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We Make Money Not Art





Last Build Date: Mon, 15 Jan 2018 17:30:27 +0000

 



Inside Private Prisons. An American Dilemma in the Age of Mass Incarceration

Mon, 15 Jan 2018 17:30:27 +0000

Based on Lauren-Brooke Eisen’s work as a prosecutor, journalist, and attorney at policy think tanks, Inside Private Prisons blends investigative reportage and quantitative and historical research to analyze privatized corrections in America



Artissima 2017: Butts, superheroes and flaccid guns

Tue, 09 Jan 2018 14:48:09 +0000

Part 2 of my cursory review of the Artissima art fair which took place in Turin back in early November. Yesterday, i talked photos, today will be a rapid fire of paintings, drawings, installations, etc. In no particular order and with as little commentary as possible



Artissima 2017: A quick run through some of my favourite photo works

Mon, 08 Jan 2018 15:02:20 +0000

I don’t normally write about art fairs but Artissima usually introduces me to so many new ideas, artists and way of representing the world that i can’t resist sharing some of the images of the event on the blog



SOS Brutalism. A Global Survey

Wed, 03 Jan 2018 14:00:47 +0000

Some 100 contributors document around 120 key buildings from this period, including many previously unpublished discoveries that are in acute danger of loss through neglect of intended demolition. Moreover, the book features overviews of brutalism in architecture in twelve regions around the world



Lyon Biennale. Floating Worlds: an ambivalent review

Thu, 28 Dec 2017 14:58:32 +0000

I was expecting the curator's ideas of transience, instability and uncertainties to be translated into powerful works that directly engage with some of today’s most pressing and depressing concerns. I got very little of that. I got plenty of clouds (including a couple of atomic ones), foam, puddles, waves and fountains though. Fortunately, the biennale also features a surprisingly high number of sound works, extraordinary visual and emotional experiences and, here and there, a couple of more politically-minded artworks



Gambiologia magazine: “The gambiarra movement”

Thu, 21 Dec 2017 15:12:37 +0000

Gambiologia is the Brazilian art and science of kludging. Someone with gambiarrá displays a cunning ability to improvise, kludge, hack and make do with whatever is available. Gambiologia, however, is far more than a demonstration of one’s own resourcefulness, it is also a political and ethical gesture. It questions industrial processes and mechanisms, rejects consumerism and postulates the need for greater autonomy



Public Space? Lost and Found

Mon, 18 Dec 2017 16:47:23 +0000

Public Space? Lost and Found considers the role of aesthetic practices within the construction, identification, and critique of shared territories, and how artists or architects—the “antennae of the race”—can heighten our awareness of rapidly changing formulations of public space in the age of digital media, vast ecological crises, and civic uprisings



Exploitation Forensics. Interview with Vladan Joler

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 16:24:14 +0000

Exploitation Forensics is a collection of maps and documents created as a result of investigations conducted in the last few years by the SHARE Lab. The maps will help visitors explore the invisible layers of contemporary technological black boxes and their fractal supply chains, exposing various forms of hidden labour and the exploitation of material resources and data



Using respiration to mine crypto-currencies

Tue, 05 Dec 2017 15:58:26 +0000

Breath (BRH) explores how the body can perform the computational process of mining crypto-currencies by converting lung exhalation into a computer’s hashing rate. The velocity of human exhalation determines the hashing rate of a small micro computer that is mining on the XMR (monero) blockchain



IDFA DocLab: my favourite interactive documentaries

Mon, 04 Dec 2017 16:55:11 +0000

As usual, this year’s program was packed with dramatic commissions and entertaining debates but it was also anchored in today’s most pressing concerns: the plight of refugees in Europe, the legacies of colonialism, the plague of fake news, violation of human rights, climate change, etc.



Links for 2017-03-31 [del.icio.us]

Sat, 01 Apr 2017 00:00:00 PDT

  • Global Inequality in Your Pocket: How Cheap Smartphones and Lax Policies Leave Us Vulnerable to Hacking - Global Voices Advocacy
    As a result, wealthier users who can afford to purchase new high-end devices every few years are protected from many threats that the majority of users — who use cheaper or used models, and don’t replace them as often — are vulnerable to. This means that the people who can least afford it are the most vulnerable to fraud, identity theft, predatory scams, cyberstalking and harassment, and other harms a person can suffer when their digital privacy is violated.
  • Space Sex Is Serious Business | FiveThirtyEight
    The research on reproduction in space has been slow and underfunded. It’s happened in fits and starts over the course of 50 years. All told, at least five species — from amoebas to rats — have gone through the, er, act of reproduction while in orbit.1 Other species have spent part of their gestation in space or donated their space-altered sperm and eggs to science.
  • Sponsored: 64% off Code Black Drone with HD Camera
    Our #1 Best-Selling Drone--Meet the Dark Night of the Sky!
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Links for 2017-03-30 [del.icio.us]

Fri, 31 Mar 2017 00:00:00 PDT

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Links for 2017-03-29 [del.icio.us]

Thu, 30 Mar 2017 00:00:00 PDT

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Links for 2017-03-28 [del.icio.us]

Wed, 29 Mar 2017 00:00:00 PDT

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Links for 2017-03-27 [del.icio.us]

Tue, 28 Mar 2017 00:00:00 PDT

  • Bacteria, Methane, and Other Dangers Within Siberia’s Melting Permafrost | WIRED
    For hundreds of thousands of years, the Siberian permafrost has been a giant freezer for everything buried within it. But global warming has put the frozen ground in defrost mode, and the tundra is now heating up twice as fast as the rest of the planet. “Permafrost is a silent ticking time bomb,” says Robert Spencer, an environmental scientist at Florida State University. As it thaws, the dirt could release a litany of horrors. Beware: The ice-beasts cometh.
  • Trump Presidency “opens door” to planet-hacking geoengineer experiments | Environment | The Guardian
    scientists have warned it could have catastrophic consequences for the Earth’s weather systems. Scientific modelling has shown that stratospheric spraying could drastically curtail rainfall throughout Asia, Africa and South America, causing severe droughts and threatening food supply for billions of people. “Clearly parts of the Trump administration are very willing to open the door to reckless schemes like David Keith’s, and may well have quietly given the nod to open-air experiments,” said Silvia Riberio, with technology watchdog ETC Group. “Worryingly, geoengineering may emerge as this administration’s preferred approach to global warming. In their view, building a big beautiful wall of sulphate in the sky could be a perfect excuse to allow uncontrolled fossil fuel extraction. We need to be focussing on radical emissions cuts, not dangerous and unjust technofixes.”
  • Photographs from the World’s Largest Human Decomposition Center
    For his series The Washing Away of Wrongs, Robert Shults photographed the forensic research of the world’s largest center for studying human remains at Texas State University.
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Links for 2017-03-26 [del.icio.us]

Mon, 27 Mar 2017 00:00:00 PDT

  • En Écosse, des employés d'Amazon en sont réduits à dormir sous des tentes pour pouvoir travailler
    Au contraire, les porte-parole de la boîte sont même enthousiastes sur les conditions de travail imposées à leurs employés. "Pendant le Black Friday [jour où le plus grand nombre de commandes est enregistré, ndlr], nous avons organisé des tombolas gratuites. Il faut que les employés s'amusent", s'est ainsi réjoui Paul Ashraf, manager général des opérations pour Amazon au Royaume-Uni. Un discours paternaliste digne du XIXe siècle et à mille lieues des réalités du quotidien des entrepôts.
  • 'We've left junk everywhere': why space pollution could be humanity's next big problem | Science | The Guardian
    While estimations vary, there are about 4,000 active and inactive satellites in space. They are at risk of being hit by the approximately half a million bits of floating space debris, ranging in size from micro-millimetres to two double-decker buses. “What everyone is realising is this is a growing problem, though nobody gave a shit in the early days of space exploration,” Held says.
  • Artificial Intelligence: The Park Rangers of the Anthropocene - The Atlantic
    In an intriguing thought experiment, landscape architect Bradley Cantrell, historian Laura Martin, and ecologist Erle Ellis have taken this ethos to its logical extreme, and ended up with what they call a “wildness creator”—a hypothetical artificial intelligence that would autonomously protect wild spaces. We’d create it, obviously, but then let it go, so it would develop its own strategies for protecting nature.
  • Should a human-pig chimera be treated as a person?
    “These concerns about chimeric research add to the already potent ethical issues associated with mainstream invasive animal research. Tens of millions of animals are sickened, injured, genetically manipulated, and killed in biomedical labs every year, even as a robust body of evidence shows that some animals are more self-aware and emotionally and cognitively complex than we previously thought. That leads to the inescapable conclusion that we have already crossed a number of moral lines.”
  • Dyslexia in Chinese: Disability of a different character | The Economist
    Until recently it was assumed that dyslexia had a universal biological origin, whatever language a person was reading. But being dyslexic in Chinese is not the same as being dyslexic in English, according to Wai Ting Siok of Hong Kong University. Her team's MRI studies showed that dyslexia among users of alphabetic scripts such as English and of logographic ones such as Chinese was associated with different parts of the brain, just as different parts of the brain were involved in reading the two types of language.
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Links for 2017-03-25 [del.icio.us]

Sun, 26 Mar 2017 00:00:00 PDT

  • FCJ 28: Creative Robotics
    The Creative Robotics issue wants to wrestle with the figure of the robot as a historically and culturally constructed sociomaterial assemblage and with how it enacts a number of political, social and aesthetic questions
  • The world if robots take our jobs - YouTube
    Computers are taking on increasingly sophisticated tasks, a trend which will cost many people their jobs. With so much automation to come, how many humans will still be needed?
  • Going for gold: Conflict Minerals at Arts Catalyst - review | The Independent
    Greenland also happens to be home to colossal reserves of rare minerals, and more people believe Greenland’s route to full independence could lie in the extraction of huge quantities of uranium and rare earth metals. Mining companies from countries as distant as Australia and China are only too ready to help Greenland shake off its colonial past.
  • When Fingerprints Are as Easy to Steal as Passwords: The Case for New Biometrics - The Atlantic
    As hackers learn to imitate the body's unique features, scientists might turn to brainwaves and genomics to verify people's identities.
  • Encountering the other mind: How AI will shift our design process, and in turn, our cities — Freunde von Freunden
    The questions of who is included and who is excluded from the wealth arise and the world may become more divided because people who qualify as “citizens” will enforce protection of a native basic income system. So perhaps unless UBI works everywhere at once it could help make global divisions between the rich and the poor even worse.
  • Field Report on an Artist and Her Pigs
    Tin Nyo, rather than forcing judgment, is forcing an engagement with the wages of survival against the desire for pleasure, and our unwillingness to tease them apart — just as we incorporate our iPhones into every corner of our lives while the conditions under which their materials are mined and manufactured remain background noise at best.
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