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Wild About PA



Read Marcus Schneck's blog on the great outdoors of Central Pennsylvania.



Last Build Date: Sat, 25 Mar 2017 17:38:03 UTC

Copyright: Copyright 2017
 



Much of Central Pennsylvania still waiting for cicadamania 2013

Wed, 05 Jun 2013 13:00:48 UTC

2013-06-05T14:33:20Z

Where are the cicadas of Brood II?

The explosive emergence of 17-year periodical cicadas expected about now has yet to fully materialize in many parts of Central Pennsylvania, and may indeed not materialize this year.

Brood II, which is the group of the large insects emerging this year, has never been as abundant or widespread as the gargantuan Brood X, which also is known as the Great Eastern Brood. However, some areas like Bergen County, N.J., have seen millions of cicadas emerge in the past couple weeks.
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And, some locations in Central Pennsylvania - notably the Williams Valley/Lykens Valley area between Tower City and the Millersburg-Halifax area - have seen large numbers of cicadas, accompanied by the trademark deafening buzz of the insects in some spots.

Greg Hoover, ornamental entomologist in Penn State's Department of Entomology and one of the leading cicada authorities in Pennsylvania, said one of the questions he's hearing most often from the media the past few days is "Why don't we have them?"

Part of the answer is the smaller nature of Brood II, but another part is that many areas no longer have "an abundance of uninterrupted woodlands" favored by periodical cicadas they once did. The third part of the answer may reside in the unseasonably cold weather just before Memorial Day, which may have held soil temperatures just below the 64 degrees Fahrenheit required to stir the cicada nymphs to leave their tunnels in the soil in search of mating opportunities.

"Some of those colder overnight temperatures may have slowed things down a bit," said Hoover.

However, he noted, areas southeast and northeast of Central Pennsylvania have seen significant emergences, hinting that "by the end of next week, the peak of the emergence will be past. We're getting close to it, if not in some of the southeastern Pennsylvania counties are past peak."

Central Pennsylvania may have one chance to yet see some emergence out of Brood II, and that chance lies in the rainfall forecast the weekend.

"A rainfall event really triggers" the full emergence," explained Hoover.

If you spot cicadas, please report your sighting to mschneck@pennlive.com.


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Pennsylvania's elk center site expands with new purchase

Sat, 25 Mar 2017 17:25:59 UTC

2017-03-25T17:38:03Z

Key part of Pennsylvania Elk Range adds nine acres important elk habitat. Watch video

The Keystone Elk Country Alliance has added nine acres to its Elk Country Visitor Center site on Winslow Hill near Benezette in Elk Country.

The KECA already had 245 acres at the 8,400-square-foot visitor center in the heart of the Pennsylvania Elk Range, complete with trails, foodplots and elk-viewing areas.

However, the additional nine acres are an important expansion to the site. It is covered with white pine and hemlock, with an overstory of oak and hickory; has two small mountain streams; and has not been impacted by mining, as so much of the region has been.

 "Elk that frequent the (visitor center) forage plots and the elk viewing areas often bed on this property," noted Rawley Cogan, president of the KECA.

"Elk use of this property is very high during the rut, especially when temperatures are high and conditions are dry.  Oftentimes warm dry weather occurs in early fall and that is when elk use of this habitat type is extremely high.  With the cool conditions provided by the thick conifers often referred to as 'black timber' by elk hunters, because little if any sunlight reaches the forest floor. And the cold mountain streams provide much needed water during this high activity period."

Best spots to see elk in Pennsylvania

The KECA used money raised through the annual Elk Tag Raffle to buy the nine acres. The raffle, held each August during the annual Pennsylvania Great Outdoors Elk Expo, offers a prize package of a conservation elk-hunting license from the Pennsylvania Game Commission, a taxidermy shoulder mount, a six-day fully guided hunt including meals and lodging from Elk County Outfitters and filming of the hunt for the national TV show TomBob Outdoors: Friends in Wild Places.

Opened in September 2010, the visitors center is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday in January through March, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday-Monday in April and May, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily June through October, and 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Thursday through Monday in November and December.

Pennsylvania Elk Expo 2.0


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Bald eagle nestcam update: How's everyone doing in the nest?

Fri, 24 Mar 2017 15:30:51 UTC

2017-03-24T15:30:49Z

Newly hatched eaglets keeping their parents busy with their constant demands. Watch video

The two baby bald eagles appear to be thriving on a steady diet of bits of fish and meat fed them by their parents in the nest near Codorus State Park at Hanover that is livestreamed from a webcam through the Pennsylvania Game Commission website.

The eaglets hatched Monday and Tuesday, March 20 and 21, from eggs laid Feb. 10 and 13 respectively. Bald eagle eggs usually take 35 days to incubate.

 Second egg hatches in Hanover bald eagle nest

Bald eagles have nested near Codorus State Park since 2005 and fledged eaglets eight times, usually two per year.

Last year, the female eagle laid eggs on Feb. 18 and 21. One hatched March 28, but the chick died. The other egg did not hatch.

The bald eagle pair successfully fledged two eaglets in 2015. Eggs were laid Feb. 14 and 27 that year, with hatching on March 24 and 25.

The eagle family can be viewed on a 24/7 livestream through the Pennsylvania Game Commission website.

Barring misfortune, the eagle family will be watchable for at least the next three months. Eaglets grow most of their feathers at about a month and begin walking at about six weeks. They will start flying at about three months.

The Hanover live stream camera has been in operation since November 2015. It is a joint project by the Pennsylvania Game Commission, HDOnTAP, Comcast Business and Codorus State Park.


Media Files:
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'Hometown Habitat' to see local premier March 27 in Harrisburg

Wed, 22 Mar 2017 14:00:00 UTC

2017-03-22T16:29:09Z

Groundbreaking book by Douglas Tallamy, 'Bringing Nature Home," made into gripping case on the screen for native plants.

"Hometown Habitat, Stories of Bringing Nature Home," a 90-minute environmental documentary about the critical role native plants play in every ecosystem, will be featured in a local premiere presented by the Harrisburg Parks Foundation, and partners, on Monday, March 27, at Appalachian Brewing Company, 50 N. Cameron St., Harrisburg.

The evening will begin with a 6 p.m. reception, followed by the film at 7 p.m. and concluding with a panel discussion at 8:30 p.m.

The film by award-winning filmmaker, Catherine Zimmerman, and narrated by author Douglas Tallamy, also highlights several national, native plant initiatives and smaller, more localized projects bringing nature into communities.

It's a video follow-up to Tallamy's 2009 book, "Bringing Nature Home," which remains an inspiration must-read for anyone wanting to develop a site with native plants or trying to convince others that nature must be incorporated into every landscape.

Tallamy: Every little pollinator-friendly planting in every little yard can add up to a big difference

Scott Shepler, a Harrisburg Parks Foundation committee member who was instrumental in putting together the program for March 27,

He explained, "My wife, Debbie, and I were inspired by the book, and we are concerned about environmental threats. We see the need for people and governments to change how we maintain our homes, parks, streams and roadways. We hope to inform more people and promote conservation landscaping practices."

After learning that the concepts and lessons from the book were being made into a documentary, the Sheplers made "a small donation" toward that work. After viewing the copy of the film they received in return for that donation, they knew they wanted to bring its message to Harrisburg.

A planning committee was formed with representation from several organizations and the idea of screening the film was expanded to also include a panel discussion "to tell stories about related activities in Harrisburg."

Another Tallamy book: "The Living Landscape"


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2nd egg hatches at Hanover bald eagle nest

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 20:15:03 UTC

2017-03-21T20:29:33Z

Two baby eagles have joined the family at Codorus State Park near Hanover. Watch video

Two baby eagles have joined the family at Codorus State Park near Hanover.

(image) An adult bald eagle watches over its two eaglets at Codorus State Park near Hanover on Tuesday afternoon. 

The second of two eggs hatched today. The first eaglet was seen Monday morning after hatching began the night before. The eggs were laid on Feb. 10 and 13. Bald eagle eggs usually take 35 days to incubate.

The bald eagle pair has nested at Codorus State Park since 2005 and fledged eaglets eight times, usually two in one year.

Last year, the female eagle laid eggs on Feb. 18 and 21. One hatched March 28, but the chick died. The other egg did not hatch.

The couple successfully fledged two eaglets in 2015. Eggs were laid Feb. 14 and 27 that year, with hatching on March 24 and 25. 

The eagle family can be viewed on a 24/7 live stream at the Pennsylvania Game Commission website. Eaglets grow most of their feathers at about a month old and begin walking at about 6 weeks. They will start flying at about 3 months old.

The Hanover live stream camera has been in operation since November 2015. It is a joint project by the Pennsylvania Game Commission, HDOnTAPComcast Business and Codorus State Park

Where are your best chances to see bald eagles in Pennsylvania?


Media Files:
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When will the second egg hatch in the Hanover webcam bald eagle nest?

Tue, 21 Mar 2017 10:30:00 UTC

2017-03-21T10:33:38Z

With one chick out of its egg, anxious Internet viewers counting the hours for a second hatching in the nest near Codorus State Park at Hanover. Watch video

As one chick began its climb toward adulthood on Monday in the bald eagle nest near Hanover, its brother or sister had yet to make its way out of its egg.

If all goes well, that second chick could make its appearance in the next few days in the nest that is the focus of a webcam livestreaming through the Pennsylvania Game Commission.

Bald eagle eggs typically hatch after 35 days of incubation in the nest.

The first one in the nest, which was laid Feb. 10, began hatching Sunday afternoon, when a pip appeared in the eggshell. A pip is the spot where the chick first pecks a small hole in its eggshell to begin the process of breaking out of the egg.

The chick was free of the egg and being fed by the parent birds by Monday morning.

According to the commission, the second egg was laid in the nest near Codorus State Park on Feb. 13.

Bald eagles in Pennsylvania: You might be surprised

Last year, the female laid the first egg on Feb. 18 and the second on Feb. 21. One of the eggs hatched on March 28, but the chick died. The other egg never hatched.

In 2015, the first egg was laid on Feb. 14 and the second on Feb. 27. The first hatched on March 24. The second hatched on March 25. The two eaglets fledged on June 22.

The commission noted that the first record of an active bald eagle nest in the area of Codorus State Park at Hanover came in 2005.

Records indicate that eaglets have fledged eight times, most often two at a time.

Best spots for seeing bald eagles in Pennsylvania

There are no records indicating that any of the adult nesting eagles have been banded or otherwise marked.

The webcams, provided by HDOnTap, were installed in November 2015. The cameras are powered by a hard line running down the tree to an electrical panel several feet from the base of the tree. Comcast Business is providing the internet service.

Friends of Codorus State Park supplied the bucket lift and other items necessary for installation and the landowner is donating the electricity to power the camera. Codorus State Park has provided on the ground staff and facilitated the project.

Hundreds of bald eagle nests across Pennsylvania


Media Files:
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There's a chick! Hanover bald eagles hatch first eaglet on webcam

Mon, 20 Mar 2017 15:27:00 UTC

2017-03-20T17:22:12Z

The first chick from two eggs in the bald eagle nest near Codorus State Park near Hanover was spotted in the nest Monday morning. Watch video

The first of two eggs in the bald eagle nest near Hanover - the nest that is the focus of a webcam livestreaming through the Pennsylvania Game Commission website - has hatched.

A newly hatched chick was spotted in the nest Monday morning, after a pip - the spot where the chick first pecks a small hole in its eggshell to begin the process of breaking out of the egg - was seen on the egg on Sunday afternoon.

The hatched egg is likely the first of this year's eggs, which was laid at about 5:45 p.m. Feb. 10, according to the commission.

The second egg was laid at about 5:15 p.m. Feb. 13.

Bald eagles in Pennsylvania: You might be surprised by these facts

Bald eagle eggs typically hatch after 35 days of incubation in the nest, but the egg in the nest near Codorus State Park appears to have taken about 37 days to hatch.

Last year, the female laid the first egg on Feb. 18 and the second on Feb. 21. One of the eggs hatched on March 28, but the chick died. The other egg never hatched.

In 2015, the first egg was laid on Feb. 14 and the second on Feb. 27. The first hatched on March 24. The second hatched on March 25. The two eaglets fledged on June 22.

The commission noted that the first record of an active bald eagle nest in the area of Codorus State Park at Hanover came in 2005.

Where are you most likely to see bald eagles in Pennsylvania?

Records indicate that eaglets have fledged eight times, most often two at a time.

There are no records indicating that any of the adult nesting eagles have been banded or otherwise marked.

The webcams, provided by HDOnTap, were installed in November 2015. The cameras are powered by a hard line running down the tree to an electrical panel several feet from the base of the tree. Comcast Business is providing the internet service.

Friends of Codorus State Park supplied the bucket lift and other items necessary for installation and the landowner is donating the electricity to power the camera. Codorus State Park has provided on the ground staff and facilitated the project.

Hays bald eagles in Western Pa. rebound from rough breeding season and nest destruction with new nest, new egg

For more Pennsylvania outdoors, life and culture news: 

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Hanover webcam bald eagle egg begins hatching

Sun, 19 Mar 2017 23:11:00 UTC

2017-03-20T15:46:44Z

With most of the snow gone from the nest near Codorus State Park, a chick inside one of the eggs appears to be on its way. Watch video

An egg in the bald eagle nest near Hanover - the nest that is the focus of a webcam livestreaming through the Pennsylvania Game Commission website - began showing the first signs of hatching on Sunday afternoon.

A pip - the spot where the chick first pecks a small hole in its eggshell to begin the process of breaking out of the egg - seems to have been spotted by those who maintain a near constant watch on the livestream video from the nest.

Although some of those watchers had hoped for a St. Patrick's Day (March 17) hatching, the timing apparently was not right for that sequence of events.

The first of this year's eggs was laid at about 5:45 p.m. Feb. 10, according to the commission. The second egg was laid at about 5:15 p.m. Feb. 13.

Bald eagle eggs typically hatch after 35 days of incubation in the nest.

Bald eagles in Pennsylvania: You might be surprised by these facts

Last year, the female laid the first egg on Feb. 18 and the second on Feb. 21. One of the eggs hatched on March 28, but the chick died. The other egg never hatched.

In 2015, the first egg was laid on Feb. 14 and the second on Feb. 27. The first hatched on March 24. The second hatched on March 25. The two eaglets fledged on June 22.

The commission noted that the first record of an active bald eagle nest in the area of Codorus State Park at Hanover came in 2005.

Records indicate that eaglets have fledged eight times, most often two at a time.

There are no records indicating that any of the adult nesting eagles have been banded or otherwise marked.

These webcams, provided by HDOnTap, were installed in November 2015. The cameras are powered by a hard line running down the tree to an electrical panel several feet from the base of the tree. Comcast Business is providing the internet service.

Friends of Codorus State Park supplied the bucket lift and other items necessary for installation and the landowner is donating the electricity to power the camera. Codorus State Park has provided on the ground staff and facilitated the project.

Where are you most likely to see bald eagles in Pennsylvania?


Media Files:
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Digging deep into the facts of snow, snow storms, snowmen and professional snowball fights

Wed, 15 Mar 2017 13:30:00 UTC

2017-03-15T13:30:45Z

Beyond the hassles of the latest snow storm and subsequent driveway and sidewalk clearing, snow is a subject with as many facets as some snowflakes. From the science of how snowflakes form and take on their shapes to the pop culture pursuit of building the largest snowman ever, here are a blizzard of facts about snow.




Snow storm Stella's ferocity caught on time-lapse video

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 17:37:40 UTC

2017-03-15T10:23:19Z

Watch as snow storm Stella's ferocity rages and wanes in a time-lapse video from 10 p.m. Monday through noon Tuesday. Watch video

As snow storm Stella spread across Pennsylvania Monday into Tuesday, a bird-feeder camera captured a time-lapse video of the storm's ferocity as it raged and then quieted and then raged once more from 10 a.m. Monday, March 13, through noon Tuesday, March 14.

The video also recorded the increasing depth of the snow fall, as well as the effect of the storm's winds as they pushed snow onto and off of various objects.

The camera was located in a yard near Hamburg in Berks County.

For more about snow storm Stella, visit the PennLive.com weather pages.


Media Files:
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Hanover webcam bald eagles battle snow to shelter their eggs

Tue, 14 Mar 2017 16:16:42 UTC

2017-03-15T14:05:28Z

Although most of the nest is covered in about a foot of snow, the adult eagles protected a spot around their eggs. Watch video

Winter storm Stella may have buried the bald eagle nest near Hanover - the one that is the focus of a webcam livestreaming through the Pennsylvania Game Commission website - but the adult eagles have ably protected their two eggs.

As they did in a major snowstorm in 2015, gaining them international Internet attention, the adults stayed on the eggs while the snow was falling. That created an area free of snow around the eggs, and the adults are now taking shifts in occupying that space and keeping the eggs warm.

Similar scenes are unfolding in more than 200 bald eagle nests across Pennsylvania today, but the nest near Codorus State Park at Hanover is the one being watched by snow-bound enthusiasts through their various screens.

Hatching time should be nearing for the two eggs in the nest. The first was laid at about 5:45 p.m. Feb. 10, according to the commission. The second egg was laid at about 5:15 p.m. Feb. 13.

Bald eagle eggs typically hatch after 35 days of incubation in the nest.

Will a bald eagle egg hatch on St. Patrick's Day.

Last year, the female laid the first egg on Feb. 18 and the second on Feb. 21. One of the eggs hatched on March 28, but the chick died. The other egg never hatched.

In 2015, the first egg was laid on Feb. 14 and the second on Feb. 27. The first hatched on March 24. The second hatched on March 25. The two eaglets fledged on June 22.

The commission noted that the first record of an active bald eagle nest in the area of Codorus State Park at Hanover came in 2005.

Records indicate that eaglets have fledged eight times, most often two at a time.

There are no records indicating that any of the adult nesting eagles have been banded or otherwise marked.

These webcams, provided by HDOnTap, were installed in November 2015. The cameras are powered by a hard line running down the tree to an electrical panel several feet from the base of the tree. Comcast Business is providing the internet service.

Friends of Codorus State Park supplied the bucket lift and other items necessary for installation and the landowner is donating the electricity to power the camera. Codorus State Park has provided on the ground staff and facilitated the project.

Where to see bald eagles in Pennsylvania?


Media Files:
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Will a Hanover webcam bald eagle egg hatch on St. Patrick's Day?

Mon, 13 Mar 2017 15:00:00 UTC

2017-03-13T15:02:42Z

Bald eagle pair continues the diligent care of their eggs in a nest near Codorus State Park that has gained worldwide Internet fame. Watch video

An egg in the bald eagle nest near Hanover that is the focus of a webcam livestreaming through the Pennsylvania Game Commission website could hatch on St. Patrick's Day, March 17.

The first of the two eggs in the nest this year was laid at about 5:45 p.m. Feb. 10, according to the commission. The second egg was laid at about 5:15 p.m. Feb. 13.

Bald eagle eggs typically hatch after 35 days of incubation in the nest.

Last year, the female laid the first egg on Feb. 18 and the second on Feb. 21. One of the eggs hatched on March 28, but the chick died. The other egg never hatched.

In 2015, the first egg was laid on Feb. 14 and the second on Feb. 27. The first hatched on March 24. The second hatched on March 25. The two eaglets fledged on June 22.

Bald eagle nestcam launches 2017 surveillance

The commission noted that the first record of an active bald eagle nest in the area of Codorus State Park at Hanover came in 2005.

Records indicate that eaglets have fledged eight times, most often two at a time.

There are no records indicating that any of the adult nesting eagles have been banded or otherwise marked.

These webcams, provided by HDOnTap, were installed in November 2015. The cameras are powered by a hard line running down the tree to an electrical panel several feet from the base of the tree. Comcast Business is providing the internet service.

Friends of Codorus State Park supplied the bucket lift and other items necessary for installation and the landowner is donating the electricity to power the camera. Codorus State Park has provided on the ground staff and facilitated the project.

Hays bald eagles rebound from dramatic breeding season


Media Files:
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Major snowstorm may push birds back to your backyard feeders

Mon, 13 Mar 2017 13:00:00 UTC

2017-03-13T13:06:04Z

Heavy snowfall could hide natural food sources, making backyard feeders a welcome alternative. Watch video

In addition to bread and milk, backyard birders may want to add fresh stores of seed for their feeders to the list of emergency supplies they plan to stock up on Monday, in preparation for the major snowstorm forecast to overspread Pennsylvania on Tuesday.

Through a winter of very little snow and abundant unseasonably warm temperatures to date, many birders have noticed fewer birds at their backyard feeders and less frequent visits by those birds that have been visiting their feeders.

Weather conditions since December have left plentiful supplies of natural foods widely available to birds and other wildlife.

In addition, new people join the bird-feeding enthusiasm each year and hang feeders in their backyards, adding to the array of choices available to the birds in most neighborhoods.

As feeders are most often a supplement to natural food sources already available to the birds, more sources in a neighborhood can lead to less visits to any one feeder or feeder setup across a fall and winter.

What do your backyard birds want to eat?

However, the approaching snowstorm, with snowfall amounts forecast as anything from "significant" to "crippling," likely will cover some of the food available to the birds, making it inaccessible for at least a few days.

In addition, natural food sources are beginning to near an end to their abundance, as the usually lean times of winter are replaced by a spring that has yet to unveil its abundance.

That could drive the neighborhood birds to feeders more forcefully than anything to come along yet this winter.

Feeders filled with fresh seed, and suet, will provide welcome energy boosts for birds working to stave off the cold.

How does your backyard bird checklist compare?


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Was this the onion snow? Or will it come next week? What about the sap-buster snow?

Fri, 10 Mar 2017 19:20:00 UTC

2017-03-11T11:18:11Z

Long-held traditions of snows in late winter and early spring have given rise to descriptive, seasonal terms.

The onion snow - a description that originated in Pennsylvania, with the Pennsylvania Dutch - refers to a snow that falls after the onions have been planted in spring and are beginning to sprout. It's generally a light snow that melts quickly.

According to the Old Farmer's Almanac, onions should be planted "as soon as the ground can be worked in the spring, usually late March or April." And, when the onions have been planted, we must hope that temperatures do not fall below 20 degrees.

Following that advice, and similar advice from many other sources, most of us have yet to touch our gardens much less plant our spring crops.

The term onion snow also has been skewed to describe a snowfall that signals a good time to begin our onion-planting.

That might refer to next week's snowfall. However, initial forecasts of as much as a foot of snow are not sounding like a light snow that will melt quickly.

Biggest snowstorm of the season headed to Pennsylvania?

Another variation on the onion snow has come to hold it as the final snow of the waning winter season. Again, not today's snow, but maybe next week.

The sap snow or sap-busting snow are other names given to snow that falls in the final days of winter, when daytime temperatures have climbed above freezing and started the sap rising in trees like the sugar maple.

An early spring snowfall was seen as a guarantee of sorts for a continued flow of sap and a longer period for tapping that sap to make more syrup and related sugary products.

The Pennsylvania Dutch also referred to snows that fell later in the season as sapling benders for the effect they had on new saplings.

Remember that warm February?


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You've seen the snow geese, but do you really know Middle Creek?

Fri, 10 Mar 2017 13:00:00 UTC

2017-03-10T15:55:08Z

An estimated 200,000-300,000 people visit Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area at Kleinfeltersville on the Lancaster-Lebanon county line each year. Although the site is maintained and managed by the Pennsylvania Game Commission, almost exclusively with hunter-trapper dollars, most visitors today are there for non-hunting recreation.




Learn to identify waterfowl like a pro in free programs

Wed, 08 Mar 2017 14:00:00 UTC

2017-03-08T14:03:05Z

What's the difference between a teal and a mallard? Waterfowl identification programs on Sunday, March 12, will put you in the know.

A pair of free, waterfowl-identification programs will be offered in Central Pennsylvania on Sunday, March 12.

The Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art will run its 20th annual Waterfowl Watch from 8 a.m.-1 p.m., with Scott Bills, retired land management group supervisor with the Pennsylvania Game Commission, offering insight into waterfowl and their seasonal migration patterns. The watch take places along the banks of the Susquehanna River at the old Millersburg Gun Club Headquarters, along River Street in Millersburg.

Binoculars, spotting scopes, field guides, a warm fire and refreshments will be provided. The program is free, but donations will be accepted.

The Pennsylvania Game Commission will offer a Basic Waterfowl Identification program from 1:30-2:30 p.m. at commission headquarters, 2001 Elmerton Ave., Harrisburg. Doors will open at 1 p.m.

The program will be led by wildlife conservation officers.

In addition to the waterfowl identification program, those attending can take in a display of waterfowl artworks, including the winners and other works submitted to the 2016-17 Federal Duck Stamp contest, as well as several original paintings by famed artist Ned Smith.

The program is free, but pre-registration is required by March 9 by calling 717-787-4250 ext. 3504 to provide your name, phone number and the number in your party.


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