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MedWorm: Alzheimer's



MedWorm.com provides a medical RSS filtering service. Over 7000 RSS medical sources are combined and output via different filters. This feed contains the latest news and research in the Alzheimer's category.



Last Build Date: Tue, 22 Mar 2016 08:29:39 +0100

 



Sleep disturbances are key symptoms of very early stage Alzheimer disease with behavioral and psychological symptoms: a Japan multi‐center cross‐sectional study (J‐BIRD)

Tue, 22 Mar 2016 07:34:22 +0100

ConclusionSleep disturbances were strongly associated with other BPSD in the very early stage of AD. (Source: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry)

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PKC Activation as a Potential Therapeutic Strategy in Alzheimer's Disease: Is there a Role for ELAV‐like Proteins?

Tue, 22 Mar 2016 06:44:14 +0100

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Source: Basic and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology)



Can a heartburn drug cause cognitive problems?

Mon, 21 Mar 2016 13:30:38 +0100

A new study has shed light on one of the long-term effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). These drugs are commonly used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), heartburn, and peptic ulcers. PPIs (omeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole, and others) help reduce the amount of stomach acid made by glands in the lining of the stomach. Research published online on February 15 in JAMA Neurology showed that there may be an association between chronic use of PPIs and an increased risk of dementia. Experts compared prescription PPI intake and diagnosis of dementia among approximately 74,000 adults ages 75 and older. In the study, chronic PPI use was defined as at least one prescription every three months in an 18-month window. The most common PPIs in use were omeprazole (Pr...



Beyond Alzheimer's: Study reveals how mix of brain ailments drives dementia

Mon, 21 Mar 2016 13:10:15 +0100

An analysis based on long-term studies of nuns and Japanese American men provides compelling new evidence that dementia often results from a mix of brain pathologies, rather than a single condition. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)



Genetic risk factors for the posterior cortical atrophy variant of Alzheimer's disease.

Mon, 21 Mar 2016 04:25:02 +0100

DISCUSSION: We provide evidence for genetic risk factors specifically related to PCA. We identify three candidate loci that, if replicated, may provide insights into selective vulnerability and phenotypic diversity in AD. PMID: 26993346 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association)



NINDS hosts 2016 Alzheimer's Disease-Related Dementias Summit

Mon, 21 Mar 2016 04:00:00 +0100

(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) March 29-30, 2016, the NIH will host a summit of researchers, scientists and clinicians to discuss the advances and research priorities in the field of Alzheimer's disease-related dementias (ADRDs), in particular updating what progress has been made since the first summit held in May 2013. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)

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Familial early-onset dementia with complex neuropathological phenotype and genomic background

Mon, 21 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Despite significant progress in our understanding of hereditary neurodegenerative diseases, the list of genes associated with early-onset dementia is not yet complete. In the present study we describe a familial neurodegenerative disorder characterized clinically as the behavioral/dysexecutive variant of Alzheimer disease (AD) with neuroradiological features of AD, however lacking Aβ deposits in the brain. Instead we observed a complex, 4 repeat predominant, tauopathy, together with a TDP-43 proteinopathy. (Source: Neurobiology of Aging)



Mitigating effect of chrysin loaded solid lipid nanoparticles against Amyloid β25–35 induced oxidative stress in rat hippocampal region: An efficient formulation approach for Alzheimer's disease

Mon, 21 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent form of dementia. Amyloid-β25–35 (Aβ25–35), a well-established neurotoxicant, is reported to be involved in the etiology of AD. Chrysin (CN) with its wide range of biological activities in terms of reversing the neuronal damage once induced is limited due to its compromised bioavailability. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) on the other hand due to its improved protein stability, avoids proteolytic degradation, as well as sustained release of the incorporated molecules could be widely applied as a drug delivery vehicle. (Source: Neuropeptides)



‘From past to future’ – deciphering the molecular basis of Alzheimer's disease through the pages of the Journal of Neurochemistry

Mon, 21 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

This article is part of the 60th Anniversary special issue. The Journal of Neurochemistry has made significant contributions toward unraveling the molecular, cellular and pathological basis of Alzheimer's disease through its 60 years. This article is part of the 60th Anniversary special issue. (Source: Journal of Neurochemistry)






Biomarkers of aggression in dementia - Gotovac K, Perkovic MN, Pivac N, Borovecki F.

Sun, 20 Mar 2016 19:34:31 +0100

Dementia is a clinical syndrome defined by progressive global impairment of acquired cognitive abilities. It can be caused by a number of underlying conditions. The most common types of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), ... (Source: SafetyLit)

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Overexpression of heat shock factor 1 maintains TAR DNA binding protein 43 solubility via induction of inducible heat shock protein 70 in cultured cells

Sun, 20 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

TAR DNA binding protein 43 (TDP‐43) is a nuclear protein that has been shown to have altered homeostasis in the form of neuronal nuclear and cytoplasmic aggregates in some familial and almost all cases of sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis as well as 51% of frontotemporal lobar degeneration and 57% of Alzheimer's disease cases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs), such as HSP70, recognize misfolded or aggregated proteins and refold, disaggregate, or turn them over and are upregulated by the master transcription factor heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). Here, we explore the effect of HSF1 overexpression on proteotoxic stress‐related alterations in TDP‐43 solubility, proteolytic processing, and cytotoxicity. HSF1 overexpression reduced TDP‐43‐positive puncta concomitantly with upregulating HSP...



Multiple genetic imaging study of the association between cholesterol metabolism and brain functional alterations in individuals with risk factors for Alzheimer's disease.

Sat, 19 Mar 2016 17:51:03 +0100

Authors: Bai F, Yuan Y, Shi Y, Zhang Z Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease. Genes involved in cholesterol metabolism may play a role in the pathological changes of AD. However, the imaging genetics-based endophenotypes derived from polymorphisms in multiple functionally related genes are unclear in individuals with risk factors for AD. Forty-three amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) subjects and 30 healthy controls underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements of brain topological organization. Thirty-three previously suggested tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 12 candidate genes in the cholesterol metabolism pathway were further investigated. A choleste...



Effectiveness of planned teaching program on knowledge regarding Alzheimer's disease among the family members of elderly in a selected urban community at Mangalore.

Sat, 19 Mar 2016 16:49:03 +0100

CONCLUSION: The findings revealed that the planned teaching program is an effective strategy for improving the knowledge of the subjects. PMID: 26985104 [PubMed] (Source: Indian Journal of Psychiatry)



The phenotypical core of Alzheimer-related and nonrelated variants of the corticobasal syndrome: A systematic clinical, neuropsychological, imaging, and biomarker study.

Sat, 19 Mar 2016 16:29:02 +0100

DISCUSSION: CBS is primarily a "motor-plus-aphasia" disease unfolding into AD-related and non-AD-related variants with distinctive cognitive-anatomic patterns. CBS, and notably its "Gerstmann variant", should be included in the new AD "lexicon" and categorized in the evolving diagnostic spectrum of "atypical AD"d. PMID: 26988428 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: The Journal of Alzheimers Association)



Ethical challenges in preclinical Alzheimer's disease observational studies and trials: Results of the Barcelona summit.

Sat, 19 Mar 2016 16:29:02 +0100

Authors: Molinuevo JL, Cami J, Carné X, Carrillo MC, Georges J, Isaac MB, Khachaturian Z, Kim SY, Morris JC, Pasquier F, Ritchie C, Sperling R, Karlawish J Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is among the most significant health care burdens. Disappointing results from clinical trials in late-stage AD persons combined with hopeful results from trials in persons with early-stage suggest that research in the preclinical stage of AD is necessary to define an optimal therapeutic success window. We review the justification for conducting trials in the preclinical stage and highlight novel ethical challenges that arise and are related to determining appropriate risk-benefit ratios and disclosing individuals' biomarker status. We propose that to conduct clinical trials with these participa...

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Quantitative characterization of the interaction space of the mammalian carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II, VII, IX, XII, XIV and their inhibitors, using the proteochemometric approach

Sat, 19 Mar 2016 12:07:13 +0100

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. Using the proteochemometric approach could find remarkable information that can be taken into consideration for designing inhibitors with the ability of selective inhibition of either cytosolic isoforms transmembrane isoforms of carbonic anhydrase (PCM), we ic or anhydrase. (Source: Chemical Biology and Drug Design)



Social representation of Alzheimer's disease for family caregivers: stressful and rewarding

Sat, 19 Mar 2016 00:20:49 +0100

CONCLUSION Due to the importance of topics related to patients' dependence and the personal and emotional consequences of the disease, overload is the main content of the SR of Alzheimer's disease for caregivers, and the understanding of these SR by health professionals should support the planning of interventions addressing this group of individuals.Resumen OBJETIVO Conocer el contenido de la Representación Social (RS) de los familiares cuidadores de pacientes con enfermedad de Alzheimer acerca de la enfermedad. MÉTODO Se llevaron a cabo entrevistas con 26 cuidadores, analizadas por el programa ALCESTE. RESULTADOS El contenido de la RS se estructuró en dos ejes temáticos denominados Cotidiano y Cuidado yConceptos y Repercusiones Médicas y Emocionales . El primer eje trae campos de im...



Spinosin, a C-glycoside flavonoid, enhances cognitive performance and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in mice

Sat, 19 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Publication date: Available online 17 March 2016 Source:Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior Author(s): Younghwan Lee, Se Jin Jeon, Hyung Eun Lee, In Ho Jung, Yeong-Woo Jo, Sunhee Lee, Jae Hoon Cheong, Dae Sik Jang, Jong Hoon Ryu Adult neurogenesis has received much attention due to its potential role in neurological or psychiatric disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, we examined whether spinosin, a C-glycoside flavonoid from the seeds of Zizyphus jujuba var. spinosa, affects cognitive performance and adult hippocampal neurogenesis in normal naïve mice. The subchronic administration of spinosin (5mg/kg) for 14days significantly increased the latency time in the passive avoidance task. Doublecortin and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining revealed that...



Polymorphisms of small ubiquitin-related modifier genes are associated with risk of Alzheimer's disease in Korean: A case-control study

Sat, 19 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Sumoylation regulates transcription factor transactivation, protein-protein interactions, and appropriate subcellular localization of certain proteins. Previous studies have shown that sumoylation of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is associated with decreased levels of amyloid beta (Aβ) proteins, suggesting that sumoylation may play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We investigated the association between polymorphisms of the SUMO genes and the risk of AD. Our study subjects consisted of 144 AD patients and 335 healthy controls without dementia. (Source: Journal of the Neurological Sciences)



Study suggests Alzheimer's lost memories may be recoverable

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 21:51:35 +0100

Intriguing research in mice suggests the disease may not completely destroy memories after all (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)

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Role of Infection in Alzheimer's Ignored, Experts SayRole of Infection in Alzheimer's Ignored, Experts Say

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 19:36:09 +0100

Despite ample evidence dating back decades supporting a heightened clinical emphasis on infection in the etiology of Alzheimer's, this clinical aspect of the disease is largely dismissed, say experts. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)



Light therapy shows promise in activating memories lost due to Alzheimer's

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 16:57:00 +0100

Not yet tested on humans, scientists say the therapy could offer promise for people suffering from early-onset Alzheimer’s. (Source: PsycPORT.com)



I Am My Mother's Chimera. Chances Are, So Are You.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 16:10:26 +0100

For years the concept of a "genetic chimera" -- an individual with two genetically distinct cells lines in his/her body -- has sparked the imagination of writers: from Stephen King to Michael Crichton, from CSI to The Office. The idea that an individual could harbor his/her own twin is creepy and intriguing at the same time. Recent advances in DNA sequencing technology have allowed us to probe much deeper into a person's genome, to the point that today scientists believe that chimerism could be far more common than what we originally thought. Chances are, you could be your own twin. But how surprised would you be if I told you that you are actually far more likely to be your mother's chimera than your unborn sibling's? Before the 1960s, it was believed that the placenta was a perfect ba...



Medical News Today: Implantable capsule shows promise for Alzheimer's prevention

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 15:00:00 +0100

Researchers have created an implantable capsule that produces antibodies that target and destroy beta-amyloid - a protein believed to play a major role in Alzheimer's development. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)

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Health Tip: Alzheimer's Disease Can Interfere With Sleep

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 11:00:00 +0100

How caregiver can help (Source: U.S. News - Health)



The effect of resveratrol on beta amyloid-induced memory impairment involves inhibition of phosphodiesterase-4 related signaling.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 05:56:02 +0100

This study investigated the effect of resveratrol on Aβ1-42-induced cognitive impairment and the participation of PDE4 subtypes related cAMP or cGMP signaling. Mice microinfused with Aβ1-42 into bilateral CA1 subregions displayed learning and memory impairment, as evidenced by reduced memory acquisition and retrieval in the water maze and retention in the passive avoidance tasks; it was also significant that neuroinflammatory and pro-apoptotic factors were increased in Aβ1-42-treated mice. Aβ1-42-treated mice also increased in PDE4A, 4B and 4D expression, and decreased in PKA level. However, PKA inhibitor H89, but not PKG inhibitor KT5823, prevented resveratrol's effects on these parameters. Resveratrol also reversed Aβ1-42-induced decreases in phosphorylated cAMP response-element bin...



Brain alterations in depression.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 04:28:02 +0100

This article describes a number of studies by our research group to find brain structures that may be involved in the symptoms of idiopathic depression, depression in Alzheimer's disease and depression in Parkinson's disease. Until recently, idiopathic depression has generally been related to deficiencies of aminergic systems. In Alzheimer patients we found a strong decrease in the number of neurons in the locus coeruleus and brain noradrenaline concentrations, but in depressed Alzheimer patients we did not find an extra de crease. This is in agreement with the finding that there is no cell loss in the locus coeruleus in idiopathic depression. We did find, however, that the number of corticotropin-releasing hormone-, vasopressin- and oxytocin expressing neurons, the number of corticotropin...

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Coping with genetic burden.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 04:28:02 +0100

Authors: Tibben A Abstract An increasing number of neurodegenerative diseases have been defined at the molecular level in recent years, making it possible to determine precisely the genotype before the onset of symptoms. Pre-symptomatic testing programs are available for Huntington disease (HD), hereditary cerebral haemorrhage with amyloid-Dutch type, inherited cerebral ataxia, myotonic dystrophy, and Alzheimer disease. Although treatment options such as gene therapy have no widespread application until now, and much has to be developed, the use of predictive DNA-diagnostics has become a clinical application for a number of hereditary diseases. For psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia or bipolar disorders, there are indications for localisation of the genetic factors, but cl...



Genes for Alzheimer Dementia.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 04:28:02 +0100

Authors: Theuns J, Van Broeckhoven C Abstract Alzheimer disease (AD), the most common form of dementia in the elderly, is rapidly becoming a major health problem in developed countries where the number of elderly people continuously grows due to improved medical care. Consequently, the number of AD patients is increasing and thus far no effective therapies are available. Clinically the disease can be diagnosed with 90% reliability on the basis of neurological examination, neuropsychological testing and brain imaging techniques. A definite diagnosis, however, requires the post-mortem detection of senile plaques (SPs) and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in the brain. The SPs are extracellular deposits mainly composed of amyloid P (Ap) surrounded by dystrophic neurites. NFT are intrane...



Development and implementation of microsimulation models of neurological conditions.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:03:01 +0100

Authors: Finès P, Garner R, Bancej C, Bernier J, Manuel DG Abstract BACKGROUND: As part of a program of the first National Population Health Study of Neurological Conditions launched in 2009, a series of microsimulation models of neurological conditions (called POHEM-Neurological meta-model) was developed to project health and economic impacts of seven neurological conditions (NCs)-Alzheimer's disease and other dementias, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's disease, traumatic brain injury, and traumatic spinal cord injury-over a 20-year horizon. DATA AND METHODS: The common framework of the seven models allows for dynamic, continuous-time, discrete-event simulation of synthetic large populations in which persons are subject to the risk of developing the N...



Deck of cards and even a GPS tracker to aid Alzheimer's sufferers

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

A BRITISH doctor has revealed the top five gadgets to help sufferers of dementia and Alzheimer's Disease. (Source: Daily Express - Health)



Pyroglutamate-A{beta} Induces Neuronal Membrane Damage [Neurobiology]

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

We report here that Aβ3pE-42 has an enhanced capacity to cause lipid peroxidation in primary cortical mouse neurons compared with the full-length isoform (Aβ(1–42)). In contrast, Aβ(1–42) caused a significant elevation in cytosolic reactive oxygen species, whereas Aβ3pE-42 did not. We also report that Aβ3pE-42 preferentially associates with neuronal membranes and triggers Ca2+ influx that can be partially blocked by the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist MK-801. Aβ3pE-42 further caused a loss of plasma membrane integrity and remained bound to neurons at significantly higher levels than Aβ(1–42) over extended incubations. Pyroglutamate formation was additionally found to increase the relative efficiency of Aβ-dityrosine oligomer formation mediated by copper-redox cycling...

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Kinesin‐1 inhibits the aggregation of amyloid‐β peptide as detected by fluorescence cross‐correlation spectroscopy

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. (Source: FEBS Letters)



Regulation of microtubule assembly by tau and not by Pin1

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Publication date: Available online 18 March 2016 Source:Journal of Molecular Biology Author(s): Steffen Kutter, Timo Eichner, Alexandra M. Deaconescu, Dorothee Kern The molecular mechanism by which the microtubule associated protein tau regulates the formation of microtubules (MTs) is poorly understood. The activity of tau is controlled via phosphorylation at specific Ser/Thr sites. 17 of those phosphorylation sites precede a proline, making them potential recognition sites for the peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1. Pin1 binding and catalysis of phosphorylated tau at the AT180 epitope, implicated in Alzheimer's disease, has been reported to be crucial for restoring tau's ability to promote MT polymerization in vitro and in vivo [1]. Surprisingly, we discover that Pin1 does not promote p...



The meaning of living close to a person with Alzheimer disease

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Abstract Only a few studies explore the lifeworld of the spouses of persons affected by early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this study is to explore the lifeworld of spouses when their partners are diagnosed with AD, focusing on spouses’ lived experience. The study employs an interpretative phenomenological framework. Ten in-depth interviews are performed. The results show that spouses’ lifeworld changes with the diagnosis. They experience an imprisoned existence in which added obligations, fear, and worry keep them trapped at home, both physically and mentally. In their longing for freedom, new strategies and attitudes helps the spouses to create an extended “lived space” with their partner. The findings stress the importance of paying attention to the lifeworl...



Structure, function and disease relevance of Omega-class glutathione transferases.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Authors: Board PG, Menon D Abstract The Omega-class cytosolic glutathione transferases (GSTs) have distinct structural and functional attributes that allow them to perform novel roles unrelated to the functions of other GSTs. Mammalian GSTO1-1 has been found to play a previously unappreciated role in the glutathionylation cycle that is emerging as significant mechanism regulating protein function. GSTO1-1-catalyzed glutathionylation or deglutathionylation of a key signaling protein may explain the requirement for catalytically active GSTO1-1 in LPS-stimulated pro-inflammatory signaling through the TLR4 receptor. The observation that ML175 a specific GSTO1-1 inhibitor can block LPS-stimulated inflammatory signaling has opened a new avenue for the development of novel anti-inflammato...



Inhibition of Aβ(1-40) Fibril Formation by Cyclophilins.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Authors: Villmow M, Baumann M, Malesevic M, Sachs R, Hause G, Fändrich M, Balbach J, Schiene-Fischer C Abstract Cyclophilins directly interact with the Alzheimer peptide Aβ and are therefore involved in the early stages of the Alzheimer disease. Aβ binding to cyclophilin D (CypD) induces dysfunction of human mitochondria. We found that both CypD and CypA suppress in vitro fibril formation of Aβ(1-40) at substoichiometric concentrations when present early during the aggregation process. The prototypic inhibitor cyclosporin A (CsA) of both cyclophilins as well as the new water soluble MM258 derivative prevented this suppression. A SPOT peptide array approach and NMR titration experiments confirmed binding of Aβ(1-40) to the catalytic site of CypD mainly via residues K16-E22. The...

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Evidence to Consider Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers for the Treatment of Early Alzheimer's Disease.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Authors: Saavedra JM Abstract Alzheimer's disease is the most frequent type of dementia and diagnosed late in the progression of the illness when irreversible brain tissue loss has already occurred. For this reason, treatments have been ineffective. It is imperative to find novel therapies ameliorating modifiable risk factors (hypertension, stroke, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and traumatic brain injury) and effective against early pathogenic mechanisms including alterations in cerebral blood flow leading to poor oxygenation and decreased access to nutrients, impaired glucose metabolism, chronic inflammation, and glutamate excitotoxicity. Angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs) fulfill these requirements. ARBs are directly neuroprotective against early injury factors in neuron...



Lymphatic Clearance of the Brain: Perivascular, Paravascular and Significance for Neurodegenerative Diseases.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Authors: Bakker EN, Bacskai BJ, Arbel-Ornath M, Aldea R, Bedussi B, Morris AW, Weller RO, Carare RO Abstract The lymphatic clearance pathways of the brain are different compared to the other organs of the body and have been the subject of heated debates. Drainage of brain extracellular fluids, particularly interstitial fluid (ISF) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), is not only important for volume regulation, but also for removal of waste products such as amyloid beta (Aβ). CSF plays a special role in clinical medicine, as it is available for analysis of biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease. Despite the lack of a complete anatomical and physiological picture of the communications between the subarachnoid space (SAS) and the brain parenchyma, it is often assumed that Aβ is cleared from ...



Leptin Dysfunction and Alzheimer's Disease: Evidence from Cellular, Animal, and Human Studies.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

We present a model where leptin has a bidirectional role in AD. Not only can alterations in leptin levels and function worsen cognitive decline and progression of AD pathology, but AD pathology, in of itself, can disrupt leptin signaling, which together would lead to a downward spiral of progressive neurodegeneration and worsening body weight and systemic metabolic deficits. Collectively, these studies serve as a framework to highlight the importance of understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the body weight and systemic metabolic deficits in AD, which has the potential to open new avenues that may ultimately lead to novel therapeutic targets and diagnostic tools. PMID: 26993509 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology)



Neurovascular and Cognitive failure in Alzheimer's Disease: Benefits of Cardiovascular Therapy.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Authors: Hamel E, Royea J, Ongali B, Tong XK Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a multifactorial and multifaceted disease for which we currently have very little to offer since there is no curative therapy, with only limited disease-modifying drugs. Recent studies in AD mouse models that recapitulate the amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology converge to demonstrate that it is possible to salvage cerebrovascular function with a variety of drugs and, particularly, therapies used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as hypercholesterolemia and hypertension. These drugs can reestablish dilatory function mediated by various endothelial and smooth muscle ion channels as well as nitric oxide availability, benefits that result in normalized brain perfusion. These cerebrovascular benefits would fav...



Detection of Aβ Monomers and Oligomers: Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer's Disease.

Fri, 18 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Authors: Zhou Y, Liu L, Hao Y, Xu M Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD), as the most common progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is pathologically characterized by deposition of extracellular plaque composed of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). Different assembled states of Aβ have been considered as both important biomarkers and drug targets for the diagnosis and therapy of AD. Recent studies demonstrate that small, diffusible Aβ oligomers formed by aggregation of Aβ monomers are the major toxic agents in AD. Therefore, the development of reliable assays for Aβ (both monomers and oligomers) will be important for the early differential diagnosis of dementia, predicting the progression of AD, as well as monitoring the effectiveness of novel anti-Aβ drugs for AD. In this review, we sum...

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Medical Students' Perceptions of Dementia after Participation in Poetry Workshop with People with Dementia.

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 21:06:02 +0100

Conclusion. Medical students' participation in a poetry workshop, with people with ADRD, positively impacts their attitudes. PMID: 26977333 [PubMed] (Source: International Journal of Alzheimers Disease)



Michigan Lead Poisoning Crisis: Is Your Water Safe?

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 20:57:46 +0100

I’ve been watching the crisis in Flint, Michigan, with increasing alarm. The city’s old pipes and fixtures are still leaching lead, poisoning water users and creating a state of emergency. More than 100,000 people are still without safe tap water.  In some cases, the water was found to contain such high levels of lead it’s been classified as “toxic waste.” What is lead poisoning? As you may know, lead is one of the most toxic heavy metals out there. People in Flint can’t drink, cook bathe or brush their teeth with the city’s water without the risk of being poisoned. And while you may have been told Flint is an extreme case, it’s hardly the only one. Lead levels in water have been deemed “unsafe” in other parts of Michig...



Could this implant PREVENT Alzheimer's?

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 20:20:07 +0100

Scientists from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland found the capsule prevents beta amyloid plaques - a key hallmark of the disease - from forming. (Source: the Mail online | Health)



Scientists: Memories lost to Alzheimer's may be recoverable

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 18:26:50 +0100

Stephen FellerCAMBRIDGE, Mass., March 17 (UPI) -- Although memories are thought to be lost in Alzheimer's disease, researchers at MIT suggest in a new study they remain in the brain but cannot be accessed. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)



Is There an Association of Physical Activity with Brain Volume, Behavior, and Day-to-day Functioning? A Cross Sectional Design in Prodromal and Early Huntington Disease

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 16:26:50 +0100

Conclusion Interventions that could delay the onset of an HD motor diagnosis, particularly at a time when people are at their peak earning potential and raising families, may improve functioning and health-related quality of life. Interventions should begin prior to motor diagnosis because there is some evidence that much of the damage the disease causes is done by the time of diagnosis16,74,75. More specific recommendations require prospective, randomized controlled trials of physical activity interventions. There is evidence that metabolic and physiological responses to exercise are altered in HD76 and that intensive exercise might damage muscle tissue77,78, requiring a careful determination of the proper dose of exercise to forestall HD progression. In one study involving aging adults a...

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Medical News Today: 'Lost' memories retrieved in mice with early Alzheimer's

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 16:00:00 +0100

Scientists have used optogenetics to retrieve the memories of mice with early Alzheimer's symptoms, suggesting it may be possible to restore memories in humans with the condition. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)



What Science Tells Us Can Affect Our Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 15:55:00 +0100

Genes and age may present the biggest risks. But here?s what else we know affects dementia risk. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)



What Science Actually Tells Us Can Affect Our Risk Of Alzheimer's Disease

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 15:55:00 +0100

Genes and age may present the biggest risks. But here?s what else we know affects dementia risk. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)



Healthy Heart May Also Mean Healthy Brain

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 15:36:05 +0100

Reuters Health - If you eat right, exercise and take care of your heart, you may also be doing good things for your brain, a U.S. study suggests. Researchers assessed memory, thinking and brain processing speed in more than 1,000 New York City residents and found people did much better on these tests when they had heart-healthy habits like avoiding cigarettes, maintaining a normal weight and keeping blood pressure and cholesterol in check. “Our findings reinforce current recommendations for cardiovascular disease prevention but suggest that they may also promote cognitive health,” lead study author Hannah Gardener, a neurology researcher at the University of Miami Medical School, said by email. At the start of the study, the 1,033 participants were 72 years old on average. They...



Memories 'taken' by Alzheimer's could possibly be retrieved

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 15:30:00 +0100

Conclusion This is a small but intriguing study, not least because of the apparent ability of scientists to pinpoint and label the exact nerve cells involved in the formation of specific memories. The researchers found their technique of brain stimulation using blue light seemed to have dramatic effects on the memory of mice. This suggests the AD mice were able to form memories – and, with the right stimulus, they could also retrieve them. This insight helps researchers build a better understanding of how Alzheimer's disease works and how it affects memory. However, this work may not translate into treatments for people with Alzheimer's disease. As the researchers point out, we already know of some significant differences in the way memory loss and brain degeneration affect mice and ...

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MIT scientists find evidence that Alzheimer’s ‘lost memories’ may one day be recoverable

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 15:25:26 +0100

Memory loss is one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's and heartbreaking for loved ones to watch progress. Gone are the details of a first love or a child's wobbly first steps. The achievements of a distinguished 30-year career. And the tall tales of traveling the globe that once had everyone rolling on the floor with laughter. Scientists had assumed for […] (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)



Memories Retrieved in Mutant "Alzheimer's" Mice

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 15:15:00 +0100

A new study suggests that patients with Alzheimer's disease can still form memories, raising hopes of new treatments -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Source: Scientific American)



An implant to prevent Alzheimer's

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 14:54:47 +0100

In a cutting-edge treatment for Alzheimer's disease, scientists have developed an implantable capsule that can turn the patient's immune system against the disease. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)



Mediterranean diet and treating diabetes and depression in old age may reduce dementia risk

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 11:30:25 +0100

The long 'preclinical' phase including mild cognitive impairment-stage (MCI) in the course of Alzheimer's disease (AD) provide the opportunity for preventive interventions to reduce the risk for conversion to dementia or rather slow disease progression.1 Currently, neither psychopharmacological nor non-pharmacological strategies turned out to prevent patients with MCI from converting to AD. There is increasing evidence that the risk for conversion from MCI to AD could be reduced by modifying life style and consequent treatment of especially the metabolic syndrome. Further, depressive symptoms in old age are frequently associated with cognitive impairment and have been reported as an important risk factor for an early manif...



Promoting multilevel primary prevention of depression and diabetes during midlife may protect against dementia

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 11:22:16 +0100

Three of the 15 major contributors to disease burden in older people are diabetes, major depressive disorder and dementia.1 Diabetes and depression occur before the onset of risk factors for all-cause dementia, Alzheimer disease and vascular dementia.2 Moreover, depression and diabetes have also been shown to have a bidirectional risk effect. While diabetes may increase the risk of depression, the association in the depression-to-diabetes direction is stronger,3 showing that depression frequently occurs before diabetes. The aim of Katon et al's paper is to study the risk for all-cause dementia among persons with diabetes mellitus (DM), depression or both compared with people who had neither illness. Katon et al conducted a population-b...

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Dextromethorphan and quinidine are suitable for off-label short term treatment of agitation in people with Alzhiemer's disease following first-line non-drug approaches

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 11:14:26 +0100

Agitation is a common and clinically important neuropsychiatric symptom in Alzheimer's disease (AD), conferring risk of distress, caregiver burden, mortality and institutionalisation. Non-drug approaches are best practice for first-line treatment.1 In cases warranting pharmacological treatment, options are limited. Atypical antipsychotics are only justified in cases of severe symptoms due to their lack of efficacy and extensive side effects.2 ,3 Innovation in this field is therefore a high priority. Treatment with dextromethorphan and quinidine has been proposed due to their mechanistic antagonism of nicotinic α3β4 receptor and low-affinity N-methyl-D-aspartate … (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))



Women’s verbal memory advantage may mask cognitive decline

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 11:07:46 +0100

Women with amnestic mild cognitive impairment have better verbal memory skills than their male counterparts during the early stages of hippocampal decline. (Source: MedWire News)



Getting Our Corporate-Suites And Boardrooms Ready For Alzheimer's Disease Prevention

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 11:00:00 +0100

How to live with a brain labeled as at-risk of decline and yet still live and be treated as a person? Autonomy ­– the freedom and capacity to self-determine our lives – is among our most cherished ethic, and unique among the many diseases of aging, Alzheimer’s and other dementias as well as cognitive aging execute a relentless frontal assault on our ability to exercise this ethic. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)



We Need To Be More Open About Alzheimer's Disease

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 11:00:00 +0100

How to live with a brain labeled as at-risk of decline and yet still live and be treated as a person? Autonomy ­? the freedom and capacity to self-determine our lives ? is among our most cherished ethic, and unique among the many diseases of aging, Alzheimer?s and other dementias as well as cognitive aging execute a relentless frontal assault on our ability to exercise this ethic. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)



Re-energizing the aging brain

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 09:00:00 +0100

The human brain has a prodigious demand for energy -- 20 to 30% of the body's energy budget. (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)

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Alzheimer’s Society responds to today’s Budget announcement

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 08:19:33 +0100

Jeremy Hughes, Chief Executive of Alzheimer’s Society, said: (Source: Alzheimers Society)



Medical News Today: Verbal memory stronger for women than men in early Alzheimer's

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 07:00:00 +0100

Studies have shown women have better verbal memory than men. Now, new research says this may help women hold on to their verbal memory skills in the early stages of Alzheimer's. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)



Women With Alzheimer's May Keep Verbal Skills Longer Than Men

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 07:00:00 +0100

Title: Women With Alzheimer's May Keep Verbal Skills Longer Than MenCategory: Health NewsCreated: 3/16/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 3/17/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Alzheimer)



Women are at greater risk of Alzheimer's than men due to wiring of the female brain

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 04:38:41 +0100

Scientists in Singapore found a key protein in the brain, myelin, which insulates the brain's wiring, is more severely damaged women with Alzheimer's than men - raising hopes of new drug treatments. (Source: the Mail online | Health)



An implant to prevent Alzheimer's

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 04:00:00 +0100

(Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne) In a cutting-edge treatment for Alzheimer's disease, EPFL scientists have developed an implantable capsule that can turn the patient's immune system against the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)

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Women with possible Alzheimer's not diagnosed as fast as men

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 00:58:28 +0100

(Source: CNN.com - Health)



Mutations in MME cause an autosomal‐recessive Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 2

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

The objective of this study was to identify new causes of Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) disease in patients with autosomal‐recessive (AR) CMT. MethodsTo efficiently identify novel causative genes for AR‐CMT, we analyzed 303 unrelated Japanese patients with CMT using whole‐exome sequencing and extracted recessive variants/genes shared among multiple patients. We performed mutation screening of the newly identified membrane metalloendopeptidase (MME) gene in 354 additional patients with CMT. We clinically, genetically, pathologically, and radiologically examined 10 patients with the MME mutation. ResultsWe identified recessive mutations in MME in 10 patients. The MME gene encodes neprilysin (NEP), which is well known to be one of the most prominent beta‐amyloid (Aβ)‐degrading enzy...



Molecular mechanism of Pin1-tau recognition and catalysis

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Publication date: Available online 17 March 2016 Source:Journal of Molecular Biology Author(s): Timo Eichner, Steffen Kutter, Wladimir Labeikovsky, Vanessa Buosi, Dorothee Kern Human peptidyl-prolyl isomerase (PPIase) Pin1 plays key roles in developmental processes, cell proliferation and neuronal function. Extensive phosphorylation of the microtubule binding protein tau has been implicated in neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's disease. For the past 15years these two players have been the focus of an enormous research effort to unravel the biological relevance of their interplay in health and disease resulting in a series of proposed molecular mechanism of how Pin1 catalysis of tau results in biological phenotypes. Our results presented here refute these mechanisms of Pin1 action. Us...



Label‐noise resistant logistic regression for functional data classification with an application to Alzheimer's disease study

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Summary Alzheimer's disease (AD) is usually diagnosed by clinicians through cognitive and functional performance test with a potential risk of misdiagnosis. Since the progression of AD is known to cause structural changes in the corpus callosum (CC), the CC thickness can be used as a functional covariate in AD classification problem for a diagnosis. However, misclassified class labels negatively impact the classification performance. Motivated by AD–CC association studies, we propose a logistic regression for functional data classification that is robust to misdiagnosis or label noise. Specifically, our logistic regression model is constructed by adopting individual intercepts to functional logistic regression model. This approach enables to indicate which observations are possibly misla...



Animal Models of Vascular Cognitive Impairment and Dementia (VCID).

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Authors: Gooch J, Wilcock DM Abstract Vascular cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) is the most common etiology of dementia in the elderly. Both, vascular and Alzheimer's disease, pathologies work synergistically to create neurodegeneration and cognitive impairments. The main causes of VCID include hemorrhage/microbleed (i.e., hyperhomocysteinemia), cerebral small vessel disease, multi-infarct dementia, severe hypoperfusion (i.e., bilateral common carotid artery stenosis), strategic infarct, angiopathy (i.e., cerebral angiopathy), and hereditary vasculopathy (i.e., cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy). In this review, we will discuss the experimental animal models that have been developed to study these pathologies. We will...

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Study of Exosomes Shed New Light on Physiology of Amyloidogenesis.

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Authors: van Niel G Abstract Accumulation of toxic amyloid oligomers, a key feature in the pathogenesis of amyloid-related diseases, results from an imbalance between generation and clearance of amyloidogenic proteins. Cell biology has brought to light the key roles of multivesicular endosomes (MVEs) and their intraluminal vesicles (ILVs), which can be secreted as exosomes, in amyloid generation and clearance. To better understand these roles, we have investigated a relevant physiological model of amyloid formation in pigment cells. These cells have tuned their endosomes to optimize the formation of functional amyloid fibrils from the premelanosome protein (PMEL) and to avoid potential accumulation of toxic species. The functional amyloids derived from PMEL reveal striking analogie...



Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Acrylamide Derivatives as Direct NLRP3 Inflammasome Inhibitors.

Thu, 17 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

In this study, the synthesis of acrylamide derivatives and their pharmaco-toxicological evaluation as potential inhibitors of NLRP3-dependent events was undertaken. Five hits were identified and evaluated for their efficiency in inhibiting IL-1β release from different macrophage subtypes, including CAPS mutant macrophages. The most attractive hits were tested for their ability to inhibit NLRP3 ATPase activity on human recombinant NLRP3. This screening allowed the identification of 14, 2-(2-chlorobenzyl)-N-(4-sulfamoylphenethyl)acrylamide, which was able to concentration-dependently inhibit NLRP3 ATPase with an IC50 value of 74 μm. The putative binding pose of 14 in the ATPase domain of NLRP3 was also proposed. PMID: 26990578 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: ChemMedChem)



Women may keep verbal memory skills longer than men in the early stages of Alzheimer's

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 23:42:09 +0100

Women may have a better memory for words than men despite evidence of similar levels of shrinkage in areas of the brain that show the earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)



Nerve cell stimulation 'may recall memories' in Alzheimer's patients

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 23:35:16 +0100

Research on mice has shown signs of reversing memory loss by using light to activate cells and help to grow new connectionsMemories banished by Alzheimer’s can in theory be rescued by stimulating nerve cells to grow new connections, a study has shown.The research, conducted in mice, raises the possibility of future treatments that reverse memory loss in early stages of the disease. Scientists used a technique called optogenetics, which uses light to activate cells tagged with a special photo-sensitive protein. Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)



Virtual 3D app helps people make homes more 'dementia-friendly'

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 23:11:58 +0100

Maree McCabe, boss of Alzheimer's Australia Vic created the 'Dementia-Friendly Home' app which comes up with ideas for carers to make their homes more accessible for those with dementia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)

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Alzheimer's could be detected in middle age before symptoms appear 

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 22:52:15 +0100

The researchers, from Ruhr University, Germany, claim their test can identify the proteins involved with the disease as they seep into the bloodstream. (Source: the Mail online | Health)



Women with Alzheimer's may keep verbal skills longer than men

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 22:43:09 +0100

HealthDay News In the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, women tend to remember words better than men do, which could delay diagnosis in women, new research suggests. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)



Verbal Skills of Women With Alzheimer's

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 22:16:57 +0100

Gender difference could slow diagnosis in women, researchers say (Source: WebMD Health)



Women May Keep Verbal Memory Skills Longer than Men in the Early Stages of Alzheimer's

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 21:00:51 +0100

RELEASE ISSUED BY: American Academy of Neurology (Source: Einstein News)



Memories ‘Lost’ To Alzheimer’s Can Be Recovered, MIT Study Suggests

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 20:33:01 +0100

CAMBRIDGE (CBS) – Researchers at MIT may have made an important breakthrough in the fight against Alzheimer’s Disease. The school announced Wednesday that it may be possible to retrieve recent memories of Alzheimer’s patients that were thought to have been “lost” to the disease. Neuroscientists reached that conclusion after extensive tests on mice that have been genetically modified to develop Alzheimer’s symptoms. First, the Alzheimer’s mice were put in a chamber with normal mice and all received a foot shock. When the mice were put back in the chamber a few days later, only the normal mice demonstrated fear while the Alzheimer’s mice didn’t seem to remember the shock. But when scientists shined light on the specific brain cells that encode the unsettling event, the...

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Women With Alzheimer's May Keep Verbal Skills Longer Than Men

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 20:00:00 +0100

Gender difference could slow diagnosis in women, researchers say (Source: U.S. News - Health)



Women with Alzheimer's May Keep Verbal Skills Longer Than Men

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 20:00:00 +0100

Gender difference could slow diagnosis in women, researchers say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Alzheimer's Disease, Women's Health (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)



Flipping a light switch recovers memories lost to Alzheimer's disease mice

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 18:04:19 +0100

Light stimulation of brain cells can recover memories in mice with Alzheimer's disease-like memory loss, according to new research. The rescue of memories, which changed both the structure of neurons as well as the behavior of mice, was achieved using optogenetics, a method for manipulating genetically tagged cells with precise bursts of light. This finding suggests that impaired retrieval of memories, rather than poor storage or encoding, may underlie this prominent symptom of early Alzheimer's disease and points to the synaptic connectivity between memory cells as being crucial for retrieval. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)



Memories wiped by Alzheimer's could be revived, research suggests

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 18:00:04 +0100

Lost memories could be retrieved by shining a light on damaged brain cells, scientists at MIT find (Source: Telegraph Health)



Women With Alzheimer's May Keep Verbal Skills Longer Than Men

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 16:03:19 +0100

WEDNESDAY, March 16, 2016 -- In the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, women tend to remember words better than men do, which could delay diagnosis in women, new research suggests. The difference exists even though women and men have similar... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)

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The Red Hot Debate about Transmissible Alzheimer's

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 14:30:00 +0100

A controversial study has suggested that the neurodegenerative disease might be transferred from one person to another. Now scientists are racing to find out whether that is true -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com (Source: Scientific American)






Blood test could diagnose Alzheimer's disease in the middle-aged

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 10:22:59 +0100

There is at present no drug capable of stopping the physical onslaught of dementia (Source: Telegraph Health)



Effect of Organic Solvent Composition on Dissociation Constants of Some Reversible Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitors

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 09:34:50 +0100

In this study, dissociation constant values (pKa) of some reversible acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine and galantamine) having different functional groups were determined in different percentages of acetonitrile (MeCN)-water and methanol (MeOH)-water binary mixtures using reversed phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) method. In this way, a complete description of the retention behavior of each solute in the space defined by the pH and organic modifier percentages variables was obtained. The linear relationships established between retention factors of the species and the polarity parameter of the mobile phase (ETN) was proved to predict accurately retention in liquid chromatography (LC) as a function of the acetonitrile and methanol content. In result, the estimated aq...



The care in Alzheimer's disease: social representations of family caregivers

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 05:20:41 +0100

This study deals with the representations of family caregivers of seniors with Alzheimer considering care under the light of the Social Representations Theory. It aims to observe and identify the represen tations of family caregivers about care and analyze how they influence their care practices. This study is exploratory, empirical, quantitative and qualita tive, using as a method of research the Discourse of the Collective Subject. Participants were 21 family caregivers of seniors with Alzheimer, 24% men and 76% women, aged 32-69 years. About the support of the family, 57% of them reported having help from relatives in caring for the elderly and 42% did not have any help. About the income, 24% said it was comfortable, 63% said it was reasonable. About the help of professionals, 63% said ...

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Genetic risk factors for the posterior cortical atrophy variant of Alzheimer's disease

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Discussion We provide evidence for genetic risk factors specifically related to PCA. We identify three candidate loci that, if replicated, may provide insights into selective vulnerability and phenotypic diversity in AD. (Source: Alzheimer's and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association)



Alzheimer disease is in part a thrombohemorrhagic disorder

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

(Source: Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis)



A systematic literature review on nurses’ and health care support workers’ experiences of caring for people with dementia on orthopaedic wards

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

ConclusionIt would be an over‐simplification to say that the care of people with dementia on medical wards is the same as the care of trauma patients with dementia. Therefore, there is a need for a study to explore nurses’ and health care worker's experiences of caring for trauma patients with dementia on orthopaedic wards. Relevance to clinical practiceThe results of this study could provide guidance on the effective care of people with dementia on orthopaedic wards. (Source: Journal of Clinical Nursing)



The red-hot debate about transmissible Alzheimer's

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Nature 531, 7594 (2016). http://www.nature.com/doifinder/10.1038/531294a Author: Alison Abbott A controversial study has suggested that the neurodegenerative disease might be transferred from one person to another. Now scientists are racing to find out whether that is true. (Source: Nature)



Alzheimer's disease: Lost memories found

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Nature advance online publication 16 March 2016. doi:10.1038/nature17312 Authors: Prerana Shrestha & Eric Klann Enhancing synaptic connections between neurons in the brain's hippocampus that are normally activated during memory formation rescues memory deficits in a mouse model of early Alzheimer's disease. (Source: Nature AOP)

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Is Nitric Oxide Assuming a Janus-Face in The Central Nervous System?

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

Authors: Felicity O, Louis S, Gazit E, de Mel A Abstract Nitric Oxide, synthesized from L-arginine by the nitric oxide synthases, has a complex role within the human body. It contributes to almost every physiological system and has been found to be both protective and toxic in disease states. An aging population faces an increasing incidence of neurodegenerative disease and the pathological action of nitric oxide in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease may be an important therapeutic target for the future. Nitric oxide's protective effects are also important to consider, through inhibition of caspase-3, nitrosylation of NMDA and increased activation of protein kinase B and CREB transcription factor. Nitric oxide has been shown to play a part in long term potentiation, revealing its ...



The High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1) Transcriptome in Cancer & Development.

Wed, 16 Mar 2016 00:00:00 +0100

CONCLUSIONS: Further elucidation of HMGA1 function should lead to novel therapeutic strategies for cancer and possibly for other diseases associated with aberrant HMGA1 expression. PMID: 26980699 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher] (Source: Current Molecular Medicine)