Subscribe: CircleID: News Briefs
http://www.circleid.com/rss/rss_news/
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
broadband  circleid twittermore  circleid  fcc  follow circleid  internet  net neutrality  net  neutrality  providers  twittermore 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: CircleID: News Briefs

CircleID: News Briefs



Latest news postings on CircleID



Updated: 2018-01-20T01:39:00-08:00

 



Industrial Plant Attack Generates Renewed Concerns Over Critical Infrastructure Hacking Threats

2018-01-19T17:39:00-08:00

A recent malware attack on the control systems of an industrial plant has renewed concerns about the threat hacking poses to critical infrastructure. Lily Hay Newman reporting in the Wired: "while security researchers offered some analysis last month of the malware used in the attack, called Triton or Trisis, newly revealed details of how it works expose just how vulnerable industrial plants—and their failsafe mechanisms—could be to manipulation." Also noted, that "the malware targets the Triconex firmware vulnerability, manipulates the system to steadily increase its ability to make changes and issue commands, and then deposits the RAT, which awaits further remote instructions from the attackers."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybersecurity, Malware, Networks




Some Hackers Earning Over 16 Times That of Full-Time Software Engineers in Their Home Country

2018-01-19T13:40:00-08:00

(image) Geographic Money Flow – Visualization of the Bounties by Geography showing on the left where the companies paying bounties are located and on the right where hackers receiving bounties are located.

A report from one of the largest documented surveys conducted on the ethical hacking community reveals some hackers are earning over 16 times that of full-time software engineers in their home country. The study had 1,698 respondents and conducted by HackerOne, a global hacker community platform, which has seen a 10-fold increase in its registered users in the past two years.

Additional key findings:

— Nearly 1 in 4 hackers have not reported a vulnerability that they found because the company didn't have a channel to disclose it.

— Money remains a top reason for why bug bounty hackers hack, but it's fallen from first to fourth place compared to 2016. Above all, hackers are motivated by the opportunity to learn tips and techniques, with "to be challenged" and "to have fun" tied for second.

— India (23%) and the United States (20%) are the top two countries represented by the HackerOne hacker community, followed by Russia (6%), Pakistan (4%) and United Kingdom (4%).

— Nearly 58% of them are self-taught hackers. Despite 50% of hackers having studied computer science at an undergraduate or graduate level, and 26.4% studied computer science in high school or before, less than 5% have learned hacking skills in a classroom.

— While 37% of hackers say they hack as a hobby in their spare time, about 12% of hackers on HackerOne make $20,000 or more annually from bug bounties, over 3% of which are making more than $100,000 per year, 1.1% are making over $350,000 annually. A quarter of hackers rely on bounties for at least 50% of their annual income, and 13.7% say their bounties earned represents 90-100% of their annual income.

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cybersecurity




China Cloud Providers Catching Up to American Firms, Plus China Has Home Market Advantage

2018-01-19T12:34:00-08:00

"Chinese tech companies plan to steal American cloud firms' thunder," says The Economist. Alibaba has its goal set to match or surpass Amazon Web Services by 2019. "We have taken on Amazon on all fronts," says Alibaba's Mr. Hu. From the article: "Whichever firm ends up leading, Chinese and Western cloud providers are bound to run into each other — though not so much in their home countries as in such places as Europe and India. AWS and its main rivals have been busy building data centres abroad for some time, including in China. But Alibaba and Tencent are catching up. Alibaba, for example, operates a dozen computing plants abroad and will open another one this month in India, near Mumbai."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cloud Computing




China Stepping Up Cryptocurrency Crackdown

2018-01-17T06:45:00-08:00

China is preparing for a new crackdown on cryptocurrency, planning to stamp out remaining trading in the country, according to state media. From the AFP report via Channel NewsAsia: "China will gradually clean up over-the-counter trading platforms, peer-to-peer networks where large exchanges occur and firms registered in the country which allow Chinese to trade overseas, the state-run Securities Journal said Tuesday. The publication cited an anonymous source close to regulators tackling online finance risks. The new plan follows China's crackdown on cryptocurrency trading last year, which saw Beijing shut down bitcoin exchanges and ban all initial coin offerings."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Blockchain, Policy & Regulation




Hackers Hijack DNS Server for Cyrptocurrency Wallet BlackWallet, Over $400K Stolen From Users

2018-01-14T19:02:00-08:00

Unknown hackers (or hacker) have hijacked the DNS server for BlackWallet.co, a web-based wallet application for the Stellar Lumen cryptocurrency (XLM). Catalin Cimpanu reporting in Bleeping Computer: "The attack happened late Saturday afternoon (UTC timezone), January 13, when the attackers hijacked the DNS entry of the BlackWallet.co domain and redirected it to their own server. 'The DNS hijack of Blackwallet injected code [said Kevin Beaumont] a security researcher who analyzed the code before the BlackWallet team regained access over their domain and took down the site ... If you had over 20 Lumens it pushes them to a different wallet… the attacker collected 669,920 Lumens, which is about $400,192 at the current XML/USD exchange rate."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Blockchain, Cyberattack, DNS




DOJ Closes Probe of VeriSign Over .Web TLD

2018-01-12T15:23:00-08:00

The Justice Department has closed its investigation into VeriSign Inc.'s involvement in an auction for the .web internet domain. Alexis Kramer reporting in BNA: "The department's antitrust division sent VeriSIgn, a Reston, Va.-based internet infrastructure provider, a civil investigative demand in January 2017 after the results of the .web auction. The DOJ told VeriSign Jan. 10 the investigation is closed, VeriSign said in a Securities and Exchange Commssion filing. .Web applicant Nu Dot Co LLC had won the domain for $135 million in an auction run by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names & Numbers [ICANN] ... VeriSign announced days later that it had provided funds for Nu Dot Co's bid and planned to acquire the rights to the domain. VeriSign hadn't applied for .web. The auction spurred a lawsuit against ICANN by domain name registry Donuts Inc., one of six other .web applicants."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Law, Registry Services, New TLDs




New Harvard Study Recognizes Community-Owned Internet Service Providers as Value Leaders in America

2018-01-11T17:52:00-08:00

Community-owned fiber networks provide least-expensive local "broadband," according to a recent study by Harvard's Berkman Klein Center. From the report, David Talbot, Kira Hessekiel, and Danielle Kehl write: "We examined prices advertised by a subset of community-owned networks that use fiber-to-the-home (FTTH) technology. In late 2015 and 2016 we collected advertised prices for residential data plans offered by 40 community-owned (typically municipally-owned) FTTH networks. We then identified the least-expensive service that meets the federal definition of broadband (regardless of the exact speeds provided) and compared advertised prices to those of private competitors in the same markets. We were able to make comparisons in 27 communities and found that in 23 cases, the community-owned FTTH providers' pricing was lower when the service costs and fees were averaged over four years. (Using a three year-average changed this fraction to 22 out of 27.) In the other 13 communities, comparisons were not possible, either because the private providers' website terms of service deterred or prohibited data collection or because no competitor offered service that qualified as broadband. We also found that almost all community-owned FTTH networks offered prices that were clear and unchanging, whereas private ISPs typically charged initial low promotional or "teaser" rates that later sharply rose, usually after 12 months."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Broadband




Kodak Announces a Blockchain Platform Initiative for Image Rights Management

2018-01-09T12:35:00-08:00

Kodak today revealed the launch of a blockchain-based platform called KODAKOne which is aimed to empower photographers and agencies to take greater control of image rights management. From today's announcement: "Utilizing blockchain technology, the KODAKOne platform will create an encrypted, digital ledger of rights ownership for photographers to register both new and archive work that they can then license within the platform. With KODAKCoin, participating photographers are invited to take part in a new economy for photography, receive payment for licensing their work immediately upon sale, and for both professional and amateur photographers, sell their work confidently on a secure blockchain platform. KODAKOne platform provides continual web crawling in order to monitor and protect the IP of the images registered in the KODAKOne system. Where unlicensed usage of images is detected, the KODAKOne platform can efficiently manage the post-licensing process in order to reward photographers."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Blockchain, Intellectual Property




Banking Industry Evaluating Security Benefits of Blockchain to Send Encrypted Information

2018-01-09T05:47:00-08:00

The banking industry is evaluating security benefits of using blockchain to send encrypted information. Greg Stiles reporting in Mail Tibune: "'We've seen potential breaches at some of these cryptocurrency exchanges… We are looking as an industry if there are ways we can use blockchain for communicating with each other, but we are not there yet, [says Jenny Menna, Senior Vice President of Information Systems Security at US Bank]. ... the industry desires to end passwords and Social Security numbers and sees blockchain as one avenue to the goal. U.S. Bank has 600 people assigned to ward off potential cyber attacks through analytical and other means. But small firms without such resources are just as likely to get hit."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Blockchain, Cybersecurity




Senate Bill to Reverse FCC Decision to Repeal Net Neutrality Received Its 30th Co-Sponsor

2018-01-08T16:44:00-08:00

A Senate bill that would reverse the Federal Communications Commission's (FCC) decision to repeal Net Neutrality received its 30th co-sponsor today, ensuring it will receive a vote on the Senate floor. Harper Neidig reporting in The Hill: "Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) announced her support for the bill on Twitter, putting it over the top of a procedural requirement to bypass committee approval. The bill, which is being pushed by Sen. Ed Markey (D-Mass.), would use Congress's authority under the Congressional Review Act (CRA) to reverse the FCC's rollback of its popular net neutrality rules… Under the CRA, if a joint resolution of disapproval bill has enough support it can bypass committee review and be fast-tracked to a floor vote."

Update Jan 9, 2018: Senate bill to block net neutrality repeal now has 40 co-sponsors. "The news comes just a day after the bill won its 30th co-sponsor, ensuring that it has enough support to clear a procedural threshold and get fast-tracked to a floor vote." –The Hill

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation




California Introduces Its Own Net Neutrality Bill; Similar Bills in Progress for WA and New York

2018-01-07T14:44:00-08:00

Sen. Scott Wiener along with ten state assembly and Senate Democrats have proposed legislation which includes a number of ways to ensure telecom companies operating in California adhere to the principles of net neutrality. Katharine Trendacosta reporting in EFF: "The substance of the legislation is still in the works, but the intent is to leverage the state's assets as a means to require networks to operate neutrally. In essence, the California bill would require net neutrality of businesses that operate within the state of California if they are relying on state infrastructure or state funding to provide the service. ... Washington and New York have similar bills in progress."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Net Neutrality, Telecom




Two Romanians Charged for Hacking Washington DC Police Computers Linked to Surveillance Cameras

2017-12-29T09:43:00-08:00

US officials say Romanians hacked Washington DC police cameras. BBC reports: "US prosecutors have charged two Romanians with hacking Washington DC police computers linked to surveillance cameras just days before President Donald Trump's inauguration. ... The perpetrators intended to use the camera computers to send ransomware to more than 179,600 email addresses and extort money from victims, the justice department said in a statement. ... The pair are being held in Romania, having been arrested at Bucharest Otopeni airport on 15 December."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybersecurity, Malware




ISPs in UK Legally Obliged to Provide High-Speed Broadband Upon Request, Starting 2020

2017-12-21T15:20:00-08:00

UK Government says internet providers will be legally required to meet user requests for speeds of at least 10Mbps starting in 2020. Jessica Elgot reporting in the Guardian: "British homes and businesses will have a legal right to high-speed broadband by 2020 ... dismissing calls from the network provider BT that it should be a voluntary rather than legal obligation on providers. Broadband providers will now have a legal requirement to provide high-speed broadband to anyone who requests it, no matter where they are in the country." It is reported that 4% of UK homes and offices (i.e., about 1.1m properties) cannot access broadband speeds of at least 10Mbps.

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Broadband, Law, Policy & Regulation




Cyberattack Causes Operational Disruption to Critical Infrastructure Using New Malware TRITON

2017-12-14T15:54:00-08:00

A new malware designed to manipulate industrial safety systems was deployed against a critical infrastructure organization that provides emergency shutdown capability for industrial processes, according to a report released today. FireEye security firm says: "This malware, which we call TRITON, is an attack framework built to interact with Triconex Safety Instrumented System (SIS) controllers. ... The attacker gained remote access to an SIS engineering workstation and deployed the TRITON attack framework to reprogram the SIS controllers. During the incident, some SIS controllers entered a failed safe state, which automatically shutdown the industrial process and prompted the asset owner to initiate an investigation. The investigation found that the SIS controllers initiated a safe shutdown when application code between redundant processing units failed a validation check — resulting in an MP diagnostic failure message."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybersecurity, Malware




FCC Repeals Net Neutrality Rules in a 3-to-2 Vote

2017-12-14T10:52:00-08:00

The FCC has repealed the 2015 net neutrality rules in a 3-2 vote. The Federal Communications Commission voted along party lines on Thursday to repeal landmark 2015 rules, setting up a court fight over a move that could recast the digital landscape. David Shepardson reporting in Reuters: "The approval of FCC Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal marks a victory for internet service providers like AT&T Inc, Comcast Corp and Verizon Communications Inc and hands them power over what content consumers can access. Democrats, Hollywood, and companies like Google parent Alphabet Inc and Facebook Inc had urged Pai, a Republican appointed by U.S. President Donald Trump, to keep the Obama-era rules barring service providers from blocking, slowing access to or charging more for certain content. ... The FCC voted 3-2 to repeal the rules." — From the official press release issued today by the FCC: "The Federal Communications Commission today voted to restore the longstanding, bipartisan light-touch regulatory framework that has fostered rapid Internet growth, openness, and freedom for nearly 20 years. Following detailed legal and economic analysis, as well as extensive examination of comments from consumers and stakeholders, the Commission reversed the FCC's 2015 heavy-handed utility-style regulation of broadband Internet access service, which imposed substantial costs on the entire Internet ecosystem. In place of that heavy-handed framework, the FCC is returning to the traditional light-touch framework that was in place until 2015." — "I Will Sue To Stop Illegal Rollback Of Net Neutrality," New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman in a statement released following FCC vote. "The FCC’s vote to rip apart net neutrality is a blow to New York consumers, and to everyone who cares about a free and open internet. The FCC just gave Big Telecom an early Christmas present, by giving internet service providers yet another way to put corporate profits over consumers. Today’s rollback will give ISPs new ways to control what we see, what we do, and what we say online. That’s a threat to the free exchange of ideas that’s made the Internet a valuable asset in our democratic process." — "FCC's rushed, technically flawed decision will harm the economy," writes Barbara van Schewick, Professor of Law and Helen L. Crocker Faculty Scholar at Stanford Law School, Director of Stanford Law School's Center for Internet and Society. "Today's vote is a stain on the FCC. For decades, the FCC prided itself on being careful, deliberate and transparent in its mission to keep the internet open for free speech, commerce and innovation, while maintaining incentives for broadband providers to invest. This FCC has failed to live up to that standard. ... While I'm confident the courts will find ample grounds to strike down today's order, Chairman Pai's rushed and technically flawed plan causes immediate damage, not just to the U.S. economy, but to the FCC's reputation and to Americans' already flagging faith in our nation's democratic processes." Follow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Broadband, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation [...]



Former Rutgers University Student and Two Other Men Plead Guilty to 2016 Mirai Botnet Attacks

2017-12-13T11:35:00-08:00

A New Jersey man was one of the three who pled guilty to hacking charges and creating the massive Mirai botnet attacks which spread via vulnerabilities in IoT devices causing massive DDoS attacks. Brian Krebs, security reporter who was first to identify two of the three men involved, today reports: "The U.S. Justice Department on Tuesday unsealed the guilty pleas of two men [updated to three men later] first identified in January 2017 by KrebsOnSecurity as the likely co-authors of Mirai, a malware strain that remotely enslaves so-called 'Internet of Things' devices such as security cameras, routers, and digital video recorders for use in large scale attacks designed to knock Web sites and entire networks offline (including multiple major attacks against this site). ... In addition, the Mirai co-creators pleaded guilty to charges of using their botnet to conduct click fraud — a form of online advertising fraud that will cost Internet advertisers more than $16 billion this year, according to estimates from ad verification company Adloox."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybercrime




FTC, FCC to Coordinate Online Consumer Protection Efforts After Roll Back of Net Neutrality Rules

2017-12-12T13:30:00-08:00

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Federal Communications Commission (FCC) have announced plans to coordinate efforts for online consumer protection following the adoption of the proposed 'Restoring Internet Freedom Order'. The draft MOU, released on Monday, outlines some ways in which the FCC and FTC propose to work together including:

— "The FCC will review informal complaints concerning the compliance of Internet service providers (ISPs) with the disclosure obligations set forth in the new transparency rule. Those obligations include publicly providing information concerning an ISP's practices with respect to blocking, throttling, paid prioritization, and congestion management. Should an ISP fail to make the required disclosures — either in whole or in part — the FCC will take enforcement action."

— "The FTC will investigate and take enforcement action as appropriate against ISPs concerning the accuracy of those disclosures, as well as other deceptive or unfair acts or practices involving their broadband services."

— "The FCC and the FTC will broadly share legal and technical expertise, including the secure sharing of informal complaints regarding the subject matter of the Restoring Internet Freedom Order. The two agencies also will collaborate on consumer and industry outreach and education."

Chris Lewis, Vice President of the consumer group Public Knowledge, says there is no comfort in this announcement from the FTC, calling the agreement an honor system for broadband. "Not only is the FCC eliminating basic net neutrality rules, but it's joining forces with the FTC to say it will only act when a broadband provider is deceiving the public. This gives free reign to broadband providers to block or throttle your broadband service as long as they inform you of it."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation




Russian-Speaking MoneyTaker Group Suspected of Stealing $10M From Companies in Russia, UK and US

2017-12-12T12:55:00-08:00

According to reports today, Russian-speaking hackers called MoneyTaker, are suspected of stealing nearly $10m by removing overdraft limits on debit cards and taking money from cash machines. The group "also stole documentation for technology used by more than 200 banks in the US and Latin America," BBC reports. "The documents could be used in future attacks by the hackers ... Kevin Curran, an independent expert and professor of cybersecurity at Ulster University, said the attacks were 'as sophisticated as it gets at this moment in time.' ... 'They're able to compromise systems and then extract all the documents for how a banking system works so that they have the intelligence needed to produce fraudulent payments.'"

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Cyberattack, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity




FCC Doesn't Understand How the Internet Works, Say Internet Pioneers in Open Letter

2017-12-11T12:27:00-08:00

Internet pioneers and leading figures published an open letter today calling on FCC to cancel the December 14 vote on the agency's proposed "Restoring Internet Freedom Order." Authors of the letter which include Vint Cerf, Steve Crocker, Dave Farber, Susan Landau, David Reed, Paul Vixie, Steve Wozniak and others state that the "FCC's proposed Order is based on a flawed and factually inaccurate understanding of Internet technology." More from the letter: "This proposed Order would repeal key network neutrality protections that prevent Internet access providers from blocking content, websites and applications, slowing or speeding up services or classes of service, and charging online services for access or fast lanes to Internet access providers' customers. The proposed Order would also repeal oversight over other unreasonable discrimination and unreasonable practices, and over interconnection with last-mile Internet access providers. The proposed Order removes long-standing FCC oversight over Internet access providers without an adequate replacement to protect consumers, free markets and online innovation."

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation




EFF to FCC: 'Restoring Internet Freedom' Plan Riddled With Technical Errors and Factual Inaccuracies

2017-12-07T13:53:00-08:00

Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) published a post today pointing out that the FCC continues to ignore the technical parts of a letter sent to it earlier this year by nearly 200 Internet engineers and computer scientists that explained facts about the structure, history, and evolving nature of the Internet. "FCC's latest plan to kill net neutrality is still riddled with technical errors and factual inaccuracies." EFF has highlighted the following as examples: — "The FCC Still Doesn't Understand That Using the Internet Means Having Your ISP Transmit Packets For You – The biggest misunderstanding the FCC still has is the incorrect belief that when your broadband provider sells you Internet access, they're not selling you a service by which you can transmit data to and from whatever points on the Internet you want." — "The FCC Still Doesn't Understand How DNS Works – Citing back to language dating from the days of Bell Operating Companies, the FCC claims that DNS functions similarly to a gateway." — "The FCC Still Doesn't Understand How Caching Works – Like DNS, it treats caching as if it were some specialized service rather than an implementation detail and general-purpose computing technique." — "The FCC Doesn't Understand How the Phone System Works – The FCC's apparent understanding of the phone system seems to be stuck in the days of rotary phones. For users on a modern American network, voice calling is just one of many applications that a phone enables. If the user has poor signal, that voice call might travel at some point over the circuit-switched PSTN, but it might also never leave a packet-switched network if it's sent over VoIP or LTE/EPC." Follow CircleID on TwitterMore under: Access Providers, Broadband, Mobile Internet, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation, Telecom, Wireless [...]