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Preview: Iridescent Art News By John Firestone

Iridescent Art News By John Firestone



Art news and the local artscape by a Central Pa. artist



Last Build Date: Wed, 08 Jul 2009 6:41:30 UTC

Copyright: Copyright 2015
 



Bob Ross

Wed, 08 Jul 2009 06:13:16 UTC

2009-07-08T06:41:30Z

Now don't get too excited, this is somewhat of a let down, but I thought it had a nostalgic art bent for some artsy geeks out there. Recently I was made aware of Livestream, a website that streams video and is also a chart room environment. Well - on this Livestream is a channel devoted to showing all the...


Now don't get too excited, this is somewhat of a let down, but I thought it had a nostalgic art bent for some artsy geeks out there. Recently I was made aware of Livestream, a website that streams video and is also a chart room environment. Well - on this Livestream is a channel devoted to showing all the old videos of Bob Ross painting his thirty minute paintings. I used to be captivated watching these videos on WITF when I was a kid, it was the only thing to get me out of the bed on a weekend during school. Now I can watch it all the time, any time. The only problem is the little chat room on the side, there seems to be an inordinate amount of trolls in there just blathering about. So if you are jonesing for some good old fashioned Bob Ross and don't mind some mindless chatter check it out. (Note: there seems to be a lot of people going in there, you may have to check back to see if there is room, but it is fun to watch an episode or two.)

Link: STREAM ROSS


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Eggplant Art

Fri, 05 Jun 2009 17:45:43 UTC

2009-06-05T18:02:49Z

The little art adventures always add up. Awhile back I had blogged about the Art-O-mat machines which can be found in various places all over the US. There are even a few in Pennsylvania, although central PA is yet to be graced with the presence. On many occasions when I go to New York City I stop by one...


The little art adventures always add up. Awhile back I had blogged about the Art-O-mat machines which can be found in various places all over the US. There are even a few in Pennsylvania, although central PA is yet to be graced with the presence. On many occasions when I go to New York City I stop by one of the locations and spend a couple of bucks on some neat little art.

On one trip I put my five dollars in and got this little eggplant art. Recently I was told that this little eggplant got sorta famous. The artist, Laura Gentry, has a clip on her blog from the Rachel Ray show that shows my little eggplant on top of the machine.





(object) (embed)




This wasn't planned; personally I think egg plants are really weird, and I have never watched the Rachel Ray show before (and I don't think I will start now either.) "Eggs" and "Plants" are just two totally separate entities that should not be collaged together even though both are edible. I don't want my eggs to come from plants - ever. And purple food? I just can't seem to stomach the idea of a shiny purple food. So when I saw eggplant art it was just odd enough for me to want to investigate a little more. Who knew? I think it very appropriate that the title of my eggplant is "Those Blabber Mouths" and it was displayed on a talk show. Whoever did the set-up deserves a pat on the back for that little subliminal jab.

I have a satisfying time buying art. Artworks are the gifts that keep on giving without the need for antibiotics. It fun to know that this little piece got some wider exposure and it reminded me that I haven't visited an Art-O-Mat machine in a few months. Maybe one of our local galleries or institutions will see about getting one for this area, to spread a little affordable art around from artists as random as eggplants.



(image) This is my eggplant. There are many like it but this one is mine.





Veiwing Art on the Internet

Fri, 24 Apr 2009 07:12:42 UTC

2009-04-24T07:35:18Z

I was looking around on the internet today and stumbled upon Richard Anuszkiewicz, an artist born in Erie Pennsylvania. I have seen this persons artwork at the Hirshhorn and it is always fun to look at. Normally artwork on a computer monitor is kind of bland and headache inducing, but this one is rather interesting. It really started messing...

I was looking around on the internet today and stumbled upon Richard Anuszkiewicz, an artist born in Erie Pennsylvania. I have seen this persons artwork at the Hirshhorn and it is always fun to look at. Normally artwork on a computer monitor is kind of bland and headache inducing, but this one is rather interesting. It really started messing with my eyes after a few seconds. I couldn't help but wonder if the figure was painted on top or was that brilliant RED painted on top. Soon it looked like that red was a few inches off of the surface. The image was purportedly uploaded to Wikipedia by someone who currently works for the artist. I can't verify anything but I thought it looked pretty cool on a computer monitor. Now that I think about it I think a lot of Op-art works kinda well on computer monitors - better than a Rubens or Titian at least.

What do you think? What kind of art actually holds up half way decent on a computer monitor? We all know that art has to be seen in person to be appreciated and blah blah blah. I wonder if soon artists will start making work that is expressly for looking good over the internet? Why not?


(image)





The slow economy is good for art collectors

Tue, 27 Jan 2009 03:03:49 UTC

2009-01-27T04:43:43Z

One good thing about the economy being slow is you can get some cool art cheap. This might not so good for artists but it is good for collectors. A lot of good artists are selling their stuff at used car lot prices. Ted Stanke is an artist who has been making work out of found objects and coinage...



One good thing about the economy being slow is you can get some cool art cheap. This might not so good for artists but it is good for collectors. A lot of good artists are selling their stuff at used car lot prices. Ted Stanke is an artist who has been making work out of found objects and coinage and is coming to terms with this financial crisis in his own way.

From his blog: "Now, in the great recession of 2009, I find myself behind several months in payments and facing a foreclosure auction at the end of the month. I HAVE DECIDED TO AUCTION THESE HISTORIC SCULPTURES TO THE PUBLIC BEFORE THEY ARE LOST FOREVER."



Warehousing art can be a depressing premise. Most artists have stacks of paintings facing the walls, or closets full of dusty work. Inside the artists house, beneath basement stairwells, you will find reliquaries to forgotten art. Some artists just can't let go of old work. I was at a lecture by Michael Aurbach, an art professor at Vanderbilt, he said he would save money if he took all of his works out of storage and submerged them beneath a river. It was costing him (at the time) hundreds of dollars a month to warehouse artwork. His work is rather large and it would be hard to keep it on permanent display, but it was still cool looking and relevant even if you know that most of the time it hibernates.

It seems that Ted is fed up with keeping his older works in storage, which is good for me; it gives me the chance to get something interesting for basement prices. I have noticed in the local galleries that many local artists are also reducing their prices. I just got two Scott Meier paintings for $50 a piece, and that is a hard price to beat anywhere.

Ted has a method to his madness which is as much of a comment on our disposable consumer culture as it is art as investment. Whatever the artists reason it seems that the current financial crisis is good for buying art. Check out Ted's blog for more info.




(image) Pennsylvania by Ted Stanke






Print Exchange

Thu, 15 Jan 2009 16:56:56 UTC

2009-01-15T17:16:19Z

Last year I wrote about a mail based printmaking print exchange led by April Katz of Iowa University. I remember that a few local people wanted to be involved, the theme was buy one get one free. My own submission was a linocut of a glass of water half filled titled "A point of view" I sent it off,...



Last year I wrote about a mail based printmaking print exchange led by April Katz of Iowa University. I remember that a few local people wanted to be involved, the theme was buy one get one free. My own submission was a linocut of a glass of water half filled titled "A point of view" I sent it off, close to the deadline, and not to long after I got a bunch of prints in the mail and some were pretty interesting. This exchange is basically a way to get free art from a diverse crew of printmakers, some young and some old. I have a lot of fun with this project; it keeps me working and thinking. If you are interested click "continue reading entry" below for the contact information and prospectus:




Iowa State University's Print Club is hosting the 9th Annual Postcard Print Exchange. Each year artists participate with entries from across the United States and as far away as Australia and the United Arab Emirates. Please read the following prospectus and pass the information on. Thank you.

April Katz


You are invited to participate in the 9th Annual University Print Society Postcard Print Exchange

The theme for this year's exchange is "Two of Five"
Pick any Two of the following Five words as the basis of your print:
Star
Imposter
Hallucinogenic
Monster
Fast
You can use any form of these words such as monsters, monstrous, monstrously, monstrousness, monstrosity, etc...We encourage you to consider all possible meanings for the above words.

Requirements:

1) Any EDITIONABLE printmaking technique may be used. (woodcuts, litho, intaglio, photography, silkscreen, digital printmaking, etc) Please Do Not send monoprints/monotypes. Each of the prints sent must be identical to the others.

2) The post cards must be 4" x 6".

3) 13 identical prints should be sent individually to the address posted below. (Each card must be stamped and will bear the markings of travel and the postal service. Do Not send the cards together in one envelope.)

4) Include the following information on the back of the card:
a. Your return address
b. April Katz' address (details below)
c. A list of the process(es) used
d. Optional: your e-mail address

Donations Requested: Please send separately a donation to help pay for postage. Send cash or checks payable to The University Print Society. Suggested Donations:
$2 students
$3 others
$4 international
Send more if you can, less if you can't.

ENTRIES DUE: Friday, APRIL 10, 2009

After receiving everyone's postcard prints the University Print Society will randomly divide up the cards and you will be sent 12 new and different prints from other participants. The University Print Society will keep one of the 13 for its collection. Postage for returning the 12 new prints will be paid for by
the University Print Society. Your donation will help us out tremendously however.

Please be sure to put your return address on every postcard sent.

Send postcard prints to:

April Katz
University Print Society
158 Design
Iowa State University
Ames, IA 50011-3092

*Please send questions and comments to the University Print Society president, Kris Engle - redninj4@gmail.com




Local Trompe l'oeilist

Fri, 21 Nov 2008 11:48:19 UTC

2008-11-21T12:20:57Z

It is always fun for me to think about what I value more in a work of art, technical brilliance or conceptual depth. A work of art does not need to be technically polished or "pretty" to be amazing.

It is always fun for me to think about what I value more in a work of art, technical brilliance or conceptual depth. A work of art does not need to be technically polished or "pretty" to be amazing.

I think of Jenny Saville and her big brushes and figures beautiful in all their large glory. I also think of Anselm Kiefer and his ragged surfaces, or a gooey De Kooning. Of course all of these artists are masters but their use of paint is not polished like a Vermeer or Durer. Lately I have been interested in the work of Gerard Dou and how ultra refined his surfaces are, but there is a lack of invention which holds him firmly on the surface.

I normally champion the more heady works of art, but sometimes these technical masters freeze me with their technique. And recently I found the one of the best I have ever seen. Lo and behold - a native Pennsylvanian - one close to the mid state area as we speak - one Anthony J. Waichulis.

From his website:


(image)



That is a painting my friends, check his website out.




A long time ago . . .

Thu, 28 Aug 2008 14:07:05 UTC

2008-08-28T14:24:25Z

A long time ago I mentioned a few websites where one could purchase interesting and sometimes very artful T-Shirts. I have bought quite a few from these websites, some for the imagery and some for the novelty. Whenever I were this shirt out I get a few laughs and giggles. I got that shirt from Shirt Woot, and if you...

A long time ago I mentioned a few websites where one could purchase interesting and sometimes very artful T-Shirts. I have bought quite a few from these websites, some for the imagery and some for the novelty. Whenever I were this shirt out I get a few laughs and giggles.

(image)

I got that shirt from Shirt Woot, and if you head that direction you will see they sell other stuff on a daily basis as well. Each day they feature a new shirt and you either love it or you know you will never pay for it.

Another site is TeeFury, these are sometimes more artsy then novelty. TeeFury also sells a new shirt each day. The longer you tool around either one of these websites the more T-shirt artists you learn about, they have their own little sub-culture and many of them sell diffferent shirts on thier own websites.




I'm back

Mon, 19 May 2008 06:19:48 UTC

2008-05-19T06:28:39Z

It has been a long time my friends, far to long. My classes are over for this semester. I tried to take three classes and since they are online I kinda figured they would be a cake walk, like I could just float by on talent. I was expensively wrong. If you are thinking about getting your MFA online, and...

It has been a long time my friends, far to long. My classes are over for this semester. I tried to take three classes and since they are online I kinda figured they would be a cake walk, like I could just float by on talent. I was expensively wrong. If you are thinking about getting your MFA online, and you have a full time job, please think twice about trying to be a full time master's student as well. I just couldn't hack through it all. Not only did I let my beloved little blog stale itself away, I got burnt out from the studio. The classes are great but when so much stuff is piling up it is like trying to shovel yourself out of debt. I didn't look forward to the classes at all since I had to do so much work in each one.

But this semester is done - I am going to start back up in the fall semester, which leaves me ample time to re-hone my blogging skills and get back into the little circle I used to enjoy so much before. There is never a lack of all things art to read/write about so it may take me a couple of weeks to reacquaint myself with the current goings on but when I do I should be in rare form for a few weeks. And then it will be back to my school hole to try and not waste money like I did this last semester.




50 last suppers

Sat, 22 Mar 2008 16:00:03 UTC

2008-03-22T16:06:22Z

From around the web: Check out this site with 50 different parodies of Da Vincis last supper. I wonder how many more there will be! Also, check out this post which is about "Great Scenes from TV and Film, Told Using Only Typography (and Sound)"



From around the web:


Check out this site with 50 different parodies of Da Vincis last supper. I wonder how many more there will be!


Also, check out this post which is about "Great Scenes from TV and Film, Told Using Only Typography (and Sound)"




Finding Time to blog

Wed, 05 Mar 2008 07:59:51 UTC

2008-03-05T08:17:24Z

You know - it's not like I planned to neglect my once so updated art blog. But when I became a full time MFA student and I am still holding down a full time job I am finding it hard enough just to spend time with my wife. And here is this pet blog of mine that I have...


You know - it's not like I planned to neglect my once so updated art blog. But when I became a full time MFA student and I am still holding down a full time job I am finding it hard enough just to spend time with my wife. And here is this pet blog of mine that I have grown so attached to, it now hangs like debt over my head. Most days I get an email asking what I am waiting on, to get busy with that local art news. Like just last week I could have told you that a few mid-state artists were showing in the New York City Art Expo and that you should go up and visit (I made it on Saturday.) Or I could have mentioned new art shows I have heard of, or told you my new favorite place to buy artistic shirts (I will have to keep that a secret for now.) Sigh. I have let you down.

I would be very interested in posting some articles here that someone else wrote about the local, or not so local, art scene. If you are interested send me what you got and I will post it for you (of course you still get full credit.) As it stands right now I am going to try posting once every other week until the semester is over. Try. You know - I think some of my future posts will be mindless ramblings of a jaded art kid - kinda like this post - but I will never be empty of art talk even if I am too exhausted to actually get it out every other night. Stay loosely tuned, before long I will thrill you with the magic of the new Anish Kapor at the Met, or the Kyhinde Wiley paintings at the National Portrait Gallery. And if I am missing anything really cool around here please smack it upside this blog and let everyone know, or at least the cool people who think for themselves and read local art blogs.





Thoughts on the Gettysburg Cyclorama

Tue, 12 Feb 2008 06:03:40 UTC

2008-02-12T06:27:47Z

Recently there was a photo article on pennlive.com about the Gettysburg Cyclorama restoration.



Recently there was a photo article on pennlive.com about the Gettysburg Cyclorama restoration.

I am sure many of you who grew up in the mid-state area have seen the cyclorama numerous times. When I was a school kid, it seemed like every other school field trip was to Gettysburg. I was always amazed at the sheer size of the painting and all of the action and landscape depicted. When I moved back to the area I took my family to see it again and was impressed by the craftsmanship of the artist. This is a good painting by traditional standards. Normally a painting exists in a box on the wall. The Cyclorama encircles the viewer a full 360 degrees. This is a true form of installation art before the term was pillaged by contemporary artists.

There is a good Wikipedia article on the Gettysburg painting that helps to show how special this painting really is. I was not aware how few of the paintings survived the ravages of time. The only other cyclorama style painting I remember seeing is the one at the Metropolitan Art museum and to be honest (and probably biased) I think the one we have here in central PA is by far the better. The wiki article I read compared this style of painting to an Imax style movie, but in Imax you don't have to turn around or move to see everything, there is no physicality like there is with the painting. Seeing this painting was an event, you listened to the story and there were lights focusing your attention to different areas at different parts of the narrative. The more I started thinking about this the more I started to miss this painting.

The sheer size and maintenance fees associated with taking care of a painting of this magnitude must be enormous. The painting weighs tons, and just to keep the building dry must be difficult with everyone breathing and sweating around the thing. This thing is like a dinosaur fossil. It's big, old, degraded by time, and great fun to look at. I think what impresses me most about this painting is that it is a cross between a mural and an easel painting. The energy expended to create and house this work of art is striking. I am glad this local jewel is being taken care of; hopefully we will have it in the area for a long time.

There is a Certain Cyclical magic in the nature of life that can be represented with a concept of a cyclorama. Some contemporary artists use this old approach to making art and I think it will become more present with time. This artwork provides a way to enter into another world almost completely and learn whatever lessons you may. And of course there are always reasons for preserving the past, mostly to inform the future with wisdom.




Print Exchange

Fri, 01 Feb 2008 17:45:31 UTC

2008-02-01T17:48:29Z

For you printmakers in the area, April Katz from Iowa State University is doing another mail format print exchange. I did this print exchange a few years back and was pleasantly surprised with the quality of some of the work I got in return.



For you printmakers in the area, April Katz from Iowa State University is doing another mail format print exchange. I did this print exchange a few years back and was pleasantly surprised with the quality of some of the work I got in return.

It goes like this; you make an edition of 13 prints and send them all off to her through the regular mail system. She then keeps one print for their archives and sends you 12 prints from other participants. It becomes an easy way to distribute your own work and get a bunch of artwork from other artists in return. If you are interested in seeing some of the prints I got in return your can check out my webpage, scroll down to find the Mail exchange section. Some of the work I got back was from some talented printmakers and well worth my time and effort. I plan to do what I have always done for print exchanges - some version of a self portrait - and I think this particular one is going to be shocking! If you want more information, like the ship to address which you will need, leave a comment or send me an email and I will give you the rest of the information.




U2 3-D at Imax

Mon, 28 Jan 2008 06:30:28 UTC

2008-01-28T06:34:06Z

For those of you who haven't already heard the hype, the Whitaker Center is showing a U2 3-D show. I got to see this show over the weekend and I have to agree with most of the pundits so far - this is one cool visual experience.



For those of you who haven't already heard the hype, the Whitaker Center is showing a U2 3-D show. I got to see this show over the weekend and I have to agree with most of the pundits so far - this is one cool visual experience.

There are things you just cant see when you go to a live show and this format gives almost you everything. The sound was great for me, all encompassing and not loud enough to make my ears ring for days afterward. And it's U2, every song of theirs is a good song.

The only problem I had with the whole affair was that it was not like being at a concert. At a concert you can get out of your chair, sing along with your favorite songs, act like a fool and dance around. At Imax you cant even tap your foot to the beat without angering the person in front of you. Just ask the people behind me, I almost bit their heads off into the second song because they kept hitting the back of my chair. It was a reminder for everyone within earshot that we were not at a concert; you have to keep your own enjoyment to yourself or face the wrath of others who paid money to enjoy the show - not your foot tapping.

Last year my wife and I saw U2 live at Philadelphia and they put on a great show, we had a fun time, my wife sang along to every song. We had seats in the area so it wasn't like we could really see Bono or the Edge like you can in Imax. However, the show sounded great and it was unique to us. This Imax show will be the same every time it is played but there is so much more that this format brings for entertainment. I really don't think I can watch another regular concert DVD without being thoroughly bored.

If I had my way all concert DVD's would be 3-D. I think the next generation Imax will have to have enough room for people to get up and dance a little bit, or be loud, or something that involves physical participation. At the end of a regular concert you feel drained and satisfied, at the end of the Imax show it was time to wake up your legs and voice. Still, you just haven't seen the concert or experienced the band the same as you do in Imax 3-D.





The Doshi exhibit at the Susquehanna Art Museum

Mon, 21 Jan 2008 19:21:27 UTC

2008-01-21T19:45:23Z

For those of you who don't know the Susquehanna Art Museum is currently free so there is no reason not to go. The current exhibit is dedicated to the Doshi troop of artists that have been in this area for as long as I can remember.



For those of you who don't know the Susquehanna Art Museum is currently free so there is no reason not to go. The current exhibit is dedicated to the Doshi troop of artists that have been in this area for as long as I can remember.

This being a rare three day weekend for me I had to sample their wares and I was glad I did. I don't know what I was expecting to see - maybe far too many landscapes or something - but I am happy to report there really was something for everyone in this exhibit. In fact, each gallery that I went through seemed to get better and better until the final gallery on the second floor which had some very impressive sculptural works and an interesting/eerie/hypnotic portrait painting. All in all I was more impressed with the sculptures than the paintings but there were a few surprises in that department as well.

You can find out more about this exhibit at the website. Many of the artists exhibited are relatively local and talented. This particular exhibit shows off the diversity of artists in the area. Even if you think you know local art (like me) there is some work that will make you take a closer look. This is exactly the type of art show we need to see more of in this area and since it is free I hope a lot of locals go to see this show.




Places to buy Art Online

Thu, 10 Jan 2008 05:59:51 UTC

2008-01-10T06:41:47Z

I know some are aware of these websites but lately I have been finding myself wandering aimlessly for hours through these pages just looking at cool artsy stuff. The more I play with websites like this the easier I find it to buy art online without regret. From what I have gathered so far the craft works are normally...



I know some are aware of these websites but lately I have been finding myself wandering aimlessly for hours through these pages just looking at cool artsy stuff. The more I play with websites like this the easier I find it to buy art online without regret. From what I have gathered so far the craft works are normally ten times the caliber of the paintings. There is a lot of cool stuff that does not cost a lot of money so if you are on the market for art, or looking for some good ideas to draw inspiration from, check these places out.

www.etsy.com/

www.trunkt.org/