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Seattle's #1 Weekly Newspaper. Covering Seattle news, politics, music, film, and arts; plus movie times, club calendars, restaurant listings, forums, blogs, and Savage Love.



Published: Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:01 -0700

Last Build Date: Fri, 18 Aug 2017 04:00:00 -0700

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What Should Replace the Fremont Lenin Statue if It Comes Down?

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 17:11:51 -0700

by The Stranger

(image)
Imagine the possibilities. Charles Mudede

A day after pro-Trump protesters called for the removal of the Lenin statute in Fremont, Mayor Ed Murray said the bronze sculpture should come down.

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Imagine the possibilities.


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Four Ex-Christian Rockers Walk into a Studio: Lo and Behold, Lo Tom!

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 16:31:38 -0700

Lo Tom might just be the Mega Voltron of 1990s Christian indie-rock luminaries. by Amber Cortes

(image)

Whatever you do, don't call Lo Tom a "supergroup." Band leader Dave Bazan, for one, is embarrassed by it.

"Supergroup made us all laugh," he says. "'Cause if the record gets announced as a supergroup thing, people will expect something that sort of... implies intention on our part. And I think with this project all we ever intended to do was just have fun together."

But the other three members of Lo Tom—who released their self-titled debut album in July—are TW Walsh, Jason Martin, and Trey Many, all staples of the Christian indie-rock set brought forth by Tooth & Nail Records in the 1990s (the label is now headquartered in Seattle). Bazan played in Pedro the Lion, Walsh in Pedro the Lion and the Soft Drugs, Martin in Starflyer 59, and Many in Velour 100 and Starflyer 59.


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Lots of Ah-hah! Moments In Psychological Thriller The Ghoul

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:58:34 -0700

An unclean London provides the backdrop of The Ghoul, a British psychological thriller that runs at the Grand Illusion from August 18 to August 24. by Andrew Wright

(image)
Primal Pictures

Movies that worm their way into a disturbed character’s head can be a discomfiting experience, especially when they’re done really well. (I firmly believe that Lodge Kerrigan’s Clean, Shaven is a great film. I also believe that you’d have to work pretty hard to get me to ever watch it again.) The British import The Ghoul is a clever, deceptively chilly example of narrative unreliability, presenting an increasingly askew perspective in a way that’s somehow both off-putting and absorbing. It lingers.

Writer/director Gareth Tunley wastes no time in establishing the basis for an intriguing psychological thriller: As a favor to his former partner, an off-duty cop (Tom Meeten) poses as a depressed patient in order to covertly gather information on a murder suspect from a psychiatrist. The film scarcely finishes setting up this premise, however, before beginning to tear it down, dropping increasingly large, worrying hints about the worldview of its central character. By the time another therapist with an infectious interest in the occult enters the picture, the lines between fantasy and reality are thoroughly scribbled over.

Debuting filmmaker Tunley has a long history with Ben Wheatley (who executive produced here), and their work shares some definite similarities, including a non-condescending affinity for the working class, as well as a knack for combining the mundane and the macabre in unpredictable proportions. What ultimately sets The Ghoul apart, however, is the way that it keeps finding opportunities to fragment its own narrative, monkeying with character motivations and sequences of events in ways that don’t always fit together until later. (Hours after watching, the ah-hah! moments keep popping up.) Even amid all of the fascinating Mobius strip shenanigans, though, the film’s largest achievement may be in its depiction of the main characters' surroundings, giving London a tangible, unclean presence that both echoes and amplifies the volatile, contents-under-pressure psyche of its protagonist. Against this backdrop, who wouldn’t go at least a little bit mad?

See Movie Times for information about The Ghoul.

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33 Movies Worth Watching in Seattle This Weekend

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:48:45 -0700

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

(image)
Don't miss your chance to see Wes Anderson's Moonrise Kingdom again on the big screen this weekend.

Take a minute to browse the best films to see this weekend—our critics' picks, plus a few more that look interesting, from idiosyncratic new releases like Brigsby Bear and Logan Lucky to the new Ferguson documentary, Whose Streets?, to an unmissable masterpiece of black cinema, Killer of Sheep. You can find more ideas in our film events calendar and movie times listings, not to mention our list of outdoor movie screenings.

THURSDAY ONLY
1. Celebrating Cary Grant
Once again, SAM has spent the summer celebrating the devilish charms of Cary Grant. Finish off the series with the almost ludicrously sexy Alfred Hitchcock caper, To Catch a Thief.
Seattle Art Museum

2. Endless Poetry
With this autobiographical film, Alejandro Jodorowsky, the surrealist genius behind El Topo and The Holy Mountain, has created the most accurate portrayal of a poet’s life in cinema history...

Don't miss your chance to see Wes Anderson's Moonrise Kingdom again on the big screen this weekend.


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Our Film Critics' Picks For This Weekend

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:42:14 -0700

Moonrise Kingdom, Brigsby Bear, Killer of Sheep, And More Picks For Aug 17-20 by Stranger Things To Do Staff Take a minute to browse the best films to see this weekend—our critics' picks, plus a few more that look interesting, from idiosyncratic new releases like Brigsby Bear and Logan Lucky to the new Ferguson documentary, Whose Streets?, to an unmissable masterpiece of black cinema, Killer of Sheep. Follow the 33 links below to open a new web browser with complete film times and trailers. THURSDAY ONLY1. Celebrating Cary GrantOnce again, SAM has spent the summer celebrating the devilish charms of Cary Grant. Finish off the series with the almost ludicrously sexy Alfred Hitchcock caper, To Catch a Thief.Seattle Art Museum 2. Endless PoetryWith this autobiographical film, Alejandro Jodorowsky, the surrealist genius behind El Topo and The Holy Mountain, has created the most accurate portrayal of a poet’s life in cinema history. When young Alejandro discovers a book of Federico García Lorca’s, he escapes his family’s house, becomes a poet, moves into a weird artist co-op, and physically ages only after having major life experiences. Every nonartist in Santiago de Chile, where the action takes place, is either a sleeping drone or a murderous pervert. Life in this world seems impossibly lonely until he meets a pink-haired woman warrior who kicks and spits at everyone she encounters. Equal parts goofy and gorgeous, violent and theatrical. Muy magnífico. Highly recommended. RICH SMITHGrand Illusion 3. Josie and the Pussycats: Pause and DrawAt this screening of Josie and the Pussycats (a satire of pop music and subliminal messaging) they'll periodically pause the movie so you can draw a picture of the scene. You'll leave with flashbacks to your awesome 2001 self and some rad fan art. Emily and Lelah of Tacocat will host.Central Cinema 4. Pop AyeKirsten Tan’s feature debut Pop Aye begins with a hitchhiker in Thailand trying to catch a ride. Trudging along the side of the road, the man holds out his hand once, with no luck. He tries again and a truck slows. The driver seems unfazed as he loads the man’s cargo: a sweetly cooperative elephant. The hitchhiker is Thana, an esteemed architect who became so frustrated with his life that he trashed it. Feeling disrespected at his job and reviled by his wife at home, he sees an elephant he recognizes from his childhood and offers to buy him on the spot. Even on film, the presence of a creature like that is enough to briefly take your breath away—and coupled with old memories, it’s enough for Thana to set out on a slow, sweet, strange cross-country journey to his hometown with the beast. JULIA RABANGrand Illusion 5. Rifftrax Live: Doctor WhoThe expert snarkers of Mystery Science Theater 3000—Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy, and Bill Corbett—will take on the notorious "Five Doctors" Doctor Who special, in which the Doctor's past selves are spirited to Death Zone of Gallifrey for mysterious purposes.Pacific Place THURSDAY-SATURDAY6. War for the Planet of the ApesThe director of War for the Planet of the Apes and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Matt Reeves, has an incredible skill for creating the plausibly crumbling natural world Caesar and his tribe are about to inherit. He's also very good at balancing the necessary irony of Harrelson's performance with the even more necessary total conviction of Serkis's (and the other mo-cap ape actors). Even better: Though the film is full of violence, Reeves makes every death matter to someone on-screen. He's less good at noticing when his film overreaches with the whole "But who is the savage, now?" shtick. At one point, the Colonel forces a cadre of ape POWs to build a (wait for it) wall outside his commandeered fortress. "Why do they need a wall?" one of them asks, and only barely resists looking damply into the camera at Trump's America. [...]



Mayor Murray Calls For Removal of Fremont Lenin Statue and Capitol Hill Confederate Monument

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:38:20 -0700

"Their existence causes pain among those who themselves or whose family members have been impacted by these atrocities." by Steven Hsieh Ian S, Charles Mudede As cities across America tear down Confederate monuments on public property, Mayor Ed Murray on Thursday called for the removal of the Fremont Lenin statute and a memorial for Confederate soldiers in Lake View Cemetery. Both monuments are on private property. In a statement to KING 5, Mayor Murray said his decision comes amid public pressure from Seattleites who have “expressed concerns and frustration over symbols of hate, racism and violence” in the city. “Not only do these kinds of symbols represent historic injustices, their existence causes pain among those who themselves or whose family members have been impacted by these atrocities,” Murray said. The violent white supremacist rally in Charlottesville over the weekend has reignited demands to remove Confederate symbols across the country. Baltimore officials tore down a statue of a Confederate soldier Tuesday night. Protesters toppled another statue in Durham. And debates have sprung up in other cities as well. But most of those debates concern monuments on public property. The mayor’s call to remove the monuments follows a remark yesterday in which he expressed “concern” over a memorial for Confederate veterans, which was installed at Lake View Cemetery in 1926. There are 11 bodies buried at the monument. Lake View Cemetery, owned by a private nonprofit, closed yesterday over public interest in the monument, and a voicemail message says the cemetery plans to stay closed until Monday. No one from the cemetery responded to The Stranger’s request for comment. A statue of Vladimir Lenin, the Communist revolutionary leader of Soviet Russia who oversaw tens of thousands of deaths, has stood at the intersection of 36th street and Fremont Place North since the 90s. The bronze figure, which is privately owned, was brought to the Puget Sound region by a construction company owner who died in a car crash in 1994. The Fremont Chamber of Commerce held the statute in a trust from 1995 to 2000, according to office administrator Caroline Sherman. "We celebrate the statue as a commitment to freedom of speech. We decorate it with tutus and scarves. It is not a political symbol,” Sherman told The Stranger. When asked whether the statue should come down, Sherman said, "Any further comments about that should be directed to the Fremont Troll.” The Fremont Troll, the more iconic sculpture in the Northwest Seattle neighborhood, did not respond to The Stranger's request for comment. A few protesters, led by a conspiracy theorist who has been retweeted by Donald Trump, demonstrated in front of the Lenin statute yesterday in response to the movement against confederate monuments. State Sen. Reuven Carlyle wrote a statement on his personal blog arguing that the Lenin statute should stay, claiming its purpose is to demonstrate "our very ability to install political art is the triumph of democracy over tyranny." He said there's no equivalency between the Fremont sculpture and Confederate monuments coming down across the country. "Unlike the Confederacy statues throughout our nation built to formally honor those in that battle of ideas, this statue is distinctly not showcased in Fremont to celebrate the murderous, painful regime," Carlyle said. "It is instead installed as a testament to its defeat and the victory of open ideas through the medium and sometimes painful juxtaposition of art itself." UPDATE: A previous version of this post stated that there are no bodies buried beneath a Confederate monument in Capitol Hill. In fact, there are 11 bodies buried near or at the monument. We can't say for certain whether there are bodies beneath it, and Lake View Cemetery did not immediately[...]


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33 Movies Worth Watching in Seattle This Weekend: Aug 17-20, 2017

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 15:33:00 -0700

The Stranger's critics' picks for Aug 17-20, 2017. by Stranger Things To Do Staff Take a minute to browse the best films to see this weekend—our critics' picks, plus a few more that look interesting, from idiosyncratic new releases like Brigsby Bear and Logan Lucky to the new Ferguson documentary, Whose Streets?, to an unmissable masterpiece of black cinema, Killer of Sheep. You can find more ideas in our film events calendar and movie times listings, not to mention our list of outdoor movie screenings. Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play. Jump to: Thursday | Friday | Friday-Sunday | Saturday | Sunday | all weekend THURSDAY ONLY1. Celebrating Cary GrantOnce again, SAM has spent the summer celebrating the devilish charms of Cary Grant. Finish off the series with the almost ludicrously sexy Alfred Hitchcock caper, To Catch a Thief.Seattle Art Museum 2. Endless PoetryWith this autobiographical film, Alejandro Jodorowsky, the surrealist genius behind El Topo and The Holy Mountain, has created the most accurate portrayal of a poet’s life in cinema history. When young Alejandro discovers a book of Federico García Lorca’s, he escapes his family’s house, becomes a poet, moves into a weird artist co-op, and physically ages only after having major life experiences. Every nonartist in Santiago de Chile, where the action takes place, is either a sleeping drone or a murderous pervert. Life in this world seems impossibly lonely until he meets a pink-haired woman warrior who kicks and spits at everyone she encounters. Equal parts goofy and gorgeous, violent and theatrical. Muy magnífico. Highly recommended. RICH SMITHGrand Illusion 3. Josie and the Pussycats: Pause and DrawAt this screening of Josie and the Pussycats (a satire of pop music and subliminal messaging) they'll periodically pause the movie so you can draw a picture of the scene. You'll leave with flashbacks to your awesome 2001 self and some rad fan art. Emily and Lelah of Tacocat will host.Central Cinema 4. Pop AyeKirsten Tan’s feature debut Pop Aye begins with a hitchhiker in Thailand trying to catch a ride. Trudging along the side of the road, the man holds out his hand once, with no luck. He tries again and a truck slows. The driver seems unfazed as he loads the man’s cargo: a sweetly cooperative elephant. The hitchhiker is Thana, an esteemed architect who became so frustrated with his life that he trashed it. Feeling disrespected at his job and reviled by his wife at home, he sees an elephant he recognizes from his childhood and offers to buy him on the spot. Even on film, the presence of a creature like that is enough to briefly take your breath away—and coupled with old memories, it’s enough for Thana to set out on a slow, sweet, strange cross-country journey to his hometown with the beast. JULIA RABANGrand Illusion 5. Rifftrax Live: Doctor WhoThe expert snarkers of Mystery Science Theater 3000—Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy, and Bill Corbett—will take on the notorious "Five Doctors" Doctor Who special, in which the Doctor's past selves are spirited to Death Zone of Gallifrey for mysterious purposes.Pacific Place THURSDAY-SATURDAY6. War for the Planet of the ApesThe director of War for the Planet of the Apes and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes, Matt Reeves, has an incredible skill for creating the plausibly crumbling natural world Caesar and his tribe are about to inherit. He's also very good at balancing the necessary irony of Harrelson's performance with the even more necessary total conviction of Serkis's (and the other mo-cap ape actors). Even better: Though the film is full of violence, Reeves makes every death matter to someone on-screen. He's less good at noticing when his film overreaches with the whole "But who is t[...]



Muscle Car Makes Some Nervous in Crowded Pike Place Market Street

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 16:03:57 -0700

What kind of freedom is an American driver supposed to find in the top numbers of an odometer? by Charles Mudede

(image)
Lee Colleton

I looked up and saw what was making so much noise on the road between MLK Way and Rainier Avenue: a muscle car. The driver put the pedal to the metal and, if he had hit something, the energy in that mass of metal would have been released with great violence. The force of that energy might even overwhelm the energy that bonds the human body. One would have what Spinoza calls "a very bad encounter"—a good encounter being one that contributes to the strength and maintenance of your bonds.

The muscle car speed past me and came to a loud stop at a traffic light on Rainier Ave. All of that speed was for nothing.

As the driver impatiently waited for the light to turn green, I recognized its make: a Dodge Challenger, the exact same model as the one used in an act of terrorism on a crowded street in Charlottesville, Virginia. The car weighs two tons and, as David Dudley put it in The Urbanist, it is "wildly overpowered" and "has a well-deserved reputation for vehicular mayhem even when operated by drivers who weren’t actively trying to kill and injure others." It can easily accelerate from 0 to 100 mph in just under 10 seconds.
width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dTPXEUZQnpM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>
Last night, I saw that the futurist and electric car advocate Lee Colleton had Tweeted a picture of a muscle car turning into the crowded street in Pike Place Market—a place that should ban cars altogether.


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The United Confederate Veterans Memorial at Lake View Cemetery.


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Whose Streets? Is Vital to the Resistance

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 15:41:04 -0700

by Jenni Moore

(image)

Most of us remember scrolling through news about the Ferguson protests on Twitter in 2014, but Sabaah Folayan and Damon Davis’ directorial debut Whose Streets? fills in the blanks of the story, offering a humanizing, much-needed portrait of those involved. Dedicated to Michael Brown, the film captures the aftermath of the shooting of the unarmed 18-year-old—by a white police officer, while the Black young man had his hands in the air—using unflinching interviews with the still-grieving Ferguson residents who’ve seen their community unify against police brutality.

Throughout Whose Streets?, citizen journalists and activists armed with cameras offer stunningly raw snapshots of human emotion, like when Brown’s mother, Lesley McSpadden, waits with community members to hear that a grand jury decided not to indict Brown’s killer. Or when Brown’s memorial site was set on fire. Or when plain-to-see conflict plays out on the face of a Black female police officer as she’s involved in an intense standoff with protesters. Or when resistance leaders speak to crowds, making my arms break out in goose bumps and my eyes well-up with pride.


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Savage Love Letter of the Day: Tiki Torches Aren't Just For Haters

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 15:00:13 -0700

by Dan Savage One of the better retorts to the white supremacists in Charlottesville would be to hold a march with rainbow Tiki Torches. That will put an end to Nazi nonsense. Don't mean to be flippant, but a little panache is called for. Just saying. Shaming Haters And Fascists To Intimidate Nazi Gangsters If rainbow Tiki torches could put an end to Nazi nonsense, SHAFTING, I could get behind your idea. But defeating Naziism and white supremacism and Trumpism won't be that simple—and the last thing we need right now, frankly, is another mob marching around carrying torches. Mobs with torches are a bad look whether you're talking front pages of newspapers, old newsreels, or Disney movies. And while rainbows are lovely, they don't have the power to transform a hateful symbol or look into something loving. I mean... look at this shit. Okay! That was grim! Kinder, gentler bonus question after the jump... I've met a very nice intelligent man almost a year ago. He's very sensitive to my needs and loyally been next to me during my darkest hours. During all this time we never had any arguments or disagreements. He's been telling me that naturally it's so easy for him to be with me, and I would say the same. However, during our first trip with merged family, his two daughters and my son, I noticed something that totally put me off. The whole trip he was making sure we split all restaurant bills, hotel expenses evenly. Even though, I used my national park entrance card to have a free pass for everyone, we drove in my car and I was filling up gas all the time. He offered to fill up gas, but I just couldn't be so petty and share that "expense." He would fill up empty bottles at the restaurant, and I would just go to the store to buy snacks, drinks and fresh water for everyone, while he's waiting in the car. He's attitude was that it's not a necessary waste of money, since we've got water already. Even his children are calling him "cheap." I understand his economical lifestyle and that he's allowing me to live and act whatever way I want... however, I feel subjected to a very unpleasant dynamics when it's concerning such a petty money matters. He's sound financially and I think it's more of his character trait. I believe people don't change, and that was and still is the dynamics between him and his ex in regards to their children, him providing financially only bare minimum. I've supported myself all my life, and I'm happy with my lifestyle. However, the big question is should I stay in this kind of relationship and is there any other perspective to it that I don't see? Sometimes Paying Less Is Tasteful Is this nice man's compulsive need to split everything right down the middle tacky? Yes. Is it tedious? It sure as shit is. Is it a red flag? Not necessarily. He's financially sound, he's agreeable and loyal, and so far he's "allowing" you to live and act in whatever way you want. (I'm a bit worried about your choice of phrasing with that sentence, SPLIT.) If you like him and he's not controlling and otherwise a pleasure to be around... perhaps you could learn to tolerate and work around his annoying obsession with splitting everything evenly? I don't know how old you two are, SPLIT, but you're both old enough to have kids of your own and, consequently, established patterns and routines. Merging with a new person, let alone blending two families together, is always difficult and usually requires some adjustments and accommodations—in ways big and ways small and ways annoying and ways tedious and ways petty. And if this guy is as good a guy as you describe, you might want to find a way to accommodate his incredibly annoying and petty and tedious cheapness. Instead of dickering over every bill as they come, for e[...]


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