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Published: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 00:00:01 -0800

Last Build Date: Fri, 17 Nov 2017 21:30:00 -0800

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A Scott McCaughey Sampler

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 18:27:19 -0800

by Sean Nelson Give Scott a listen, and consider buying the Gun album! You may have heard by now that the precious natural musical and human resource known as Scott McCaughey suffered a stroke yesterday while on tour with Alejandro Escovedo in San Francisco. As of this moment he is in stable condition and recovering. While he's occupied with that difficult work, I propose that everyone take a few minutes and listen to some of his music. I further recommend that you consider purchasing the album I consider his masterpiece, The Minus 5 also known as The Gun Album. (I confess a small bias because I sing harmonies on two songs, but I assure you, the mastery couldn't have less to do with me.) Even if everyone who has been a member of the Minus 5 at one time or another shelled out $10 for a copy, we might even be able to make it chart. I'm sure he'd prefer you get it at a record store, but digital options abound, as well. In the meantime, here's a very short list of some McCaughey songs to get you started on a weekend, if not, indeed, a lifetime, of listening pleasure, so that we can all be prepared for his comeback. YOUNG FRESH FELLOWS width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zP6ggG4QhWs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/blQMpEwX0KA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OcrdE5_SMZ4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qbVtwRrX1hE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hsShBQdctVs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NY6_nrc4Z6U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> THE MINUS 5 width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/0d7aGL5zEyo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/P0CEgnyefbU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tEA83xVq3y4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/c1ZYUBEhbAg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wzGcGAHbauk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Wz3wqR31h8Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WVmU0cDXNV8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Rb4JWGMkUHQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Selections rom the aforementioned STLP: width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CDhfmzIr3go" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GazQ-CIA94A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_dk3C4ZgWIg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FALGeotmVDk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> ...and here's his 10-minute epic about Michael Nesmith, sooo.... width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QLto7zBeIcg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> THE BASEBALL PROJECT width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GnpPWHkIkVE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YZbearvNxRI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ccqm2Bbj2Lc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> And a short bit about his sunglasses... width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7cuZCLddjtM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> [...]Give Scott a listen, and consider buying the Gun album!


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Cheap & Easy Things To Do This Weekend

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:54:58 -0800

Yulefest, Seattle Festival of Trees, BadWill Market, And More Events For Nov 17-19 by Stranger Things To Do Staff Panicking because you haven't yet made plans for the weekend and you're short on cash? Don't worry—below, find all of your options for last-minute entertainment that won't cost more than $10, ranging from the Seattle7Writers' Holiday Bookfest to the opening of the Seattle Festival of Trees, from the Anthony Bourdain Viewing Party to the Value Village Tacky Holiday Sweater Workshop, and from Local Comic Shop Day to Melrose Market Turkey & Trimmings. See all 120 options below. FRIDAY ART 1. Statix Grand Opening Art Show Welcome Ten Hundred's new arts space and shop to Pioneer Square with an opening party featuring works by Adam One, Casey Weldon, Cassie Murphy, Claudius Phaedrus, Craig Cundiff, Ego, Joey Nix, Joseph Brooks, Katie Kurkjy, Leo Shallat, Matthew Curry, Melissa Crosetto, Patrick Toney, Rhodora Jacob, Rich M. Stevens, Shohei Otomo, Solace, Stefari, Taboo 1, They Drift, and Ten Hundred. The main part of the show features refreshments and music. (Pioneer Square, free) COMMUNITY 2. Talking Turkey Day As we well know, Thanksgiving is a holiday steeped in colonialism and built on a terrible lie. We also know that it's a day to feast on various nightshades and birds. For this edition of Night Lab, join Ada's head chef, Kristina Hoffman, in a discussion of the history and evolution of our Thanksgiving meals. Guests will also also get the chance to share their own stories of familial and regional tradition. (Capitol Hill, free admission) FOOD & DRINK 3. Ice Cream & Pie Social This social from vegan bakery and ice creamery the Cookie Counter celebrates the classic pairing of ice cream and pie. Order your holiday pies, select from a menu of new ice cream flavors, and eat slices of pumpkin, caramel apple, pecan, and gluten free pumpkin pie (with an optional scoop or coconut whip). There will also be a cookbook and recipe exchange, a reading of Giving Thanks: A Native American Morning Message and kid's craft project led by senior volunteers from the PNA Village, vintage board games, and a raffle. The Cookie Counter crew will be wearing pie-inspired headwear and any customers who show up in pie-themed attire get $2 off their purchase. (Greenwood, free) 4. Sound & Fog Sparkling Wine Tasting Taste six sparkling wines and decide which lucky winner will grace your Thanksgiving dinner or holiday gathering table. Enjoy the wines on their own or try them in an effervescent cocktail. (West Seattle, $5) MUSIC 5. Autumn Disco '70s Night Take a disco nap and put on your chicest '70s outfit for this groovy throwback party, where DJ Magic Sean will be laying down the funk until the wee hours. (Capitol Hill, $10) 6. Brad Yaeger & The Night Terrors, Chris Newman's Deluxe Combo, Atomic Rust Brad Yaeger and The Night Terrors play "pompous bombastic dramatic rock," and will be joined by high energy groups Chris Newman's Deluxe Combo and Atomic Rust. (Georgetown, $8) 7. Dandu, Danny & The Good Intentions, The Suffering Fuckheads Join experimental groove-wonks Dandu as they headline at the legendary Blue Moon, along with support from Danny & the Good Intentions and the Suffering Fuckheads. (University District, $8) 8. Karl Blau Album Release and In-Store Performance Anacortes singer-songwriter, major Northwest music scene fixture, and K Records stalwart Karl Blau will release his new album, Out Her Space, on Bella Union Records this November, and will celebrate with a live, free, and all-ages in-store performance. (West Seattle, free) 9. The Peacers, Flat Worms, Feed, Tissue Yet another of Drag City's casually brilliant rock groups, Peacers achieve a slack cool in their gently distorted nuggets. Their two albums aren't mind-blowing, but if you fancy Pavement, Guided by Voices, and Ty Segall in reflective mode (he's an ex-Peacer, btw), then Peacers will put a modest spri[...]



Last-Minute Plans: 120 Free, Cheap & Easy Things To Do In Seattle This Weekend: Nov 17-19, 2017

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:54:26 -0800

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

(image)
The winter traditions of many Nordic regions tend to exude cheer and warm, fuzzy feelings. Kick off your holiday season with traditional Scandinavian dance, music, and crafts at Yulefest on Saturday and Sunday. Courtesy of the Nordic Heritage Museum

Panicking because you haven't yet made plans for the weekend and you're short on cash? Don't worry—below, find all of your options for last-minute entertainment that won't cost more than $10, ranging from the Seattle7Writers' Holiday Bookfest to the opening of the Seattle Festival of Trees, from the Anthony Bourdain Viewing Party to the Value Village Tacky Holiday Sweater Workshop, and from Local Comic Shop Day to Melrose Market Turkey & Trimmings. For even more options, check out our complete Things To Do calendar.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.

FRIDAY
ART
1. Statix Grand Opening Art Show
Welcome Ten Hundred's new arts space and shop to Pioneer Square with an opening party featuring works by Adam One, Casey Weldon, Cassie Murphy, Claudius Phaedrus, Craig Cundiff, Ego, Joey Nix, Joseph Brooks, Katie Kurkjy, Leo Shallat, Matthew Curry, Melissa Crosetto, Patrick Toney, Rhodora Jacob, Rich M. Stevens, Shohei Otomo, Solace,
Stefari, Taboo 1, They Drift, and Ten Hundred. The main part of the show features refreshments and music.
(Pioneer Square, free)

The winter traditions of many Nordic regions tend to exude cheer and warm, fuzzy feelings. Kick off your holiday season with traditional Scandinavian dance, music, and crafts at Yulefest on Saturday and Sunday.


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Last-Minute Plans: 120 Free, Cheap & Easy Things To Do In Seattle This Weekend: Nov 17-19, 2017

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:51:00 -0800

No advance planning required for these cheap events. by Stranger Things To Do Staff Panicking because you haven't yet made plans for the weekend and you're short on cash? Don't worry—below, find all of your options for last-minute entertainment that won't cost more than $10, ranging from the Seattle7Writers' Holiday Bookfest to the opening of the Seattle Festival of Trees, from the Anthony Bourdain Viewing Party to the Value Village Tacky Holiday Sweater Workshop, and from Local Comic Shop Day to Melrose Market Turkey & Trimmings. For even more options, check out our complete Things To Do calendar. Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play. Jump to: Friday | Saturday | Sunday FRIDAY ART 1. Statix Grand Opening Art Show Welcome Ten Hundred's new arts space and shop to Pioneer Square with an opening party featuring works by Adam One, Casey Weldon, Cassie Murphy, Claudius Phaedrus, Craig Cundiff, Ego, Joey Nix, Joseph Brooks, Katie Kurkjy, Leo Shallat, Matthew Curry, Melissa Crosetto, Patrick Toney, Rhodora Jacob, Rich M. Stevens, Shohei Otomo, Solace, Stefari, Taboo 1, They Drift, and Ten Hundred. The main part of the show features refreshments and music. (Pioneer Square, free) COMMUNITY 2. Talking Turkey Day As we well know, Thanksgiving is a holiday steeped in colonialism and built on a terrible lie. We also know that it's a day to feast on various nightshades and birds. For this edition of Night Lab, join Ada's head chef, Kristina Hoffman, in a discussion of the history and evolution of our Thanksgiving meals. Guests will also also get the chance to share their own stories of familial and regional tradition. (Capitol Hill, free admission) FOOD & DRINK 3. Ice Cream & Pie Social This social from vegan bakery and ice creamery the Cookie Counter celebrates the classic pairing of ice cream and pie. Order your holiday pies, select from a menu of new ice cream flavors, and eat slices of pumpkin, caramel apple, pecan, and gluten free pumpkin pie (with an optional scoop or coconut whip). There will also be a cookbook and recipe exchange, a reading of Giving Thanks: A Native American Morning Message and kid's craft project led by senior volunteers from the PNA Village, vintage board games, and a raffle. The Cookie Counter crew will be wearing pie-inspired headwear and any customers who show up in pie-themed attire get $2 off their purchase. (Greenwood, free) 4. Sound & Fog Sparkling Wine Tasting Taste six sparkling wines and decide which lucky winner will grace your Thanksgiving dinner or holiday gathering table. Enjoy the wines on their own or try them in an effervescent cocktail. (West Seattle, $5) MUSIC 5. Autumn Disco '70s Night Take a disco nap and put on your chicest '70s outfit for this groovy throwback party, where DJ Magic Sean will be laying down the funk until the wee hours. (Capitol Hill, $10) 6. Brad Yaeger & The Night Terrors, Chris Newman's Deluxe Combo, Atomic Rust Brad Yaeger and The Night Terrors play "pompous bombastic dramatic rock," and will be joined by high energy groups Chris Newman's Deluxe Combo and Atomic Rust. (Georgetown, $8) 7. Dandu, Danny & The Good Intentions, The Suffering Fuckheads Join experimental groove-wonks Dandu as they headline at the legendary Blue Moon, along with support from Danny & the Good Intentions and the Suffering Fuckheads. (University District, $8) 8. Karl Blau Album Release and In-Store Performance Anacortes singer-songwriter, major Northwest music scene fixture, and K Records stalwart Karl Blau will release his new album, Out Her Space, on Bella Union Records this November, and will celebrate with a live, free, and all-ages in-store performance. (West Seattle, free) 9. The Peacers, Flat Worms, Feed, Tissue Yet another of Drag City's casually brilliant rock groups, Peacers achieve a sla[...]



Week in Weed: Sessions Backs Down, Fake Weed Death News, and Art Garfunkel’s Weird Pot Poem

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:26:40 -0800

Plus: Anthony Bourdain checks out Seattle's weed scene, and a weird rant at zoning board meeting goes awry. by Amber Cortes Anthony Bourdain, a fan of craft alcohol and hand-trimmed weed. DANIEL ZUCHNIK VIA GETTY IMAGES This week, Jeff Sessions finally revealed some of his evil plans for weed, which involved… nothing that was very evil-sounding (for now). Also, doctors deny they attributed a Colorado baby’s death to marijuana. Anthony Bourdain visits a Washington cannabis farm, and Art Garfunkel gets funky with pot poetry. Read on. Sessions: Obama Policy Still in Effect After all the huffing and puffing about blowing the weed house down, Sessions seemed to be taking the soft approach to maintaining Obama-era policies on marijuana when he spoke at a congressional hearing on Tuesday: Our policy is the same, really, fundamentally as the Holder-Lynch policy, which is that the federal law remains in effect and a state can legalize marijuana for its law enforcement purposes but it still remains illegal with regard to federal purposes. Though the Cole Memo, which helps protect states who have legalized weed from federal interference, will stay as it is, and Sessions even admitted that cannabis is less dangerous than heroin, don’t expect marijuana to be anything less than a Schedule 1 drug anytime soon. “First Ever Marijuana OD” Is Fake News Remember back in March when news came out about a baby in Colorado who was said to the “the first marijuana overdose” ever? Yeah, um, not a thing, it turns out. A report suggesting a link between the 11-month-old’s death and cannabis, which was found in a urine test, drew controversy and media attention when it came out. But the doctors that authored it said that the term they used—"associated with"—was not meant to indicate any cause and effect. "We are absolutely not saying that marijuana killed that child," said Thomas Nappe, one of the authors of the report. The official cause of death was myocarditis, an inflammation of the heart muscle. California Has Released Their Marijuana Rules And there are 278 pages of them! For now, everything is temporary and aimed toward getting their freshly-legalized weed market rolling by January 1. They’ll go through much of the same motions regarding licensing and distribution, advertising rules, and other regulatory issues to work out that other states have been through since they legalized. Welcome to the club, Cali! Another Eastern Washington County Bans Weed Mostly, they say, because of the “terrible” smell that pervades the area around harvest time. It’s part of a larger pattern of counties and towns that have banned cannabis production and possession in Eastern Washington. Anthony Bourdain Checks Out the Weed Scene in Washington State He visited the family-owned and operated Hollingsworth Cannabis Company in Mason County, and raves about their "solar-powered greenhouses, hand-trimmed buds, and hand-packed bags." Did he get high in Seattle? Most assuredly. His visit to Seattle for Parts Unknown will be broadcast on Sunday. What Is This Guy On, Anyway? A neighborhood zoning board meeting took Parks and Rec into the Upside Down the other day when a man there went off against a proposed medical marijuana store around the corner from where he lived. He said the store will "bring undesirable elements into the neighborhood" and bad-mouthed everyone from vets living with PTSD to breast cancer survivors. Later, he told NBC Boston that he was intentionally using "satire" to point out the hypocrisy of neighbors who may oppose the store. And maybe it worked—the dispensary was approved by the zoning board by a unanimous vote. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ST_1pWFUwxQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Art Garfunkel Waxes Poetic on Pot In 1983, folk singer Art Garfunkel took a "walking tou[...]


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Savage Love Letter of the Day: A Gay Australian Sends a Letter to His Father

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:21:19 -0800

by Dan Savage G'day Dan. My name’s Lee. I’m a 32-year-old, gay, cis-male from Australia. As you know we just went through a bullshit, non-binding survey about marriage equality. Fortunately, the "Yes" vote won, but there were still a lot of people who voted no—which, as I just found out, includes my dad. I've sent him an email this morning about it and I wanted to share it with you, too, as I’ve utilized a lot of your previous advice as inspiration on what to say to him. I think without your insights I probably would have either ghosted him or blew up at him. But I decided to go the Dan Savage route instead. So, I wanted to say thank you. Cheers. Lee Thank you so much for sharing the letter you sent to your dad—and I'm making it today's SLLOTD (with Lee's permission) because I think it could help others who may find themselves in a similar position. Men and women in Australia whose parents voted against their right to marry someone they love and young queers who are just coming out and aren't getting the reaction they hoped for from their parents. It's enclosed after the jump. Hi Dad, I’d probably prefer to have this conversation over the phone as the written word can lack so much nuance and meaning. However, I think the content of what I want to say is more important in this case, and I can structure my thoughts more clearly in writing. I know you voted "No” on the recent postal survey as to whether or not I should be allowed to marry the person I love. Actually, that’s not entirely true, but from the hushed murmurs and redirected conversations with others, it seems like that’s a safe assumption. I’m not sure how I feel about that. I’m not angry, but I’m not not angry. I’m not sad, but I’m not not sad, either. Perhaps "confused, disappointed and empty" best describes it. Part of me doesn’t necessarily care what your reasons were. But the other part of me wants to continue to have a relationship with you, and if that’s to happen, then understanding, overcoming and breaking down those reasons is going to be a fundamental part of that. You’re not religious, so the sacred argument doesn’t seem to the be reason. Given your divorce and some of the contributing factors, I can’t imagine that the “sanctity” argument carries much weight either. This really only leaves a general, low-level of homophobia and that you think being gay is “just a bit icky.” Others have tried to explain your decision as, “Well, you know how he is,” “He’s just of that age,” or, “You know he’s always been stubborn.” But you didn’t just abstain, you actively voted for a federal law that fundamentally treats your own son differently to your daughters. Despite your stubbornness, I would have thought if there’s maybe one thing that could give you at least pause for thought to challenge your own beliefs and values, it might be your own son. But that seems not to be the case. Rather than thinking to yourself, “This is something that I don’t believe in—I’ve was brought up in a certain way, but maybe I’ll at least have a conversation with Lee and explain why I have reservations about voting yes. Maybe, considering this is something that affects him directly, I’ll take just five minutes to try and understand things from him perspective,” you didn’t discuss this with me. To rewind the clock for moment I do want to apologize for the way I acted back in 2012 when I came out. Rather than us really discussing it, I instantly went on the defensive and got angry when you showed reservations. It was unfair of me to not give you the space, time, or conversation to help you understand or come to terms with it. It took me 28 years to reconcile who I was—why should have I expected you to reconcile it in a week? I’m going to propose something to you now that I should have back i[...]


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Thank You, Tannaz Farsi's Solo Show at Glass Box, for Reminding Me I'm Invisible

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 15:41:00 -0800

Field not Frame is up at Glass Box through December 9th. by Leah St. Lawrence

(image)
Courtesy of Glass Box

The newest solo show at Glass Box in the International District features minimalist sculptures by Tannaz Farsi, who lives and works in Oregon. Farsi is an accomplished contemporary artist, using sculptural techniques to present interpretations of visual coding and commentaries on identity and digital language. Farsi has shown at the Disjecta Contemporary Art Center and the Delaware Center for Contemporary Art, among others. Luckily, Seattle still maintains spaces such as Glass Box (the last time Seattle was graced with Farsi’s work, Glass Box was OHGE Ltd.) and curators such as Julia Greenway to bring us thought provoking contemporary visual art—a hard thing to come by in the Sell! Sell! Sell! establishment galleries of Pioneer Square.

Farsi’s solo show features seven sculptures. The first two works you encounter are of a personal-to-the-artist nature. One is a memory box of sorts, featuring the artist’s mother’s hand knit sweater and a digital print of a parrot. In the same room is a stack of greeting cards indiscriminately floating on the wall. There are no explanations or didactics near the artworks. There is a print out on the front desk you can carry with you, but why bother? It won’t help you. I invite you to project yourself into the downstairs work instead of trying to interpret the "intent" of the work (especially that card stack).

In the other room is one of Farsi’s most recurring pieces–Untitled [Without Control]. It is a large round silver medallion, standing alone in the middle of the room, with “YOUAREINVISIBLE” carved through it. It said to me: “No one actually sees you. I am sorry to inform you.” I found it relieving and responded: “Thank you for your honesty.” Upstairs there are two works. The first is composed of three individually titled sculptures which form one installation. 10 security lights blare directly at two steel plates carved with words addressing social and digital boundaries (colonist, pilgrim, defector, to name a few). Around the corner is the last piece, "Script." Do not miss it.

Field not Frame is up at Glass Box through December 9th.

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Wonder Is Guaranteed to Soften Your Scowl

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 15:19:02 -0800

by Elinor Jones

(image)

It’s easy to live a snarky life. I see a lot of movies that are god-awful, and the world around us is also pretty god-awful, and without wanting to, I seem to have “This is stupid” on the tip of my tongue more often than not. So when a movie comes along that is good—legitimately, sincerely good, like flowers or soup or dogs—I find myself grasping at a way to describe it.

Wonder is that good movie. It’s about a little boy, Auggie (Room's Jacob Tremblay), and his mom (Julia Roberts), his dad (Owen Wilson), and his older sister (Izabela Vidovic). Auggie was born with a condition that makes him look different, so that's what Wonder focuses on—but it’s not really what this movie is. This is a portrait of a group of humans—grown-ups and kids, but mostly kids—who are whole, complicated people, who have opportunities to be selfish and opportunities to be kind. Wonder defaults to kindness in a manner that feels both totally inspiring and completely organic.


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Scott McCaughey (Young Fresh Fellows, Minus 5, REM) Is in Stable Condition Following a Stroke While on Tour

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:55:48 -0800

I can't think of a more appropriate sound to hear coming out of every window in town this weekend than Scott McCaughey's voice. by Sean Nelson

(image)
One of the most prolific and best loved musicians in the NW.

The following message was posted to Facebook earlier today:

Scott McCaughey, the ever-smiling, sunglasses-wearing front man of the bands The Minus 5 and the Young Fresh Fellows, and side man to countless bands — including M. Ward, The Baseball Project, Tired Pony, and R.E.M. — suffered a stroke while on a West Coast tour with Alejandro Escovedo. He is in stable condition.

Loved by many and a best friend to all, Scott brings a very bright light to the stage. In his ever-changing hats and loud sports coats, Scott exudes such joy while he performs.

“Scott McCaughey is one of the unsung heroes of rock n roll. A true believer and one of the most creative people I have ever met.” says guitarist Peter Buck.

The road to recovery will be a long one, and we believe it will come through music. We can’t wait to see him back in action. The collective energy of the entire creative community is powerful enough to overcome this hurdle. With the love and support of all of you, Scott will continue to share his love of music with the world.

We promise to provide continued updates and will share any messages of support you want to send with him.

width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kyvXgcT1pGo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>

My sentiments ex-fucking-actly.

On a personal note, I am a friend of Scott's and, like many people reading this, have recorded, performed, and toured with him many times. He's one of the warmest, most inclusive, and celebratory people I've ever met, not to mention talented, not to mention prolific, not to mention humble.

There's nothing he loves more than talking about, listening to, and above all playing rock and roll, and I look forward to hearing him do it again when (not if) he's up to it.

In the meantime, he has made more records than any three average musicians make in a lifetime. I encourage you to go check them out if you haven't, or even if you have. Start with The Minus Five (self-titled, a.k.a. The Gun Album), then Down With Wilco, then go backwards to the Young Fresh Fellows. Then do whatever you want. You won't be sorry.

I can't think of a more appropriate sound to hear coming out of every window in town this weekend than Scott McCaughey's voice.

One of the most prolific and best loved musicians in the NW


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Thirst Street Stars an American in a City That Hates Her, Paris

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:45:47 -0800

by Joule Zelman

(image)
This looks like it will not end well... Thirst Street

A woman falling prey to psychotic romantic obsession is a story older than the Bible, so plotwise Nathan Silver’s Thirst Street about a grieving American flight attendant who moves to Paris to stalk her one-night fling, is nothing new. And truth be told, the opening minutes play like a marriage between Wes Anderson and 1970s giallo, with stylized montage, Anjelica Huston’s wry narration, and candy colors. What Thirst Street gets painfully right, though, is the desperate alienation of living in a beautiful country that doesn’t want you and that you don’t understand.

Lindsay Burdge plays Gina, a shy woman whose boyfriend has recently committed suicide. In a stupor, she allows her well-meaning coworkers to drag her to what the outdated guidebook promises is a quaint Parisian cabaret. It’s actually a strip club, and Gina goes home with the sketchy bartender, Jérôme (Damien Bonnard). Whether by chance or because we’re trapped in her already unmoored perspective, he looks just like her dead partner. By morning, she’s in love.

As Jérôme is too cowardly to reject her outright, all of his indirect deflections only feed her mania. He protests that he doesn’t want a long-distance relationship. She moves to Paris. He needs to work instead of having her over. She gets a job at the titty bar. And throughout, her very poor French shields her from the cruelty, perversion, and mockery of the people around her. “You have to use your breasts, Gina,” the dissatisfied boss of the club says in French. “Customers will slide bills into your cleavage.” This is translated for her as “You need to allow customers to be friendly toward you.” When Jérôme’s ex, a rock star, returns from a tour, Gina’s fixation begins to unnerve the Parisians even as they unwisely string her along.

We’ve all heard enough boiled bunny references to last a lifetime, and you might wonder if the world really needed another entry in the hell-hath-no-fury genre. But Burdge plays Gina as a devastated, rootless woman rather than male paranoia given flesh. Somehow, her acting combines with cinematography straight from an artsy 1970s porno and a soundtrack of woozy love songs to create an expressionist portrait of overwhelming loneliness.

For more info about this and other movies screening this weekend, see Movie Times.

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This looks like it will not end well...


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A Simple Story of Love and Sex and Human Statues in This Year's Romanian Film Festival

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:30:10 -0800

by Joule Zelman

(image)
"The whole earth is our hospital endowed by the ruined millionaire..." Scarred Hearts

A young man in a dapper straw boater and his doting father alight from a horse-drawn carriage at a seaside sanatorium. He’s examined by a bluff, bearded doctor who smokes while palpating the abdomen. The x-ray technician wears a suit like a medieval executioner. With no gravity whatsoever, the doctor announces that the man has spinal tuberculosis: Two of his vertebrae have been devoured by microbes, and a pool of pus has collected in an abcess. Thus begin the travails of the Jewish poet Manu in Radu Jude’s period drama Scarred Hearts, based on the semi-autobiographical writings of Max Blecher.

Jude’s follow-up to Aferim! falls in line with the classic aesthetics of the Romanian New Wave. Almost every scene takes place in a single take with a stationary camera. This allows the viewer to retain mental distance, but might seem an odd choice in Scarred Hearts, given that the protagonist is forced into bed for most of the film. Barring a tragic and bitterly funny sex scene, the action takes place almost completely in the minds and speech of the clinic’s patients. It insists on the humanity of those transformed into “human statues” by constricting plaster casts. It fetishizes nothing—not the clothing or decor of the 1930s, not “noble” suffering, not even poetry.

And widening the scope from Manu’s simple story of love and sex in the midst of physical deterioration, it’s a very dark tale. The invalids debate the rise of Hitler, the Iron Guard (Romania’s fascist party), and the intellectuals like Emil Cioran who compromise with them. When his girlfriend asks about the time he was most afraid, Manu recalls three boys shouting “Die, dirty Jews!” in the street. “Why is it so easy to call for death in Romania and people don’t even turn to look?” he asks. Blecher himself died before the Iron Guard dictatorship of Horia Sima. But Jude has turned his work into a warning and a premonition of cultural rot and nascent violence.


Scarred Hearts, playing at ARCS Romanian Film Festival this Sunday at SIFF Uptown. See Movie Times for more information about this festival.

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"The whole earth is our hospital endowed by the ruined millionaire..."


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New Things To Eat & Drink Right Now

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:25:09 -0800

The Atlantic's Last Days, Anthony Bourdain's Favorite Places, And More by Stranger Things To Do Staff Looking for something to do this weekend? How about a Hawaiian happy hour with Loco Moco at Coastal Kitchen, the grand opening of a Taylor Shellfish Oyster Bar in Bellevue, an Anthony Bourdain viewing party at the Shanghai Room, or the closing party for The Atlantic? Read on for all that and all the other food news you need to know, like that Bok a Bok is bringing its Korean fried chicken and kimchi mac and cheese to Capitol Hill (!), that Mamnoon just opened a new bar, and that Junebaby was just named one of the best restaurants in America. Plus, check out our post from last week for more food news, or check out our ultimate guide to Thanksgiving food, whether you're dining out or in. RESTAURANT OPENINGSTaylor Shellfish Oyster BarThe local, sustainable seafood chain opens its newest oyster bar in Bellevue. Be the first to try their new menu, oysters, and cocktails by attending their grand opening.BellevueOpening November 18 Bok a BokChef Brian O’Connor, who previously worked at at Skillet and Roux, is bringing Bok a Bok, his fried Korean chicken joint in White Center, to Capitol Hill, with sandwiches and sides like chili salt French fries and kimchi mac and cheese. The same offerings will also be available at neighbors Neumos, Barboza, and the Runaway.Capitol HillOpening December 1 RESTAURANT CLOSURESFiddlehead Fine FoodsThe West Seattle brunch and lunch spot bid adieu this week with a Facebook post thanking its customers for six years of business. Cafe Mia, a “bistro + vin bar in West Seattle specializing in house-made global cuisine, wines, craft beer, teas, PNW coffee, & organic juices + smoothies,” is slated to open in its stead.West SeattleClosed November 11th The AtlanticThe warm, charming neighborhood bar that owner Lex Petras painstakingly renovated himself is closing after a year and a half. Service ends on Friday, but guests can say goodbye by dropping by for a cash-only taco night with a full bar on Saturday from 5-9.Central DistrictClosing November 18th SPECIALSBateauTo help the victims of the Napa Valley wildfires, Bateau is donating all their $25 corkage fees from November 20-21 to funds that will aid wildfire relief for the famous wine region. Cloudburst BrewingThe microbrewery responsible for the Alternative Facts IPA and Clickbait IPA has a new beer with a social media-minded name on tap—the Stranger Things Season 2-inspired Now Memories IPA. Their pun-tastic Instagram post about the new offering reads: "Shh, we tapped a stranger thing today....it made us do it. Now Memories IPA is hopped with 438 and Citra. It’s like you’ve tasted these hops before, but it wasn’t your mouth. #wellthatgotkindaweird #strangerthings #nowmemories #ipa #elevenlevelsofflavor #thatupsidedownlife #justiceforbobnewbysuperhero" Daniel’s BroilerThe Northwest steakhouse is now offering a new happy hour selection at all of its locations, available daily from 4-6:30 pm in the lounge only. Drink deals include a martini or Manhattan for $10, one glass of house red or white wine for $8, and a featured beer of the day for $5. In addition, bar food—including the Steakhouse burger, Filet Mignon steak strips, crispy fried calamari, seared Ahi tuna, crispy artichoke hearts, beef tenderloin sliders and stuffed mushrooms—is half off during happy hour. Fat’s Chicken and WafflesThe Southern fried chicken and waffles joint is now serving the decadent Bates Mode burger, featuring caramelized onions, gravy, bacon, mayo, mustard, and cheddar cheese. Frankie & Jo’sThe plant-based ice cream parlor has launched a new seasonal flavor, Japanese Pump[...]



New Things to Eat & Drink in Seattle Right Now: November 17, 2017 Edition

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:23:24 -0800

by Stranger Things To Do Staff Alert: Sun Liquor’s aged, rum-spiked, small-batch version of eggnog will hit the shelves at 9 am Saturday morning at seven Total Wine & More locations in Washington. It sold out quickly last year, so get your hands on it before it's gone. Sun Liquor / Facebook Looking for something to do this weekend? How about a Hawaiian happy hour with Loco Moco at Coastal Kitchen, the grand opening of a Taylor Shellfish Oyster Bar in Bellevue, an Anthony Bourdain viewing party at the Shanghai Room, or the closing party for The Atlantic? Read on for all that and all the other food news you need to know, like that Bok a Bok is bringing its Korean fried chicken and kimchi mac and cheese to Capitol Hill (!), that Mamnoon just opened a new bar, and that Junebaby was just named one of the best restaurants in America. Plus, check out our post from last week for more food news, or check out our ultimate guide to Thanksgiving food, whether you're dining out or in. RESTAURANT OPENINGSTaylor Shellfish Oyster BarThe local, sustainable seafood chain opens its newest oyster bar in Bellevue. Be the first to try their new menu, oysters, and cocktails by attending their grand opening.BellevueOpening November 18 Alert: Sun Liquor’s aged, rum-spiked, small-batch version of eggnog will hit the shelves at 9 am Saturday morning at seven Total Wine & More locations in Washington. It sold out quickly last year, so get your hands on it before it's gone.[...]


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New Things to Eat & Drink in Seattle Right Now: November 17, 2017 Edition

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:19:00 -0800

The Atlantic's last days, Anthony Bourdain's favorite places, and more. by Stranger Things To Do Staff Looking for something to do this weekend? How about a Hawaiian happy hour with Loco Moco at Coastal Kitchen, the grand opening of a Taylor Shellfish Oyster Bar in Bellevue, an Anthony Bourdain viewing party at the Shanghai Room, or the closing party for The Atlantic? Read on for all that and all the other food news you need to know, like that Bok a Bok is bringing its Korean fried chicken and kimchi mac and cheese to Capitol Hill (!), that Mamnoon just opened a new bar, and that Junebaby was just named one of the best restaurants in America. Plus, check out our post from last week for more food news, or check out our ultimate guide to Thanksgiving food, whether you're dining out or in. RESTAURANT OPENINGSTaylor Shellfish Oyster BarThe local, sustainable seafood chain opens its newest oyster bar in Bellevue. Be the first to try their new menu, oysters, and cocktails by attending their grand opening.BellevueOpening November 18 Bok a BokChef Brian O’Connor, who previously worked at at Skillet and Roux, is bringing Bok a Bok, his fried Korean chicken joint in White Center, to Capitol Hill, with sandwiches and sides like chili salt French fries and kimchi mac and cheese. The same offerings will also be available at neighbors Neumos, Barboza, and the Runaway.Capitol HillOpening December 1 RESTAURANT CLOSURESFiddlehead Fine FoodsThe West Seattle brunch and lunch spot bid adieu this week with a Facebook post thanking its customers for six years of business. Cafe Mia, a “bistro + vin bar in West Seattle specializing in house-made global cuisine, wines, craft beer, teas, PNW coffee, & organic juices + smoothies,” is slated to open in its stead.West SeattleClosed November 11th The AtlanticThe warm, charming neighborhood bar that owner Lex Petras painstakingly renovated himself is closing after a year and a half. Service ends on Friday, but guests can say goodbye by dropping by for a cash-only taco night with a full bar on Saturday from 5-9.Central DistrictClosing November 18th SPECIALSBateauTo help the victims of the Napa Valley wildfires, Bateau is donating all their $25 corkage fees from November 20-21 to funds that will aid wildfire relief for the famous wine region. Cloudburst BrewingThe microbrewery responsible for the Alternative Facts IPA and Clickbait IPA has a new beer with a social media-minded name on tap—the Stranger Things Season 2-inspired Now Memories IPA. Their pun-tastic Instagram post about the new offering reads: "Shh, we tapped a stranger thing today....it made us do it. Now Memories IPA is hopped with 438 and Citra. It’s like you’ve tasted these hops before, but it wasn’t your mouth. #wellthatgotkindaweird #strangerthings #nowmemories #ipa #elevenlevelsofflavor #thatupsidedownlife #justiceforbobnewbysuperhero" Daniel’s BroilerThe Northwest steakhouse is now offering a new happy hour selection at all of its locations, available daily from 4-6:30 pm in the lounge only. Drink deals include a martini or Manhattan for $10, one glass of house red or white wine for $8, and a featured beer of the day for $5. In addition, bar food—including the Steakhouse burger, Filet Mignon steak strips, crispy fried calamari, seared Ahi tuna, crispy artichoke hearts, beef tenderloin sliders and stuffed mushrooms—is half off during happy hour. Fat’s Chicken and WafflesThe Southern fried chicken and waffles joint is now serving the decadent Bates Mode burger, featuring caramelized onions, gravy, bacon, mayo, mustard, and cheddar cheese. Frankie & Jo’sThe plant-based ice cream p[...]



Seattle Defends Income Tax in Court, Judge Expected to Rule Next Week

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:18:34 -0800

The judge said he plans to rule by Thanksgiving. by Heidi Groover The scene at Seattle City Hall in July as the state Republican Party chairman responded to Seattle's new income tax. HG The City of Seattle appeared in court Friday for the first arguments in what promises to be a long legal fight over its recently passed high earners income tax. If it can hold up in court, the tax will charge .25 percent on income above $250,000 ($500,000 for joint filers). The city would use the money to fund social services, reduce regressive taxes, or replace lost federal funding. In a state with the most regressive tax system in the country and a city that is particularly generous to the wealthy, passing the tax was a popular move for Seattle's left. But the tax will faces court challenges, which will likely reach the state supreme court. Friday's hearing was the first battle. Over the course of three hours, attorneys for several plaintiffs, including investment manager Michael Kunath, argued the tax violates state law and court precedent. In defending the tax, lawyers for the city and the Economic Opportunity Institute argued Seattle is too dependent on regressive taxes that unfairly hit poor people. (The EOI helped craft the tax.) “Poor and middle class people are being pushed out" while the city raises revenue with regressive taxes, Knoll Lowney, representing the Economic Opportunity Institute, said in court Friday. "This threatens to make Seattle a home only for the rich." (Notably, an attorney on the other side pointed to Seattle's soda tax, passed just “two weeks before regressivity became an important reason for passing the income tax.") Attorneys defending the tax also made unusual arguments in hopes of bypassing unfavorable law and precedent. Along with a 1930s Supreme Court ruling against a state income tax, Washington State Law says "a county, city, or city-county shall not levy a tax on net income." Lawyers defending the tax argued Friday against interpreting state law as a blanket ban on any city income taxes like the one passed by the city council. They argued Seattle's income tax is not on "net income" because the ordinance mandates a tax on "total income in the tax year in excess of $250,000." The ordinance defines "total income" as the "amount reported as income before any adjustments, deductions, or credits." In a motion to the court, the city wrote: “Simply put, total personal income is not net income.” But lawyers for the plaintiffs claim there is no meaningful distinction. The tax affects net income, they argue, and is therefore illegal. “There is no merit to any of the arguments they’re making," said attorney Matthew Davis. "There is a statute that says, 'thou shalt not do this' and the city council said 'we’re going to do it anyway.'" Davis twice called the arguments from the city and EOI "the biggest bunch of legal malarky that I’ve ever heard." Paul Lawrence, representing the city, argued the state supreme court had in the past wrongly applied previous case law to block income taxes. Lawrence and Lowney also argued the income tax is in fact a version of an excise tax, which is allowed by state law, because it is a tax "for the privilege, for the benefit of living in Seattle." “People in Seattle are obtaining significant benefits from residing here," Lawrence said. "That is what the city is trying to tax." Speaking to reporters after the hearing, Christopher Rufo, a plaintiff who would not actually pay the tax, responded to that argument. "As a Seattleite and as an American, I think it's a right to choose where we li[...]


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FCC Paves Way for Sinclair to Dominate Seattle's Local TV News Market

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 14:05:00 -0800

by Katie Herzog Sinclair owns KOMO and could own rival Q13 soon too. William Thomas Cain/Getty This week the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) repealed decades-old rules that could give conservative Sinclair Broadcasting a big boost in media markets across the country, including Seattle. The regulations, which were put in place to protect the integrity and diversity of local media markets, were eliminated by an FCC vote of 3 to 2. Sinclair currently owns and operates over 170 television stations across the country, including KOMO, which they purchased in 2013. In recent months, Sinclair has been attempting to purchase the Tribune Media Company, which would increase Sinclair’s market share to 233 television stations in 108 U.S. markets. That’s 73 percent of U.S. households, and includes Q13, a KOMO rival in Seattle. This sort of merger would not have been possible before Trump. Rules in place since the 1970s have restricted the number of television and radio stations media companies can own in one market, but in May, the FCC relaxed those regulations, and Sinclair announced their bid for Tribune just weeks later. If this sounds fishy, it is: The New York Times reported that the day before Trump’s inauguration, Sinclair chairman David D. Smith visited Ajit V. Pai, a Obama-era FCC commissioner who would soon be named chairman of the agency. Soon after, Pai undertook a “deregulatory blitz, enacting or proposing a wish list of fundamental policy changes advocated by Mr. Smith and his company. Hundreds of pages of emails and other documents obtained under the Freedom of Information Act reveal a rush of regulatory actions has been carefully aligned with Sinclair’s business objectives.” This week, Sen. Maria Cantwell and Sen. Tom Udall, a Democrat from New Mexico, as well as 13 of their Senate colleagues, requested that the inspector general of the FCC open an investigation into the objectivity of Pai and the FCC. “We have strong concerns that the FCC’s ongoing review of the proposed merger of Sinclair Broadcasting and Tribune Media may be tainted by a series of actions and events that raise questions about the independence and impartiality of the FCC,” the senators wrote to FCC Inspector General David Hunt. They have also asked Pai to recuse himself from all FCC business related to the Sinclair-Tribune merger. As Cantwell and her colleagues know, what’s good for Sinclair isn’t necessarily good for the public. In July, Last Week Tonight host John Oliver broadcast a segment on Sinclair’s proposed buyout of Tribune. Citing a report from The Seattle Times, Oliver pointed out that Sinclair stations, including KOMO, are required by their corporate parent to air “must-runs,” which are frequently pro-Trump propaganda pushed by a number of talking heads. Crosscut also reported extensively on the segments. One of the those talking heads is Boris Epshteyn, a Russian-born political strategist, investment banker, and attorney who served as a Trump campaign advisor and briefly worked as an aide in his administration. Epshteyn is also the chief political analyst at Sinclair, and every night he is beamed into Sinclair stations across the country, spewing his pro-Trump messages in between high school sports scores and the local weather forecast. In August, after President Trump responded to the killing of a counter protester at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville by saying there were “good people on both sides,” Epshteyn, echoing Trump, blamed the left: “Representative Steve Scalise and three others shot on an Ale[...]


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Watch These Three Excellent Short Films Inspired by Andrew Wyeth Paintings

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 13:50:20 -0800

The three films chosen will definitely bring a fresh perspective to the work and life of this popular realist painter. by Amber Cortes The story behind this painting was inspiration behind one filmmaking team's winning entry. Who would have known that the paintings of Andrew Wyeth would make such a good catalyst for the creativity of local filmmakers? The Seattle Museum of Art knew! In honor of their comprehensive retrospective that opened last month celebrating the works of Wyeth, SAM sponsored a "film sprint" inviting local filmmakers to make a short film inspired by one of his paintings. The three films, selected by an audience, a curator, and a round of judges, will make you laugh, may make you cry, and will definitely bring a fresh perspective to the work and life of this popular realist painter, whose melancholy landscapes and tender portraits have became American classics. And, apparently there used to be a thing on Slog called Short Film Fridays? So, in the spirit of that, here they are: Audience Pick: Weird Dog Productions, New Tomorrow From some of the hilarious geniuses behind The Future Is Zero game show, New Tomorrow is a funeral home which, has some, um, unusual burial options. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vTVRmdG4roA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Judges’ Pick: Team Wyethian, This Film Instead One filmmaking team has a disturbing Stand by Me moment while scouting locations in the countryside, and decides to shift gears on the film they had planned to make. A true story. (The judges were Patti Junker, SAM’s Ann M. Barwick Curator of American Art; and local filmmakers and artists Clyde Petersen and Wynter Rhys.) width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4Pe-buod4Aw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Curator’s Pick: Team Egg Tempera, Helga Andrew Wyeth made over 200 portraits of nurse and muse, Helga Testorf, in a farmhouse, for 15 years, in secret. This short film tells Helga’s side of this fascinating, poignant story. (Chosen by Patti Junker.) width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UmLnvwjmz7Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> [ Comment on this story ] [ Subscribe to the comments on this story ] [...]The story behind this painting inspired one filmmaking team's winning entry.


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King County Jury Finds that Port of Seattle Illegally Fired Two Employees

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 13:41:51 -0800

It's the port, again. by Sydney Brownstone Ah, the port. Stephen Brashear/The Stranger A King County jury ruled on Thursday that the Port of Seattle wrongfully fired two employees, Deanna Zachrisson and Elaine Lincoln, in 2015. Back in 2015, the Port of Seattle launched an internal investigation into the two employees after e-mails emerged in which Zachrisson and Lincoln, both senior employees in the Airport Dining and Retail group at the airport, called a black business owner a "thug." The e-mails surfaced as part of discovery in a racial discrimination lawsuit brought on at the time by three minority-owned airport concession businesses. Lawyers for Zachrisson and Lincoln argued the emails were dug up by port commissioner John Creighton in an attempt to retaliate against them. The port's internal investigation found no evidence of racial bias from Zachrisson and Lincoln, but fired the two anyway for allegedly violating the port's e-mail policy. According to a trial brief filed by the former port employees, their firing was "mere pretext to hide retaliation." Zachrisson and Lincoln's lawyers argued that Creighton had drafted and helped pass a motion at the port commission back in 2012 that was favorable to minority-owned concession businesses, but against Federal Aviation Administration rules that don't permit preferential treatment. Zachrisson alerted the FAA, and the FAA then told the port that it would be putting its federal funding at risk. Zachrisson and Lincoln also filed an ethics complaint against Creighton, who had received donations from the concessionaires for his campaign, and talked to KING 5. Lawyers for Zachrisson and Lincoln argued that their actions as whistleblowers set Creighton against them, and on Thursday, a King County jury agreed. "Commissioner Creighton learned about the two emails from the Concessionaires," Zachrisson and Lincoln's lawyers wrote in a trial brief. "Harboring animosity over their continued refusal to implement the illegal lease extensions, Creighton seized upon the opportunity to discredit the ADR staff." Creighton filed a public records request on the employees' e-mails and turned them over to port staff. He posted about the e-mails on social media and talked to reporters. The employees were placed on administrative leave and subsequently fired by then-CEO Ted Fick. Fick later resigned over "personnel issues" and controversy over accepting gifts from port tenants and awarding himself a $24,500 bonus. Creighton was recently voted out of office, losing his port commission seat to upstart challenger Ryan Calkins. "By recognizing the illegal retaliation against these women, the jury has sent a message to all employers,” Beth Bloom, attorney for the former employees, said in a statement. “Employers must not fire employees for refusing to break the law or reporting misconduct.  Protecting whistleblowers is the best guarantee we have to ensure that the government serves the interests of the people.” [ Comment on this story ] [ Subscribe to the comments on this story ] [...]Ah, the port.


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Inbox Jukebox: A Weekly Shortlist of Good New Music. Shenandoah Davis, Maya Youssef, and More

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 13:20:25 -0800

Our critic reviews 5 outstanding songs from his inbox to help you stimulate your brainbox. by Dave Segal Shenandoah Davis, Seattle's orchestral-pop savant. Lou Daprile Shenandoah Davis, “The Wings” (Plume). The lead track from Seattle vocalist/pianist Shenandoah Davis's Souvenirs, "The Wings" epitomizes her ambitious compositional skills while showcasing her buoyant voice and perceptive lyrics (Souvenirs is being promoted as an unconventional breakup album, and its emotional heft is substantial; plus, it was recorded in a Brooklyn apartment with Sam Miller). This is exquisitely melodious pop that harks back to the lilting charm of '60s girl groups, but with the orchestral grandeur of Scott Walker's first four solo albums and the icy-sweet spaciousness of Mercury Rev's Deserter's Songs/All Is Dream era. width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oCWAKSsH3LE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen> Mavis Staples, "If All I Was Was Black" (Anti-). Damn, Mavis Staples is still fabulous at 78. With production/instrumental help from Wilco's Jeff Tweedy, the soul/gospel grande dame inhabits this mid-tempo beauty—the title track from her just-released album—with her patented warmth and wisdom. There's nothing radical about the music or lyrics; Mavis just hits that sweet spot in your heart with her weathered-to-perfection voice. Even in subdued mode (for her), Staples stirs deep feelings. "It's time for more love," she sings with irrefutable logic, followed by a wonderfully gnarly Tweedy guitar solo, as the song ambles with a slightly faster Rose Royce/"I Wanna Get Next to You" gait. Mind's now at ease. width="500" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TTgFZtu2ohk" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allowfullscreen> Maya Youssef, “Queen of the Night” (Harmonia Mundi). Newsflash: There are other contemporary musicians from Syria besides Omar Souleyman who deserve your precious attention. Maya Youssef—whose album Syrian Dreams comes out today on Harmonia Mundi's Latitudes Series—is a virtuoso of the kanun, a 78-stringed plucked zither used in traditional Syrian music. The piquant timbres she generates from it, coupled with her gorgeously bittersweet melodies and crisp hand-drum rhythms, culminates in an ambrosial aura. "Queen of the Night" sounds like the work of a Middle Eastern Alice Coltrane or Dorothy Ashby. Not gonna lie: Youssef makes this American of Syrian descent proud. width="500" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JugasQgXglQ" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allowfullscreen> Marisa Anderson, "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" (Mississippi). Portland guitarist Marisa Anderson might be the female John Fahey. On Traditional and Public Domain Songs, she displays her preternatural facility for making old music sound startlingly alive. (Her original material is fantastic, too, and she's amazing live, as well.) Here, Anderson transforms patriotic warhorse "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" into a glassy-eyed reverie with wonderfully slurring tones and a much more laggard tempo, as if to mock the original's audacious strut. Glory, glory, hallelujah! style="border: 0; width: 100%; height: 120px;" src="https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=1522509839/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/artwork=small/track=1726897523/transparent=true/" seamless>Traditional and Public Domain Songs by Marisa Anderson Eric Copeland, "Mixer Shredder" (DFA). As Eric Copeland's biggest fan, I am compell[...]


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Why the Apes in War for the Planet of the Apes Are More Moral Than Roy Moore

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 13:08:00 -0800

by Charles Mudede War for the Planet of the ApesYesterday, Roy Moore, the accused pedophile who is running in Alabama's Senate race, claimed he was something of a messiah of American moral values that needed to be upheld. Moore, as we all should see, bases morality not on human sociality (the human as animal) but a particular conception of the family (human culture). By moral, he means the family as it's understood by the cultural standards of a certain race of Americans. Further more, the reason why he is a member of the GOP is because there was a moment in the history of capitalism when the middle-class family was considered to be the most stable, and therefore the most useful/ideal, unit of consumption. Interesting enough, the GOP aligned itself with this ideal—pro-family or value voters—only in the 1980s. A decade before that, a leader of the GOP could establish and fund Planned Parenthood without blinking an eye or worrying about value votes. The family ideal, however, began its decline in the 1960s with the neoliberal revolution, which adopted important features of the counter-culture movement (this explains how the cultural response to the classic capitalist family became the neoliberal call to "think different") but rejected the labor movement (the class response to capitalist distribution). Grasping this complicated transition, which was actually initiated by Jimmy Carter, the first neoliberal president, and his nomination of Paul Volker to the Chairman of the Federal Reserve in 1979 (the first year of the last decade of the short 20th century), will provide the key to understanding why Moore's conception of the family is not about the family as such but the increased displacement of the white heterosexual male as the center of the once-dominant unit of consumption. For the past 40 years, the GOP has heavily farmed this field of white-male feeling for votes. And so we have a morality that is very flexible because it is cultural and not properly animal. Let's think along these lines for a moment. What is poorly understood by most people is that there is a difference between human sociality and human culture. We are hyper-social before we are hyper-cultural. This point is clearly and convincingly made in Hal Whitehead's essay "Social and Cultural Evolution in the Ocean" in the book The Deep Structure of Biology: Is Convergence Sufficiently Ubiquitous to Give a Directional Signal?. The social is, and can only be the kind of animal we actually are. It's deeper and changes very slowly. Culture, on the other hand, springs from the social with the function of adapting the human to a variety of temporally and spatially changing environments. Indeed, the anthropologists Robert Boyd and Peter J. Richerson claim in Not By Genes Alone: How Culture Transformed Human Evolution that the wildly unstable climate of the Pleistocene was responsible for increasing the importance of culture in human populations. The Holocene introduced a global temperature stability from which we appear to be leaving only after 12,000 years. The combination of climate stability and hyper-culture can be seen by anyone who lives in a city or on a farm. But the level of cooperation that's needed to manage a farm or a factory or a city does not have its roots in culture but in the social, the body of what Jared Diamond called "the third chimpanzee" in his best and first book. And what I have stressed in my essays for the online arts journal e-flux is that culture[...]


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The Culture of Harassing and Demeaning Women Scientists

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 13:02:00 -0800

by Sarah Myhre SolStock/gettyimages.com EDITOR'S NOTE: This post has been updated at the bottom with a comment from Cliff Mass. Feminist rage has burned through my days and nights this last week, leaving me exhausted and anger-hangover every morning. Harvey Weinstein, Louis CK, Roy Moore, Al Franken–take them all down. I have fiery images in my mind’s eye of the careers of powerful men toppling like Saddam’s statue. BURN THEM ALL DOWN. I rage silently in my lipstick and heels, dressing as powerfully and sexually I can–as if to say, “try it on me motherfuckers”. I rage-walk from the bus to day care to work to the grocery store and I stare down every man on the street, silently shaming him with my eyes. It is a game I play through these rage-soaked days. This reckoning—it must extend to science, too. It must extend to our public institutions like the University of Washington. As a student and then a professional scientist, I have been assaulted, raped, harassed, demeaned, belittled, and threatened on the job. That is right. Every single professional gig that you might read on my CV comes with a litany of backstories of abuse and violence. I am not unique. I am the norm, and I have persevered in science exactly because of the rage that has transported me recently through the streets of Seattle. The rage protects as much as it exhausts and depletes. For example, as an undergraduate student at Western Washington University, I did research in Caribbean Costa Rica, in a small village named Manzanillo. At 22-years old, I spent hundreds of SCUBA hours, over a period of four months, underwater studying coastal fringing coral reefs. One night in the bar in the village, after working in a wetsuit all day, I was approached by a man with a plaintive: “Hey baby, what is your name, talk to me.” Exhausted, I walked away from him and sat down in the bar tables away. Moments later, his hand was on the back of my head, lifting me out of my chair by my hair, throwing me on the ground. I fell to my knees and quickly got back to my feet to stand and face this man. As I faced him, he spat in my face–in my open eye. Instead of involuntarily wiping the spit, I defiantly blinked away his mucus and looked at him. He said to me, “If I ever see you again, I will kill you.” And then he walked away. Eight months later, I published that first scientific paper from my research on coral reefs, and it launched my career. These are the stories behind the shiny baubles on our CVs. Even worse, our harassers are often our scientific “colleagues” and coauthors–they are powerful men who gatekeep our careers or publications. Indeed, my own CV contains the names of multiple men who have harassed or demeaned me. This shit is systemic. In our university culture, men scientists often feel that it's just fine to demean women scientists. This was my indeed my experience with the now infamous local Seattle weather guy. In January of 2016, the Monday after the Women’s March, I gave invited scientific testimony to the Washington State House Environment Committee on greenhouse gas emission reduction. After the testimony, Representative Shelly Short asked a panel of us a question about Dr. Cliff Mass’s views on climate change. I choose to answer that question honestly, saying “Many of us at the University of Washington do view his views as coming from a denialist or contrarian place.” On my drive home from Olympia, I receiv[...]


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The Top 15 Acts to Check Out at Seattle's Freakout Festival This Weekend: Nov 17-18, 2017

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 12:49:00 -0800

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

(image)
Witness the power of declarative yet mercurial MC/vocalist Stas THEE Boss this Saturday at Freakout Festival.

During Freakout Festival this weekend, more than 50 local and touring music acts will fill the Ballard zone for two whole days of rock, soul, hiphop, dance beats, and more. On our Freakout Festival calendar, you can see the complete schedule that's sortable by venue and date, and read descriptions about and listen to music from every artist. If that's overwhelming, look no further—below, you'll find just our critics' picks for each day. Follow the links below for ticket links and music clips.

FRIDAY
Bread and Butter
Seattle foursome Bread and Butter’s bio describes them as “Specializing in blasted stoner pop jams—true to their name, plain and simple. These wastoids will make you feel like drinking plentiful Tecate and just forgetting about time.” In six months, I will agree with that statement—their track called “Cool in the Water” is a total day-drinking jam for sunburns, bridge jumping, light denim, forgetting to go to work, and no problem-o classic rock ’n’ roll. EMILY NOKES
Sunset Tavern, 11 pm

Witness the power of declarative yet mercurial MC/vocalist Stas THEE Boss this Saturday at Freakout Festival.


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Crater Announces Their Second Album Unearth, and Releases Single “Novocaine”

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 12:36:10 -0800

"Novocaine" is more direct with less distraction—but still just as captivating. by Anna Kaplan

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Crater, the duo of Ceci Gomez and Kess Gordon. Courtesy of Crater's Facebook

After seeing that they had changed their Facebook cover photo to a glowing mix of orange and purple shades, I thought something might be up with electronic duo Crater.

From there, Crater (Ceci Gomez and Kess Gordon) proceeded to drop teasers on their Facebook page for the past few weeks about releasing new music soon, and today, Crater are back with their first single, “Novocaine,” off of their upcoming sophomore record Unearth.

In line with their glowing debut album, Talk to Me so I Can Fall Asleep, “Novocaine” incorporates Crater’s moody, industrial tone with slightly less noise. Although I loved the seemingly endless amounts of samples and synths on the first record, "Novocaine" is more direct, with less distraction—but still just as captivating.

src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/6sCuD9eCYp5ZXhFIpYV6As" width="300" height="380" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true">

Crater said the track references the inner workings of someone who knows they’ve gone off the deep end. The song starts off with an airy ethereal intro, before adding a few layers of rolling synths. A computerized sample softly speaks, "The novocaine when I'm with you, unknown pleasure" before the track slowly lurches into something more menacing.

“I don't trust myself,” vocalist Ceci Gomez croons through levels of distortion and broken syllables about halfway through the song, before piercing synths take control. The soft-intro-turned-threatening dance track personifies the feelings of someone who begins to realize all the chaos they’ve caused.

In the three months since I caught Crater for the first time at Bumbershoot, I've been waiting for new music from them. They played a couple of new tracks during their set, which left me itching to hear more, and unfortunately, “Novocaine” has done everything but numb my desire to hear even more from the Seattle/LA based duo.

“Novocaine” is available on Spotify, and their second record Unearth will drop on Jan. 12.

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Crater, the duo of Ceci Gomez and Kess Gordon.


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Wonder Is Guaranteed to Soften Your Scowl

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 12:26:00 -0800

by Elinor Jones

It’s easy to live a snarky life. I see a lot of movies that are god-awful, and the world around us is also pretty god-awful, and without wanting to, I seem to have “This is stupid” on the tip of my tongue more often than not. So when a movie comes along that is good—legitimately, sincerely good, like flowers or soup or dogs—I find myself grasping at a way to describe it.

Wonder is that good movie. It’s about a little boy, Auggie (Room's Jacob Tremblay), and his mom (Julia Roberts), his dad (Owen Wilson), and his older sister (Izabela Vidovic). Auggie was born with a condition that makes him look different, so that's what Wonder focuses on—but it’s not really what this movie is. This is a portrait of a group of humans—grown-ups and kids, but mostly kids—who are whole, complicated people, who have opportunities to be selfish and opportunities to be kind. Wonder defaults to kindness in a manner that feels both totally inspiring and completely organic.

I spent the whole movie wondering (ha!) how an adaptation of a corny bestselling novel could turn out so non-corny and delightful. Then the director’s name flashed on screen: Stephen Chbosky. Chbosky most recently wrote the screenplay for Disney's live-action Beauty and the Beast, but more importantly, he wrote The Perks of Being a Wallflower, and he was also responsible for that book's perfect movie adaptation.

This man has got a gift for creating things that makes us hardened adults develop a melancholic knot in our hearts that reminds us exactly how it felt to be a kid.

I don’t want to oversell this movie, because I’d like each and every one of you to be surprised by the myriad of ways it can soften your scowl. So I’m gonna stop here, and go pet some dogs, and feel totally content. (image)

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Speaking of Trucks...

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 11:53:00 -0800

by Katie Herzog

A tipster sent us these, which were reportedly taken in suburban Cincinnati.


KREM 2 asked the Federal Aviation Administration about the incident, and the FAA responded that while there is no safety risk to giant dicks painted in the sky, they "cannot police morality."

The Navy, however, can. "The Navy holds its aircrew to the highest standards and we find this absolutely unacceptable, of zero training value and we are holding the crew accountable," said Navy officials in a statement.

The Navy has not released the pilot's name, but we think some re-training is in order: Dicks are too easy! You want a real challenge? Try flying a giant vagina.

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The Top 15 Acts to Check Out at Seattle's Freakout Festival This Weekend: Nov 17-18, 2017

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 11:51:00 -0800

When and where to see the best local bands. by Stranger Things To Do Staff During Freakout Festival this weekend, more than 50 local and touring music acts will fill the Ballard zone for two whole days of rock, soul, hiphop, dance beats, and more. On our Freakout Festival calendar, you can see the complete schedule that's sortable by venue and date, and read descriptions about and listen to music from every artist. If that's overwhelming, look no further—below, you'll find just our critics' picks for each day. Follow the links below for ticket links and music clips. Jump to: Friday | Saturday FRIDAY Bread and Butter Seattle foursome Bread and Butter’s bio describes them as “Specializing in blasted stoner pop jams—true to their name, plain and simple. These wastoids will make you feel like drinking plentiful Tecate and just forgetting about time.” In six months, I will agree with that statement—their track called “Cool in the Water” is a total day-drinking jam for sunburns, bridge jumping, light denim, forgetting to go to work, and no problem-o classic rock ’n’ roll. EMILY NOKESSunset Tavern, 11 pm Charms CHARMS are among a burgeoning wave of Seattle post-punk groups writing tumultuous, infernal songs to mirror the dangerous times in which we live. Like some perturbed combo of Siouxsie & the Banshees and Killing Joke, the trio churn out end-time jams that bless these future ruins with surprisingly melodic panache. DAVE SEGALSunset Tavern, 12:05 am FKL Having started in London, and now run across the Atlantic, the duo behind FKL is made up of Joe Gillick and Sage Redman, who together blend elements of coldwave, post-punk, and new school electronica for a sound that touches on both house pop and grime. KIM SELLINGHattie's Hat, 12 am My Goodness My Goodness are the Seattle torque-and-stomp blues-fired duo of Joel Schneider and Ethan Jacobsen. Schneider's Verellen-amped guitar sound caves into Jacobsen's drums like a landslide. Jacobsen's totemic, ore-cracked cymbals, snare, and kick receive and reciprocate the landslide, hammering back the vibrations with sturdy balance and malt-liquored lilting. Schneider's muscle-toned vocals (See also: Absolute Monarchs) are a furnace of screams, but can switch to a bullet-in-the-heart croon in seconds. TRENT MOORMANTractor Tavern, 11:25 pm Smokey Brights Go to this set. Do it. Do it for Smokey Brights, who are the kind of crackly and warm guitar-driven rock that you already know and love, even if you’ve never heard it. It’s that warm blanket that you throw over your head to avoid dealing with your uncle’s off-color rants about refugees. Do it for yourself. KATHLEEN TARRANTConor Byrne, 11:30 pmAlso on Saturday: Filson, 5:50 pm Taylar Elizza Beth Somehow maintaining a balance of lush cosmic haze and centering gravitas, experimental hiphop artist Taylar Elizza Beth incorporates values of theater, poetry, and electronica into her work, resulting in a heady mix that elevates as it grounds. Her much-anticipated next EP Fresh Cut Flowers (the follow-up to 2014's The BLK EP) is set to come out sometime this spring. KIM SELLINGHattie's Hat, 10:35 pm SATURDAY Cosmos You'll be hard-pressed to find a more original band than Cosmos. On their latest album, Moonshine, they combin[...]



On the Boards’ New Artistic Director Is Rachel Cook

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 11:30:22 -0800

"I’m excited to see what sorts of magic and mischief she’ll make in Seattle." by Amber Cortes Rachel Cook, On the Boards' New Artistic Director COURTESY OTB The performing arts organization On the Boards (OtB) has a lot to celebrate this year—for one, it's their 40th anniversary. And now, after a six month search, they've chosen a new artistic director: Rachel Cook. After the departure of Lane Czaplinski, OtB’s artistic director for the last 15 years (who left to run the performing arts program at the Wexler Center in Ohio), they had a some big shoes to fill. Czaplinski created the Performance Production Program, which provides resources to local artists to fulfill their vision, and (most notably) started OntheBoards.tv in 2010, which brings full-length OtB performances to over 157 countries. He's also described as "a fearless karaoke singer." So, who is Rachel Cook? She hails from Houston and was recently a curator at DiverseWorks, a center for visual, literary, and performing art. According to the OtB press release: Prior to joining DiverseWorks, Cook worked for dOCUMENTA(13)’s publication team, and was a fellow for the International Studio & Curatorial Program in New York. Cook holds a MA from the Center for Curatorial Studies at Bard College and a BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute. Last year she received a Curatorial Fellowship from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts to research a series of Walker Evans’ photographs from the African Negro Art exhibition at MoMA in 1935. "I am eager to begin getting to know everyone better and initiate collaborations with artists and the community to further re-imagine how a contemporary performing arts organization can contribute to the critical discourse about art and the world we live in today,” Cook says. “Rachel is one of those rare individuals who excels at both the day-to-day brass tacks that keep an organization running, and the philosophical questioning that is so vital to keeping an organization from becoming mired in business as usual," said writer and On the Boards artist-in-residence Claudia La Rocco. "The stakes for making artistic organizations relevant in our society feel really high right now. Rachel is keenly aware of those stakes; I’m excited to see what sorts of magic and mischief she’ll make in Seattle.” This all sounds very exciting! We're excited to see what Cook will bring to the table at an organization known for fearlessly taking risks with their programming, and, hope she's good at karaoke, too. [ Comment on this story ] [ Subscribe to the comments on this story ] [...]Rachel Cook, On the Boards' New Artistic Director


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What Does a Democratic State Senate Majority Mean For Voting Rights in Washington?

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 11:23:03 -0800

State legislators for years have failed to pass a Voting Rights Act. by Bernard Ellouk Are fairer elections in non-Seattle Washington on the way? GETTY Passing a Washington Voting Rights Act, which could mandate re-districing of city elections from at-large to districted, has bedeviled state Democrats for nearly a decade. But now that the election is over, a major priority for the ascendant state Democratic majority will be to make state elections fair for minority candidates, whose electoral prospects are significantly diminished under the at-large voting system used by most Washington cities. Bills advancing a state voting rights act have snaked through the legislature annually, often passing the Democratic-held House, only to die on the Senate floor. But Manka Dhingra’s win in the 45th, which won the Senate back for Democrats, restored hope for advocates pushing a Washington Voting Rights Act, who for years have been waging a battle for electoral equality across the state. The fight began earnestly in 2012 when the ACLU filed a suit against the city of Yakima alleging that the city weakened the votes of its majority Latino population by using a prejudiced voting system. At the time, the Yakima voting system required the city’s whole population to vote for every city council candidate despite the fact that candidates were running to represent a city district. The system allowed the city’s slim white majority of Yakima to consistently vote down all non-white candidates. For decades and despite a burgeoning Latino population, no single Latino was elected to Yakima city council despite the attempts of dozens of Latino candidates. In 2014, the ACLU followed its Yakima suit with a similar one against Pasco, in which it claimed that the Pasco’s at-large voting system “impermissibly dilutes the Latino votes,” violating the federal voting rights act. Pasco’s Latino population represented 56% of the population of the city, yet no single Latino held elected office. Both the Yakima and Pasco lawsuits were successful, and both cities were required by court order to dismantle their at-large voting system and replace it with a districted system. A districted system would allows segments of a city, rather than the entire city, to elect city council members. The change succeeded in diversifying the cities as a handful of Latino candidates would go on to win city council positions for the first time. In Yakima, Dulce Gutierrez, Avina Gutierrez and Carmen Mendez won seats in 2015, the first election after the mandatory re-districting. In Pasco, Ruben Alvarado, Blanche Barajas, and Saul Martinez won council seats in November’s election. “It has done a lot to level the playing field,” says Ruben Alvarado of the lawsuits. Alvarado claims that he would not have run had it not been for the court-mandated re-districting. “It was entirely prohibitive beforehand,” he adds. But victories through lawsuits have meant that progress has been piecemeal. While Pasco and Yakima saw gains in Latino representation, both bodies are still majority white despite the city’s being majority Latino. While the most obvious structural inequality may be gone, Latino candidates still face challenges securing[...]


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