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Preview: Best Syndication - Men's Health

Best Syndication - Men's Health





 



CDC and NHLBI Survey on COPD identifies State-level occurrence Rates

Mon, 26 Nov 2012 05:55:27 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A newly released survey of COPD rates was released by US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI). The rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were nationally estimated as well as with surveys conducted in 21 states, Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico.

The surveys included information about the COPD patients’ quality of life and healthcare resources available to them. The newly released 2011 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey was conducted using phone calls throughout the United States. The BRFSS survey contacts people randomly via landline or mobile phones.

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Study: Boys with ADHD have more problems as Adults

Tue, 16 Oct 2012 07:05:57 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A 33-year follow-up study found that boys that were diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood grew up to have significantly worse outcomes with education, occupation, income, and social areas of their lives. The report was published in the Online First by Archives of General Psychiatry.

Rachel G. Klein, Ph.D., of the Child Study Center at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York, and colleagues, studied the outcomes of adult men who were diagnosed as being ADHD around the age of 8 years old. The study involved 135 men who were diagnosed with ADHD in childhood and 136 men who were not diagnosed with ADHD.

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High Blood Pressure reduced in Men treated for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Mon, 15 Oct 2012 03:25:51 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study investigated men for sleep apnea to see if treating the breathing disorder would have a positive effect on their hypertension and diabetes. The researchers found that treating men with positive airway pressure (PAP) while sleeping also reduced their blood pressure. The study results were published in the Oct. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

"All types of patients may benefit from this treatment, even those with other chronic medical conditions," said Bharati Prasad, MD, MS, the study's principal investigator. "It's important to now do a prospective study enrolling different types of patients with sleep apnea."

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Live up to Six More Years by staying Physically Active and Socially Involved

Fri, 31 Aug 2012 06:18:00 +0000

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(Best Syndication News ) - Making healthy lifestyle choices in old age can increase lifespan by up to six years for men and up to five more years for women, according to a Swedish study published in the online edition of BMJ. Healthy lifestyle choices include not smoking, eating right, staying physically active, and staying socially.

The researchers wanted to see if having healthy habits were just as important after a person turns 75. They wanted to see if there was an extension on a person's lifespan.

To investigate, the researchers studied 1,800 participants that were tracked from 1987 to 2005. Over the 18-year period, the participants were documented for their age, sex, occupation, education, lifestyle habits, what they did in their leisure time, and their socializing network.

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CDC suggests that all Baby Boomers be tested for Hepatitis C

Fri, 17 Aug 2012 03:40:05 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is recommending that all baby boomers in the country be tested once for the hepatitis C virus. The CDC estimates that 1-in-30 baby boomers are infected with hepatitis C and may not even be aware that they are infected. Baby boomers are people who were born between 1945 and 1965.

The CDC said that hepatitis C can cause the liver to become seriously diseased and in some cases, it could lead to liver cancer. The fastest growing rate for cancer related death is liver cancer. In the US, hepatitis C is also a leading cause for liver transplants.

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Getting Active in their Leisure-time helped Middle-Age Adults have Lower Levels of Inflammatory Markers

Tue, 14 Aug 2012 04:16:08 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that middle-aged adults who kept active on a regular basis during their leisure-time had better protection for the heart than those who remained inactive. The research was published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation.

The researchers investigated over 4,200 study participants with an average age of 49 to determine if leisure-time physical activities provided benefits to keeping a heart healthy. The leisure-time activities included brisk walking, vigorous gardening, cycling, sports, housework, and home maintenance.

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Scientists suggest RDA of Vitamin C should be doubled to Reduce Disease Risk

Tue, 17 Jul 2012 06:22:12 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The US recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamin C should be increased to 200 milligrams per day for adults, scientists from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University suggests. The current RDA for vitamin C for women is 75 milligrams and 90 milligrams for men. The scientists from the institute put forward that an increase in the RDA could reduce heart disease, stroke, and cancer. The call for the higher intake of vitamin C was published in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.

Balz Frei, a professor and director of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, said that some clinical trials were essentially imperfect. Of course, the Linus Pauling Institute has long been recommending vitamin C for improving health.

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Losing Weight can improve Low Testosterone Levels in Men

Wed, 27 Jun 2012 04:58:08 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that overweight men could improve their low testosterone levels by losing extra weight and exercising more. The men in the study were middle age, overweight, and had pre-diabetes. The results were presented this week at The Endrocrine Society’s 94th Annual Meeting in Houston, Texas.

Study co-author Frances Hayes, MD, professor at St. Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin, said that doctors should try to support men in their efforts to lose weight before prescribing testosterone therapy to restore low levels of the hormone.

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Men with reduced DHEA Steroid Levels at a higher Risk for Heart Disease

Sat, 23 Jun 2012 23:06:23 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that elderly men who had low levels of natural steroid hormones were at a higher chance for developing cardiovascular disease. The researchers presented their findings this Saturday at The Endocrine Society's 94th Annual Meeting, which is being held in Houston, Texas.

Dehydroephiandrosterone (DHEA) is the steroid that was studied. The hormone is secreted by the adrenal gland. DHEA-S, the sulfated form, floats through the blood and is converted in other tissues and is turned into estrogen and testosterone hormones.

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Eating Foods High in Vitamin D might reduce Stroke Risk in Japanese-American Men

Tue, 29 May 2012 02:29:54 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A 34-year study of Japanese-American men found an increased stroke risk later in life with those who did not eat a diet high in vitamin D. The study was published in Stroke, an American Heart Association journal.

The study’s lead author, Gotaro Kojima, M.D., said that eating foods high in vitamin D might be helpful for preventing strokes. Dr. Kojima is a geriatric medicine fellow from John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu.

Vitamin D interested researchers because of the possibility that it may help reduce the risk of diseases such as cancer and diabetes. Vitamin D has long been established as a necessary nutrient for preventing rickets in children and to help prevent bone loss in adults.

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Low Oxygen in Cells might spur Cancer Growth

Fri, 04 May 2012 05:08:39 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The tumor growth rate of certain cancers could be increased with low oxygen levels, according to recent study from researchers at the University of Georgia. The study was published in the early online edition of the Journal of Molecular Cell Biology.

The current consensus of most researchers is that genetic mutation is the main cause of cancer growth. This study suggests another cause: low oxygen levels (hypoxia) in cells. Oxygen may play a role in unruly tumor growth in certain types of cancer. Prior research showed that low oxygen levels were a contributing factor to cause cancer to advance, however, they did not point to it as the main cause.

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2012 California County Health Report released by CDPH

Thu, 12 Apr 2012 22:07:25 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The California Department of Public Health has released their County Health Status Profiles 2012 report that assesses the health status of each county throughout the state. The current data analyzed was between 2008 – 2010 and was compared against the Healthy People 2010 National Objectives to determine if the state has met each goal.

The CDPH report saw improvements from the previous report that involved the years of 2005 through 2007. The new report saw around a 14 percent decline in the birthrates of adolescent mothers for the 2008 through 2010 data. There was a 29.4 percent reduction in motor vehicle traffic crash death rates, which was the best improvement overall in the 2012 report. The rates of Gonorrhea infections declined by 25.6 percent. AIDS infections declined by 24.4 percent. Diabetes death rates also showed a decline by 11.1 percent. All cancers including lung, breast, and prostate declined since the 2005 – 2007 report. There also was a reduction in coronary heart disease, and cerebrovascular disease. However, death rates for Alzheimer’s disease and suicide rates increased.

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FDA announces New Safety Concerns for Statins

Wed, 29 Feb 2012 05:13:38 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Cholesterol lowering medications prescribed by doctors have new important safety information announced by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These include not needing to do routine blood tests for liver enzymes, memory loss problems, increased diabetes risk, and muscle damage risk.

The FDA is advising health care professionals that routine blood tests for liver enzymes are no longer necessary because they did not prove to be helpful in preventing rare cases of serious liver injury that can happen when taking statins.

Memory loss, forgetting, and being confused have been reported as a side effect from some people taking statin medications. The memory loss was described as being “fuzzy.” The FDA said that the memory loss was reversible once the person stopped taking the medication.

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Medivation Shares rise after Positive Results from Prostate Drug Trial

Thu, 02 Feb 2012 09:51:56 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) –Medivation, Inc. (NASDAQ: MDVN) shares increased 21.95 percent, up $12.16 to close at $67.57. The share price climbed Wednesday, after of positive results with the Phase 3 AFFIRM trial for a drug to treat prostate cancer. Medivation is working with Japan based Astellas Pharma Inc. (TYO: 4503) on the development of the MDV3100 investigational drug.

Data from the trial showed that MDV3100 provided an average 4.8 month life extension compared to the placebo group. The data will be presented at the 2012 Genitourinary Cancers Symposium in San Francisco, CA this Thursday, February 2.

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Study finds 1 in 10 Canadians cannot afford Prescription Medication

Mon, 16 Jan 2012 20:58:10 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study from the University of British Columbia along with the University of Toronto suggested that around 1 in 10 Canadians could not afford their prescription medications. Approximately 9.6 percent of Canadians were not getting their prescription filled, not getting it refilled, or even skipping dosages because of the cost.

The researchers reviewed data from 5,732 respondents to a Statistics Canada’s Canadian Community Health Survey to determine the magnitude of the problem of affording prescription medication in country.

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Disease Prevention tips on ‘The Dr. Oz Show’

Tue, 26 Jul 2011 05:09:33 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Dr. Oz hosted a special ‘Prevention Power Hour’ on his TV show today and said it is never too late to prevent disease. By changing how you do things you can reduce your risk of developing heart disease by up to 80 percent, cancer up to 60 percent, and type 2 diabetes up to 90 percent, he explained. Two doctors join him on the show to explain simple lifestyle changes that can prevent diseases. Later on, Dr. Oz had Health Magazine editor, Frances Largeman-Roth, RD, shared some unique household products that can offer health prevention - all for under $10.

Donald Hensrund, Md, chair Preventive Medicine at the Mayo Clinic and said that preventive medicine, helps people make lifestyle changes to feel better now and live longer.

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Exercise improves Memory and Brain Function

Mon, 25 Jul 2011 23:14:42 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers reviewed over one hundred studies on exercise and the effect it has on the brain. They concluded that aerobic and strength-training exercises are important for preserving brain and cognitive health. The “Exercise, Brain and Cognition Across the Lifespan” report is published in the online edition of the Journal of Applied Physiology.

Michelle W. Voss, of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and her colleagues reviewed 111 current animal and human studies to highlight the brain function benefits from aerobic exercise and strength training workouts for humans at all ages.

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Prostate Cancer Vaccine used to cured mice in Mayo Clinic Study

Sun, 19 Jun 2011 20:24:25 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study from the Mayo Clinic and several UK research institutions revealed that a human vaccine treatment was able to cure mice with prostate tumors. The vaccine for prostate cancer did not show any discernible side effects. They wanted to see if the immune system's own resources, along with the vaccine, could be used to purge prostate tumors from the body. The hope is to develop a new medical treatment that would not involve any toxic chemotherapy or radiation treatments.

Richard Vile, Ph.D., a Mayo Clinic immunologist, professor from the Richard M. Schulze Family Foundation and lead author of the study, said the researchers hope to begin clinical trials in two years.

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Citalopram and Finasteride Recall announced because of label mixup says FDA

Sat, 09 Apr 2011 01:57:22 +0000

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Best Syndication News

(Best Syndication News) - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced a recall for citalopram and finasteride prescription medications because the wrong labels may have been put on these bottles mixing the two of them up. Greenston LLC, a subsidiary of Pfizer, is the manufacturers of these two medications that involved in this recall.

The list of recalled citalopram and finasteride prescription drugs are as follows:

• Citalopram 10 mg Tablets (100-count bottle), lot number FI0510058-A

• Finasteride 5 mg Tablets (90-count bottle), lot number FI0510058-A

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Playing Video Games could help Men and Boys to develop Visuomotor Skills

Sun, 26 Sep 2010 22:10:11 +0000

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Best Syndication News

(Best Syndication News) Men and boys will be happy with the results of a study from researchers at the Centre for Vision Research at York University in Canada found that young men that played video games for at least 4 hours per week had better eye hand coordination than those that did not play video games on a regular basis. The researchers presented the study results in the October 2010 issue of Elsevier's Cortex (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/cortex).

The researchers said that the way that the brain processed the eye-hand coordination or visuomotor skills were using the prefrontal cortex at the front of the brain compared to parietal cortex which is the part of the brain that is used by the hand-eye coordination. The boys that didn't play video games had their brain activity in the parietal cortex while the video gamers had the prefrontal cortex activated.

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