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Luke Cage Brings the Fight to the Streets In "Who's Gonna Take the Weight"

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The superhero series developed by Cheo Hodari Coker exists in the same Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers movies, but is more closely tied to fellow Netflix Originals Daredevil and Jessica Jones. Because we're so excited about the show, we're going to recap each episode every hour as we go through and watch: you can check out our recap of the premiere and episode 2. Last episode, Luke Cage did a light riff on Spider-Man's origin story, killing off the titular hero's father figure and teaching him a variation on the classic, "with great power comes great responsibility." [...] there's the plot: [...] it's neither: with Luke on a heroic rampage, Cottonmouth is out of money, and Dillard is about to exposed as less community organizer, and more organized crimelord. [...] just like Daredevil villain Wilson Fisk (Vincent D'Onofrio), Cottonmouth goes off the rails (again), using a rocket launcher to blow up Genghis Connie's (and presumably Luke, RIP Luke, gonna be weird to have a TV series without him). Season 1's standout found DD fighting a series of goons in one shot, in a hallway; while Season 2 upped the ante weaving in and out of elevators, staircases, and yes, hallways. [...] the credits, I guess: we haven't talked about this aspect of the show yet, but in the opening credits, Luke Cage IS Harlem.



Luke Cage: Let's "Step Into the Arena" and Talk About Origin Stories

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The superhero series developed by Cheo Hodari Coker exists in the same Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers movies, but is more closely tied to fellow Netflix Originals Daredevil and Jessica Jones. Because we're so excited about the show, we're going to recap each episode every hour as we go through and watch: you can check out our recap of the premiere, episode 2 and episode 3. Let's talk about origin stories. Because even though we met Luke Cage (Mike Colter) in a previous Marvel/Netflix series (that would be Jessica Jones), these first four episodes of his titular series have served as a tour through the origin stories of other Marvel heroes, as filtered through the uniqueness of Mr. Cage (née Carl Lucas). If the first two episodes were Luke's Spider-Man "with great power comes great responsibility" moment, and episode three was a riff on Netflix's take on Daredevil, then episode four is very loosely Captain America with a touch of Iron Man. Without the ongoing saga of Chico (RIP Chico, you were a character, I guess) over, and Cottonmouth (Mahershala Ali) amping up the danger considerably by trying to blow up Luke with a rocket launcher, the deck is clear to focus in on the man who is now known as Luke Cage; and the show was better for it. [...] by putting Mike Colter in an amazing wig and beard that made him look more like the cowardly lion than a superhero, we got to figure out what's driving the man we know today. [...] you need a guy who feels like he can never win. Mix in a racist prison guard making sure Luke can't win, two convicts who don't mind playing dirty, and you've got Luke feeling like maybe he does deserve to be treated like a bad guy, after all. In the previous series, Reva was killed for having a flash drive containing incriminating footage of experiments on the villainous Kilgrave (David Tennant).



Luke Cage: "Just to Get a Rep" Asks... Who Owns Harlem?

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The superhero series developed by Cheo Hodari Coker exists in the same Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers movies, but is more closely tied to fellow Netflix Originals Daredevil and Jessica Jones. Because we're so excited about the show, we're going to recap each episode every hour as we go through and watch: you can check out our recap of the premiere, episode 2,episode 3, and episode 4. [...] Luke stalks around Harlem non-stop, destroying his fancy new funeral suit, and -- frustration filling his furrowed brow -- trying to help as many people as he can at the same time. Three episodes ago Cottonmouth killed Tone (Warner Miller) for going nuts shooting up Pop's shop, growling, "There are supposed to be rules." Three episodes later, he's blown up a Chinese restaurant with a rocket launcher, shot one of his associates for suggesting, "Maybe if we just give this Luke Cage cat his side of the street, we take ours?" and is calling in favors from all over to buy a super-bullet called Judas that might be able to break Cage's unbreakable skin. Or in other words, Cottonmouth does what he always does: focuses on himself and the money; while Luke talks to the heart of the people. Cottonmouth may represent Old Harlem, and Luke the raw justice of the streets; but ultimately, if these two ideologies don't work together to stop what the uber-bad Diamondback has planned (or whatever is going on with Mariah Dillard), it's the city that's going to pay. - Dapper Dan, the real life "Hip-Hop Tailor of Harlem" shows up to give Luke his suit, which is pretty cool (and also marks the second cameo after Method Man of real life awesome dudes giving Luke clothes).



Luke Cage: Time for a Geography Lesson On "Suckas Need Bodyguards"

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The superhero series developed by Cheo Hodari Coker exists in the same Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers movies, but is more closely tied to fellow Netflix Originals Daredevil and Jessica Jones. Because we're so excited about the show, we're going to recap each episode every hour as we go through and watch: you can check out our recap of the premiere, episode 2, episode 3, episode 4 and episode 5. If the first few hours were all riffing off superhero tropes, the past few have delved deeper into movies: the prison movie; the community railing against an evil developer movie; and this time the urban assault movie. Specifically, 16 Blocks comes to mind, as Luke (Mike Colter) and Claire Temple (Rosario Dawson) end up taking a bleeding Scarfe (Frank Whaley) the treacherous short distance from Harlem, to 1 Police Plaza with deadly results. Scarfe is in this situation in the first place because he mouthed off to the increasingly erratic Cottonmouth (Mahershala Ali), squeezing him for money to get weapons that can pierce Luke's unbreakable skin; and instead, getting shot by Cottonmouth. Unfortunately she's held back by another rat working for Cottonmouth, who she ends up having to take down -- missing the opportunity to catch up with Luke and Scarfe. [...] why those last two blocks or so become a firefight. The blowback even hits Cottonmouth's cousin Mariah Dillard (Alfre Woodard), who's political goals get stymied by a bad interview with local press (what, Pat Kiernan wasn't available?) and an association with her criminal relative.



Luke Cage: Everything Changes With "Manifest"

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

Expires 02-16 Other Links From TVGuide.com Marvel's Luke CageMike ColterAlfre WoodardMahershala AliTheo Rossi



Luke Cage: "DWYCK" Proves That Everyone Has a Breaking Point

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The superhero series developed by Cheo Hodari Coker exists in the same Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers movies, but is more closely tied to fellow Netflix Originals Daredevil and Jessica Jones. Because we're so excited about the show, we're going to recap each episode every hour as we go through and watch: you can check out our recap of the premiere, episode 2, episode 3, episode 4, episode 5, episode 6,episode 7 and episode 8. Granted, healing means different things to different people: for Misty (Simone Missick), it's about figuring out why she lost her nerve when attacked by Diamondback (Erik LaRay Harvey); for Mariah (Alfre Woodard), it's moving on from her cousin's death; and for Luke, it's literally healing from the dual bullet wounds piercing his unbreakable skin. Let's start with Misty, because she underscores the theme of the episode by shouting, You think you are gonna break me? Bring it, at a psychologist brought in to evaluate her efficacy and continued loyalty to the NYPD. After sipping lemonade and trashing the male cops on the force (the second Beyoncé reference in as many episodes), she reveals that her cousin was raped, murdered and disfigured when Misty was a kid, leading to her constant drive for justice. The Chief tasks her with tracking down Luke, who was captured on camera attacking two cops. See, Mariah wants to move past the death of Cottonmouth (Masershala Ali), by her own hand no less, by selling all of her cousin's criminal assets and getting out of the crime game. After Mariah calls a meeting of the local crime bosses, Diamondback shows up and slaughters them in a variety of creative ways (my fave was shooting one guy through the throat and into another guy's head; that was pretty cool). If Misty drinking lemonade and bringing hot fire to the men who have wronged her wasn't on the nose enough, how about Luke being profiled by the police while wearing a hoodie, and then s



Luke Cage Premiere Recap: Meet the New King of Harlem

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The superhero series developed by Cheo Hodari Coker exists in the same Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers movies, but is more closely tied to fellow Netflix Originals Daredevil and Jessica Jones. Because we're so excited about the show, we're going to recap each episode every hour as we go through and watch; and needless to say, spoilers for Marvel's Luke Cage past this point! With the exception of Phil Coulson (Clark Gregg) graduating from the movies to Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., each subsequent main character has been introduced in their own series, versus having a pre-existing back-story. The potentially invulnerable, super strong part-time bartender first showed up as a major supporting character in Marvel and Netflix's previous series, Jessica Jones. Because of the events of that series -- which included Cage's girlfriend Jessica shooting him in the face to break him from a villain's mind-control ("I still get headaches," notes Cage in this premiere episode) -- More than that, it's Cage's "with great power comes great responsibility" Spider-Man moment, as he lets a kid with a gun walk away from him without a word; and later that choice leads to multiple deaths... [...] Cage's realization it's time to put on his hoodie, and get to work. [...] other than a surprisingly hands-on sex scene, some hair sweeping (literally sweeping, because Cage is bald), and a killer action sequence at the end (please have someone punch Luke and break their hand in slow motion every episode, thanks)... Where the movies have struggled to deliver nuanced villains beyond Tom Hiddleston's Loki; Fisk's tragic backstory and Kilgrave's malevolent innocence of his misdeeds made for compelling, complex performances that stood toe to toe with their heroic opposites. In the first episode, an arms deal with a rival gang goes South when the aforementioned kid ends up killing nearly everyone involved and stealing a large sack of money.



Luke Cage: The Past Haunts the Present in "Code of the Streets"

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The superhero series developed by Cheo Hodari Coker exists in the same Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers movies, but is more closely tied to fellow Netflix Originals Daredevil and Jessica Jones. Because we're so excited about the show, we're going to recap each episode every hour as we go through and watch: you can check out our recap of the premiere, here. Turns out the second chapter, titled "Code of the Streets," gives us the final piece of the puzzle that brings the bulletproof Cage out of his funk, and into full hero mode. Visual innovation, some incredible musical moments, powerful statements and Cage finally stepping (back) up to bat. Last episode, Cage turned aside and let Chico leave the barbershop with a gun, just like Spider-Man let a nameless burglar leave his wrestling match after robbing the owner. [...] just like that nameless burglar ended up killing Spider-Man's Uncle Ben, Cage's actions directly lead to the death of Pop. [...] instead of wallowing in the past (the death of his wife, whatever happened to land him in Seagate Prison, his really, really bad dating experience with Jessica Jones), Cage decides to put on his green and yellow hoodie and fight crime. He, like Dillard, is constantly trying to send himself and Harlem back to an earlier era when crime was easy and had rules, when massive music clubs were the hub of activity, and when it was clear who was right and who was wrong... Add in the recurring discussion of the use of the N-word throughout the episode, and how that ties us -- or not -- to the past, and you have a strong theme of history informing our present actions; but ideally not making us a slave to circular behaviors.



Luke Cage: "Blowin' Up the Spot" Brings on the Bad Guys

Fri, 30 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The superhero series developed by Cheo Hodari Coker exists in the same Marvel Cinematic Universe as the Avengers movies; but are more closely tied to fellow Netflix Originals Daredevil and Jessica Jones. Because we're so excited about the show, we're going to recap each episode every hour as we go through and watch: you can check out our recap of the premiere, episode 2, episode 3, episode 4, episode 5,episode 6, and episode 7. If the eighth episode of Luke Cage is any indication, it's definitely the latter, as everyone from Luke (Mike Colter) to Mariah (Alfre Woodard) is haunted by specters from deep in their personal histories. Whenever he's tried to go it alone, he's failed: protecting Pop (Frankie Faison) in episode 2; trying to save Squabbles in episode 4; and, as it turns out, not saving his own brother from the wrath of their father. Look, Cottonmouth was a superb foil for Luke, pitting his "classic" Harlem against Luke's modern take on the neighborhood. [...] worth mentioning: their nearly episode-long fight, which ranges from a blown-up ambulance, to an assault on a women's clinic, to a fight in an abandoned theater, to finally taking it to the streets -- where Luke gets shot with another Judas bullet, and falls nearly dead into a garbage truck -- is appropriately epic. Diamondback may only be Luke's physical equal because the latter is slowly dying due to a bullet wound; but it's the first time (other than episode 4 when Luke was pre-powers) that we've seen him challenged. The only one who isn't having it is Misty (Simone Missick), who is unable to escape her own past allegiances, or at least her present ones in the police department. Is she realizing in that moment that she spent most of her days going by the book, when the book is often wrong (shades of Luke/Diamondback's father's sermons)? The only big difference here is that, in the books, Diamondback used exploding switchblades, which is way m



Exclusive: ?Nashville Announces Casting for Rayna's Silicon Valley Superfan

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The show has added Cameron Scoggins in a recurring role as Zach Welles, a young Silicon Valley billionaire who also happens to be an obsessive Rayna superfan, TVGuide.com has learned exclusively. [...] TVGuide.com has learned that Joseph David-Jones (DC's Legends of Tomorrow)has been cast in the recurring role of Clay, a young African-American musician in his mid-20s who is destined for great things. Scoggins and David-Jones join previously-announced cast addition Jen Richards, who will play a physical therapist in Season 5.



How to Get Away with Murder Star: [SPOILER] Is Alive - But There Might Be More to It

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

The following story contains spoilers about Thursday's episode of How to Get Away with Murder. Ergo, he is not the poor victim who died in Annalise's (Viola Davis) house fire. At the end of the hour, Oliver frantically runs towards Annalise, asking "Is it true?" "Let's not let our minds go there," she says, covertly slipping him her burner phone to "wipe it clean," before the cops arrest her. Who else would Oliver be that torn up about besides the guy whose heart he crushed to smithereens again, when Connor tried to get back together in the past timeline? Conrad Ricamora: [Laughs] Well, he's there the night of the fire. Ricamora: I mean, the show is called How to Get Away with Murder, so you kind of know what you're signing up for. How much did Pete [Nowalk, the show's creator] tell you all about the mystery beforehand? Did he tell you you're alive at the end of Episode 2? Did you find out at the table read? The writers like to keep it open. What was the reaction at the table read? I'm assuming everyone found out at the same time. Do you think it makes sense or is it something that will tie together by that point? [...] when you shot the scene, you didn't know who it was, so were you playing it as if it was Connor on the gurney? At that point, he's forged strong relationships with many people and of course Connor is going to be on his mind. Are you going to keep breaking Coliver fans' hearts? Ricamora: [Laughs] I think they're figuring out where their boundaries are in their relationship. Why was Connor so OK with him [deleting his Stanford acceptance]? Are there any times in a relationship where you keep secrets? Are you really protecting someone by holding back? I think that will be a fun theme that plays out this season. Annalise is suspended, but she said that's not going to stop her from teaching her students. Oliver's been hired to help at the legal clinic and he's going to start out helping



The Blacklist: Is Liz's Memory Deceiving Her?

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

On Thursday's episode of The Blacklist, Liz (Megan Boone) discovered that everything she thought she knew about her childhood may be wrong, and Red Reddington (James Spader) added another name to his kill list that will have significant repercussions going forward -- or did he? After Mr. Kaplan (Susan Blommaert) leads Red to the bounty hunter who kidnapped Agnes for Kirk, her efforts are rewarded by Red leading her out to a beautiful acre of land he owns in the middle of a deserted forest, and shooting her in the face for her earlier betrayal. Over in Liz's corner, after a harrowing helicopter crash and rescue, Alexander Kirk (Ulrich Thomsen) brings Liz to his "cottage" in Nova Scotia, which he says he long ago nicknamed his "Summer Palace" (appropriate -- that's a pretty big "cottage," if you ask me) because his little princess love it so much when they went there for a summer several years ago. While there, Liz witnesses Kirk getting medical treatments behind closed doors, and also walks into what is clearly a pristinely preserved little girl's bedroom, and which has a chilling effect on her. Memories come flooding back to Liz as she picks up a book and a child's drawing signed "Masha," and she remembers that this is her childhood bedroom. Liz also has a vivid memory of herself and her mother burying a coffee can time capsule in the backyard.



Pitch: Are We Heading Towards a Ginny and Mike Relationship?

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

If the first episode of Pitch was about whether Ginny Baker (Kylie Bunbury) could handle the pressures of major league baseball, the second episode was about whether the rest of her team could deal with the pressure of having her on their team. [...] that Ginny is the center of the media's eye, she has to deal with having microphones shoved in her face and figuring out how to be a role model and icon while the rest of her team resents her for all the attention. All she wants is to be one of the guys, but the episode forces Ginny to accept her place in the spotlight and fight for her right to be just a ball player -- and using her platform for good. [...] far, Mike and Ginny have one of the most compelling relationships on the show.



Grey's Anatomy's Camilla Luddington Discusses Jo and Alex's "Complicated" Future

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

Luddington: I think Stephanie will always be there for her, and I think Jo has a bad habit of feeling like she wants to try and cope with it on her own. [...] even if there are moments where Stephanie is there for her, I think that at the end of the day, the people that she's trying to impress in order to get ahead in the hospital, those are the people that she's hoping to forge relationships with too, and then something like this, where it's their fellow attending, that makes it hard for her. Luddington: I think you just see her sort of slowly kind of backed into a corner, as opposed to really trying to explain to what would be 100 people what happened. ... [...] at the end of the day, also what's tricky, again, is that, would it have even been considered cheating? Because he had broken up with her.



Lady Gaga Will Perform During the 2017 Super Bowl Halftime Show

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

Lady Gaga confirmed Thursday she will perform during the halftime show of Super Bowl LI despite the fact most people watching the 51st Super Bowl probably won't know or care unless she comes out dressed as a bottle of Bud Light. The American Horror Story actress made the announcement via Twitter, as all important announcements are made in 2016. Here's the tweet as evidence I'm not making this up.



?Grey's Anatomy: Will Alex Go to Jail?

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

[...] Alex gets the unwelcome surprise during his court appearance that he's being charged with second-degree felony assault, meaning he could face serious jail time. [...] Alex misreads a young kidney patient's chart, and snaps at Ben (Jason George) when he tries to point out the error, resulting in the boy having to have surgery and Alex getting kicked off the case. Good news for DeLuca, though - his medical career isn't over after all, and Meredith later tries to make amends by calling him in on the aforementioned kidney surgery. Later, torn between her friendship to him and her professional responsibilities as chief, Bailey tells Alex she doesn't want to fire him but can't in good conscience allow him to carry on as a surgeon with a felony assault charge hanging over his head. -Anyone else think Jo was being a bit too sensitive when she took umbrage at Amelia saying she was going to beat the crap out of her patient's (apparently female) tumor?



The Good Place Just Found Its Tom Haverford

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

Amy Poehler was the anchor, but the show was stacked with great characters played by talented comic actors in a way that allowed the world of Pawnee to keep getting bigger and richer every season. Given Schur's ensemble comedy history -- before Parks, he wrote for The Office, and 0n both of those shows he learned from Greg Daniels, who wrote for The Simpsons at its peak -- it's no surprise that The Good Place is starting to develop a similarly strong roster of characters, some of whom bear resemblance to Parks characters. [...] an excellent new one, Jason Mendoza (Manny Jacinto), emerged in his eponymous episode, and he's reminiscent of one of Parks and Recreation's greatest creations, Tom Haverford. Tom "Tommy Fresh" Haverford -- not to mention the actor who played him, Aziz Ansari -- was the breakout character of Parks' early seasons. Last week, Jianyu, the silent, noble Buddhist monk, revealed to Eleanor that he was not supposed to be in the Good Place, either, and had kept up Jianyu's vow of silence to avoid revealing himself as a fraud. This is where he differs from Eleanor, who's really trying to become a better person, and Tom Haverford, who evolved into a more mature, less obnoxious person as the series progressed. Jacinto was silent for almost all of the first three episodes, but he finally gets to be hilarious here, delivering lines like "I came up with hundreds of plans in my life, and only one of them got me killed" with an irresistible dopiness.



How Luke Cage Built the Gritty and Complex World of Netflix's First Black Superhero

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

If you ask Marvel's Luke Cage showrunner Cheo Hodari Coker to describe his next installment of the Netflix Marvel Cinematic Universe, he'd say it's a standard western motif, entrenched in hip-hop tradition and wrapped in a superhero cape. If you ask critics what that means, they'll tell you that Luke Cage is profoundly culturally relevant, tapping into the heart of the black American experience at a time when racial tension seems to be at a boiling point. [...] the show invites its audience into the nuanced conversations currently happening within the black community, from the definition of progress and whether people of color can actually get ahead in this country to the propriety of using the N-word. "Honestly, the fact of the matter is, within hip-hop, within the black community, there's always been a very complex relationship with that word," Coker says of the dichotomy of the characters within Luke Cage who use the word - primarily the gangsters trying to take over, and those who disagree with it - Luke and City Councilwoman Mariah Dillard (Alfre Woodard). The neighborhood serves as its own character within the Luke Cage narrative, and grounds the comic-book story in a vivid, urban reality. Coker took pains to create Luke's world with the proper historical context and an expertly crafted musical backdrop because he realized very early on that to make Luke Cage believable his characters would have to live in a world that felt like the same one his viewers live in. Harlem, in its golden age, fostered revolutionary artists Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston and Louis Armstrong, while simultaneously giving birth to infamous gangsters like Dutch Schultz, Bumpy Johnson and Frank Lucas. The opening credits feature a street sign for Malcolm X Blvd, the alternative name for Harlem's main thoroughfare Lennox Blvd, where a lot of the show was filmed. Months before NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick became a constant



Westworld Will Be HBO's Next Huge Hit...for Some

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

Westworld doesn't adhere to traditional rules of television, opting instead to focus on the upper-level "What if?" nature of its premise. In addition to Abrams and Nolan (who wrote the Dark Knight movies with his brother Christopher and the short story that Memento was based on), big-name actors are on board, including Anthony Hopkins as Dr. Robert Ford, the creator of Westworld who has grandiose ideas about what the place can be (think the old dude from Jurassic Park). There's also Ed Harris as "The Man in Black," a repeat visitor whose dark side takes him places no one else goes; Evan Rachel Wood as Dolores, a Westworld local who begins to question her existence; Jeffrey Wright as Bernard Lowe, a programmer who studies humans in order to apply their functions to the androids; James Marsden as Teddy Flood, a visitor with eyes for Dolores; and Thandie Newton as Maeve Millay, the madame at the local saloon. Spanning shots of what I'll guess is Utah are glorious, and when placed up against the futuristic headquarters of the Westworld architects, enhance the fantasy-like quality of the theme park.



Designated Survivor, Speechless Get Full-Season Pickups at ABC

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

ABC has ordered full seasons of freshman series Designated Survivor and Speechless, the network announced Thursday. Designated Survivor, airing Wednesdays at 10/9c, stars Kiefer Sutherland as Tom Kirkman, a low-level cabinet member-turned-president of the United States following a deadly attack on Washington, DC.



Ofelia Is Under Attack in This Fear the Walking Dead Finale Sneak Peek

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

Ofelia (Mercedes Masöhn) has been missing for most of the back half of Season 2, but we learned in "Pillar of Salt" that she'd fled the hotel and was driving toward the United States in a pickup truck she'd stolen from Strand (Colman Domingo), presumably in search of the fiancé she lost. [...] one of the constants of the Walking Dead universe is that vehicles cause an endless amount of trouble (just ask Rick and Daryl about their truck full of supplies on the bottom of a lake), so of course she's surprised by two zombies who pop up out of nowhere. Fear the Walking Dead's two-part season finale starts Sunday, Oct. 2 at 9/8c on AMC.



Once Upon a Time: The Land of Untold Stories Will Unfold Differently in Storybrooke

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

There have been ominous warnings from Mr. Hyde (Sam Witwer) about the dangers the "refugees" possess now that they're in town and stories they've put a lot of energy into hiding could now come out in the open. Creators Adam Horowitz and Eddy Kitsis spoke at a season premiere screening event about how the Land of Untold Stories fairy tales will unfold and interweave with the central character narratives. The literary master of revenge will have a connection to the Evil Queen, who obviously has a thirst for revenge herself. "For us, when we bring in new characters, the fun of telling that story is also how it thematically links back to our characters," Kitsis said.



?Survivor: Millennials vs. Gen X: The First Blindside Victim Speaks Out

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

Mari: In a heartbeat. Absolutely. I'm still hashtag salty. Survivor airs Wednesdays at 8/7c on CBS. (Full disclosure: TVGuide.com is owned by CBS.) Other Links From TVGuide.com Survivor: Millennials vs. Gen XMari TakahashiJessica Figueroa



On Conviction, Hayley Atwell Is the Anti-Peggy Carter

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

Sadly, the drama's sharp writing, enviable fashion and playful attitude failed to result in stellar ratings and ABC canceled it after only two seasons. A former defense attorney and first daughter, Hayes is blackmailed into running an investigative unit dedicated to overturning wrongful convictions. [...] though seeing Atwell work from within a corrupt system to fight "the Man" and help the disenfranchised is comfortingly similar to what fans saw her do on Agent Carter, the similarities stop there. Given her messy history (the premiere includes a cocaine arrest and mentions some nude paparazzi photos that made the rounds), Hayes has a well-earned reputation for being brash and transgressive. [...] thanks in large part to Atwell's natural charisma, Conviction is filled with potential, particularly if the show starts to allow Hayes to work with -- not against -- her team of CIU employees (which includes Alias' Merrin Dungey, Animorphs' Shawn Ashmore, The Walking Dead's Emily Kinney and Graceland's Manny Montana).



Son of Zorn: Defending the Office Fridge Against Invaders from Across the Hall

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 05:00:00 UT

Zorn, bored by the lack of conflict at his job as a soap dispenser salesman at Sanitation Solutions, is looking for a fight. When his attempts to antagonize his boss Linda (Artemis Pebdani) by repeatedly smushing her sandwiches fail, he stumbles across a new enemy when an employee of Vita Shock, the company across the hall from Sanitation Solutions, takes some hot sauce that doesn't belong to him from the office's shared kitchen.