant Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, is designated a terrorist organization by Europe, the United States and Turkey, but its progressive stance on women makes western opposition more complicated. – YaleGlobal Kurdish political parties in Turkey practice gender equality; Erdogan’s crackdown on opponents, chief among them the Kurds, threatens status of women The West does not view the Kurds as terrorists Rod Nordland Rod Nordland Other The New York Times United States (US) YaleGlobal Online 26 December 2016 26 December 2016 Read the article. Source url:  http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/07/world/middleeast/turkey-kurds-womens-rights.html Rights:  © 2016 The New York Times Company No [...]