Subscribe: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories
http://www.csmonitor.com/rss/csm.rss
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
abuse  american  april  cocoa  germany  global  metoo movement  metoo  new  part  private  rural  sexual assault  state  stories  voice  women 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Christian Science Monitor | All Stories

Christian Science Monitor | All Stories



Read the front page stories of csmonitor.com.



 



How Egypt’s stubborn poverty threatens strongman Sisi’s grip

The majority of Egyptians have agreed to 'tighten their belts' to give Sisi time for his painful, IMF-mandated economic reforms. But without a turnaround, their patience could soon run out. There are already signs of voter apathy.

(image)



Another way to look at ‘DNA’

Today’s contributor was healed of a hereditary, chronic back problem as his sense of identity shifted radically.

(image)



Where maple syrup meets global economics

The recent upheaval in Western democracies has several causes, but perhaps the greatest is this: How are they coming to terms with their shifting role in the global economy?

(image)






Readers write: Lifting humanity through a story, prayer after mass shootings, making sense of confusing events

Letters to the editor for the April 23, 2018-April 30, 2018 weekly magazine. 

(image)



As its beaches recede, Florida shores up private ownership

A new law passed in March sets limits on public access to private beaches. Some conservatives say private beaches should be sacrosanct, pitting them against advocates for customary-use access along Florida's coastline. 

(image)



The art of parsing apologies

A wave of recent apologies by public figures requires a fine discernment to understand when someone does right for the original offense.

(image)



Are environmentalists hypocrites?

Concern for the environment often rises alongside material wealth. Yet that wealth in turn drives environmental destruction. Is there a way out?

(image)



UW-Madison announces plan to address history of racism

The plan comes out of a working group formed in response to the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., and aims to acknowledge the university's history and find ways to move forward and increase inclusivity of underrepresented groups.

(image)



Former NFL player Chris Borland helps athletes and veterans adjust to retirement

The former 49er walked away from a promising football career after one year because of concerns over head injuries. Now he helps military veterans and other football players deal with the challenges they share reintegrating into society. 

(image)



Protest art is preserved in libraries, museums

Museums, universities, and libraries across the United States collected signs from the 2017 Women's March sites and put out a call on social media. Now these artifacts are being placed in archives and displayed in exhibitions.

(image)



Churches struggle with their #MeToo moment

The #MeToo movement has forced Hollywood, Washington, and Wall Street to grapple honestly with patterns of sexual harassment and abuse. Many churches are still struggling to embrace such introspection and the disruption it brings.  

(image)



Amid US woes, Chinese telecom giant turns to Europe, Asia

Huawei, the No. 3 smartphone brand, has repeatedly been stymied trying to enter the American market. The US has cited national security concerns. 

(image)



Diversity on display at tech conference minus 'tech bros'

An alternative cybersecurity conference held this week in San Francisco was notable for its representation of women and minorities who are often absent at such events. Only one in ten cybersecurity workers are women. 

(image)



After sex-abuse scandal, protesters demand change on Nobel literature prize board

Sara Danius was the first woman to lead the secretive board that awards the Nobel Prize in Literature. Her removal from the academy, amid criticism from male members for her handling of the scandal, has sparked protests across Sweden. 

(image)



Dainty machines? Collaborative robots help humans in Japanese factories

As the workforce ages in Japan and elsewhere, "cobots" are emerging as a way to keep assembly lines moving without replacing humans. Cobots are being used by companies of all sizes for simple tasks and small-batch manufacturing.

(image)



On 19th anniversary, Columbine asks other schools to remember, not politicize

As students around the nation plan walkouts, Columbine will continue its tradition of commemorating the anniversary of the shooting with a day of service. 

(image)



'Dread Nation' is a rollicking 'Gone With the Wind + Zombies' adventure

But don't underestimate the latest YA novel by activist Justina Ireland – it's also a biting commentary on contemporary race relations in America.

(image)



Still small voice

In recognition of Earth Day on April 22, today’s column is a poem that points to the light, peace, harmony, and joy that divine Spirit has bestowed on its entire creation.

(image)



Top Picks: The Shacks' 'Haze,' the podcast 'Brains On!,' and more

The film 'Phantom Thread' is available on DVD and Blu-ray, the PBS program 'The Jazz Ambassadors' chronicles how the American government sent jazz musicians around the world as cultural ambassadors, and more top picks.

(image)



#MeToo's next challenge: domestic gun violence

The #MeToo movement has empowered thousands of women to tell their stories of harassment and abuse throughout America's workplaces. But advocates say women abused at home often face a more dangerous path.

(image)



What's in a name? Why a Castro-less Cuba may not mean a changed one.

Former President Raúl Castro, brother of revolutionary leader Fidel, handed over the presidency Thursday to Miguel Díaz-Canel. His first task will be getting the economy back on track, but just how radical an approach he can take is uncertain – as is whether he wants one.

(image)



Kremlin cyberpower? How fight over messaging app is showing its limits.

The Russian government is trying to block popular messaging app Telegram from domestic users. But its creator, Pavel Durov, is easily winning the fight, ensuring Telegram stays up even as the Kremlin clumsily causes collateral damage online.

(image)



The new mercy for corrupt firms that fess up

For most white-collar crimes, such as corruption, more countries are following a US practice of legal leniency toward companies that confess and reform.

(image)



Ivory Coast, chocolate giants team up to make cocoa production more sustainable

Ivory Coast is the world's biggest cocoa producer, but agriculture of the plant has led to mass deforestation. In order to prevent losing all its forest cover by 2034, the country is exploring new ways of tracking cocoa production and developing agroforests.

(image)



Promise of outdoor activities pulls new residents to rural areas

Rural communities with large recreation industries have seen a dramatic rise in population. The trend is part of what drove the overall slight growth of the rural population in the US from 2016 to 2017, even though many rural counties have been shrinking for years. 

(image)



Voice assistants can't understand Pittsburghese

If you're from Pittsburgh, 'Sorry, I didn't get that,' may be a refrain you're used to hearing from Alexa. Voice assistants, trained on regular American English, often trip up on requests in regional dialects.

(image)



Senate to allow infants into the chamber

The tradition-bound institution voted to allow newborns of senators into the chamber. Though the rules change passed without issue, some senators voiced private concerns about allowing infants inside the chamber.

(image)



Some male sexual assault victims feel left out by #MeToo

In response to the female-dominated #MeToo movement, male sexual assault victims have started tweeting with a #MenToo hashtag. Because of social stigma and feelings of shame, many men don't speak up about their abuse, say experts.

(image)



Teachers engage in online activism in fight for funding

Tired of low wages and a lack of state funding, teachers began sharing their stories online. Their Facebook groups have drawn tens of thousands of members and played a key role in helping to organize demonstrations.

(image)



'God Save Texas' is Lawrence Wright’s affectionate, eye-opening, slightly rueful love letter to his native state

Intended to be part travelogue, part reportage, and part memoir, 'God Save Texas' reads less like a coherent narrative and more like a collection of essays.

(image)



My Earth Day prayer

Today’s column explores the possibility of a flourishing Earth – and the role that prayer plays. 

(image)



Exactly how often is that?

Even if you decide to make a firm distinction between bi- and semi-, these words are used so interchangeably that it’s still confusing.

(image)



Meanwhile in ... Gambia, voters will vote using glass marbles for the last time

And in Estonia, citizens are enjoying a reputation as global leaders in digital governance. Known as e-Estonia, the system handles almost all government functions digitally, linking legislation, elections, banking, education, health care, and taxes on a single platform. 

(image)



Even at Starbucks? A conversation grows about hidden racial bias.

Two black men were waiting for a friend, but not making a purchase, in one of the most overtly progressive corporations in the nation. Their arrest, shared widely on social media, puts fresh focus on the challenge of latent racism.

(image)



Why Bob Corker is bucking GOP tribalism, in a Tennessee tradition

At a Monitor breakfast, Tennessee’s retiring US senator sang the praises of the Democrat who hopes to succeed him, former Gov. Phil Bredesen. Their bipartisan collaborations go way back.

(image)



Moon shot for peace between the Koreas

Two historic summits in coming weeks reflect a bold vision by the South Korean leader to probe the North’s potential shift toward a peaceful peninsula.

(image)



Pompeo for State: Meeting Kim may help sell him as a diplomatic repairman

Pompeo's confirmation as secretary of State is uncertain, but Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker, appearing at a Monitor Breakfast, called reports Pompeo met secretly with Kim Jong-un 'a plus.'

(image)



US counties get mixed grades in ‘State of the Air’ pollution report

The American Lung Association’s annual report on pollution levels in the United States warns that 2 in 5 Americans live in counties with too much ozone or particulate pollution.

(image)



How an activist who helped transform postwar Germany views its newest challenges

Gesine Schwan ran for president of Germany, led the German-Polish Viadrina University, and  is one of the few remaining political activists of the generation whose lifespan parallels that of democratic Germany. Now, she keeps a keen eye on the crises that have blown up in both the European Union and Germany.

(image)