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New DDoS record . (Security)
New DDoS record set at 1.3 Tbps Thanks to Memcached servers .






ODESK YOUR EXAM S ONLINE (Development)
You can try all your exams before the official exam, such as cisco, java, language etc...













Open Source Licenses (Security)
Licenses Open source licenses grant permission to everyone to use, modify, and share licensed software for any purpose, subject to conditions preserving the provenance and openness of the software. The following licenses are arranged from one with the strongest of these conditions (GNU AGPLv3) to one with no conditions (Unlicense). GNU AGPLv3 Permissions of this strongest copyleft license are conditioned on making available complete source code of licensed works and modifications, which include larger works using a licensed work, under the same license. Copyright and license notices must be preserved. Contributors provide an express grant of patent rights. When a modified version is used to provide a service over a network, the complete source code of the modified version must be made available. GNU GPLv3 Permissions of this strong copyleft license are conditioned on making available complete source code of licensed works and modifications, which include larger works using a licensed work, under the same license. Copyright and license notices must be preserved. Contributors provide an express grant of patent rights. GNU LGPLv3 Permissions of this copyleft license are conditioned on making available complete source code of licensed works and modifications under the same license or the GNU GPLv3. Copyright and license notices must be preserved. Contributors provide an express grant of patent rights. However, a larger work using the licensed work through interfaces provided by the licensed work may be distributed under different terms and without source code for the larger work. Mozilla Public License 2.0 Permissions of this weak copyleft license are conditioned on making available source code of licensed files and modifications of those files under the same license (or in certain cases, one of the GNU licenses). Copyright and license notices must be preserved. Contributors provide an express grant of patent rights. However, a larger work using the licensed work may be distributed under different terms and without source code for files added in the larger work. Apache License 2.0 A permissive license whose main conditions require preservation of copyright and license notices. Contributors provide an express grant of patent rights. Licensed works, modifications, and larger works may be distributed under different terms and without source code. MIT License A short and simple permissive license with conditions only requiring preservation of copyright and license notices. Licensed works, modifications, and larger works may be distributed under different terms and without source code. The Unlicense A license with no conditions whatsoever which dedicates works to the public domain. Unlicensed works, modifications, and larger works may be distributed under different terms and without source code. The above licenses represent the entire spectrum of open source licenses, from highly protective to unconditional. One of these should work for most new open source projects. Many other open source licenses exist, including older versions of and close substitutes for some of the above.



10 strange novels of the British countryside (Misc)
he best creepy stories take place against the creepy backdrop of the British countryside. Here are ten of our favourites... From the moors to the mountains, from gnarled woods to deserted beaches, Britain has spectacular countryside. But it's also, in the right literary hands, very creepy countryside. So many of the best UK novels make use of that strange, unsettling quality of the British landscape, and our relationship with it. Spooky houses, dangerous relationships, ancient folk figures or alien invaders - here's a look at ten novels that use the countryside to connect us to a time and a place, and to make us realise that it's not all sweet tweeting birdies and green rolling hills in Britain. There's something dark at the heart of our landscape, and these writers know how to show it: 1. On The Black Hill by Bruce Chatwin On the border between Wales and England lies a farm called The Vision. Twins Lewis and Benjamin Jones live there, working the land, sleeping in the same double bed, and this book is consumed by their relationship to the land and to each other. From the beginning of the twentieth century, through the span of their lives, there is the sense that they are part of each other and of the farm in a way that cannot be explained in words. Bruce Chatwin was a great travel writer, visiting places such as Australia and Patagonia and imbuing a sense of their mysteries to the reader. He did the same with the Welsh borders in this book. It reminds us of what is being lost as time moves on, and how unquantifiable an understanding of the land is. 2. Rawblood by Catriona Ward Set in a gothic house in the middle of Dartmoor, with a ghost that haunts it through the years, turning those who see it mad: Rawblood is a brilliant throwback to all those stories about generational families with their terrible secrets, and things that go bump in the night. But it delves deeper into the whys of these strange events, and has a great understanding of the characters of the Villarca family that live there. The west-country moors have been the setting for some of the most memorable of unsettling stories in British literature (see the book just below for another one); there's something about that unconquerable space that threatens us, even now. Rawblood is a continuation of our long-standing fear of the bleak expanse of the wide-open, so far from shelter or from normality, and it's brilliant. 3. An English Ghost Story by Kim Newman So the Naremores, a family with a few problems, move into their new home miles from the nearest town after a particularly rash decision to purchase, and come to realise they're not alone. It's not a new idea, but old ideas done well can be just as fun. Of course there are ghosts in the spooky house in the middle of nowhere. But what I love about Newman's ghost story is that the relationship the spirits have with the new owners of the Hollow, a big house in Somerset surrounded by fruit trees and hedgerows; from bounteous beginnings to the big freeze, everything follows the seasons to suggest that the ghosts are not abominations, but part of nature too. I love that idea. 4. Jamaica Inn by Daphne Du Maurier Du Maurier wrote a number of books that used their west-country setting to maximum effect, and I think Jamaica Inn is the spookiest of them, being a tale of terrible happenings on Bodmin Moor, and of the hard, desperate men and women who live there. The book begins with one of the great descriptions of English weather at its worst. It's two o'clock in the afternoon in late November and a clammy mist has settled over the moor as our heroine journeys towards the inn in a rickety carriage that isn't keeping out the damp in the least. She's shivering, and heading towards an unwelcoming inn, and an amoral uncle who will frighten and abuse her. Brrrrrrrr. 5. Puffbal[...]









Think you're not being tracked? Now websites turn to audio fingerprinting to follow you (Misc)
New research into web-tracking techniques has found some websites using audio fingerprinting for identifying and monitoring web users. During a scan of one million websites, researchers at Princeton University have found that a number of them use the AudioContext API to identify an audio signal that reveals a unique browser and device combination. "Audio signals processed on different machines or browsers may have slight differences due to hardware or software differences between the machines, while the same combination of machine and browser will produce the same output," the researchers explain. The method doesn't require access to a device's microphone, but rather relies on the way a signal is processed. The researchers, Arvind Narayanan and Steven Englehardt, have published [url=https://audiofingerprint.openwpm.com/]a test page[/url] to demonstrate what your browser's audio fingerprint looks like. "Using the AudioContext API to fingerprint does not collect sound played or recorded by your machine. An AudioContext fingerprint is a property of your machine's audio stack itself," they note on the test page. The technique isn't widely adopted but joins a number of other approaches that may be used in conjunction for tracking users as they browse the web. For example, one script that they found combined a device's current charge level, a canvas-font fingerprint and a local IP address derived from WebRTC, the framework for real-time communications between two browsers. The researchers [url=https://webtransparency.cs.princeton.edu/webcensus/index.html#fp-results]found[/url] 715 of the top one million websites are using WebRTC to discover the local IP address of users. Most of these are third-party trackers. Another more widely used method is fingerprinting based on the HTML Canvass API, which aims to deduce the fonts installed on a browser. They found 3,250 first-party sites using this technique. Meanwhile, Canvass fingerprinting was found on 14,371 sites with scripts loaded from 400 different domains. The researchers analysed canvass fingerprinting in 2014, and note three changes since then. "First, the most prominent trackers have by and large stopped using it, suggesting that the public backlash following that study was effective. Second, the overall number of domains employing it has increased considerably, indicating that knowledge of the technique has spread and that more obscure trackers are less concerned about public perception. Third, the use has shifted from behavioral tracking to fraud detection, in line with the ad industry's self-regulatory norm regarding acceptable uses of fingerprinting." The other key finding, which may be good news depending on your attitude to Google, Facebook and Twitter, is that the number of third-party trackers that users will encounter on a daily basis is small. "All of the top five third parties, as well as 12 of the top 20, are Google-owned domains. In fact, Google, Facebook, and Twitter are the only third-party entities present on more than 10 percent of sites," the researchers note. The researchers say their data suggests there has been a consolidation in the market for third-party tracking, which contrasts to the perception that there has been an explosion in third-party trackers. And that could be good news in terms of pressuring the industry to make privacy-enhancing improvements. "For 100 or so third parties that are prevalent on one percent or more of sites, we might expect that they are large enough entities that their behavior can be regulated by public-relations pressure and the possibility of legal or enforcement actions," they argued. [b]News sites have the most trackers, according to the researchers.[/b] [img]http://zdnet4.cbsistat[...]



Microsoft and Canonical partner to bring Ubuntu to Windows 10 (Hot n Happening)
According to sources at Canonical, Ubuntu Linux's parent company, and Microsoft, you'll soon be able to run Ubuntu on Windows 10. This will be more than just running the Bash shell on Windows 10. After all, thanks to programs such as Cygwin or MSYS utilities, hardcore Unix users have long been able to run the popular Bash command line interface (CLI) on Windows. With this new addition, Ubuntu users will be able to run Ubuntu simultaneously with Windows. This will not be in a virtual machine, but as an integrated part of Windows 10. The details won't be revealed until tomorrow's morning keynote speech at Microsoft Build. It is believed that Ubuntu will run on top of Windows 10's recently and quietly introduced Linux subsystems in a new Windows 10 Redstone build. Microsoft and Canonical will not, however, sources say, be integrating Linux per se into Windows. Instead, Ubuntu will primarily run on a foundation of native Windows libraries. This would indicate that while Microsoft is still hard at work on bringing containers to Windows 10 in project Barcelona, this isn't the path Ubuntu has taken to Windows. That said, Canonical and Microsoft have been working on bringing containers to Windows since last summer. They've been doing this using LXD. This is an open-source hypervisor designed specifically for use with containers instead of virtual machines (VMs). The fruits of that project are more likely to show up in Azure than Windows 10. It also seems unlikely that Ubuntu will be bringing its Unity interface with it. Instead the focus will be on Bash and other CLI tools, such as make, gawk and grep. Could you run a Linux desktop such as Unity, GNOME, or KDE on it? Probably, but that's not the purpose of this partnership. Canonical and Microsoft are doing this because Ubuntu on Windows' target audience is developers, not desktop users. In particular, as Microsoft and Canonical continue to work more closely together on cloud projects, I expect to find tools that will make it easy for programmers to use Ubuntu to write programs for Ubuntu on the Azure cloud. So is this MS-Linux? No. Is it a major step forward in the integration of Windows and Linux on the developer desktop? Yes, yes it is.