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Preview: PubMed: Quality of care

pubmed: Quality of care



NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=(("quality assurance, health care"[MeSH Terms] OR "quality indicators, health care"[MeSH Terms] OR "quality of health care"[MeSH Terms] OR "total quality management"[MeSH Terms]) AND quality[TI]) AND English[Lang] AND "adult"[MeSH Te



 



The Conversion of Planned Colonoscopy to Sigmoidoscopy and the Effect of this Practice on the Measurement of Quality Indicators.
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The Conversion of Planned Colonoscopy to Sigmoidoscopy and the Effect of this Practice on the Measurement of Quality Indicators.

Am J Gastroenterol. 2017 Oct;112(10):1545-1552

Authors: Beg S, Sansone S, Manguso F, Schembri J, Patel J, Thoufeeq M, Corbett G, Ragunath K

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: A cecal intubation rate (CIR) of >90% is a well-accepted quality indicator of colonoscopy and is consequently monitored within endoscopy units. Endoscopists' desire to meet this target may mean that incomplete colonoscopies are recorded as flexible sigmoidoscopies. The aim of this study was to examine whether the conversion of requested colonoscopies is a clinically significant phenomenon and whether this impacts upon the measurement of quality indicators.
METHODS: A retrospective review of all flexible sigmoidoscopies performed between 1 January 2015 and 31 December 2015 at Nottingham University Hospitals, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, and Cambridge University Hospitals was performed. Where a colonoscopy was requested but a flexible sigmoidoscopy performed, the patient's records and endoscopy reports were reviewed to determine whether this conversion was decided before the start of the procedure and documented.
RESULTS: During the 12-month period, 6,839 flexible sigmoidoscopies were performed by 125 endoscopists. The original requests of 149 sigmoidoscopies could not be retrieved and were therefore excluded from this analysis. Of the 6,690 sigmoidoscopy requests reviewed, 2.8% (n=190) procedures were originally requested as a colonoscopy. On review of patient records, 85 conversions were appropriate according to pre-defined criteria. However, 105 conversions were deemed inappropriate, occurring in patients who had a valid documented indication for colonoscopy and had undergone full bowel preparation. The most common reasons cited included poor bowel preparation (n=37), technically challenging procedure (n=24), at the endoscopist's discretion based on clinical factors (n=21), and obstructing patology (n=8). A clear reason for conversion was not apparent in 11 cases. During the study period, 21,271 colonoscopies were performed and so conversions represent 0.45% of the total requests. When inappropriate conversions were included in individuals' performance data, 15 endoscopists fell to ≤90% target cecal intubation target.
CONCLUSIONS: A small, but significant number of colonoscopies are converted to flexible sigmoidoscopies at the time of the procedure. This study demonstrates the conversion of colonoscopy to sigmoidoscopy as being a potential limitation of relying on CIR alone. Endoscopy units should consider monitoring the rate of inappropriate conversions to ensure quality.

PMID: 28555631 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




Is Advanced Imaging in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Ever Warranted? Reconciling Clinical Judgment With Common Quality Measures.
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Is Advanced Imaging in Early-Stage Breast Cancer Ever Warranted? Reconciling Clinical Judgment With Common Quality Measures.

J Natl Compr Canc Netw. 2016 Aug;14(8):993-8

Authors: Kamal A, Zhang T, Power S, Marcom PK

Abstract
BACKGROUND: The American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation's Choosing Wisely initiative aims to reduce unnecessary advanced imaging for early-stage breast cancer (ESBC). Additionally, NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer permit such images when oncologists perceive clinical clues of advanced disease. The utility of advanced imaging in ESBC is not known.
PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed all patients with ESBC from January 2010 to June 2012 at a large tertiary cancer center. Early-stage was defined as stage IIb or less. We included advanced imaging within 60 days after diagnosis. Three independent reviewers manually abstracted a sample of charts to determine reason for ordering.
RESULTS: A total of 1,143 ESBC cases were identified; 21.8% of which had at least one advanced imaging procedure performed. Imaging modalities varied widely (38% CT, 21% PET, 34% bone scans, and 6% MRI). Patients who underwent advanced imaging were more likely to have triple-negative disease, be younger (age <50 years), and have higher stage disease (stage IIb vs ≤ stage IIa; all P<.001). A total of 100 cases (40%) were abstracted; 5 were excluded due to bilateral disease. Of the 95 cases remaining, 62% of the imaging studies were performed for staging, 17% for significant concurrent disease, and 22% for findings atypical of ESBC. Of the studies performed for staging, 15% produced clinically meaningful findings. Overall, 45% of studies were ordered for suspicious findings, complex history, or produced a meaningful result.
CONCLUSIONS: Of patients with ESBC, 21.8% had at least one advanced imaging procedure within 60 days of diagnosis; almost half were clinically useful. Chart abstraction helped clarify intent. Conversations between clinicians and patients are needed to balance patient preferences and clinician judgment.

PMID: 27496115 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




Variability in quality of care among dialysis units in the state of São Paulo and the ordinance number 389/2014 of the Health Ministry of Brazil.
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Variability in quality of care among dialysis units in the state of São Paulo and the ordinance number 389/2014 of the Health Ministry of Brazil.

J Bras Nefrol. 2016 Mar;38(1):62-9

Authors: Castro MC

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Medical organizations have proposed indices to assess the quality of dialytic therapy offered to patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recently, the Ministry of Health of Brazil published the ordinance n° 389/2014, which establishes targets in the care of patients with CKD.
OBJECTIVE: We evaluate the performance of hemodialysis (HD) clinics in relation to the goals established in this ordinance.
METHODS: Cross-sectional study, prospective, observational, involving 1,633 patients with CKD on HD in eight clinics. Demographic characteristics, Kt/V, hemoglobin, phosphorus, parathormone (PTH) and the mortality rate were recorded. The results were compared to the goals established in the ordinance No. 389/2014: Kt/V > 1.2 in more than 70% of patients, hemoglobin between 10 and 12 g/dl in more than 80%, phosphorus between 3.5 and 5.5 mg/dl in more than 50%, and PTH < 600pg/ml in more than 80% of patients.
RESULTS: The age was 56.4 ± 15.2 years, the median time on dialysis was 28.4 months. The HD session time was 3.74 ± 0.31 hours. For Kt/V, six clinics reached the goal. For hemoglobin, none of the clinics reached the goal. For phosphorus, only two clinics meet the goal and for PTH four clinics. Six clinics hit two goals and two clinics did not achieve any goal. Mortality was lower in clinics that reached targets (10.2vs. 21.6% per year; p = 0.0546).
CONCLUSION: For Kt/V most clinics reached the goal established by the ordinance. For hemoglobin and phosphorus, the objectives were not achieved in many clinics. For PTH, the response was variable and dependent on clinical features.

PMID: 27049366 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]