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Stanford CSI on social entrepreneurship





 



Tackling Energy Poverty With Pay-As-You-Go Solar

Fri, 21 Feb 2014 18:18:54 +0000

Lesley Marincola, CEO, Angaza Design
Short Description: 

In East Africa, 80% of the population lives off the grid and often has to use kerosene fuel for lighting. Lesley Marincola, CEO of Angaza Design, argues that the high retail prices of energy and electric products in developing markets are to blame. In this audio interview, Marincola talks with Stanford Center for Social Innovation correspondent Sheela Sethuraman about how Angaza’s extreme affordability model helps tackle energy poverty in emerging markets.

Retail prices of energy and lighting products in emerging markets are simply too high for end users, argues Lesley Marincola. As a result, large populations throughout the world live off the grid and have to rely on kerosene fuel and other less efficient light sources. To help combat this widespread energy poverty problem, Angaza has developed a pay-as-you-go financing platform for its solar products, as opposed to a large up-front retail price. In this podcast, Marincola also offers insights on her design and implementation of Angaza products, specifically focusing on user needs in these developing markets.

Lesley Marincola, CEO and founder of Angaza Design, is a product designer (B.S.) and mechanical engineer (M.S.) from Stanford University. Prior to founding Angaza, Lesley worked with the Amazon Design team at Lab126 on the first three iterations of the Kindle, and at D2M Inc., a Bay Area design consultancy. She was recognized by Businessweek as one of “America’s Best Young Entrepreneurs”, is a World Economic Forum Young Global Shaper, was named a Forbes “30 Under 30” Entrepreneur, and is a 2013 Echoing Green Fellow. Marincola's vision is to solve the world’s most widespread problems – like energy access – with market-driven technology innovation developed from a human-centered design approach.

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The Tech Awards
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Podcast #: 
6024



Using Science and Social Enterprise to Improve Rice Crop Yield in India and Bangladesh

Fri, 14 Feb 2014 19:29:44 +0000

Pamela Ronald, Professor of Plant Patholoy and the Genome Center, University of California - Davis Short Description:  Working through social enterprise in improving and securing crop yield, especially rice, scientists have enabled farmers in India and Bangladesh to feed their families and earn a profit from their surplus. In this audio interview, Pamela Ronald, of the University of California, Davis, talks with Stanford Center for Social Innovation correspondent Sheela Sethuraman about how her laboratory, in collaboration with other scientists, developed a variety of rice with sufficient submergence tolerance to survive severe flooding. Through very innovative work in the area of agriculture, scientists have worked through social enterprise in improving and securing crop yield, especially rice, which has enabled farmers in India and Bangladesh to feed their families and earn a profit from their surplus. In this audio interview with Stanford Center for Social Innovation correspondent Sheela Sethuraman, Pamela Ronald, of the University of California, Davis, talks about how her laboratory, in collaboration with other scientists, developed a variety of rice with sufficient submergence tolerance to survive severe flooding. Ronald also offers insights on the relationship between genetic engineering and organic farming, enhancing an ecologically based system of farming, and on international development, in this Social Innovation Conversations, Stanford University podcast. Pamela Ronald is Professor, Department of Plant Pathology and the Genome Center at the University of California, Davis. She also serves as Director of Grass Genetics at the Joint Bioenergy Institute. Ronald’s laboratory has engineered rice for resistance to disease and tolerance to flooding, which seriously threaten rice crops in Asia and Africa. Ronald led the isolation of the rice XA21 immune receptor and the rice Sub1A submergence tolerance transcription factor. In 1996, she established the Genetic Resources Recognition fund, a mechanism to recognize intellectual property contributions from less developed countries. The Tech Awards Related Stuff Ronald Laboratory Laboratory for Crop Genetics Innovation & Scientific Literacy International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) Global Rice Science Partnership (GRiSP) David Mackill and Pamela Ronald: Humanitarian Awards (Tech Museum) Tech Awards Podcast Series, Stanford Center for Social Innovation The Tech Museum Tomorrow's Table: Organic Farming, Genetics, and the Future of Food Podcast #:  6023 [...]



Cameron Conaway: Knowing When to "Tap Out" of the Fight

Fri, 07 Feb 2014 18:42:07 +0000

Ned Breslin, CEO, Water For People Cameron Conaway, Executive Editor, GoodMenProject.com Short Description:  In the nonprofit world, people talk about the importance of failure so often it has become cliché. Failure as a way to learn from your mistakes and improve your work. As a former Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighter, Cameron Conaway knows a lot about failure and the value of confronting fear and risk head on, literally. At the same time, Cameron also knows the importance of reflecting and pivoting to become more successful – and he has used that understanding to not only win fights but to write powerful poetry. In this podcast, Ned Breslin speaks with the MMA fighter and poet about this difficult balance and how you know when it’s time to “tap out” of the fight. What insights does a former Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) fighter, now poet, activist and thought leader, have to teach social entrepreneurs? As it turns out, a lot more than you might imagine. MMA fighters understand what failure is – not the "I failed… now let me put my badge on" rhetoric that has become an essential, but increasingly superficial, part of any budding entrepreneur's story. MMA fighters understand failure, and the pain that accompanies it. They get knocked down. They get knocked out. And they have to truly examine the lessons of defeat in order to perfect their strategy for success. This warrior mindset forces growth, adaptation and new creative expression. MMA fighters also know the wisdom of when to “tap out” and the necessity of dramatic pivots in some cases to achieve new areas of personal and professional development. Cameron Conaway's journey offers fascinating lessons that show how unusual story arcs provide insightful truths for social entrepreneurs everywhere. Edward D. (Ned) Breslin is CEO of Water For People , widely considered a force for positive change by challenging status quo approaches to water and sanitation, philanthropy and aid transparency and offering concrete alternatives, and received the Skoll Award for Social Entrepreneurship in 2011. Cameron Conaway, Executive Editor at The Good Men Project, is an NSCA-Certified Personal Trainer, a former MMA fighter and an award-winning poet. His international investigations into poverty, child labor and human trafficking can be found in publications such as The Guardian, The Huffington Post and the Women News Network. Conaway is a recipient of the Wellcome Trust Arts Award and currently teaches the capstone Shakespeare Seminar for Ottawa University. The Social Disruptors Related Stuff The Social Disruptors Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship Water for People The Good Men Project Podcast #:  6037 [...]



Hau Lee: Value Chain Innovation in Developing Economies

Tue, 04 Feb 2014 23:27:11 +0000

Hau Lee, Thoma Professor of Operations, Information and Technology, Stanford Graduate School of Business
Tue, 02/04/2014
Short Description: 

Hau Lee explains how value chain innovations can help entrepreneurs in developing economies grow their businesses, and what multinational corporations can learn from them.

Hau Lee explains how value chain innovations can help entrepreneurs in developing economies grow their businesses, and what multinational corporations can learn from them.

Lee is the Thoma Professor of Operations, Information and Technology at the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

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Media Files:
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Quality and Innovation as the Basis for Sustainability

Fri, 31 Jan 2014 17:55:55 +0000

John Kehoe, VP of Sourcing and Development, TCHO Short Description:  TCHO, a chocolate factory in San Francisco, uses chocolate production to encourage social entrepreneurship in developing countries. In this short audio lecture, John Kehoe, VP of Sourcing and Development at TCHO, discusses the company’s complex supply chain from grower to store. Through the company’s partnership program TCHOSource, TCHO utilizes technology and innovation to work with its sourcing cooperatives around the world. The goal is to improving the growers’ livelihoods and craft while increasing quality, productivity, and sustainability. TCHO, a chocolate factory in San Francisco, has encouraged social entrepreneurship in developing countries through its innovative supply chain practices. In this short audio lecture, John Kehoe, VP of Sourcing and Development at TCHO, discusses the company’s complex supply chain. His story starts with growers in Ghana, Ecuador, Peru, and Madagascar, and moves to to their factory and store in San Francisco. The company has developed TCHOSource, a unique partnership program that connects the TCHO to its sourcing cooperatives around the world through technology. The use of technology throughout the supply chain helps increase the quality, productivity, and sustainability of the chocolate production. Technology use, starting from the co-op level, allows TCHO to help improve the livelihood and craft of its growers. TCHO is promoting social entrepreneurship from the ground up. John Kehoe began his career in international trade in Caracas, Venezuela, in 1987 with a local trading operation. After establishing a $10MM annual cotton trade, he co-founded and operated a leading cocoa exporting business, managing thirty percent of the country’s exports of premium cacao with clients in the United States, Japan, and Europe. In 1999, ED&F Man Cocoa hired Kehoe to restructure a cocoa exporting operation in the Dominican Republic. In 2002, he returned to the United States, and founded “EcoTrade” a specialty cocoa brokerage and consultancy based in Miami. Joining TCHO in March of 2008, he has helped build TCHOSource through a $3.3MM USAID cooperative development grant. He also created a network of raw materials suppliers providing critical inventory financing. Kehoe holds a BA in economics from Tulane University and attended Venezuela’s IESA Advanced Management Program and the Owner–Directors program at INSEAD in Fontainebleau, France. Responsible Supply Chains Conference Related Stuff Global Supply Chain Management Forum, Stanford Graduate School of Business Responsible Supply Chains Conference TCHO Social Entrepreneurship and Cocoa Farmers Podcast #:  6012 [...]



SV2: Silicon Valley Social Venture Fund

Wed, 18 Dec 2013 00:42:33 +0000

Author:  Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen Victoria Chang Tue, 12/17/2013 arrillaga-laura-kathryne.jpg Multimedia Case:  No Arrillaga created Silicon Valley Social Venture ("SV2") in partnership with Community Foundation Silicon Valley (“CFSV”), a nationally recognized public foundation that had experience working with individual donors and had established credibility within the philanthropic field. Arrillaga formed SV2 as a donor-advised fund to ensure that CFSV staff would help guide SV2 partners leverage their expertise and funding to select high-performing community organizations, thus generating the greatest social impact.  In 1998, Laura Arrillaga launched the Silicon Valley Social Venture Fund (“SV2”) with two objectives: 1) providing Silicon Valley donors with philanthropic experience and education that would empower their personal giving; and 2) awarding local nonprofits with multi-year, capacity-building grants that would help them to strengthen their organizations and meet the higher level of accountability associated with contemporary philanthropic investments. SV2 followed a venture philanthropy partnership model in which investors pooled their money to give large, multi-year grants to nonprofits and also served in consulting and advisory roles to help grantees meet their capacity-building goals.  Arrillaga created SV2 in partnership with Community Foundation Silicon Valley (“CFSV”), a nationally recognized public foundation that had experience working with individual donors and had established credibility within the philanthropic field. Arrillaga formed SV2 as a donor-advised fund to ensure that CFSV staff would help guide SV2 partners leverage their expertise and funding to select high-performing community organizations, thus generating the greatest social impact.  By 2005, Arrillaga and CFSV had built a volunteer-driven organization composed of 160 partners ranging in age from their twenties to their sixties. SV2 had donated $2 million to support 13 local grantees. Moreover, SV2 had implemented two professionally facilitated strategic planning processes in its short history. In the future, Arrillaga and her team hoped to continuously evolve the organization, in particular, to improve SV2’s partner consulting program to better leverage partner expertise to benefit grantees. They also wondered how to more fully engage partners in SV2’s grantmaking and educational activities while increasing SV2’s accountability to grantees, partners and the broader philanthropic community. Case No:  SI80 E-Copy Available:  Yes E-Copy Url:  https://gsbapps.stanford.edu/cases/documents/SI-80%20SV2-Silicon%20Valley%20Social%20Venture%20Fund%20060113.pdf Paper Copy:  No Related Stuff Related Research:  Acumen Fund and Embrace: From the Leading Edge of Social Venture Investing Mount Pleasant School: Achieving Excellence with Limited Resources [...]



PATH and the Safe Water Project: Seeking Market-Based Solutions to Global Health

Wed, 18 Dec 2013 00:21:20 +0000

Author:  Stefanos Zenios Lyn Denend Tim Elliot Tue, 12/17/2013 zenios-stefanos.jpg Multimedia Case:  No This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The purpose of the grant was to evaluate to what extent market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage products by low-income populations. This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The purpose of the grant was to evaluate to what extent market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage products by low-income populations. Over the course of the grant, PATH conducted approximately 10 pilots in four countries. In the process, the Safe Water Project team accumulated substantial insights related to user-centered design, access, and affordability (see OIT-107, OIT-108, and OIT-109 for specific lessons in each of these three areas). PATH also amassed a number of important general lessons about planning and executing pilot projects, which are expanded upon in the case. Case No:  OIT106 E-Copy Available:  Yes E-Copy Url:  https://gsbapps.stanford.edu/cases/documents/restricted/OIT106.pdf Paper Copy:  Yes Order Paper Copy Url:  http://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/product/OIT106-PDF-ENG Related Stuff Related Research:  PATH and the Safe Water Project (107) PATH and the Safe Water Project (108) PATH and the Safe Water Project (109) [...]



PATH and the Safe Water Project: Making Safe Water Products More Affordable

Tue, 17 Dec 2013 23:45:23 +0000

Author:  Stefanos Zenios Lyn Denend Tim Elliott Tue, 12/17/2013 zenios-stefanos.jpg Multimedia Case:  No This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project. One of the key objectives of this effort was to explore how the private sector could help make HWTS products more affordable. By conducting a portfolio of field-based pilots in collaboration with commercial partners, the PATH team sought to better understand the effect of different pricing, consumer financing, and subsidy models on demand within low-income population in developing countries.  This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The purpose of the grant was to evaluate to what extent market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage products by low-income populations.  One of the key objectives of this effort was to explore how the private sector could help make HWTS products more affordable. By conducting a portfolio of field-based pilots in collaboration with commercial partners, the PATH team sought to better understand the effect of different pricing, consumer financing, and subsidy models on demand within low-income population in developing countries. Over several years, the Safe Water Project team experimented with different affordability models, including microfinance loans for water filters and a layaway program. Although specific results varied across the pilots, which spanned India, Cambodia, and Kenya, they collectively gave rise to series of important insights about the affordability of HWTS products. Case No:  OIT109 E-Copy Available:  Yes E-Copy Url:  https://gsbapps.stanford.edu/cases/documents/restricted/OIT109.pdf Paper Copy:  Yes Order Paper Copy Url:  http://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/product/OIT109-PDF-ENG Related Stuff Related Research:  PATH and the Safe Water Project (106) PATH and the Safe Water Project (107) PATH and the Safe Water Project (108) [...]



PATH and the Safe Water Project: Improving Access to Safe Water Through Innovative Sales and Distribution Models

Tue, 17 Dec 2013 23:39:41 +0000

Author:  Stefanos Zenios Lyn Denend Tim Elliott Tue, 12/17/2013 zenios-stefanos.jpg Multimedia Case:  No This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. One of the team’s primary objectives was to investigate sales and distribution challenges in this space. By conducting a portfolio of field-based pilots, the team hoped to test different models for improving customer access to these safe water products in an effort to identify scalable, sustainable, and replicable solutions. Although specific results varied across the pilots, which spanned India, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Kenya, they collectively gave rise to series of important sales and distribution insights. This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The purpose of the grant was to evaluate to what extent market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage products by low-income populations.  One of the team’s primary objectives was to investigate sales and distribution challenges in this space. By conducting a portfolio of field-based pilots, the team hoped to test different models for improving customer access to these safe water products in an effort to identify scalable, sustainable, and replicable solutions. Although specific results varied across the pilots, which spanned India, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Kenya, they collectively gave rise to series of important sales and distribution insights. Case No:  OIT108 E-Copy Available:  Yes E-Copy Url:  https://gsbapps.stanford.edu/cases/documents/restricted/OIT108.pdf Paper Copy:  Yes Order Paper Copy Url:  http://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/product/OIT108-PDF-ENG Related Stuff Related Research:  PATH and the Safe Water Project (106) PATH and the Safe Water Project (107) PATH and the Safe Water Project (109) [...]



PATH and the Safe Water Project: Empowering the Poor Through User-Centered Design

Tue, 17 Dec 2013 23:35:41 +0000

Author:  Stefanos Zenios Lyn Denend Tim Elliott Tue, 12/17/2013 zenios-stefanos.jpg Multimedia Case:  No This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.  This case provides an overview of the nonprofit organization PATH and its Safe Water Project—a five-year effort launched in late 2006 with $17 million in funding from the global development unit of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. The purpose of the grant was to evaluate to what extent market-based approaches could help accelerate the widespread adoption and sustained use of household water treatment and safe storage products by low-income populations. Through a portfolio of field-based pilots, PATH intended to experiment with different sales and distribution strategies to improve consumer access to safe water solutions, such as water filters and chlorine-based water purification tablets. It also planned to test different pricing and consumer financing models to address the affordability of these products. However, extensive market research revealed another problem—few products in the space were both effective and designed specifically to meet the unique needs and preferences of these consumers.  Accordingly, PATH applied for and was awarded $7 million in additional grant funding from the Gates Foundation to design a water filter product that would meet high standards of efficacy, be desirable—or aspirational—to low income consumers, and work effectively within the rural conditions where the majority of the poor resided. The PATH team would accomplish this through a process that the organization called user-centered design.  Case No:  OIT107 E-Copy Available:  Yes E-Copy Url:  https://gsbapps.stanford.edu/cases/documents/restricted/OIT107.pdf Paper Copy:  Yes Order Paper Copy Url:  http://cb.hbsp.harvard.edu/cb/product/OIT107-PDF-ENG Related Stuff Related Research:  PATH and the Safe Water Project (106) PATH and the Safe Water Project (108) PATH and the Safe Water Project (109) [...]