Subscribe: CircleID: News Briefs
http://www.circleid.com/rss/rss_news/
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
circleid twittermore  circleid  dns  fcc  follow circleid  follow  internet  net neutrality  net  neutrality  security  twittermore 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: CircleID: News Briefs

CircleID: News Briefs



Latest news postings on CircleID



Updated: 2017-12-07T21:53:00-08:00

 



EFF to FCC: 'Restoring Internet Freedom' Plan Riddled With Technical Errors and Factual Inaccuracies

2017-12-07T13:53:00-08:00

Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) published a post today pointing out that the FCC continues to ignore the technical parts of a letter sent to it earlier this year by nearly 200 Internet engineers and computer scientists that explained facts about the structure, history, and evolving nature of the Internet. "FCC's latest plan to kill net neutrality is still riddled with technical errors and factual inaccuracies." EFF has highlighted the following as examples:

— "The FCC Still Doesn't Understand That Using the Internet Means Having Your ISP Transmit Packets For You – The biggest misunderstanding the FCC still has is the incorrect belief that when your broadband provider sells you Internet access, they're not selling you a service by which you can transmit data to and from whatever points on the Internet you want."

— "The FCC Still Doesn't Understand How DNS Works – Citing back to language dating from the days of Bell Operating Companies, the FCC claims that DNS functions similarly to a gateway."

— "The FCC Still Doesn't Understand How Caching Works – Like DNS, it treats caching as if it were some specialized service rather than an implementation detail and general-purpose computing technique."

— "The FCC Doesn't Understand How the Phone System Works – The FCC's apparent understanding of the phone system seems to be stuck in the days of rotary phones. For users on a modern American network, voice calling is just one of many applications that a phone enables. If the user has poor signal, that voice call might travel at some point over the circuit-switched PSTN, but it might also never leave a packet-switched network if it's sent over VoIP or LTE/EPC."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Broadband, Mobile Internet, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation, Telecom, Wireless




Puerto Rico Disaster Stands Alone: A Look at Prolonged and Widespread Impact on Its Internet Access

2017-12-07T12:31:00-08:00

(image) Doug Madory, Director of Internet Analysis at Dyn, has a report published today examining the state of Puerto Rico's recovery of its internet access. He writes: "We have been analyzing the impacts of natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes going back to Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Compared to the earthquake near Japan in 2011, Hurricane Sandy in 2012, or the earthquake in Nepal in 2015, Puerto Rico's disaster stands alone with respect to its prolonged and widespread impact on internet access." For a more accurate indication of the pace of recovery in the region, DNS activity is being monitored (rather than Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) routes) and currently the DNS query volumes from the island are still only a fraction of what they were on September 19th — the day before the storm hit, according to Dyn.

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, DNS




Bitcoin Miner NiceHash Reports Hack, More Than $60 Million Worth of Bitcoin Potentially Stolen

2017-12-07T06:25:00-08:00

"Nearly $64m in bitcoin has been stolen by hackers who broke into Slovenian-based bitcoin mining marketplace NiceHash." Samuel Gibbs reporting in The Guardian: "NiceHash is a digital currency marketplace that matches people looking to sell processing time on their computers for so called miners to verify bitcoin users' transactions in exchange for the bitcoin. ... The marketplace suspended operations on Thursday while it investigated the breach ... The hack was 'a highly professional attack with sophisticated social engineering' that resulted in approximately 4,700 bitcoin being stolen, worth about $63.92m at current prices."

NiceHash, in a statement posted on its website today, said that it had stopped operations for 24 hours and was working to verify how many bitcoins were taken. A press release posted on the website states: "Our payment system was compromised and the contents of the NiceHash Bitcoin wallet have been stolen. We are working to verify the precise number of BTC taken."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cybercrime




Worldwide Security Spending to Reach $96 Billion in 2018, Up 8 Percent from 2017, Says Gartner

2017-12-07T05:55:00-08:00

Worldwide enterprise security spending to total $96.3 billion in 2018, an increase of 8 percent from 2017, Gartner forecasts. "Organizations are spending more on security as a result of regulations, shifting buyer mindset, awareness of emerging threats and the evolution to a digital business strategy. ... Overall, a large portion of security spending is driven by an organization's reaction toward security breaches as more high profile cyberattacks and data breaches affect organizations worldwide. Cyberattacks such as WannaCry and NotPetya, and most recently the Equifax breach, have a direct effect on security spend, because these types of attacks last up to three years. ... several other factors are also fuelling higher security spending. Regulatory compliance and data privacy have been stimulating spending on security during the past three years."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cybersecurity




Russia in Talks to Create Independent DNS

2017-11-28T17:19:00-08:00

The Russian Security Council has proposed development of an independent DNS which would continue to work in the event of global internet malfunctions, according to a report from RT. "The initiative was discussed at the October meeting of the Security Council, which is Russia's top consultative body on national security. ... While discussing the issue, members of the council noted that 'the increased capabilities of western nations to conduct offensive operations in the informational space as well as the increased readiness to exercise these capabilities pose a serious threat to Russia's security.' They decided that the problem should be addressed by creating a separate backup system of Domain Name Servers (DNS), which would not be subject to control by international organizations. This system would be used by countries of the BRICS bloc — Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybersecurity, DNS, DNS Security




CENTR Reports TLD Slowdown Partly Due to Deletes by Chinese Investors Which Had Peaked in 2016

2017-11-27T13:12:00-08:00

(image) The Council of European National Top-Level Domains Registries (CENTR) in its quarterly report released today says global domains under all TLDs have contracted slightly due to declines in several larger new gTLDs. From the report: "There are an estimated 311 million domains under management over 1,500+ top-level domains globally*. Over the past 2 years, quarterly growth rates have been decreasing since peaks in early 2016. The slowdown is the result of deletes after a period of increased investment from Chinese registrants. Other explanations to the slowdown are specific TLDs, such as .xyz and .top, which have contracted significantly. Without these outliers, global TLD growth would be at 1.0% for Q3 2017 and 2.5% YOY. ... Reductions in .xyz and .top also has pushed the overall new gTLD market share down from 7.5% to 6.6%. The other groups were not affected, suggesting previous gains in those TLDs may have been speculative."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Domain Names, Registry Services, New TLDs




Russian Behind Massive LinkedIn, Dropbox Hack Subject of Extradition Fight Between US and Russia

2017-11-26T11:26:00-08:00

"A young Russian alleged to have masterminded a massive hacking of social networks including LinkedIn and Dropbox is now at the center of an extradition struggle between the United States and Russia." Tim Lister and Tomas Etzler, reporting today in CNN: "Yevgeniy Nikulin was detained in October 2016 [CircleID report on the arrest], in the Czech Republic capital of Prague, after US authorities issued an international arrest warrant for him. He was on vacation there with his girlfriend. ... But soon after his arrest, Russian authorities also sought his extradition. The Russian charge referred to the alleged theft from an online money transfer company back in 2009. The Foreign Ministry in Moscow said ... it was 'actively working with the Czech authorities to prevent the extradition of a Russian citizen to the United States.'"

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cybercrime




Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Says FCC's Roll Back Plan on Net Neutrality Makes No Sense

2017-11-23T11:56:00-08:00

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on Wednesday told reporters that President Donald Trump's plan to roll back net neutrality protections for the internet "does not make sense". He'll be looking into what he can do to defend net neutrality for the whole internet, Trudeau said. Trudeau's statements from Justin Ling's report in Motherboard: "I am very concerned about the attacks on net neutrality ... Net neutrality is something that is essential for small businesses, for consumers, and it is essential to keep the freedom associated with the internet alive. ... We need to continue to defend net neutrality. And I will." Trudeau did not comment directly on whether he would convey the message to Trump directly and is quoted saying: "We are just absorbing the position the president has taken and looking at the impact it's going to have in the United States and in Canada."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation




FCC Plans to Order States Not to Impose Laws Regulating Broadband Service, Senior Officials Revealed

2017-11-22T12:56:00-08:00

In a phone briefing with reporters on Tuesday, Senior FCC officials revealed plans whereby state and local governments will not be able to impose local laws regulating broadband service. A development following FCC Chair's release of the draft on "Restoring Internet Freedom Order." Jon Brodkin reporting in Ars Technica: "FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's proposed order finds that state and local laws must be preempted if they conflict with the US government's policy of deregulating broadband Internet service, FCC officials said. ... It isn't clear yet exactly how extensive the preemption will be. ... but it could also prevent state laws related to the privacy of Internet users or other consumer protections."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Broadband, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation




FCC Chair Releases Draft to Abandon Net Neutrality, Says Gov't Must Stop Micromanaging the Internet

2017-11-21T09:35:00-08:00

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Ajit Pai today released a statement on his draft "Restoring Internet Freedom Order", circulated to Commissioners this morning and will be voted on at the FCC's Open Meeting on December 14. "Today, I have shared with my colleagues a draft order that would abandon this failed approach and return to the longstanding consensus that served consumers well for decades," says FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. "Under my proposal, the federal government will stop micromanaging the Internet. Instead, the FCC would simply require Internet service providers to be transparent about their practices so that consumers can buy the service plan that's best for them and entrepreneurs and other small businesses can have the technical information they need to innovate."

Former Democratic FCC chairman Tom Wheeler, who drafted the 2015 net neutrality rules has called Tuesday's move "tragic." Wheeler told the Washington Post: "The job of the FCC is to represent the consumer. If you like your cable company, you'll love what this does for the Internet, because it gives Internet service providers the same kind of control over content and price as cable operators have today."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation




Berners-Lee Talks Net Neutrality in Washington, "ISPs Should be Treated More Like Utilities"

2017-11-17T12:34:00-08:00

Tim Berners-Lee is in Washington urging lawmakers to reconsider the rollback of net neutrality laws — while remaining optimistic, he sees a "nasty wind" blowing amid concerns. Olivia Solon reporting in The Guardian writes: "These powerful gatekeepers ... control access to the internet and pose a threat to innovation if they are allowed to pick winners and losers by throttling or blocking services. It makes sense, therefore, that ISPs should be treated more like utilities. ... 'Gas is a utility, so is clean water, and connectivity should be too,' said Berners-Lee. 'It's part of life and shouldn't have an attitude about what you use it for — just like water.'"

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation




U.S. Government Takes Steps Towards Increased Transparency for Vulnerabilities Equities Process

2017-11-16T18:47:00-08:00

The White House has released a charter offering more transparency into the Vulnerabilities Equities Process. Tom Spring from ThreatPost reports: "On Wednesday it released the 'Vulnerabilities Equities Policy and Process' [PDF] charter that outlines how the government will disclose cyber security flaws and when it will keep them secret. The release of the charter is viewed as a positive by critics and a step toward addressing private-sector concerns that the VEP's framework is to secretive."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cybersecurity, Policy & Regulation




IBM Launches Quad9, a DNS-based Privacy and Security Service to Protect Users from Malicious Sites

2017-11-16T17:58:00-08:00

In a joint project, IBM Security along with Packet Clearing House (PCH) and The Global Cyber Alliance (GCA) today launched a free service designed to give consumers and businesses added online privacy and security protection. The new DNS service is called Quad9 in reference to the IP address 9.9.9.9 offered for the service. The group says the service is aimed at protecting users from accessing malicious websites known to steal personal information, infect users with ransomware and malware, or conduct fraudulent activity. Quad9 is said to provide these protections without compromising the speed of users' online experience. From the announcement: "Leveraging PCH's expertise and global assets around the world, Quad9 has points of presence in over 70 locations across 40 countries at launch. Over the next 18 months, Quad9 points of presence are expected to double, further improving the speed, performance, privacy and security for users globally. Telemetry data on blocked domains from Quad9 will be shared with threat intelligence partners for the improvement of their threat intelligence responses for their customers and Quad9." — The Genesis of Quad9: "Quad9 began as the brainchild of GCA. The intent was to provide security to end users on a global scale by leveraging the DNS service to deliver a comprehensive threat intelligence feed. This idea lead to the collaboration of the three entities: GCA: Provides system development capabilities and brought the threat intelligence community together; PCH: Provides Quad9's network infrastructure; and IBM: Provides IBM X-Force threat intelligence and the easily memorable IP address (9.9.9.9)." — Philip Reitinger, President and CEO of the Global Cyber Alliance: "Protecting against attacks by blocking them through DNS has been available for a long time, but has not been used widely. Sophisticated corporations can subscribe to dozens of threat feeds and block them through DNS, or pay a commercial provider for the service. However, small to medium-sized businesses and consumers have been left behind — they lack the resources, are not aware of what can be done with DNS, or are concerned about exposing their privacy and confidential information. Quad9 solves these problems. It is memorable, easy to use, relies on excellent and broad threat information, protects privacy, and security and is free." Follow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Cyberattack, Cybercrime, DNS, DNS Security, Malware, Privacy, Web [...]



Russia Targeted British Telecom, Media, Energy Sectors, Reveals UK National Cyber Security Centre

2017-11-15T12:14:00-08:00

Speaking at The Times Tech Summit in London, Ciaran Martin, chief of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC), warned Russia is seeking to undermine the international system. "I can't get into too much of the details of intelligence matters, but I can confirm that Russian interference, seen by the National Cyber Security Centre, has included attacks on the UK media, telecommunications and energy sectors. ... The government is prioritising cyber security because we care so much about the digital future of the country. We're doing it broadly on the themes that will come up today — defend networks, deter attackers and develop the skills base."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybersecurity, Policy & Regulation




Airplanes Vulnerable to Hacking, Says U.S. Department of Homeland Security

2017-11-15T10:03:00-08:00

Researchers have been able to successfully demonstrate a commercial aircraft can be remotely hacked. Calvin Biesecker reporting in Avionics reports: "A team of government, industry and academic officials successfully demonstrated that a commercial aircraft could be remotely hacked in a non-laboratory setting last year, a U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) official said Wednesday at the 2017 CyberSat Summit in Tysons Corner, Virginia. [U.S. Department of Homeland Security aviation program manager says] 'We got the airplane on Sept. 19, 2016. Two days later, I was successful in accomplishing a remote, non-cooperative, penetration ... [which] means I didn't have anybody touching the airplane, I didn't have an insider threat. I stood off using typical stuff that could get through security and we were able to establish a presence on the systems of the aircraft."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybersecurity




Poland to Test a Cybersecurity Program for Aviation Sector

2017-11-08T13:08:00-08:00

During the two-day Cybersecurity in Civil Aviation conference, Poland announced an agreement to test a cybersecurity pilot program for the aviation sector as Europe's European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) civil aviation authority face increasing threats posed by hackers to air traffic. "We want to have a single point in the air transport sector that will coordinate all cybersecurity activities… for airlines, airports, and air traffic," said Piotr Samson, head of Poland's ULC civil aviation authority. "Despite the assurances of experts in the field, computer systems failures triggered by hackers or accident have caused flight chaos in recent years. Poland's flagship carrier LOT was briefly forced to suspend operations in June 2015 after a hack attack." See full report.

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybersecurity




Former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer Apologizes for Data Breach, Blames Russian Agents

2017-11-08T10:52:00-08:00

Former Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer apologized today at the Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation hearing regarding massive data breaches at the internet company, blaming Russian agents. David Shepardson [reporting](http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-databreaches/former-yahoo-ceo-apologizes-for-data-breach-blames-russians-idUSKBN1D825V) in Reuters: "Verizon [which] acquired most of Yahoo Inc's assets in June ... disclosed last month that a 2013 Yahoo data breach affected all 3 billion of its accounts, compared with an estimate of more than 1 billion disclosed in December. In March, federal prosecutors charged two Russian intelligence agents and two hackers with masterminding a 2014 theft of 500 million Yahoo accounts, the first time the U.S. government has criminally charged Russian spies for cyber crimes."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybersecurity




ICANN Holding Its First North American Meeting Since 2014 in Puerto Rico

2017-11-07T15:39:00-08:00

style=“;margin:0 0 10px 0;" width="644" height="362" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/l7ooF2Xwf04?rel=0" frameborder="0" gesture="media" allowfullscreen>

As ICANN wraps up its Annual General Meeting in Abu Dhabi, the organization is inviting participation in its 61st ICANN meeting in San Juan, Puerto Rico, from 10–15 March 2018. Vice President, Christopher Mondini writes: "In the wake of the recent hurricane season, the island remains resilient and determined to bounce back. Recovery efforts over the past months have demonstrated the profound strength and solidarity that run deep in the island’s cultural roots." The six-day meeting aims to focus on outreach, capacity building, and showcasing ICANN’s work to a broader global audience. The event is hosted by the Puerto Rico Top Level Domain (.pr)

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: ICANN




Cloudflare Uses Lava Lamps to Generate Encryption Keys

2017-11-07T13:37:00-08:00

The web performance and security company, Cloudflare has shared one of the methods it uses to ensure randomness when generating encryption keys. Rhett Jones reporting in Gizmodo: "Cloudflare provides security and domain name services for millions of the most prominent sites on the web. The company has built a solid reputation for its secure encryption and one of the key factors in its system is a wall of 100 lava lamps in the lobby of its San Francisco headquarters. ... The most simple explanation is that a lava lamp is a great way to generate randomness. Coding just isn't great at generating random numbers because, at its heart, code requires a system to mimic chaos."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cybersecurity




US Department of Defense Getting Aggressive on Adoption of Cloud, Machine Learning

2017-11-07T12:57:00-08:00

The US Department of Defense is seeking private sector's help to "vault DOD" into the world of elastic computing, data management and analytics, cybersecurity, and machine learning. In an op-ed published in Defense One, Patrick Shanahan, U.S. Deputy Defense Secretary writes: "While the Department has made strides, our computing platforms are not keeping pace with private industry, or even international actors. To maintain advantage over increasingly capable and brazen adversaries, DOD must have a worldwide, secure, exponentially elastic, and resilient information environment that continually learns and adapts. We must adjust more rapidly than our opponents and deliver a superior understanding of the battlespace in order to deliver weapons on time and on target. We are aggressively pressing forward and invite the private sector to partner with us in this vital endeavor."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cloud Computing, Cybersecurity, Data Center