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Why the gig economy fits well with the lives of Baby Boomers

Mon, 26 Jun 2017 06:39:00 +0000

NHC
Why the gig economy fits well with the lives of Baby Boomers

We Baby Boomers are benefiting significantly from the gig economy, says author, speaker and optimist Tim Drake. Not just as consumers by it providing lower prices and more convenience, but as participants too. It’s an important bolt-on to something bigger, he says, enabling new ways of doing business to emerge, and a fresh outlook on what ‘work’ is. But is it something we should think about taking a much more active role in? Baby Boomers fit into what I call Generation Cherry. Indeed, that is the title I gave my book on the subject. The profile is slightly wider than Baby Boomers, as Generation Cherry covers people in their fifties, sixties, seventies and eighties (possibly even forties and nineties). We can be classed as one broad group, and are so called, because we had a cherry on everything. We had free primary, secondary or tertiary education. We benefitted from an excellent, free Health Service. The Beatles, the Stones, Queen and Dylan were fresh and fantastic. Jobs were plentiful – you could pick and choose. And most jobs had occupational pensions. You could afford to buy a house – a big cherry that. And the biggest cherry of all? We are

First published as Why the gig economy fits well with the lives of Baby Boomers on NHC




SDF podcast 9: Either back to the future or fast forward to a new normal

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 11:40:36 +0000

NHC
SDF podcast 9: Either back to the future or fast forward to a new normal

In the latest episode 9 of The Small Data Forum podcast, hosted by Thomas Stoeckle in conversation with regulars Sam Knowles and me, we enjoyed a wide-ranging, lively conversation over the course of 45 minutes on topics as diverse as the 2017 general election campaign (what went wrong for Theresa May and the Conservatives with a clear focus on the politics) and the latest global communications report from the Annenberg School of Communications (we focused especially on PR and AVE). Writer of the show notes for this episode is Sam: News is neither a fixed nor a finite entity. There are some periods in history when it feels like there’s just more happening than at others. I’m not talking about the Dark Ages (which suffered a blackout from not just newscasters but also historiographers). I’m talking about periods in one’s life in the early 21st century when it feels as if there’s more going on globally and geopolitically than at others. Now of course, the growth of social media, driven by the democratisation of mobile technology and the explosion in smartphones in particular, has had a profound impact on the way that news is gathered, shared, and amplified. Today, anyone

First published as SDF podcast 9: Either back to the future or fast forward to a new normal on NHC


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Nevillehobsoncom/~5/Sg8JPDZ05ig/rss




For Immediate Release 92: Marketing failures of the UK’s Conservative Party

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 09:32:00 +0000

NHC
For Immediate Release 92: Marketing failures of the UK’s Conservative Party

We said we’d do one episode together of the For Immediate Release podcast as a ‘limited return engagement,’ emulating The Hobson and Holtz Report that Shel and I did for ten years. We did do that with episode 84 in April. We enjoyed it so much we decided to do another one, and so we recorded episode 92 yesterday. In keeping with our ‘hefty but good’ slogan, Shel and I enjoyed a conversation over an hour and forty minutes that covered a big agenda: There’s a new mobile-based social network that has been described as Twitter for audio. Neville has been using Hear Me Out for a week, and Shel has been listening to the 42-second audio clips. Neville delved into the recent UK general election and the failures of Prime Minister Teresa May’s Conservative Party, which could be the same failures ascribed to any brand’s botched marketing, including bad polling data, shrugging off social media and influence marketing (which the competing Labour Party exploited), an unclear strategic narrative, bad sloganeering, and too much reliance on the traditional print media. Shel penned a post for the NASDAQ Market Insites blog about two significant studies that reveal the imminent absorption of

First published as For Immediate Release 92: Marketing failures of the UK’s Conservative Party on NHC


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Nevillehobsoncom/~5/RDt9h7XX4Qw/forimmed-92.mp3




Is podcasting about to get its tipping point?

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 09:46:00 +0000

NHC
Is podcasting about to get its tipping point?

There’s been quite a sense of anticipation, if not excitement, among podcasters about Apple’s announcement last week on some significant enhancements the company is making this autumn to its podcast app for iPhones and other iOS devices. The big change in the app is potentially a game-changer for podcasting as it will provide podcasters with basic analytics functionality to offer evidence of listening behaviours by subscribers (where they paused in a podcast, how much of it they listened to, did they listen to all of it, etc) rather than just metrics on downloads (how many downloads, which country are downloaders in, what directory listing did they click, etc). In simple terms, it means podcasters will now be able to answer the question “How many listens does your podcast get?” with some confidence that will fill a major gap in understanding how a podcast is doing. It will give them real insights into discovering how much of their shows people are actually listening to: all the way through, just parts, or hitting the ‘stop’ button after the first five minutes. Some platforms and podcast directories have offered rudimentary analytics features before. But as Apple’s podcast player app enjoys a market-leading share

First published as Is podcasting about to get its tipping point? on NHC




Theresa May’s fragile foundation

Sun, 11 Jun 2017 06:42:00 +0000

NHC
Theresa May’s fragile foundation

It was rather a surreal experience watching the BBC’s election night analytics and opinion show on the BBC News Channel on Thursday June 8, from shortly after the closing of the poll at 10pm (I lasted until about 1am on Friday morning). It was the exit poll – a joint effort by the BBC, ITV and Sky News – that set the scene for a night of traumatic change for the ruling Conservative party led by Theresa May, and qualified jubilation for the fractious Labour party (‘qualified’ because they didn’t actually win the election) led by Jeremy Corbyn that achieved its best-ever share of the popular vote (40.3%) in decades. Reaction on Twitter was immediate and humorous (or not, depending on where you sat in the political spectrum). The outcome, as we well know now, was a hung parliament very much in line with the exit poll prediction; a Conservative party in government, winning the most votes (48.9%) and with the most members elected to Parliament, but without a majority; and Theresa May, the Prime Minister, the architect of this self-inflicted debacle now widely regarded at home and abroad as highly damaged goods with a political reputation in tatters, whose very

First published as Theresa May’s fragile foundation on NHC




20 Highlights from Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends 2017 report

Wed, 07 Jun 2017 06:49:00 +0000

NHC
20 Highlights from Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends 2017 report

The 2017 edition of venture capitalist Mary Meeker’s annual Internet Trends report was published last week. As with previous editions, the 2017 report offers credible insights into some of the significant trends that are shaping, evolving and defining the internet and our use of it. This year, there’s a strong focus on online advertising, interactive games, healthcare, and much more. Weighing in at 355 slides, the presentation deck PDF is a hefty opus with much to glean and digest. I’ve zeroed-in on some metrics that offer insights of particular interest to communicators like me. Following my narrative, in which I note the numbers of the specific slides that I’m highlighting, I’ve embedded Meeker’s deck so you can view or download all those slides right here. While many of the specific examples I’ve highlighted are from experiences in the USA, it’s fair to consider them as broad trend indicators and pointers that would also be indicative for other markets such as the UK, continental Europe and further afield. Indeed, the report goes into some detail on trends in two specific countries – India and China. So let’s get to it… 1. Internet users totalled 3.4 billion people worldwide in mid-2016, growth

First published as 20 Highlights from Mary Meeker’s Internet Trends 2017 report on NHC




Delicious: Preserving a big piece of social web history

Sun, 04 Jun 2017 08:20:00 +0000

NHC
Delicious: Preserving a big piece of social web history

Bookmarking interesting content you encounter on your travels around the web is very much a second-nature act these days. See and save it now, read or share it later. It wasn’t always as easy as that until Delicious came on the scene in 2003 in the early days of the modern social web. It offered not only an easy way to bookmark websites and other content and save those bookmarks to your account on the Delicious website, but also organize the bookmarks via user-assigned tags and enable other Delicious users to find your bookmarks. Delicious also made it very easy to share your content via RSS, an automated content sharing system that emerged at about that time. I started using Delicious in 2004, finding it a very useful tool. I still have my account that contains nearly 28,000 bookmarks. It’s quite a trip down memory lane looking over bookmarks from the early days. Shel and I used it during the decade 2005-2015 that we presented The Hobson and Holtz Report business podcast, sharing links via the podcast’s Delicious account of the topics we discussed in each weekly show. Such a rich and influential history, and a major part of the

First published as Delicious: Preserving a big piece of social web history on NHC




The big asks of British Airways

Tue, 30 May 2017 06:08:00 +0000

NHC
The big asks of British Airways

It’s hard to know what to fully make of the dreadful mess in which British Airways finds itself today. It follows over three full days of massive disruption to the airline’s business that has resulted in wide scale flight cancellations around the world, huge queues at terminals at the UK’s major airports and many in other countries, and a severe hit on reputation and trust that could cost BA dearly. According to BA, a computer systems failure led to all this. It was caused by a power outage at a data centre near Heathrow airport in London on Saturday May 27, they said. That event knocked out all the airline’s means of managing flights, aircraft movements, passenger bookings, check-ins, baggage handling, you name it, even their phone systems. The impact was global, affecting operations everywhere. The result has been ugly scenes on the TV screens in every broadcaster’s news bulletins throughout this past weekend and during the Monday Bank Holiday in the UK, showing airport terminals packed with crowds looking for answers and solutions that nobody was able to answer or fully deliver. It’s been splashed across the front pages of newspapers here and worldwide, every day for three days.

First published as The big asks of British Airways on NHC




SDF podcast 8: Seek out those you can trust

Thu, 25 May 2017 10:29:35 +0000

NHC
SDF podcast 8: Seek out those you can trust

In the latest episode 8 of The Small Data Forum podcast, hosted by Thomas Stoeckle in conversation with regulars Neville Hobson and Sam Knowles, we explore whether following the ‘interesting times’ of 2016, we are seeing some sort of ‘regression to the mean’, with a right wing populist not succeeding in general elections in the Netherlands, with Emmanuel Macron becoming president of France, and with Chelsea FC winning the Premier League (following Leicester City’s surprise success last year). And such is the nature of our continuously evolving subject matter, when we have completed a podcast, we often find that on key discussion points, there is already more, and breaking news. The Facebook Files Just days after recording our latest musings last week on the challenges and opportunities surrounding big-small data, with multiple references to Facebook and their attempts to counter fake news, the Guardian broke the story of the Facebook Files, based on more than 100 internal training manuals, spreadsheets and flowcharts outlining the rules and guidelines for what its two billion users can and can’t post on the site. This will add to the global debate about the role and ethics of Facebook and other social media platforms in

First published as SDF podcast 8: Seek out those you can trust on NHC


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Nevillehobsoncom/~5/7stK4WcG-kQ/machine-learning-report.pdf




The end of AVE in PR?

Mon, 22 May 2017 06:16:00 +0000

NHC
The end of AVE in PR?

If there’s one phrase guaranteed to generate debate in the PR business, it’s ‘advertising value equivalence,’ AVE for short. In simple terms, AVE looks at the volume of space an editorial article takes in a print publication, or the amount of time an editorial audio or video segment plays, and equates its value to the price you’d have paid if you had bought the equivalent-size space or time as advertising. For decades the use of AVE has been a controversial activity, one that has been viewed as unethical by some practitioners and professional associations regarding its perceived lack of validity as a metric to measure the value of a public relations activity. You can read this argument in considerable detail in a paper published by The Institute for Public Relations. In particular, note this discussion point from the paper: We urge you to move away as quickly as possible from statements of the nature, “Our news coverage this quarter was worth $X million in advertising.” Instead, talk about how you achieved your prominence goal, how your coverage gained in prominence over the year, or how you beat out your competitors in terms of the prominence of your coverage. Written in

First published as The end of AVE in PR? on NHC


Media Files:
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/Nevillehobsoncom/~5/5bgDYNH0g6I/2003_AVE1.pdf