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The Stranger, Seattle's Only Newspaper



Seattle's #1 Weekly Newspaper. Covering Seattle news, politics, music, film, and arts; plus movie times, club calendars, restaurant listings, forums, blogs, and Savage Love.



Published: Sat, 20 Jan 2018 00:00:01 -0800

Last Build Date: Sat, 20 Jan 2018 06:30:00 -0800

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Last-Minute Plans: 107 Free, Cheap & Easy Things To Do In Seattle This Weekend: Jan 19-21, 2018

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 16:47:28 -0800

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

(image)
Friday is your last chance to see the cool and sweet and whimsical Diagon Alley replica in Ballard. Jon Chambers

We know it's the middle of winter and you probably haven't made plans for the weekend yet, but it's not too late to go out and do something awesome. Below, find all of your options for last-minute entertainment that won't cost more than $10, ranging from a Dolly Parton Birthday Party Tribute Show to the opening of Zohra Opoku: Harmattan Tales, and from a reading with Washington State's incoming poet laureate Claudia Castro Luna to the Seattle Women's March. For even more options, check out our complete Things To Do calendar.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.

FRIDAY
ART
1. Bobbin: Break Dancing Translated to a Visual Medium
See visual art by B-boy Bobbin, who uses acrylic sumi ink on wooden media. There will also be dance, music, and drinks for purchase.
(Beacon Hill, free)

Friday is your last chance to see the cool and sweet and whimsical Diagon Alley replica in Ballard.


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com




The Womxn's March and Beyond: 21 Inauguration Anniversary Resistance Events in Seattle This Week

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 15:50:02 -0800

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

(image)
The Seattle Womxn's March 2.0 takes place on Saturday, January 20. Ramon Dompor

January 20, 2018, marks the anniversary of both Trump's inauguration and the Womxn's March, as well as the date of the Seattle Womxn's March 2.0. The march expects big crowds again, but it's not the only opportunity to resist inequality and act in solidarity with underrepresented communities in Seattle and beyond. We've compiled this week's options below, including Womxn Act on Seattle on Sunday, a citywide day of civic action featuring more than 60 separate events, all of which are on our Womxn Act on Seattle calendar. Plus, find details on the Safe & Legal: Celebrating 45 Years of Abortion Access event, #MeToo in Seattle Tech: What Men Can Do, and other events happening between January 19 and 24. For options beyond this anniversary week, check out our complete resistance & solidarity calendar.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.

SATURDAY
Beer Trumps Hate
Red Door will donate $1 for every pint of Rooftop Brewing's Imp. Peach Mint IPA sold to the Washington Brewshed Alliance, "an outreach initiative designed to highlight the overlapping interests between the conservation and beer communities."

The Seattle Womxn's March 2.0 takes place on Saturday, January 20.


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com




Help Wanted: Stranger Sister Paper The Portland Mercury Is Hiring a News Reporter!

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 15:45:00 -0800

by Wm.™ Steven Humphrey

(image)
damedeeso / Getty Images

The Stranger's sister paper, The Portland Mercury, is losing beloved news reporter Doug Brown, who is leaving to do some important work with the ACLU (impressive!). We do wish him all the best! But you know what that means... the Mercury is hiring a news reporter! Could this person be you (or someone you know)? Read the job listing below, and if you know a good candidate, please help spread the word!

NOW HIRING: FULL TIME NEWS REPORTER

Good news: The Portland Mercury is hiring! We’re looking to add a full-time reporter to our award-winning staff—known locally for smart, deep, and accessible journalism. And we want someone with hustle and an unflinching drive to make a meaningful difference in our community.

Qualified applicants must possess the following:
• A substantial body of professional work published within the past three years.
• Snappy, smart writing chops paired with a passion for long-form storytelling and a dedication to accuracy. Show us your well-cultivated voice.
• A demonstrated ability to devise and execute unique, high-quality story ideas—with little to no handholding—in an extremely competitive news market.
• Experience requesting and digging through public records in pursuit of scoops or must-read context.
• Flexibility. Be able to jump from the courthouse to city hall to a protest to wherever else you're needed. It’s a busy city.
• An easy, active relationship with social media.
• A thriving cultural life outside of work… and, seriously, a sense of humor.
• We’ll like you even more if you can take a good picture or build an amazing spreadsheet or infographic.
We especially encourage people of color and women to apply!

Again, this is a full-time position—with competitive salary and benefits—in a profitable and stable company. Evening and weekend hours aren’t the norm, but they’re also not unheard of.

Interested applicants should send us a résumé, the best cover letter known to humankind, links/PDFs to at least three pieces, and four story ideas. Email everything to newsreporterjob@portlandmercury.com. Snail mail won’t be accepted. Sorry!

Deadline for applications: Friday, February 2.
The Mercury is an equal opportunity employer.

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Why Is January So Warm?

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 08:26:32 -0800

by Sarah Myhre evgenyvasenev/gettyimages.comOn Wednesday, January 17, the high temperature in Seattle was 57 degrees. The high in New Orleans was 35 degrees. Meanwhile, temperature records were broken across Alaska this week, with highs of 65 in Southeast Alaska. These kinds of startling mosaics of anomalous weather patterns are in line with the teleconnected consequences that come with the unravelling of the Arctic cryosphere, and specifically, sea ice. It is thought that the loss of Arctic sea ice contributes to intensified weather fluctuations in the midlatitudes, and this disruption is physically translated through the location and waviness of the East Coast jet stream and how far south polar air is shunted. And so, it is not all surprising that in the midst of our warm January in Seattle, I am wearing my now-infamous heels and I’m not cold (except for my heart—feminist hearts are made of frozen male tears). Last weekend, I skied on corn snow in a tee-shirt in the sunshine like it was April. This is what normal feels like in the Anthropocene. This wave of warm weather in the Pacific Northwest is happening at the same time that national science agencies (including NOAA, NASA, and the UK’s Met Office) are publishing their 2017 global temperature anomaly reports—which show that 2017 was the hottest year ever measured without the boosting amplification of an El Niño oscillation. That sounds like a fairly newsworthy bit of information. Sometimes the signs of climate warming are uncomfortable and scary—and sometimes they are ambient and seemingly benign. A warm January day doesn’t seem consequential, and yet all these changes are additive. It is a slow creep with a catastrophic punctuation. Like many “tragedy of the commons” problems, we can turn away from it when we choose to, because the consequences aren’t front and center. Similarly, we turn away from the suffering of others, the rising tide of tribalism, and the distortion of truth in our public spaces. Our human brains are very good at normalizing bad situations. However, when we normalize the fact that we are changing the heat budget, the chemistry, the fate of life on this planet, we are playing a toxic and dangerous game. We are colluding ourselves into thinking, “This is ok, the climate has always changed, it won’t be as bad as they say, this isn’t my problem.” This is intergenerational injustice; and as we burn through the fossil fuel resources of this one finite planet and alter the geologic trajectory permanently, we are also dramatically reshaping the life-sustaining capacity of the planet for our children. I am sure all of us have heard one bro or another remark, “This global warming thing is great—I love warm weather.” Or, the ever popular and morally bankrupt, “Climate change doesn't matter because the planet will survive without us.” These sentiments are borne from the untethered vacuum of information and accountability that characterizes public discourse and public leadership right now. By and large, these attitudes are fueled by tribalism and derision of public experts—as if we, as public experts, have anything to gain by trying to sound a collective alarm. It is very hard to distort the fact that trees in Seattle are starting to bud out, and that it feels like spring in mid-January. In the same vein, it’s hard to distort the fact that the planet is warming abruptly, with permanent consequence to human health, ecosystems, and energy infrastructure. The facts are just too damn robust. But, we don’t live in a world where facts matter. We live in a world of self-harm and nihilism on the grandest and most chaotic of scales. Enjoy the weather, Seattle. Global Temperature Report for 2017 - Berkeley Earth https://t.co/kyakyADsPy— Historyteller (@historyteller32) January 19, 2018 Medical-scope may have caused superbug outbreak: A Seattle man, Richard Bigl[...]Hi Donny


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com




Planning For Seattle Women's March 2.0

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 08:10:23 -0800

Here we go again. by Steven Hsieh Women's March 2016 Ramon Dompor Here we go again. Last year, more than 100,000 people marched from Judkins Park to Seattle Center the day after our racist chaos-monger president took the oath of office. Millions more took to the streets in other parts of the country (and the world). One year of chaos later, it’s time to fill the streets again. Here’s what you need to know: Where will we march? The march begins at Cal Anderson Park and ends at Seattle Center, with long stretches of Pine Street and 4th Ave in between. Here’s a map, courtesy of the organizers: When should I get there? The march begins at 10 a.m, but organizers recommend you leave your home as early as possible to avoid traffic. You might also want to duck out early to avoid the chaos of a stadium-size crowd leaving the same place at once. How do I get there? If you’re planning on taking public transit, here’s some good news. Sound Transit plans to operate extra light rail trains as needed. King County Metro will also operate extra busses for routes 8, 41, 44, 101, 150, 255, RapidRide C, D, and E Lines. Sound Transit will also run extra service for routes 512, 550 and 554. Use the Metro and Sound Transit trip planners. Expect crowded busses and trains. Don’t be a space-hogging asshole. Pack light. If you must drive, park somewhere near a light rail station and ride the train to Capitol Hill. Seattle Center or University District are good options. If you’re one of the Stranger’s three Eastside readers, you might want to ride on one of these charters organized by volunteers. Act fast! Space is filling up. How many people will be there? About 42,000 marked themselves as “interested” on the event’s official Facebook page. What should I bring? Make a sign (and post it on Instagram, tagging @thestrangerseattle). That’s really all you need. Again, pack light. The forecast calls for rain. Dress appropriately. If you bring snacks, please share them with me. Who are the organizers? Be the Change Network, Council on American-Islamic Relations, Fuse Washington, Huskies for NARAL and Act Now Mantra. Here’s the list. What else is happening this weekend? Another group of organizers called Seattle Womxn Marching Forward are planning a day of action on Sunday. Check out the schedule. [ Comment on this story ] [ Subscribe to the comments on this story ] [...]Women's March 2016


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com




Our Film Critics' Picks for This Weekend

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 15:53:59 -0800

The 31 Best Movies Playing From Jan 18-21 by Stranger Things To Do Staff Is it the rain that makes Seattle's movie scene so lush? Whatever the case, there's a lot to take in this weekend, from movies by homegrown Seattle filmmakers, like Brown's Canyon and the Violet Films/SJ Chiro Short Films Retrospective, to some Hitchcock classics to the new biopic Tom of Finland. Follow the links for complete showtimes, tickets, and trailers. THURSDAY ONLYHouse of UsherIf you have a yen for bastardized, cheesy versions of Edgar Allan Poe classics, the team of slithery star Vincent Price and king of B-movies Roger Corman has the thing for you. This version of "The Fall of the House of Usher," about the mad scion of a cursed line and his beautiful cataleptic sister, mashes in a silly love story, saturated colors, and plenty of spooky decor.Scarecrow Video ThelmaMuch like Jordan Peele folded acidic commentary and comedy into the shocks and dread of Get Out, Joachim Trier’s fourth feature, Thelma, is a lot more than it appears: as a thriller about a young woman with kinetic abilities. Our introduction to Thelma is as a lonely university student, who, when not fielding weirdly invasive phone calls from her parents, shuffles quietly between classes and the library. As she studies one afternoon, she finds herself gazing longingly at a female classmate, Anja (Kaya Wilkins), then suffering a seizure that sends her falling to the floor and sends crows thumping into a nearby window. As the friendship and attraction between the two women deepens, Thelma reels with fantasies and increasingly dangerous seizures, not to mention an existential crisis, as she begs God to remove this desire from her heart. There’s much more to Thelma, but I hesitate to unpack it and risk ruining the film’s slow-build tension. It keeps you waiting for the dam to burst—and makes the eventual deluge all the more satisfying. ROBERT HAM Grand Illusion Smiles of a Summer Night (Winter Light: The Films of Ingmar Bergman)Not all of the films by Swedish director Ingmar Bergman are sad and gloomy. Some are indeed comedies, such as Smiles of a Summer Night. The title of that film really says it all—the film’s plot simply involves men and women falling in and out and in and out of love. Will they find happiness at the end of the movie? Will something special happen on the shortest night of the year? These are the problems enjoyed by a society with a very good welfare system. CHARLES MUDEDESeattle Art Museum Wolf Guy: Enraged LycanthropeWant to see Sonny Chiba as the scion of a lycanthrope clan versus a supernatural phantom tiger? We don't blame you. This is the first time the film from the infamous Toei Studio will be released outside of Japan.Ark Lodge Cinemas THURSDAY & SATURDAY2017 Sundance Film Festival Short Films TourShort film may be something of a neglected art for your average filmgoer, but there's a lot to be said for the brief format—not least of all because it's a way for emerging talent to get noticed. These Sundance shorts include the International Fiction Jury Award-winning "And the Whole Sky Fit In the Dead Cow’s Eye" by the Chilean Francisca Alegría, a ghost story; the US Fiction Jury Award-winning "Lucia, Before and After," depicting a woman during the 24-hour waiting period for an abortion in Texas; Kristen Stewart's directorial debut "Come Swim"; and much more.Northwest Film Forum THURSDAY & SUNDAYTom of FinlandTom of Finland lived a very interesting life. It’s a shame this biopic covers so much of it. Touko Valio Laaksonen, the man behind the pseudonym, was a prolific homoerotic fetish artist whose life spanned from WWII trenches to beefcake magazine fame to vilification during the Reagan era. So much of Laaksonen’s art is about gaydar—the lingering glances, nonverbal cues, and performance of stereotypes that allow[...]



31 Movies Worth Watching in Seattle This Weekend: Jan 18-21, 2018

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 15:52:43 -0800

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

(image)
Franka Potente expresses some feelings in Run Lola Run.

Is it the rain that makes Seattle's movie scene so lush? Whatever the case, there's a lot to take in this weekend, from movies by homegrown Seattle filmmakers, like Brown's Canyon and the Violet Films/SJ Chiro Short Films Retrospective, to some Hitchcock classics to the new biopic Tom of Finland. Follow the links for complete showtimes, tickets, and trailers, or, if you're looking for even more options, check out our complete movie times listings or our film events calendar.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.

THURSDAY ONLY
House of Usher
If you have a yen for bastardized, cheesy versions of Edgar Allan Poe classics, the team of slithery star Vincent Price and king of B-movies Roger Corman has the thing for you. This version of "The Fall of the House of Usher," about the mad scion of a cursed line and his beautiful cataleptic sister, mashes in a silly love story, saturated colors, and plenty of spooky decor.
Scarecrow Video

Franka Potente expresses some feelings in Run Lola Run.


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com