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Preview: Best Syndication - Womans Health

Best Syndication - Womans Health





 



FDA suggests reduced dose for Zolpidem Sleeping Medications

Fri, 11 Jan 2013 04:25:26 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) expressed concern for consumers who take certain medications containing zolpidem to treat insomnia. The medication could cause the user to be less capable at completing activities that require full attention, such as driving a vehicle.

Because of this concern, the FDA has notified the manufacturers of the sleep drugs containing zolpidem to lower the recommended dose. Zolpidem is marketed as a generic or under the brand names of Ambien (oral tablet), Edluar (tablet placed under the tongue), and Zolpimist (oral spray). Additionally, the FDA is currently trying to determine the risk of next-morning impairment in other sleep drugs and OTC products.

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Moms with Vitamin D deficiency had Lower Birth Weight Newborns

Fri, 21 Dec 2012 02:00:28 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Women who had deficient levels of vitamin D early on during their pregnancy were at an increased risk for having a baby with a lower birth weight. The study results will be reported in the January print edition and online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health and was conducted by researchers from the University of Pittsburg Graduate School Of Public Health. Lead author, Alison Gernand, Ph.D., M.P.H., R.D., post-doctoral associate in Pitt Public Health's Department of Epidemiology, explained that being deficient in vitamin D during the first trimester put the fetus at twice the risk of restricted growth during the pregnancy.

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Women who Smoke were at a higher Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death

Wed, 12 Dec 2012 05:05:50 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Women who smoke moderately are at a significantly higher risk than non-smokers to succumb to sudden cardiac death, according to a new study. The researchers reported their findings in the American Heart Association Journal, Circulation: Arrhythmia & Electrophysiology.

The risk factor for sudden cardiac death may even be higher in women who have smoked for a long time. However, over time, the risk factor could be reduced or eliminated by quitting the habit.

The study’s lead author, Roopinder K. Sandhu, M.D., M.P.H., a cardiac electrophysiologist at the University of Alberta's Mazankowski Heart Institute in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, said that previous research has identified the risk for sudden cardiac death. In this new research, they wanted to determine the risk factor based on the quantity and duration of smoking. Sandhu and colleagues wanted to compare the risk factor to healthy women.

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Menopause combined with obesity and overeating encourages Breast Cancer Tumor Growth

Mon, 10 Dec 2012 02:41:51 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Using a rat model, researchers investigated breast tumor growth associated with menopause, obesity and overeating. The rat model demonstrated the potential increased risk for breast-cancer tumor growth and progression with post-menopausal women who are obese and overeat. The results were published in the American Association for Cancer Research journal, Cancer Research.

Paul S. MacLean, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center in Aurora, Colorado explained that obese post-menopausal women are at an increased risk for developing breast cancer and for having less desirable clinical outcomes.

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Steriod Injection for Back Pain associated with Bone Loss in Postmenopausal Women

Mon, 03 Dec 2012 04:35:16 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers from Henry Ford Hospital found that postmenopausal women who received epidural steroid injections to ease back pain had six-times the loss of bone density than what is usual after six months. The study results were published in the December 1 edition of the journal Spine.

The study’s lead author, Shlomo Mandel, M.D., a Henry Ford orthopedic physician, said that physicians should be careful when prescribing epidural steroid injections for patients that are at risk for bone loss. He suggests that physicians should consider prescribing calcium and vitamin D supplements and exercise to the patient as part of treatment regimen.

The researchers wanted to see if the steroid injections used to treat lumbar stenosis, an abnormal narrowing of the spinal canal, would increase the risk for postmenopausal bone loss in women.

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CDC and NHLBI Survey on COPD identifies State-level occurrence Rates

Mon, 26 Nov 2012 05:55:27 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A newly released survey of COPD rates was released by US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). The rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were nationally estimated as well as with surveys conducted in 21 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.

The surveys included information about the COPD patients’ quality of life and healthcare resources available to them. The newly released 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey was conducted using phone calls throughout the United States. The BRFSS survey contacts people randomly via landline or mobile phones.

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Women in Midlife benefited from Walking over 6,000 Steps Daily

Mon, 26 Nov 2012 04:50:31 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Get moving and counting at least 6,000 steps daily may improve the health outcome for women in midlife. A study found that increasing activity decreased the risk for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The researchers will be publishing their findings in the journal of the North American Menopause Society, Menopause.

While walking is the most obvious way to get 6,000 steps, it need not be from that activity. There were 292 women between 45 and 72 years old participating in the study. They wore pedometers that counted the number of steps they took each day. The participants were also measured for cholesterol, blood sugar levels, and waist and hip circumference. The researchers categorized the women who took over 6,000 steps as being active; those who stepped less were considered inactive.

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Vitamin C Deficiency in Pregnant Mothers may affect Baby’s Brain Development

Fri, 16 Nov 2012 06:17:44 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Vitamin C deficiency in expecting mothers can cause brain damage for the developing baby, according to a study from researchers at the University of Copenhagen. Giving the baby vitamin-C supplements after birth did not reverse the brain damage. The results were published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.

Around 10 to 20 percent of all adults are estimated to have some level of vitamin-C deficiency. This study demonstrates the importance of women taking doctor-recommended vitamin supplements during pregnancy.

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Increased Risk for Overweight Children if Mom Smoked during Pregnancy

Tue, 30 Oct 2012 21:33:38 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Risk factors for children becoming overweight were assessed in a new study. The researchers found that children born to women who smoked during pregnancy had a higher risk of becoming overweight. In addition, children that were at a higher birth weight and had rapid weight gain during the first year of life were also at an increased risk for becoming overweight during childhood.

The study results were published in the online edition of the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Resveratrol Supplements did not benefit Healthy Women

Fri, 26 Oct 2012 05:20:23 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study on healthy middle-aged women found no benefit gained by taking resveratrol supplements, a compound found in red wine. The study was reported in the October 25 online edition of Cell Metabolism.

Previous research had suggested that resveratrol in red wine could help reduce heart disease risk and increase lifespan. People have been taking resveratrol in hopes of better health. The U.S. resveratrol supplement business has grown into a $30 million a year industry. People take supplements because they would have to drink large amounts of red wine to gain the benefit – at least that was the conventional wisdom. Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis wanted to see if taking resveratrol supplements was beneficial to otherwise healthy women.

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Menopausal Hot Flashes reduced with Hypnosis

Thu, 25 Oct 2012 05:05:50 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that women could reduce the number of menopausal hot flashes by up to 74 percent with hypnosis. The controlled, randomized study results were published in the online edition of the journal Menopause.

The researchers from the Mind-Body Medicine Research Laboratory at Baylor University, Waco, TX; the school of Nursing at Indiana University in Indianapolis, IN; and the College of Education at the University of Texas, Austin, worked together on this study. They randomly assigned postmenopausal women either to hypnosis or the control groups.

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Heart Attacks more deadly for Women

Mon, 22 Oct 2012 05:26:01 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A new study found that women have a higher chance of dying from a heart attack (ST elevation myocardial infarction) than men. Dr Guillaume Leurent from the Centre Hospitalier Universitaire in Rennes, France presented the study’s findings at the Acute Cardiac Care Congress 2012 meeting in Istanbul, Turkey this week. This is the first annual event hosted by the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) for the European Society of Cardiology (ESC).

The researchers found that women tended to have longer delays before being treated. The women suffering a heart attack were treated less aggressively, and there were more complications with longer hospital stays.

Previous research showed women having worse outcomes with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) events. So the French researchers decided to investigate whether there were any gender differences in the way they were treated.

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Low Calcium Diet associated with an increased risk for Primary Hyperparathyroidism

Fri, 19 Oct 2012 05:39:09 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found an increased risk for developing primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) in women who ate a low calcium diet. Primary hyperparathyroidism is a condition where the parathyroid gland is releasing too much of the parathyroid hormone into the body. The condition can cause weak bones, fractures, and kidney stones. Additionally, other studies have associated untreated PHPT with higher rates of high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke.

PHPT is most often found in post-menopausal women between 50-60 years of age. One in 800 people will be affected by PHPT during their lifetime.

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Menopause Hormone Replacement Therapy reduced Heart Failure and Heart Attack Risk

Wed, 10 Oct 2012 06:38:06 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that women who took hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for ten years had a reduced risk for heart failure and heart attack compared to women who did not take the therapy. The positive effects of taking HRT therapy appears to be a reduction in cardiovascular disease, but on the negative side, there is an increased risk for developing breast cancer. The new study suggests that the cardiovascular benefits are present without having an increased risk for cancer, deep vein thrombosis, or stroke.

The randomized trial-study was conducted in Denmark over a ten-year period. The researchers had followed-up after an additional six years to assess if HRT reduced heart disease risk if therapy started soon after menopause.

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Elderly Women’s Brains function better with Daily Low Dose Aspirin Regimen

Thu, 04 Oct 2012 06:05:48 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Brain function declined less in elderly women who took a daily low-dose aspirin. These women, who were also at a high risk for heart disease, had less mental decline compared to women who did not take the daily aspirin. The study results were published in the online journal BMJ Open.

The researchers suggest that inflammation associated with heart disease may also influence the way the brain ages.

In the study, 681 women between 70 and 92 were investigated. Out of these women, 601 were at a high risk for having heart disease or a stroke. Their risk was at a 10 percent rate or higher, based on the Framingham scale.

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Eating high amounts of Antioxidants helped lower Heart Attack Risk for Women

Mon, 24 Sep 2012 05:47:53 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A new study found that women who ate a diet rich in antioxidants had a significantly reduced risk for having a heart attack, also known as a myocardial infarction. Swedish researchers published their findings in the October issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

Lead investigator, Alicja Wolk, DrMedSci, Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden, explained that their study was the first to investigate how dietary antioxidants are related to myocardial infarction risk.

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Live up to Six More Years by staying Physically Active and Socially Involved

Fri, 31 Aug 2012 06:18:00 +0000

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(Best Syndication News ) - Making healthy lifestyle choices in old age can increase lifespan by up to six years for men and up to five more years for women, according to a Swedish study published in the online edition of BMJ. Healthy lifestyle choices include not smoking, eating right, staying physically active, and staying socially.

The researchers wanted to see if having healthy habits were just as important after a person turns 75. They wanted to see if there was an extension on a person's lifespan.

To investigate, the researchers studied 1,800 participants that were tracked from 1987 to 2005. Over the 18-year period, the participants were documented for their age, sex, occupation, education, lifestyle habits, what they did in their leisure time, and their socializing network.

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CDC suggests that all Baby Boomers be tested for Hepatitis C

Fri, 17 Aug 2012 03:40:05 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is recommending that all baby boomers in the country be tested once for the hepatitis C virus. The CDC estimates that 1-in-30 baby boomers are infected with hepatitis C and may not even be aware that they are infected. Baby boomers are people who were born between 1945 and 1965.

The CDC said that hepatitis C can cause the liver to become seriously diseased and in some cases, it could lead to liver cancer. The fastest growing rate for cancer related death is liver cancer. In the US, hepatitis C is also a leading cause for liver transplants.

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Sleep Apnea rate in 20-Year-old Women was seen 50 percent of the time

Thu, 16 Aug 2012 04:46:24 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study from Sweden found that women have a high rate of obstructive sleep apnea. They found 50 percent of the 20-year-old participants had obstructive sleep apnea. The women who were obese or had hypertension had a higher rate of sleep apnea. The results were published online today in the European Respiratory Journal.

The condition occurs when a person sleeps and their airway becomes blocked preventing regular breathing. The severity of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) can be determined by the number of pauses.

OSA is usually associated with men, but this new research sheds light on OSA in women. This study suggests that it should be identified as a problem for females too.

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Getting Active in their Leisure-time helped Middle-Age Adults have Lower Levels of Inflammatory Markers

Tue, 14 Aug 2012 04:16:08 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that middle-aged adults who kept active on a regular basis during their leisure-time had better protection for the heart than those who remained inactive. The research was published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The researchers investigated over 4,200 study participants with an average age of 49 to determine if leisure-time physical activities provided benefits to keeping a heart healthy. The leisure-time activities included brisk walking, vigorous gardening, cycling, sports, housework, and home maintenance.

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