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Seattle's #1 Weekly Newspaper. Covering Seattle news, politics, music, film, and arts; plus movie times, club calendars, restaurant listings, forums, blogs, and Savage Love.



Published: Fri, 15 Dec 2017 00:00:01 -0800

Last Build Date: Fri, 15 Dec 2017 06:30:00 -0800

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An Art Exhibition Tonight That Includes Spot Illustrations from The Stranger in the 1990s

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 16:23:27 -0800

by Christopher Frizzelle One of Sean Hurley's pieces that will be on exhibit tonight at Steve Gilbert Studio from 5 to 9 pm. Sean Michael Hurley In The Stranger's calendar, Sean Michael Hurley's art show, "Urban Myths," is described as an exhibition of "mystical, symbolist-inspired drawings." What I didn't know until a few hours ago is that the show also includes spot illos from The Stranger that ran in the 1990s, during those lost years that aren't archived on our website. I didn't work at The Stranger in the 1990s, so I don't know which of these are symbolist-inspired and which of these were Stranger illustrations. Maybe you can tell? Sean Michael Hurley Sean Michael Hurley Sean Michael Hurley Sean Michael Hurley Sean Michael Hurley Sean Michael Hurley Sean Michael Hurley The originals of Stranger illustrations will be going for $25 a pop—a screaming deal. I don't know about you, but I have a few blank spaces on my walls that need filling. See you there. [ Comment on this story ] [ Subscribe to the comments on this story ] [...]One of Sean Hurley's pieces that will be on exhibit tonight at Steve Gilbert Studio from 5 to 9 pm.


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com




Our Film Critics' Picks For This Weekend

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 16:13:13 -0800

25 Picks For Dec 14-17 by Stranger Things To Do Staff The biggest news in film this week is of course Star Wars: The Last Jedi, which is good enough to justify the obsessive fanfare and may be just what you need to escape this galaxy. But there are plenty of other options, chosen by our critics and presented below, including Golden Globe-nominated The Shape of Water and holiday classic It's a Wonderful Life. Follow the links for complete showtimes and trailers. THURSDAY ONLYBob & Carol & Ted & AliceThis satirical sex comedy from 1969 (tee hee) mocks free love and new-age psychology in a tale of two couples, one free-spirited and one prim, who decide to try their hand at group sex. Among the assets of this film by Paul Mazursky: a performance by Natalie Wood and an original score by Seattle’s own Quincy Jones.Grand Illusion JaneBased on recovered footage of iconic primatologist Jane Goodall during her groundbreaking chimpanzee research in 1960s Tanzania, Jane unfolds in a traditional National Geographic documentary format: beautiful nature footage paired with reserved British voiceover (provided by Goodall herself). Anyone with a passing interest in Goodall’s writings about the social relationships of chimpanzees will be delighted by the dramatic film clips of chimps stealing bananas from her camp set to an energetic score by Philip Glass. Mixed-in moments of Goodall’s perfectly-lit beauty seem out of place with her professional reflections until the film reveals this recovered footage was shot by Hugo van Lawick, a gifted wildlife photographer and, in time, Goodall’s first husband. The authentic relatability to both these love stories—van Lawick falling for Goodall and Goodall discovering her life’s work—pushes Jane beyond the confines of a nature film into the territory of being a pretty ideal date movie. SUZETTE SMITHSIFF Cinema Uptown MarshallBefore he was the first black justice on the United States Supreme Court, Thurgood Marshall was a lawyer who traveled the country as the NAACP's first attorney, defending innocent black people who had been accused of crimes they didn't commit. Marshall is about one of those early cases. In a courtroom plastered with murals of bound Native Americans, Marshall (Chadwick Boseman) defended a black man accused of raping a wealthy white woman (Kate Hudson). Marshall wasn’t allowed to speak in the courtroom; that honor fell to his white co-counsel, Sam Friedman (Josh Gad). If this case were tried today, we’d know the cards were stacked against them—but this took place in the 1940s, when schools were legally segregated and Black people were still at the back of the bus. There are a few weird things about Marshall. The first weird thing is that it’s... funny? Boseman and Gad are both great, and the smarmy DA (Dan Stevens) is deliciously hittable. The second weird thing about Marshall—which is notably less delightful than the first—is that a large part of the film focuses on proving that a woman lied about being raped. This is gross, no matter how much we're rooting for the defendant. ELINOR JONESPacific Place Roman J. Israel, Esq.Let's begin by recalling Jake Gyllenhaal’s bulging eyes in Dan Gilroy’s excellent thriller Nightcrawler. They are the eyes of a man who almost entirely lives in his head. With those eyes in mind, let's turn to the star of a new film that's also directed Gilroy, Roman J. Israel, Esq. Denzel Washington—a black American actor who has handled his Hollywood career far more prudently and effectively than, say, Will Smith—plays Mr. Israel, a man who, like Gyllenhaal's character in Nightcrawler, lives deep inside of his head. But we see his extreme inwardness not in his eyes but manner of walk. Roman J. Israel is a lawyer who has a monstrous memory. He can recall with no effort all of the details of dead and forgotten cases; he also lives in his vivid dreams of a better and more just American society. He walks like his mind h[...]



25 Movies Worth Watching in Seattle This Weekend: Dec 14-17, 2017

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 16:12:37 -0800

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

(image)
Star Wars: The Last Jedi is a blockbuster space opera and a "feminist rejection of male impulsiveness," per Charles Mudede.

The biggest news in film this week is of course Star Wars: The Last Jedi, which is good enough to justify the obsessive fanfare and may be just what you need to escape this galaxy. But there are plenty of other options, chosen by our critics and presented below, including Golden Globe-nominated The Shape of Water and holiday classic It's a Wonderful Life. Follow the links for complete showtimes and trailers, or, if you're looking for even more options, check out our complete movie times listings, and our film events calendar.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.

THURSDAY ONLY
Bob & Carol & Ted & Alice
This satirical sex comedy from 1969 (tee hee) mocks free love and new-age psychology in a tale of two couples, one free-spirited and one prim, who decide to try their hand at group sex. Among the assets of this film by Paul Mazursky: a performance by Natalie Wood and an original score by Seattle’s own Quincy Jones.
Grand Illusion

Star Wars: The Last Jedi is a blockbuster space opera and a "feminist rejection of male impulsiveness," per Charles Mudede.


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com




25 Movies Worth Watching in Seattle This Weekend: Dec 14-17, 2017

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 16:08:05 -0800

The Stranger's film critics' picks. by Stranger Things To Do Staff The biggest news in film this week is of course Star Wars: The Last Jedi, which is good enough to justify the obsessive fanfare and may be just what you need to escape this galaxy. But there are plenty of other options, chosen by our critics and presented below, including Golden Globe-nominated The Shape of Water and holiday classic It's a Wonderful Life. Follow the links for complete showtimes and trailers, or, if you're looking for even more options, check out our complete movie times listings, and our film events calendar.Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play. Jump to: Thursday Only | Friday-Sunday | Saturday Only | Sunday Only | All Weekend THURSDAY ONLYBob & Carol & Ted & AliceThis satirical sex comedy from 1969 (tee hee) mocks free love and new-age psychology in a tale of two couples, one free-spirited and one prim, who decide to try their hand at group sex. Among the assets of this film by Paul Mazursky: a performance by Natalie Wood and an original score by Seattle’s own Quincy Jones.Grand Illusion JaneBased on recovered footage of iconic primatologist Jane Goodall during her groundbreaking chimpanzee research in 1960s Tanzania, Jane unfolds in a traditional National Geographic documentary format: beautiful nature footage paired with reserved British voiceover (provided by Goodall herself). Anyone with a passing interest in Goodall’s writings about the social relationships of chimpanzees will be delighted by the dramatic film clips of chimps stealing bananas from her camp set to an energetic score by Philip Glass. Mixed-in moments of Goodall’s perfectly-lit beauty seem out of place with her professional reflections until the film reveals this recovered footage was shot by Hugo van Lawick, a gifted wildlife photographer and, in time, Goodall’s first husband. The authentic relatability to both these love stories—van Lawick falling for Goodall and Goodall discovering her life’s work—pushes Jane beyond the confines of a nature film into the territory of being a pretty ideal date movie. SUZETTE SMITHSIFF Cinema Uptown MarshallBefore he was the first black justice on the United States Supreme Court, Thurgood Marshall was a lawyer who traveled the country as the NAACP's first attorney, defending innocent black people who had been accused of crimes they didn't commit. Marshall is about one of those early cases. In a courtroom plastered with murals of bound Native Americans, Marshall (Chadwick Boseman) defended a black man accused of raping a wealthy white woman (Kate Hudson). Marshall wasn’t allowed to speak in the courtroom; that honor fell to his white co-counsel, Sam Friedman (Josh Gad). If this case were tried today, we’d know the cards were stacked against them—but this took place in the 1940s, when schools were legally segregated and Black people were still at the back of the bus. There are a few weird things about Marshall. The first weird thing is that it’s... funny? Boseman and Gad are both great, and the smarmy DA (Dan Stevens) is deliciously hittable. The second weird thing about Marshall—which is notably less delightful than the first—is that a large part of the film focuses on proving that a woman lied about being raped. This is gross, no matter how much we're rooting for the defendant. ELINOR JONESPacific Place Roman J. Israel, Esq.Let's begin by recalling Jake Gyllenhaal’s bulging eyes in Dan Gilroy’s excellent thriller Nightcrawler. They are the eyes of a man who almost entirely lives in his head. With those eyes in mind, let's turn to the star of a new film that's also directed Gilroy, Roman J. Israel, Esq. Denzel Washington—a black American actor who has handled his Hollywood career far more prudently and effectively than, say, Will Smith—plays Mr. Israel, a man[...]



Culture News: Artist Sondra Perry Is On Display at SAM, Hillary Clinton Stops at Elliott Bay, and a DIY Space Closes

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:50:05 -0800

Plus: A new Executive Director for NAAM, and some big-art-money grant winners. by Amber Cortes Artist Sondra Perry's backhoe video installation. IMAGE COURTESY SEATTLE ART MUSEUM New Media Artist Sondra Perry’s Mixed Media Installation Opens at Seattle Art Museum: The winner of the 2017 Gwendolyn Knight and Jacob Lawrence Prize has made a sculpture featuring a refurbished backhoe with a three-channel video monitor attached that projects images representing race, class, abstraction, and gentrification. Perry’s video, Eclogue for [in]HABITABILITY , was unveiled at SAM on December 8 and will be on display in SAM's Gwendolyn Knight | Jacob Lawrence Gallery through July 7. If You’re Out for the Capitol Art Walk Tonight, Look for the “Capitol Hill Arts District” Medallions: They were just installed at 40 different spots all over the hill, designating ‘cultural spaces’ like theaters, galleries and music and bookstores. They were funded by the Office of Arts and Culture. The City Is Rushing to Sign a Lease for the Asian Art Museum Expansion Before the End of the Month: Since, under the new Republican tax plan, federal tax credits that would partially fund the project, like the Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit, will be abolished (the city is seeking a $6 million credit). Members of the Protect Volunteer Park group that’s against the expansion are pressing for Mayor Durkan to stop City Hall from signing the lease, which they say will deplete “our public wealth for generations, in exchange for a quick financial rush of $6 million in tax credits.” The Northwest African American Museum’s New ED is LaNesha DeBardelaben: She comes to NAAM from the Wright Museum, the nation’s second largest African American museum, and will now lead the only museum in the Northwest dedicated to the art and culture of people of African descent. Norman Rice, NAAM board member and former Mayor of Seattle, welcomed her in the press release, stating, “We are proud and pleased to have her wisdom, insights, and energy to move our museum to new heights.” Hillary Clinton Was in Seattle: And middle aged white people were lining up around the block of Elliott Bay Bookstore to meet her/get their book signed/tell her they’re sorry about the election. Katie Herzog talked to a couple of them. (Remember the pussy hats? They’re baaaaaaaack.) Some Worthy Writers and Artists Received Some Big Money: As part of the James W. Ray Awards. The biggest grant of $50K will go to poet Jane Wong and Tacoma-based visual artist and activist Christopher Paul Jordan; performer Veronica-Lee-Biak will get $15,000 to put towards new projects. DIY Venue Office Space to Hold Its Final Event on Friday, December 22: This will be your last chance to hit Office Space, a hub of Seattle underground rock events over the past few years that also featured practice spaces, and recording and art studios. This final blowout will feature live music from American Nudism, Darto, Vacant Life, Women of the Divine Orgasm, and more TBA. In addition, there’ll be close-out sale of Good Person Records merch, a Need Things vintage pop-up shop, oracle card readings by Lil Kay (half of profits will go to Southern Poverty Law Center), comedy by Clara Pluton, and more. According to the Facebook event page, “All proceeds will go to the costs of deconstructing and re-establishing the space.” Ask a punk for directions. [ Comment on this story ] [ Subscribe to the comments on this story ] [...]Artist Sondra Perry's backhoe video installation.


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com




Where to Celebrate the Winter Solstice

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:47:30 -0800

14 Events for Dec 14-21 by Stranger Things To Do Staff The month of December is host to several religious holidays, but it also coincides with the winter solstice, when Northern Hemisphere-dwellers experience the darkest day of the year (officially happening at 8:28 a.m. on Thursday, December 21). Whether you want to dance under the moon or take a candlelit stroll, there are lots of ways to rival the gloom and keep your days warm and aglow. We've compiled them all below, from Seward Park's Solstice Trail Run to Conor Byrne's Winter Solstice Masquerade, and from Tavern Law's Halfway to Summer: Tiki and Spritz Party to Fremont's epic Feast of the Winter Solstice. DECEMBER 14 Winter Solstice Masquerade Bask in the mystique of (almost) the longest night of the year at Conor Byrne's masqued ball with music by Sarah St. Albin and Heather Edgley + The Nobodies. DECEMBER 16 Seattle Secular Solstice So many holiday stories and traditions focus on light: it's no wonder that Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and Advent call for lighting dozens of candles in the most depressing time of year. For those without such a tradition, Seattle Secular Solstice invites you, for the fourth year, to gather on the darkest day of the calendar to sing, eat food, and celebrate "empathy and evidence" (this year's theme). Meet these friendly secular folks at the University Christian Church for your December dose of cheery humanism. SeaMuse Winter Solstice Concert Hear Celtic and Balkan tunes, seasonal songs and poems, strings plucked and bowed, clarinet, and drums from SeaMuse who will be performing, appropriately enough, at Cafe Solstice. Seward Solstice Trail Run Choose between a 4.2-mile or 10k trail run in Seward Park's old growth forest to ring in the forthcoming Yule. DECEMBER 16-17 NOCCO: Mystics, Servants, & Devils Just in time for the winter solstice, North Corner Chamber Orchestra will present a program that juxtaposes the old world with the new, bringing together mystical sensibilities involving magic and religious devotion. Enjoy the premiere of Seattle composer Jim Knapp's latest piece, commissioned directly by NOCCO, as well as Arvo Pärt’s Fratres, the Brandenburg Concerto #1 by J.S. Bach, and Stravinsky’s Soldier’s Tale. DECEMBER 17 A Bonsai Solstice A couple of days before the darkest night of the year, experience sundown in the candlelit Pacific Bonsai Museum's garden while Gary Stroutsos plays Native American flute. Halfway to Summer: Tiki and Spritz Party The solstice means we're halfway to summer's warm embrace. Celebrate by getting in a more heliolithic state of mind with colorful Wray & Nephew tiki cocktails and bright, cheery Aperol Spritzes. Come to Tavern Law clad in tiki or tropical attire for a shot at a prize for best dressed. Winter Solstice Meditation It's a Chinese tradition for families to eat Tang Yuan (sweet, gingery balls of rice) on the longest day of the year to symbolize "reunion and completion." Taste the winter solstice delicacy as you reflect on the year in a guided meditation at the Cloud Room. DECEMBER 17-20 Solstice Walks at Bloedel Reserve A parade of lanterns will light up the darkest days of the year at this annual winter solstice walk. Choose between the all-ages walks on December 17 and 18, or opt for the boozier walks on December 19 and 20. DECEMBER 21 Cloudburst Solstice Mai Tais Bust out your Hawaiian shirt and brighten up the darkest day of the year with beers and mai tais from Cloudburst Brewing at the Pine Box. Feast of the Winter Solstice Join the Fremont Arts Council on the longest night of the year to celebrate the season with shared dishes, colorful costumes (the suggestions span from "dance floor royalty" to "high animal spirits," so don't be shy), art, and live music. Winter Solstice Candleli[...]



Where To Celebrate the Winter Solstice 2017 in Seattle

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:47:27 -0800

by Stranger Things To Do Staff

(image)
The Fremont Arts Council's Feast of the Winter Solstice is one of the city's biggest events to mark the darkest day of the year. Courtesy of Fremont Arts Council

The month of December is host to several religious holidays, but it also coincides with the winter solstice, when Northern Hemisphere-dwellers experience the darkest day of the year (officially happening at 8:28 a.m. on Thursday, December 21). Whether you want to dance under the moon or take a candlelit stroll, there are lots of ways to rival the gloom and keep your days warm and aglow. We've compiled them all below, from Seward Park's Solstice Trail Run to Conor Byrne's Winter Solstice Masquerade, and from Tavern Law's Halfway to Summer: Tiki and Spritz Party to Fremont's epic Feast of the Winter Solstice.

Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play.

DECEMBER 14
Winter Solstice Masquerade
Bask in the mystique of (almost) the longest night of the year at Conor Byrne's masqued ball with music by Sarah St. Albin and Heather Edgley + The Nobodies.

The Fremont Arts Council's Feast of the Winter Solstice is one of the city's biggest events to mark the darkest day of the year.


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com




Where To Celebrate the Winter Solstice 2017 in Seattle

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:42:00 -0800

Parties, concerts, candlelit walks, and other ways to spend the darkest day of the year. by Stranger Things To Do Staff The month of December is host to several religious holidays, but it also coincides with the winter solstice, when Northern Hemisphere-dwellers experience the darkest day of the year (officially happening at 8:28 a.m. on Thursday, December 21). Whether you want to dance under the moon or take a candlelit stroll, there are lots of ways to rival the gloom and keep your days warm and aglow. We've compiled them all below, from Seward Park's Solstice Trail Run to Conor Byrne's Winter Solstice Masquerade, and from Tavern Law's Halfway to Summer: Tiki and Spritz Party to Fremont's epic Feast of the Winter Solstice. Get all this and more on the free Stranger Things To Do mobile app—available now on the App Store and Google Play. DECEMBER 14 Winter Solstice Masquerade Bask in the mystique of (almost) the longest night of the year at Conor Byrne's masqued ball with music by Sarah St. Albin and Heather Edgley + The Nobodies. DECEMBER 16 Seattle Secular Solstice So many holiday stories and traditions focus on light: it's no wonder that Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, and Advent call for lighting dozens of candles in the most depressing time of year. For those without such a tradition, Seattle Secular Solstice invites you, for the fourth year, to gather on the darkest day of the calendar to sing, eat food, and celebrate "empathy and evidence" (this year's theme). Meet these friendly secular folks at the University Christian Church for your December dose of cheery humanism. SeaMuse Winter Solstice Concert Hear Celtic and Balkan tunes, seasonal songs and poems, strings plucked and bowed, clarinet, and drums from SeaMuse who will be performing, appropriately enough, at Cafe Solstice. Seward Solstice Trail Run Choose between a 4.2-mile or 10k trail run in Seward Park's old growth forest to ring in the forthcoming Yule. DECEMBER 16-17 NOCCO: Mystics, Servants, & Devils Just in time for the winter solstice, North Corner Chamber Orchestra will present a program that juxtaposes the old world with the new, bringing together mystical sensibilities involving magic and religious devotion. Enjoy the premiere of Seattle composer Jim Knapp's latest piece, commissioned directly by NOCCO, as well as Arvo Pärt’s Fratres, the Brandenburg Concerto #1 by J.S. Bach, and Stravinsky’s Soldier’s Tale. DECEMBER 17 A Bonsai Solstice A couple of days before the darkest night of the year, experience sundown in the candlelit Pacific Bonsai Museum's garden while Gary Stroutsos plays Native American flute. Halfway to Summer: Tiki and Spritz Party The solstice means we're halfway to summer's warm embrace. Celebrate by getting in a more heliolithic state of mind with colorful Wray & Nephew tiki cocktails and bright, cheery Aperol Spritzes. Come to Tavern Law clad in tiki or tropical attire for a shot at a prize for best dressed. Winter Solstice Meditation It's a Chinese tradition for families to eat Tang Yuan (sweet, gingery balls of rice) on the longest day of the year to symbolize "reunion and completion." Taste the winter solstice delicacy as you reflect on the year in a guided meditation at the Cloud Room. DECEMBER 17-20 Solstice Walks at Bloedel Reserve A parade of lanterns will light up the darkest days of the year at this annual winter solstice walk. Choose between the all-ages walks on December 17 and 18, or opt for the boozier walks on December 19 and 20. DECEMBER 21 Cloudburst Solstice Mai Tais Bust out your Hawaiian shirt and brighten up the darkest day of the year with beers and mai tais from Cloudburst Brewing at the Pine Box. Feast of the Winter Solstice Join the Fremont Arts Coun[...]



The Moral of South Korean Film On the Beach at Night Alone: "Men Are All Idiots"

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:20:00 -0800

by Kathy Fennessy

(image)

South Korea is known for many things, not least its addictive soap operas. The prolific Hong Sang-soo, who specializes in films about self-pitying alcoholics, created a real-life K-drama when he had an affair with The Handmaiden star Kim Min-hee, a willowy woman with a dreamy effect. Any other director might have kept a low profile until things blew over, but Hong made a movie about it, On the Beach at Night Alone, and cast Min-hee as Young-hee, an actress much like herself.

The sorrows of a director's mistress...


Media Files:
https://www.thestranger.com




Here's Where To See (And Drink With) Santa This Year

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:10:58 -0800

From Breweries to Conservatories to Performance Venues by Stranger Things To Do Staff Santa used to stick to shopping malls and parades, but lately he's been exploring new pastures, drinking a wider variety of beverages, and hanging out with wish-havers of all ages (even pets). To help keep track of his whereabouts, we've compiled all of his appearances this month in Seattle. Grownups can knock back some booze with him at Linda's annual Drunk Santa Party and see him in a murder-filled thriller in [...]



If You Are Confused About Where to Draw the Line with Sexually Harassing Me at Work, I Will Invoice You

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 14:51:54 -0800

A solution I think we can all agree on. by Sydney Brownstone Solutions all around! triloks/getty There seems to be a lot of confusion about where to draw the lines in all this troubling "sex-reckoning" we're having these days. Despite the fact that the law decided sexual harassment at work was a form of sex discrimination 53 years ago, it seems that men feel that their advances toward employees or subordinates could be construed as innocent flirting under the right circumstances. How to possibly tell? I've been asked where to draw the line, and I've also been told that drawing any line is dangerous. I've been told this is about hurt feelings. That it's subjective. (Objectively, federal civil rights law defines harassment as "unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature ... when this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual's employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual's work performance, or creates an intimidating, hostile, or offensive work environment," but ok.) I've been told that pointing out sexual harassment as sexual harassment would become a swift, extrajudicial conviction of any man who stands accused. It took me some time to sleep on it, but I think I've found the solution. If men still think they're entitled to treat women who work for them or under them as sexual targets, despite the fact that these women did not sign up for that and expect to be treated equally to men (and despite the fact that men in the workplace don't have the same expectations leveled at them), we should be paid for the extra labor. To future bosses: If you sexually harass me, I will invoice you. Because women apparently don't have the choice about whether to be sexually harassed or not at work, because reporting that would make us, you know, morally panicked prudes, my time spent dealing with sexual harassment can be found on a bill. On this itemized invoice, my future bosses will be able to see, clearly, which actions they perceive as flirting that I perceive as dealing with extra, stupid work in addition to my regular job. Here are my rates: Asking me to define sexual harassment when you could easily look it up on the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's website: $20 Asking me if you've ever sexually harassed me: $30 Putting your hand on my leg: $5,000 Grabbing my ass: $15,000 Kissing me: $20,000 Commenting publicly about said ass: $25,000 Creating a hostile work environment because of everything above: Lifetime healthcare benefits, $4 million for every woman employee The list goes on, but those are some examples. Hey, this way men don't have to be held responsible for their actions outside of paying me! But, that said, I will expect backpay for all the years of being sexually harassed when I wasn't paid for it. And maybe the company will wonder why we have to pay all of these sex work invoices when the problem could just be solved by not sexually harassing employees. Carry on! [ Comment on this story ] [ Subscribe to the comments on this story ] [...]Solutions all around!


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The Voyager Golden Records: Greetings from the Beleaguered but Hopeful Humans of Planet Earth

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 14:45:00 -0800

by Andrew Hamlin In 1977, the United States, acting on behalf of the Planet Earth, launched two deep-space probes a few weeks apart, Voyager 1 and 2, tiny druplets expelled from the complex raspberry of our civilization. They flew by Jupiter and Saturn, sending incredible pictures and crucial revelations about the weather, magnetic fields, rings and moons of the two gas giants. As I type this, Voyager 1—which was actually launched after Voyager 2—is flying through space and is roughly 13 billion miles away from the Sun. As of August 25, 2012, it was the first Earth spacecraft to cross out of the solar system and into interstellar space. Voyager 2 hasn’t gone quite that far, but it will. Both of these spacecraft carry something that isn’t in the mission statement of either: A Golden Record. More specifically, a 12-inch LP fashioned from gold-plated copper and mounted to the side of each Voyager—a still life of Earth conveyed in words, music, and images, coded as sound. Also included are instructions for playback—left for any alien civilization who might run across this thing at any point in the deep future. As the de facto ambassador to the stars, it’s a little surprising that the Voyager Golden Record—assembled by a committee led by late astronomer Carl Sagan—hasn’t been made readily available to the humans it represents, which, aside from a short-lived CD-ROM release in the ‘90s, has been the case for 40 years. Until now. Matt Sullivan, co-founder of Seattle’s reissue label Light In The Attic Records, explained that LITA wanted to helm the release of the Voyager record, and reached out to Golden Record Committee member Ann Druyan about their interest. She told him that David Pescovitz and Timothy Daly of Ozma Records were already working on it. “Coincidentally, David had reached out to us about a month before that, to tell us about the founding of Ozma Records and that they were working on a special project that they would tell us more about soon. Turns out Ann beat them to the punch on that one.” LITA ended up distributing this new release instead.San Francisco Amoeba Music manager Daly, teaming with Pescovitz, a science writer, had organized a Kickstarter campaign to raise money for a limited-edition reissue of the Voyager Golden Record, which consisted of a golden vinyl LP featuring the original music and the words, a deluxe book designed by Lawrence Azerrad with the images of Earth presented decoded as regular pictures, and an essay by another committee member, Tim Ferris, credited as the producer of the original Golden Record. The Kickstarter proved so successful, says Pescovitz, that the Ozma duo rolled a slightly-modified version into wider production. “For us, the Kickstarter was a way to tell the story, and have pre-orders, get a sense of how many people were actually interested in this thing. Even when Carl Sagan and the others were hoping it would get released, the record labels were facing two challenges. One, they didn't know what the audience would be, and two, it was a copyright nightmare. “It absolutely blew our mind how much the story of the record resonated, once word got out. It's as relevant now as it was 40 years ago, and I think it's because it embodies a sense of hope and optimism, and people are jonesing for that right now.” Ferris recalls having lunch with Pescovitz a few years before the record’s release. “He told me of his idea. I said that others had come up short but he certainly could try and might well succeed. I stressed the importance of retrieving and working from the master, rather than trying to recreate the record from other materials.” Ferris, a key player in the Golden Re[...]


Media Files:
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Sandy Hook, Five Years Later

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 08:00:12 -0800

by Sean Nelson

(image)
"It was too loud. Something was bad." Handout / Getty Images News

Five years ago today, Adam Lanza walked into Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, CT and murdered 26 people, 20 of whom were first graders. That means they were between six and seven years old. (A commemorative walk for remembrance and reflection is scheduled from 5-6:30pm tonight at Green Lake Park.)

The internet is alight with heartrending remembrances today. The Twitter feed of CNN anchor Jake Tapper has been especially poignant, with a stream of photos of the victims and concise, shattering memories from the family and friends who survived them.

[ Comment on this story ]

[ Subscribe to the comments on this story ]

"'We're going to have to get back next year at entitlement reform, which is how you tackle the debt and the deficit."


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City of Seattle Tells Facebook and Google to Hand Over Political Ad Data

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 06:00:15 -0800

The demand was made in response to Stranger reporting by Eli Sanders Dear Facebook: Seattle would like you to share your election ad records for local races, as required by city law. Thanks! Justin Sullivan / Getty Images In response to The Stranger's reporting, the City of Seattle sent letters to Facebook and Google this week telling the tech giants they are definitely "commercial advertisers," as defined by city ordinance, and are therefore legally required to disclose detailed information on all political advertising they've sold in recent Seattle elections. If the companies comply with Seattle's law, the public will end up with a much better sense of how local candidates for mayor, city council, and the city attorney's office are using digital media to stump for votes. The letters, sent by Wayne Barnett, executive director of the Seattle Ethics and Elections Commission, came after my recent testing (here and here) of tech company compliance with Seattle laws on election ad transparency. In short, what I found is that Facebook and Google—which together took in more than $450,000 in local political ad money during our recent city elections—are not complying. Under Seattle law, the tech giants should be keeping a lot of details about local political ad purchases "open for public inspection." They should provide, to anyone who asks, the names and addresses of the people who purchased political ads in recent Seattle elections; the "exact nature and extent" of the ads (which, for digital platforms, would include political ad targeting data); and how the bills for any political ads were paid. This, by the way, is very similar to what some members of Congress, alarmed by Russian purchases of fake presidential election ads on digital platforms, now hope to require in future federal elections. If the City of Seattle is successful in enforcing its local laws when it comes to Facebook and Google, then voters here will soon be able to know what every single one of the digital ads in a particular election looked like, as well as which demographic slices of the Seattle electorate may have been targeted by particular digital messages. Barnett affirmed the law's requirements in his December 12 letter to Facebook, citing chapter and verse of the municipal code. "As the Commission's Executive Director," Barnett wrote, "I am requesting under SMC 2.04.280.B that Facebook provide me, by January 2, 2018, with the information it is required to maintain for public inspection under SMC 2.04.280.A." A nearly identical letter was sent to Google. I reached out to the tech giants two weeks ago, after I tested compliance at their Seattle offices and found zero election ad records "open for public inspection." Both Facebook and Google have told me they're looking into the issue. But so far neither company has gotten back to me with what they've found. I'll let you know when they do, or when I hear what they've done in response to Barnett's letters. Seattle's tough law on election ad transparency, it turns out, traces back to 1977. For the full story on why it clearly applies to modern tech giants, and what all happened when I tested the law at local tech offices, pick up the December 20 issue of The Stranger. [ Comment on this story ] [ Subscribe to the comments on this story ] [...]Dear Facebook: We would like you to share your local election ad records, as required by Seattle law.


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