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Science | The Guardian



Latest Science news, comment and analysis from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice



Published: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 14:27:57 GMT2017-06-22T14:27:57Z

Copyright: Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2017
 



Hill fort hotspots in UK and Ireland mapped for first time in online atlas

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 23:01:21 GMT2017-06-21T23:01:21Z

Scotland is home to majority of 4,000 sites on database – but many are not on hills and are not really forts, say researchers

Some soar out of the landscape and have impressed tourists and inspired historians and artists for centuries, while others are tiny gems, tucked away on mountain or moor and are rarely visited.

Related: First world war training tunnels and trenches discovered in Wiltshire

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Manchester gets UK's first high-energy proton beam cancer therapy machine

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 13:18:45 GMT2017-06-22T13:18:45Z

Ninety-tonne cyclotron at Christie hospital will give NHS patients access to treatment that is currently only available abroad

A 90-tonne machine that will allow cancer patients to receive state-of-the-art high-energy proton beam therapy on the NHS for the first time is to be installed at a hospital in Manchester.

The cyclotron delivers a special type of radiotherapy currently only available overseas. The NHS has been paying for patients to travel abroad for the treatment since 2008.

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Millions of mysterious 'sea pickles' swamp US west coast

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 01:30:37 GMT2017-06-22T01:30:37Z

Huge and unexplained bloom has fishers racing to save their nets, and scientists hurrying to study the rare animal

A rare, tiny marine creature known as the “unicorn of the sea” has swarmed in its millions on the west coast of America, ruining fishermen’s nets and baffling scientists who are scrambling to find out more about them.

Fishers along the west coast have told researchers that in some places they are unable to catch anything because the pyrosome clusters are so dense and tightly packed. Their hooks, when pulled from the ocean, wriggle with the odd-looking creatures, which are sometimes referred to as “sea pickles” or “fire bodies”.

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Archaeologists unearth prehistoric ritual area around Bryn Celli Ddu

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 12:39:29 GMT2017-06-21T12:39:29Z

Previously unknown Anglesey landscape possibly includes cairn cemetery in what experts described as ‘really exciting stuff’

Archaeologists have uncovered a prehistoric ritual landscape that possibly includes a cairn cemetery around a 5,000-year-old burial mound aligned with the summer solstice sun on Anglesey.

Though far less famous than Stonehenge, the spectacle of sunlight shining down a long narrow passage to light up the inner chamber of Bryn Celli Ddu on the longest day of the year is unforgettable. Excavation now suggests the site had significance for prehistoric people that lasted for millennia after the earth mound was raised over a stone passage grave.

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Out with the old: new treatment on cell ageing process – Science Weekly podcast

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 14:43:57 GMT2017-06-21T14:43:57Z

Ian Sample explores research on cellular senescence and the role this therapeutic approach can play in age-related diseases and health issues

Subscribe & Review on iTunes, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

In 1965, Professor Leonard Hayflick published a landmark paper describing a process that limited the proliferation – or growth – of normal human cells in culture. Linking this effect to both tumour suppression and ageing, the exact mechanism of what came to be known as cellular senescence was still unknown. Fast forward half a century and cellular senescence is taking centre stage as a promising therapeutic approach for treatment of age-related pathologies. But what have we uncovered about how this senescence happens in cells? And how might we harness this knowledge for the treatment of an ever-ageing population?

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Rocking and rolling: how to stop luggage toppling on the race through the airport

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 06:01:22 GMT2017-06-21T06:01:22Z

Scientists in Paris come up with unexpected answer to the age-old problem of running to the departure gate with a two-wheeled suitcase

Half a century after the American businessman Bernard D Sadow shocked travellers with the invention of “rolling luggage”, scientists have worked out why suitcases tend to to rock violently from one wheel to the other until they overturn on the race through the airport.

This most pressing of modern mysteries was taken on by physicists in Paris, who devised a scale model of a two-wheeled suitcase rolling on a treadmill and backed up their observations with a pile of equations and references to holonomic restraints, finite perturbations and the morphing of bifurcation diagrams.

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The geeks are inherent at birth: older men have geekier sons, study finds

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 14:01:01 GMT2017-06-20T14:01:01Z

Researchers claim boys born to older fathers score higher on a scientifically devised ‘geek index’, which takes in non-verbal IQ and social aloofness

Older men tend to have “geekier” sons who are more aloof, have higher IQs and a more intense focus on their interests than those born to younger fathers, researchers claim.

The finding, which emerged from a study of nearly 8,000 British twins, suggests that having an older father may benefit children and boost their performance in technical subjects at secondary school.

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Nasa's Kepler telescope finds 10 Earth-like planets: 'We are not alone'

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 03:40:22 GMT2017-06-20T03:40:22Z

Rocky worlds discovered by Kepler telescope are right distance from their parent stars for water to pool on the surface

Astronomers have added 219 candidates to the growing list of planets beyond our solar system, 10 of which may be about the same size and temperature as Earth, boosting their chances of hosting life.

Scientists found the candidates in a final batch of Nasa’s Kepler Space Telescope observations of 200,000 sample stars in the constellation Cygnus.

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Summer solstice: the perfect day to bask in a dazzling scientific feat

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 12:34:47 GMT2017-06-20T12:34:47Z

Wednesday is the longest day of the northern hemisphere’s year – but few realise that it also marks a monumental achievement in rational thinking

If you live in the northern hemisphere, Wednesday is the summer solstice – the longest day of the year. In London, the sun will rise at 04:43 and then creep across the sky for 16 hours, 38 minutes and 18 seconds before setting at 21:21. For some cultures, the solstice is seen as the beginning of the summer, while others think of it more as midsummer. It is marked with celebrations across the northern hemisphere, most famously at Stonehenge.

Traditionally, such revels were conducted in skyclad fashion. But these days turning up starkers at an English heritage site is probably not the best course of action. Not that I object to the odd bit of pagan revelry, but for me the summer solstice is the anniversary of one of the greatest achievements of the human mind: it marks the day we first calculated the size of the Earth.

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Life won't find a way: how an ostrich fossil halted plans for a real-life Jurassic Park | Elsa Panciroli

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 07:00:24 GMT2017-06-21T07:00:24Z

Despite dinosaurs having met extinction long ago, our dreams of reviving them refuse to die. Recent events imply we may have to settle for resurrecting poultry

There are some ideas that just won’t die. Like the villain in a movie, even when they’ve been shot with the bullets of refutation, scalded by heated discourse, and pushed off into the pool of disproven theories, these ideas still claw their way back, bedraggled and screaming, to attack us one more time.

If there is one idea in palaeontology that typifies this tiresome cycle, it is the resurrection of the dinosaurs. “Can we ever bring them back?” it is so often asked. Despite scientists repeatedly saying no, the question lives on. This is due in part to the rehashing of a handful of studies that seemed for a moment to offer promise of a real-life Jurassic Park, but have all been shown to be flawed.

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Africats to the Purr-ymids: DNA study reveals long tale of cat domestication

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 17:06:30 GMT2017-06-19T17:06:30Z

Study of ancient genetic material from Egypt to Viking graveyards reveals all tamed cats descended from one rodent-catching African subspecies first tamed by Near East farmers 9,000 years ago

The untold story of how cats came in from the wild to commandeer the finest armchairs and win over the internet has been laid bare by a comprehensive analysis of ancient feline DNA.

Drawing on genetic material from mummified cats in Egypt, and remains from Viking graveyards and stone age sites, researchers pieced together how cats first came to live with humans and ultimately spread around the world as their companions.

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Dust on desert winds reduces air pollution

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 20:30:11 GMT2017-06-20T20:30:11Z

Study of Gobi sand blowing over east China finds air stagnates and human-made pollution rises when dusty winds die down

People in China breathe more easily when dust-laden winds blow in from the Gobi desert. Paradoxical as it sounds, desert dust helps to keep human-made pollution down, a new study shows.

Air pollution is a big issue in China, with hundreds of millions of people suffering from respiratory problems. An estimated 1.6 million deaths (17% of mortalities) a year are attributed to China’s dirty air.

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Life on Mars: Elon Musk reveals details of his colonisation vision

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 11:42:00 GMT2017-06-16T11:42:00Z

SpaceX entrepreneur outlines his plan to make humans a multi-planetary species, including an ‘intentionally fuzzy’ 10-year timeframe

As far as home planets go, the Earth ticks most of the boxes: oxygen, water, food and lovely views. But there are risks to be considered too. What if a nuclear war, an asteroid collision or a rogue AI sent it all up in smoke, blotting out our own fragile existence?

Luckily, Elon Musk is one step ahead and last year outlined his ambition to send humans to Mars as a “backup drive” for civilisation. Now, the billionaire entrepreneur has provided further details of his vision to make humans a multi-planetary species in a breezy paper, published in the appropriately-titled journal New Space.

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Prostate cancer blood test could transform treatment, say scientists

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 23:01:19 GMT2017-06-18T23:01:19Z

Three-in-one test reveals which men with advanced cancer are suitable for treatment with ‘precision’ drug olaparib

Scientists have developed a simple three-in-one blood test they believe could transform treatment of advanced prostate cancer, helping to extend or save lives.

The test, developed by researchers at the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) in London and the Royal Marsden NHS foundation trust, picks out men suitable for treatment with olaparib, part of a revolutionary class of drugs called “PARP-inhibitors”, which stops damaged cells from repairing themselves.

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Scientists make quantum leap towards a secure new kind of internet

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 18:00:46 GMT2017-06-15T18:00:46Z

A global quantum internet is a major step closer as satellite beams ‘entangled’ light particles to ground stations more than 700 miles apart

Scientists have taken a major step towards building a global quantum internet by beaming “entangled” particles of light from a satellite to ground stations more than 700 miles apart.

The feat paves the way for a new kind of internet which draws on the curious ability for subatomic particles to be connected to one another despite being far apart and even on opposite sides of the planet.

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Did you solve it? Pythagoras's best puzzles

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 16:00:40 GMT2017-06-19T16:00:40Z

The solutions to today’s puzzles

In my blog earlier today I set you the following three problems from Pythagoras Magazine.

1) Dollar bills. In a bag are 26 bills. If you take out 20 bills from the bag at random, you have at least one 1-dollar bill, two 2-dollar bills, and five 5-dollar bills. How much money was in the bag?

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Nazneen Rahman: ‘Science and music are mediums in which I create’

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 07:30:01 GMT2017-06-18T07:30:01Z

The scientist at the Institute of Cancer Research – and a singer-songwriter with two albums – reflects on her two loves and motivating forces

I’ve had an exciting and unusual few weeks. My group published a scientific paper revealing a new genetic cause of a childhood kidney cancer called Wilms’ tumour. This discovery has been of immediate benefit to families, providing an explanation for why their child got cancer, and information about cancer risks for other family members. During the same period, I also released my second album of original songs, called Answers No Questions. On one day, I found myself singing live on Radio London in the morning and talking genetics to the World Service in the evening.

Over the past few weeks, I have found it increasingly difficult to know quite how to answer the ubiquitous question – what do you do?

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'We're sort of her mum': behind the scenes at Taronga zoo | photo-essay

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 19:00:15 GMT2017-06-18T19:00:15Z

We join the keepers at Sydney’s Taronga zoo as they nurture and train their newest arrivals, including Maiya the red panda and Kamini the pygmy hippo. A photo-essay by Jonny Weeks

Lily and Blossom are about to be toilet trained at Taronga zoo. The two young sugar gliders are curled up together inside a wooden box within a staff bathroom while trainer Suzie Lemon is trying to coax them out with the promise of a sugary, sap-like treat. Lily eventually emerges and promptly pees all over the floor but Lemon doesn’t seem to mind. After all, they’re not here for that kind of toilet training.

“We’re training them to glide over to us on cue to demonstrate their natural gliding behaviour,” Lemon explains. “We needed an enclosed space, somewhere with four solid walls, because in future they’re going to be doing this for education purposes in the new learning centre.

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Lab notes: a quantum leap and life on Mars – the week science went sci-fi

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 15:29:28 GMT2017-06-16T15:29:28Z

The sensible thing to do is calm down, figure out how to take care of planet Earth and all be a bit better about not making ourselves extinct. But who cares about sensible: Elon Musk has revealed the details (well, let’s call them that) of his colonisation vision for Mars, including an “intentionally fuzzy” 10-year timeframe for flights. So once you’ve got yourself all signed up, to prepare for the trip you’ll need a tan, right? You’ll be a long way from any salons, and indeed the sun, so what about using a newly-created tanning chemical? It causes the release of dark pigment in skin, creating a real ‘fake’ tan without the need for sunbathing, so for Earthlings that also means it should protect against skin cancer. It won’t be commercially available for a while, but by the time it is, you could be Googling the cheapest place to buy it via the quantum internet. Scientists this week made a huge leap towards a new, secure type of internet by using a satellite to beam “entangled” light particles to ground stations more than 700 miles apart. For the present, however, we have more weighty problems to consider, overweight and obesity being chief among them. This week experts have warned that being overweight – not just obese – kills millions a year and a major Swedish study has concluded that women who are obese when they conceive are more likely to have babies with serious birth defects. On a happier note, men most at risk of testicular cancer could be identified using newly discovered group of genes. So that’s something.

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Face value: the science of first impressions – Science Weekly podcast

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 10:29:57 GMT2017-06-16T10:29:57Z

Hannah Devlin delves into the world of human faces and asks: how does the brain process them? And how do faces affect our ideas about people?

Subscribe & Review on iTunes, Soundcloud, Audioboom, Mixcloud & Acast, and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter

Roman statesman Marcus Cicero once called the face “a picture of the mind with the eyes as its interpreter.” In the centuries since, humanity’s obsession with the clues hidden in our faces has grown. Once the preserve of mystics, the human face has now come under the scrutiny of scientific examination. We are now closer to understanding how our minds process a seemingly infinite array of face types, and what – if anything – faces can tell us about the people behind them.

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Obese women more likely to have babies with serious birth defects, says study

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 05:01:31 GMT2017-06-15T05:01:31Z

Increased risk of health problems including heart defects, digestive anomalies and malformations of genitals or limbs revealed by major study

Women who are obese when they conceive are more likely to have a baby with serious birth defects, a major study has found.

The research revealed a sliding scale of risk for health problems including congenital heart defects, anomalies of the digestive system and malformations of genital organs or limbs.

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Meet the chef who’s debunking detox, diets and wellness

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 10:00:04 GMT2017-06-18T10:00:04Z

Anthony Warner – alias blogger turned author the Angry Chef – is on a mission to confront the ‘alternative facts’ surrounding nutritional fads and myths

A few minutes into my encounter with the Angry Chef, I begin to wonder if his moniker might be ironic, like the big guy whose friends call him “Tiny”. On the basis of his excoriating blog – which exposes “lies, pretensions and stupidity in the world of food” – I had been expecting a bilious, splenetic man with wild eyes, his skin covered in tattoos. Instead, I’m sat across from a mild-mannered nerdy type with a tidy beard and black-framed spectacles. Unlike his writing, which is showered with profanities, he hasn’t sworn once. In fact, he picks his words very deliberately, as if there’s a legal and fact-checking team working overtime in his brain.

“I expected you to be a bit more … furious,” I finally say. “Do you have a temper?”

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Inside the rehab saving young men from their internet addiction

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 09:00:05 GMT2017-06-16T09:00:05Z

At a cabin in the Washington state woods, the reSTART center helps residents withdraw from technology that has consumed their lives

By the time Marshall Carpenter’s father broke down the barricaded door of his son’s apartment and physically ripped him away from his electronic devices, the 25-year-old was in a bad way. He could not bear to live a life that didn’t involve hours upon hours of uninterrupted screen time.

“I was playing video games 14 or 15 hours a day, I had Netflix on a loop in the background, and any time there was the tiniest break in any of that, I would be playing a game on my phone or sending lonely texts to ex-girlfriends,” Carpenter says.

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Cassava crisis: the deadly food that doubles as a vital Venezuelan crop

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 06:00:29 GMT2017-06-22T06:00:29Z

It is a plant that millions depend on for survival. But another, identical variety can be lethal – and desperate people turning to the black market can’t tell them apart

Venezuela has suffered food shortages for several years but things only seem to be getting worse. People are resorting to the black market for food, skipping meals and rummaging through garbage in search of sustenance. Last year, three quarters of adults involuntarily lost an average of 19lb (8.6kg). Malnutrition is on the rise and people are being exposed to lethal foods. At least 28 people have died as a result of eating bitter cassava, having mistaken it for the sweet variety.

Cassava, also known as manioc and yuca, is a staple food for about 700 million people worldwide. The perennial plant is native to South America but was brought to Africa by 17th-century explorers and later introduced to Asia. It thrives in tropical climates. The plant is very resilient, surviving where many other crops fail, and involves less human investment per calorie than potatoes. It is often poorer communities that rely on cassava for their survival.

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Why I left physics for economics

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:30:29 GMT2017-06-22T05:30:29Z

I recently decided to abandon the rules that govern nature for the rules that govern people and markets: economics. Why would I do such a thing?

I love physics. Brick by brick, you can build new theories from established ones and know that they will apply not just on Earth but throughout the entire universe. The upsides are incredible: I worked on the theory and simulation of plasmas (the stuff stars are made of) for nuclear fusion. If nuclear fusion succeeds in its objectives, it could mean the end of our reliance on fossil fuels, the end of climate change, and energy security for at least millions of years. The experiments in fusion push the limits of nature. Every time Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s Ignition Facility in California fires its fusion laser, the world’s most energetic, material is heated from 18 degrees above absolute zero to hotter than the centre of the sun in just a few nano-seconds. The work was as exciting and intellectually rewarding as you might expect.

As quantum mechanics brought down classical mechanics, the financial crisis has led to a reappraisal of macroeconomics

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British archaeology is in a fight for survival

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 09:32:08 GMT2017-06-20T09:32:08Z

The first University Archaeology Day marks a point of crisis in British archaeology. As student applications fall, threatening university departments with cuts, commercial demand for archaeologists is soaring, leaving a looming skills shortage

On 22 June, the first ever University Archaeology Day will be hosted by University College London. The event aims to promote archaeology as a university subject and as a career to prospective students, bringing together archaeology departments from around the country and various organisations who employ archaeology graduates. The intention is to paint an inspiring picture of archaeology as an exciting field of study leading to a hearty spread of career opportunities, but University Archaeology Day is also a response to a growing crisis in UK archaeology, both for university departments and for the commercial sector. This crisis is likely to have repercussions well beyond the world of academia.

Archaeology is a great subject to take at university; it brings together a mix of humanities and sciences, and combines social theory, critical thinking and hard practical skills. Adventure abounds, both intellectual and actual. Why then are fewer and fewer students applying to study it? This is the question plaguing beleaguered archaeology departments across the UK which are seeing student numbers drop year on year.

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Sun, sand and apex predators: taking the plunge with oceanic whitetip sharks

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 06:00:02 GMT2017-06-20T06:00:02Z

Carcharhinus longimanus return annually to the waters around Cat Island in the Bahamas. I went to take a closer look at this once-abundant top predator

My face is pressed up against the window and my brow is furrowed. For someone about to land in the Bahamas I look surprisingly troubled. I am trying to figure out the size of the swell and the prevailing wind direction from 10,000ft up in the air. For the last week I have been obsessively refreshing the forecast page for Cat Island, hoping that a small weather window will appear.

I’m here to dive with the oceanic whitetip shark – Carcharhinus longimanus, the migratory circumtropical pelagic apex predator. Historically, the oceanic was a highly abundant species, but more recently it has undergone severe population declines. Globally across its range, it is listed by the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) red list as vulnerable, and critically endangered in the north-west and western central Atlantic. This reduction in numbers is a result of fishing pressures, most likely related to the global shark fin trade, for which it is targeted and highly prized due to its large pectoral fins, from which the shark gets its name: “longimanus”, meaning “long hands”.

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Can you solve it? Pythagoras's best puzzles

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 06:15:28 GMT2017-06-19T06:15:28Z

Three teasers from the vaults

Hi guzzlers,

The most famous theorem in maths is named after the Greek thinker Pythagoras. So is the most famous recreational mathematics publication in the Netherlands.

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Alien megastructures – where we should look next

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 12:26:08 GMT2017-06-15T12:26:08Z

Huge extraterrestrial construction projects should leave detectable traces that astronomers could see

You remember the alien megastructure. No? Let me refresh your memory. Back in October 2015, the internet nearly broke when astronomers announced they had detected a strange signal that stood a remote chance of being a vast extraterrestrial construction - dubbed the alien megastructure.

It was discovered using Nasa’s Kepler Space Telescope, which was designed to look for the slight drop in light caused when a planet passes in front of its star. In this case, the telescope gave astronomers much more than they bargained for.

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Russian fake news is not new: Soviet Aids propaganda cost countless lives

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 11:54:57 GMT2017-06-14T11:54:57Z

It’s easier than ever to spread myths and falsehoods, which shows how little we learned from one of the worst pieces of dezinformatsiya ever disseminated

The 2016 US election and subsequent fallout seem certain to occupy a unique place in the history books. Donald Trump’s campaign against Hillary Clinton was marked by incredible events and statements, from racism to misogyny. But perhaps the most startling and remarkable revelation is that a growing body of evidence indicates that Russia tampered with the election, and questions are being raised about President Trump’s ties with Russia.

Related: 'Nervous' Jeff Sessions' attempt at Trump-like bravado falls flat

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The ancient mystery of St Hilda's 'snake stones': what do ammonites really look like?

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 09:39:30 GMT2017-06-14T09:39:30Z

Despite being among the most recognisable, common fossils, not one has been found that gives us an accurate idea of how the animals looked in life

Think of a generic fossil and – alongside dinosaur skeletons or trilobites – it’s likely that the coiled shells of ammonites spring to mind. Ammonites are an extinct group of cephalopods, the mollusc group that contains octopuses, vampire squid, ‘squids’ (there are many different kinds of squid, so squids will be used to generically refer to them all throughout), cuttlefish, nautiluses, the extinct belemnites and other forms.

You can see ammonites everywhere; they’re widely used as an icon for company logos from publishers to construction companies, museums and fossil shops. Visit the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site in the UK, and ammonite road signs greet you at every town and city and even the lampposts on the seafront feature a familiar coiled shell.

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Cholesterol-lowering vaccine jab to stop heart attacks could be close

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 05:30:02 GMT2017-06-20T05:30:02Z

Vaccine to be trialled by humans could be effective alternative to statins

A vaccine jab that prevents heart attacks could be imminent after promising early research shows how the immune system can be directed to lower cholesterol.

Patients have already been enrolled into a phase one trial to see if the approach, so far tested on mice, will work in humans.

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New blood test could see personalised prostate cancer treatment

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 06:01:28 GMT2017-06-19T06:01:28Z

Revolutionary three-in-one blood test could change treatment for advanced stages of disease, say scientists.

A new three-in-one blood test could pave the way to precision-personalised treatment for advanced prostate cancer, say scientists.

The test has the potential to transform the way the disease is tackled by targeting specific gene mutations, it is claimed.

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The latest threat to Antarctica: an insect and plant invasion

Sat, 17 Jun 2017 20:54:30 GMT2017-06-17T20:54:30Z

Rise in tourism and warmer climate bring house flies – and the growth of mosses in which they can live

Antarctica’s pristine ice-white environment is going green and facing an unexpected threat – from the common house fly. Scientists say that as temperatures soar in the polar region, invading plants and insects, including the fly, pose a major conservation threat.

More and more of these invaders, in the form of larvae or seeds, are surviving in coastal areas around the south pole, where temperatures have risen by more than 3C over the past three decades. Glaciers have retreated, exposing more land which has been colonised by mosses that have been found to be growing more quickly and thickly than ever before – providing potential homes for invaders. The process is particularly noticeable in the Antarctic peninsula, which has been shown to be the region of the continent that is most vulnerable to global warming.

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Long and complex forensic investigation ahead for Grenfell Tower

Thu, 15 Jun 2017 13:27:43 GMT2017-06-15T13:27:43Z

Recovering victims’ remains is a priority, with experts confident every person will be found. But establishing fire’s cause will take months, they say

Forensic experts have spoken of the extraordinarily complex investigation that lies ahead at Grenfell Tower and predicted that establishing the causes of the devastating fire will take months.

In the coming days, recovering victims’ remains would be a priority, they said, as investigators work against the clock to complete their search while the building remains structurally sound.

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Risk of bleeds and death with daily aspirin use higher than thought

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 05:05:27 GMT2017-06-14T05:05:27Z

Research suggests 3,000 people die a year in UK from long-term use of aspirin or similar drugs, but also taking heartburn medication could help reduce risk

The risk of long-term aspirin use causing major bleeding and death is higher than previously thought, with over-75s particularly vulnerable, a study suggests.

Around 40% of adults aged 75 or over in the UK take a daily aspirin and lifelong treatment is recommended for patients who have previously had a heart attack or stroke.

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Airport noise increases risk of heart disease, study suggests

Wed, 14 Jun 2017 05:00:18 GMT2017-06-14T05:00:18Z

The highest noise levels, particularly at night, are associated with a greater risk of high blood pressure and heart flutter, say scientsts

People who live close to an airport and are constantly barraged by the sound of planes taking off are at increased risk of heart disease, research suggests.

A study found that people who were exposed to the highest noise levels, particularly at night, were at greater risk of developing high blood pressure and heart flutter.

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Biology A-level students mark down exam board after yet another error

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 17:40:58 GMT2017-06-13T17:40:58Z

OCR apologises again after third mistake in exam paper, with pupils uncertain they will reach grades needed for university places

One of England’s main examination boards has been forced to issue an apology for the third time in a little over a fortnight after students and teachers spotted yet another error on one of its papers.

The mistake occurred on OCR’s A-level biology paper, which was sat by almost 19,000 students on Monday. A question asked students to calculate a standard deviation but failed to provide the formula needed for the calculation, as required by the syllabus.

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Suntans for all: chemical causes any skin to tan – and protects against cancer

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 16:00:02 GMT2017-06-13T16:00:02Z

Scientists create chemical that causes release of dark pigment in skin, creating a real ‘fake’ tan without the need for sunbathing

Scientists have created the ultimate fake tan: a chemical that triggers the release of dark pigment in the skin without the need for sunbathing or a genetic predisposition for tanning.

The substance would induce a tan even in fair individuals with the kind of skin that would naturally turn lobster pink rather than bronze in the sun, the scientists predicted.

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Defibrillator-carrying drones could save lives, research suggests

Tue, 13 Jun 2017 15:00:01 GMT2017-06-13T15:00:01Z

Drones were 16 minutes faster than the emergency services, increasing the chance of survival for people who suffer cardiac arrest, study shows

Drones are already employed for anything from military to recreational use, from oil exploration to filmmaking, but they could also help save the lives of people who have suffered a cardiac arrest, research suggests.

A simulated study found that drones carrying a defibrillator, which could be used by a member of the public, arrived 16 minutes quicker than the emergency services on average, saving precious time.

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Testicular cancer: men most at risk could be identified using new gene group

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 15:00:29 GMT2017-06-12T15:00:29Z

Discovery of 19 new genes could allow doctors to spot the 1% of men most at risk of the cancer, allowing closer monitoring or preventative treatment

Researchers believe they can identify the 1% of men who are most at risk from testicular cancer after they discovered a new group of genes linked to the disease.

Screening men for the 19 new genes, along with 25 known already, would allow doctors to spot those who are 14 times more likely than usual to develop the cancer, the scientists said.

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Being overweight – not just obese – kills millions a year, say experts

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 13:30:28 GMT2017-06-12T13:30:28Z

Described as a ‘growing and disturbing global health crisis,’ more than two billion adults and children suffer from weight-related health problems

Being overweight – even without being obese – is killing millions of people around the world, according to the most extensive and authoritative study of the global impact ever carried out.

More than two billion adults and children are suffering from health problems in the world because of their weight, says a team of 2,300 experts led by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IMHE), based at the University of Washington in Seattle.

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Vincent Fournier's best photograph: Boris the cosmonaut shows off his spacesuit

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 06:00:29 GMT2017-06-22T06:00:29Z

‘After two hours of drinking vodka, General Boris suggested we just do the shoot at his house’

Star City is a self-contained city for cosmonauts about an hour from Moscow. Astronauts still come from all over the world to get trained there. It might look dated but, underneath, the important stuff is all working. As well as a training centre, it has a launch site, a technical department, a school, and a hospital – everything really. During the cold war, when there was a lot of money going into the space race, it was an important place. That’s not so much the case now.

We are all awed by space – and, although there is something old-fashioned, even funny, about this image, it is still noble. The subject’s name is General Boris V and I took his portrait back in 2007. Originally, the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Centre had agreed to let me shoot on their premises, but when I got there they asked for money.

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Women with BRCA gene mutations given clearer picture of breast and ovarian cancer risk

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 23:41:41 GMT2017-06-20T23:41:41Z

Results of Australian study will provide carriers with greater confidence in decisions they make about prevention strategies

Women who carry the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutations now have the clearest picture yet of their risk of developing breast and ovarian cancer.

An Australian study led by the University of Melbourne, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre and Cancer Council Victoria tracked almost 10,000 women with these mutations for up to 20 years.

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Do you want to feel much better right now? Say sorry | Rowan Davies

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 19:13:17 GMT2017-06-20T19:13:17Z

Making a decision not to apologise can feel empowering. But – as my teenage sons have learned – it can also leave you with the sense of being a complete arse

I’m terribly sorry about this. I mean, I do realise the last thing you need right now is another piece of opinion. If you’ve been upset by the headline, I can only apologise. With luck we will be able to put this behind us, while agreeing that this one is very much on me.

Related: Sorry, but it’s time for women to stop apologising so much | Viv Groskop

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From the Rescuer to the Aggressor – understanding the 10 types of human

Mon, 19 Jun 2017 15:05:39 GMT2017-06-19T15:05:39Z

Why do some people chase noble dreams while others torture to stay sane? Barrister Dexter Dias’s new book draws on ‘moral cognition’ to explain FGM, the crimes of child soldiers – and why we happily pay to punish a cheat

Why do human beings hurt other human beings? That, says the barrister and sometime judge, Dexter Dias QC, is the most fundamental question in his book Ten Types of Human. In it, we meet sex traffickers, the sex-trafficked, a woman whose career was very nearly ended when she blew the whistle in Bosnia, a man whose life very nearly was, when he tried to stage a rescue. We go from the post-earthquake shanty towns of Haiti, where Hobbesian brutality meets human dignity, to the living room of a woman with locked-in-syndrome; we meet women whose features have been destroyed by acid attacks, whose lives have been changed by FGM, men whose minds have been rewired by violence, we meet people who don’t survive to the end of the book. But this isn’t a story about victimhood.

Dias tells the story of human behaviour through 10 tropes. The Kinsman will protect his or her own gene pool at the expense of any other. It’s illustrated in the first instance by a thought experiment in which there is a gunman in your child’s school (how many classmates are you prepared to sacrifice for the sake of your own? One of his colleagues got to, “all the other children in the world, except for one, for my child to play with) and moves into a detailed consideration of FGM as an iteration of parental love twisted by cultural norm.

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That time I made my mom guess the meaning of English expressions

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 11:00:02 GMT2017-06-22T11:00:02Z

After Uganda’s president said he and Queen Elizabeth were ‘friends with mutual benefits’, I was inspired to investigate some other confusing idioms

Uganda’s president, Yoweri Museveni, recently tweeted that he and Queen Elizabeth II were “friends with mutual benefits”. I sympathize: English expressions are confusing, some of them feel almost deliberately obscure – designed to exclude non-native speakers from the joke.

Museveni later deleted his tweet. I wish he hadn’t. We should celebrate linguistic ambiguity and explore the universe of meanings in words.

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Name that wildflower

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 20:30:16 GMT2017-06-18T20:30:16Z

Hardly any British children can identify a red clover, and few students take plant science for a first degree. The charity Plantlife is determined to change that

The summer flowers are in bloom, but a recent survey of 2,000 people found that 80% didn’t know a common dog violet, even though it’s found across nearly the whole UK. Less than half of young people could name a bluebell and hardly any could identify a red clover. And another sign of how children are losing touch with the names of common flowers is that the Oxford Junior Dictionary, has dropped plant names such as bluebell and blackberry from its latest edition.

Related: Five simple ways to help your child get into the wild | Patrick Barkham

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Cosmic crisp – a new apple to get your teeth into

Sun, 18 Jun 2017 06:00:04 GMT2017-06-18T06:00:04Z

After 30 years’ experimentation, farmers in Washington state are ready for the biggest ever planting of a new variety of apple

Nearly 30 years ago, Dr Bruce Barritt was jeered when he branded the apple industry in Washington state a dinosaur for growing obsolete varieties such as red and golden delicious. Now, farmers in the state, where 70% of US apples are grown, are ripping up millions of trees and replacing them with a new variety, the cosmic crisp, which Barritt, a horticulturalist, has created in the decades since.

With 12m trees to be planted by 2020, and the first harvest of apples due in the shops in 2019, it is the biggest ever launch of a new apple. Around 10m 40lb boxes are expected to be produced in the next four years, compared with the usual 3-5m for a new variety. It’s a gamble for growers: replanting costs up to $50,000 per acre, so the cosmic crisp needs to fetch top dollar to make their investment worthwhile.

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Saturn in full view and at full tilt

Sun, 11 Jun 2017 20:30:07 GMT2017-06-11T20:30:07Z

Saturn is at its best, enjoying its summer solstice and in opposition, though sadly low in Britain’s sky

Saturn’s northern hemisphere is now tilting at its maximum angle to the Sun, 26.75°, as the beautiful ringed planet enjoys its own summer solstice. It is also nearing opposition on the 15th when it stands opposite the Sun in Earth’s sky so that it rises at sunset, stands highest in the middle of the night and sets at sunrise.

Saturn’s rings are best seen when the planet comes to opposition around the times of Earth’s solstices, as it does every 15 years or so. This arises because the rings lie directly above Saturn’s equator and its polar axis is aligned to within 6° of that of the Earth, much closer than for any other planet. We could say that we share the same north pole star, Polaris.

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Does the future hold the key to happiness? | Oliver Burkrman

Fri, 09 Jun 2017 14:00:03 GMT2017-06-09T14:00:03Z

Old-school psychologists obsess over the past; modern, self-helpy ones focus on the present. But a new school of thought is hanging happiness on the future

The standard knock against old-school approaches to psychologyFreud, Jung et al – is they’re obsessed with the past. Visit some crusty psychoanalyst and you’re sure to waste years picking through your childhood, concluding – surprise! – that your parents messed you up. (A Freudian slip is where you say one thing but mean your mother.) Modern, self-helpy psychology starts from the tempting premise that you can skip all that: just change your present-day thoughts and happiness will follow! But now Martin Seligman, the father of “positive psychology”, has gone further. The past and present are both distractions, he argues in a book and New York Times essay; the key to happiness lies in humans’ unique ability to contemplate the future. “For the past century, most researchers have assumed we’re prisoners of the past and the present,” he writes. But we’re not. For example, depression results not mainly from “past traumas and present stresses, but because of skewed visions of what lies ahead”. Indeed, “the main purpose of emotions is to guide future behaviour”. He even proposes a new discipline, “prospective psychology”, to tackle this paradigm-shifting truth.

Related: Bored? Now you know why

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India launches powerful new rocket

Thu, 08 Jun 2017 20:30:37 GMT2017-06-08T20:30:37Z

Advanced satellite launch vehicle will free India from the need to buy launch slots from other countries in future

India launched a new rocket this week, extending the country’s ability to place larger payloads into orbit. Until now, India had depended on buying launch slots from other countries and organisations, using the European Space Agency’s Ariane 5 rocket, for example.

India’s 43m-tall Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV Mk3) took to the skies at 11:58 GMT on Monday 5 June from the Satish Dhawan space centre, on Sriharikota island, off India’s east coast.

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Beryl Allan obituary

Tue, 06 Jun 2017 15:08:48 GMT2017-06-06T15:08:48Z

My mother, Beryl Allan, who has died aged 94, was a keen scientist whose varied life included working in radar for the army and, later, bringing science to members of the Women’s Institute. Science, and its public understanding, was the field to which she dedicated much of her later life.

Born in north London, to Elsie (nee Dawson), who worked for a milliner, and Colin Broadbent, a gentleman’s tailor, Beryl went to Southgate county school, where she excelled educationally and at sports.

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How sad that English-speaking parents are afraid of their children being taught in Welsh | Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett

Thu, 22 Jun 2017 11:53:33 GMT2017-06-22T11:53:33Z

The English colonial legacy has left its mark in Wales, and it sticks in the craw that otherwise liberal people might criticise minority-language activists in the UK

Tuesday’s Guardian article about Welsh language education caused huge controversy. In it, some parents protested about their village school switching to Welsh-language teaching. The print headline was: Welsh-only teaching – a political tool that harms children?

The framing of the teaching of Welsh to children as a question of ethics, and the suggestion that it could put any child in Wales at a disadvantage, upset me and other Welsh speakers. Focusing on a bitter row that took place last year in Llangennech, Camarthenshire, the article emphasised the concerns of one parent, with voices on the other side of the debate largely absent, leading to a rather one-sided argument.

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What if dinosaurs were still alive? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Brian Switek

Wed, 21 Jun 2017 07:00:24 GMT2017-06-21T07:00:24Z

Every day millions of internet users ask Google life’s most difficult questions, big and small. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries

Dinosaurs dominated terrestrial life on this planet for over 130m years. If it hadn’t been for a wayward asteroid, the reign of Tyrannosaurus rex and its ilk could have lasted for at least another 66m. In fact, let’s presume for a moment that the cosmic boulder that ended the Cretaceous period totally missed Earth and allowed dinosaurs to survive to the present. What would life be like now?

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Ten years ago Turnbull called out Peter Garrett on climate. What went wrong? | Graham Readfearn

Tue, 20 Jun 2017 19:00:09 GMT2017-06-20T19:00:09Z

After a decade of policy backflips and uncertainty, we are now being sold ‘technology neutral’ energy policy. But we need it to be discriminatory – and favour clean power

Ten years ago today Malcolm Turnbull was getting stuck in to a debate in Parliament House with Peter Garrett about climate change.

Climate change, said Turnbull, was “an enormous challenge and probably the biggest one our country faces, the world faces, at the moment.”

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Want to be a safer driver? The technology and psychology that can help

Fri, 16 Jun 2017 08:43:17 GMT2017-06-16T08:43:17Z

More than 1 million people worldwide are killed on roads each year. Psychologists are working on ways to nudge drivers towards being safer

Imagine a world inhabited by rational people, motivated to serve the common good, whose perceptions stay the same and whose decisions are logical.

The reality, of course is that people are guided by emotions, beliefs and biased perceptions. These human characteristics result in major social problems such as obesity, debt, climate change and more than 1.2 million people being killed on the road globally every year.

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Smoking in cars is banned. But children still inhale toxic fumes in backseats

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 04:52:13 GMT2017-06-12T04:52:13Z

Studies show pollution levels inside cars are higher than outside where NO2 emissions are dissipated into the wider atmosphere

Air pollution more harmful to children in cars than outside, warns top scientist

By now, if you are a pedestrian or cyclist you are probably aware that traffic pollution is a danger to your health, but there is one group of people who are perhaps more at risk: children in cars.

Numerous studies have shown how high pollution levels are in cars. A study in Copenhagen found that a driver actually breathed in higher amounts of pollution than a cyclist on the same road. For the cyclist, the emissions dissipated into the wider atmosphere which reduced their exposure, but for the car driver these emissions were circulated and built up in the cabin.

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It's Hug a Climate Scientist Day. Just remember: no surprise hugs! | First Dog on the Moon

Mon, 12 Jun 2017 03:17:17 GMT2017-06-12T03:17:17Z

Every 12 June a grateful planet pauses to give thanks to those brave souls who bear the burden of knowing what the rest of us can’t stand to think about

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Caring about climate change: it's time to build a bridge between data and emotion | Ketan Joshi

Wed, 07 Jun 2017 01:57:51 GMT2017-06-07T01:57:51Z

Seeing the span of our children’s lives laid over a climate projection graph slices through the boredom that comes with climate apathy

Long after we each cease to exist, the physical outcomes of the choices we make today, and tomorrow, will linger. Shadows of our decisions on policy, energy and lifestyle will manifest as the consequence of our injection of greenhouse gases into the Earth’s atmosphere.

Related: Writing about climate change: my professional detachment has finally turned to panic | Michael Slezak

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New Zealand launches 3D-printed rocket into space – video

Thu, 25 May 2017 09:41:27 GMT2017-05-25T09:41:27Z

Stunning images from New Zealand’s North Island as Rocket Lab, a Silicon Valley-funded company, launches the maiden space flight of its battery-powered, 3D-printed rocket from the Mahia peninsula

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The Antikythera mechanism: the world's first computer? – video

Wed, 17 May 2017 14:22:54 GMT2017-05-17T14:22:54Z

The 2,000-year-old Antikythera shipwreck is considered the greatest archaeological discovery of the 20th century. It included ancient, ornate pottery, weapons, a skeleton that provides scientists with their first real hope of sequencing DNA from a shipwreck victim, and the famous Antikythera mechanism - thought to be the world’s first computer

Images and footage courtesy of Michael Tsimperopoulos and Brett Seymour/EUA/WHOI/Argo.

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Riders on the storm: the scientists who chase tornadoes - in pictures

Wed, 17 May 2017 12:26:50 GMT2017-05-17T12:26:50Z

With funding from the US National Science Foundation and other government grants, scientists and meteorologists from the Center for Severe Weather Research try to get close to supercell storms and tornadoes. They’re trying to better understand tornado structure and strength, how low-level winds affect and damage buildings, and to learn more about tornado formation and prediction.

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Eighteen-foot nodosaur unveiled at Alberta museum – video

Mon, 15 May 2017 20:54:36 GMT2017-05-15T20:54:36Z

An 18ft nodosaur, one of the world’s best preserved armoured dinosaurs, has been unveiled at the Royal Tyrrell Museum of Paleontology in Alberta, Canada. The fossil was found in 2011 in Alberta’s oilsands, and was subject to 7,000 hours of reconstruction work before being put on display

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Narwhals: new footage reveals possible purpose for mysterious tusk – video

Fri, 12 May 2017 11:55:20 GMT2017-05-12T11:55:20Z

Drone footage in Canada captures the behaviour of rarely-seen narwhals which appear to use their long tusks to tap and stun fish, making them easier to catch. Narwhals, a type of whale, live in remote locations, meaning very little is known about them. WWF and Fisheries and Oceans Canada have been working together to monitor the creature to better protect it from industrial development

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75m-year-old 'Ghostbuster' dinosaur discovered – in pictures

Tue, 09 May 2017 23:01:04 GMT2017-05-09T23:01:04Z

Scientists from the Royal Ontario Museum have identified a new species of anklylosaurid. Named Zuul crurivastator in a nod to a demon dog-like creature from the film Ghostbusters and its potentially shin-bruising armoured anatomy, the skeleton is one of the most complete and best preserved of this group of dinosaurs ever found.

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US should get to Mars during my presidency, Trump tells astronaut – video

Tue, 25 Apr 2017 08:49:59 GMT2017-04-25T08:49:59Z

Astronaut Peggy Whitson, who broke the US record for the most time in space, has received a congratulatory call from Donald Trump. The US president has urged Nasa to ‘speed up’ its Mars mission despite announcing plans to cut the space agency’s spending by about $200m

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Lyrid meteor shower illuminates sky over China – timelapse video

Mon, 24 Apr 2017 08:34:18 GMT2017-04-24T08:34:18Z

Stargazers were treated to a spectacle when the Lyrid meteor shower lit up the night sky over the north-eastern province of Jilin at the weekend. The annual event usually occurs between 19 and 23 April when the Earth passes through the dusty tail of comet Thatcher

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Thousands rally around the world for ‘March for Science’ – video

Sat, 22 Apr 2017 16:05:35 GMT2017-04-22T16:05:35Z

Thousands of people gathered in demonstrations across the globe for the ‘March for Science’ on Saturday, in a rebuke of Donald Trump’s dismissal of climate science and his attempts to cut large areas of scientific research. People congregated in cities such as London, Sydney and Berlin, with more than 600 marches planned across the US, Europe, South America and Australia

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People march for science around the UK - in pictures

Sat, 22 Apr 2017 10:29:41 GMT2017-04-22T10:29:41Z

People around the world are taking to the streets to stand up for science on Earth Day. We’ll be updating this gallery with photos from the UK marches throughout the day

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The 35 words you’re (probably) getting wrong

Mon, 05 Jun 2017 16:19:42 GMT2017-06-05T16:19:42Z

Have you made a flagrant error, in confusing your alternative choices? The legendary Fleet Street editor Harold Evans proscribes this glossary to solve your language dilemmas

I freely acknowledge that, in a list of this sort, “glossary” is a fancy Latin word for a collection of pet peeves (noun, 1919), meaning an annoyance or irritation. One of my peeves is that, as a noun originating in America, it had not been admitted into the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary (1968) on my desk in London when I edited the Sunday Times. Now, it is recognised (“back-formation from peevish”). I admit I have no evidence for believing that the neglect of peeve is to blame for angering the poltergeist Peeves in the Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

Affect/Effect You can only affect something that already exists. When it does, you can effect, or bring about, a change in it. To say: “It effected a change in his attitude” is correct; so is: “It affected his attitude.” To combine the two – “It affected a change in his attitude” – is silly.

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The 20 big questions in science

Sat, 31 Aug 2013 23:05:00 GMT2013-08-31T23:05:00Z

From the nature of the universe (that's if there is only one) to the purpose of dreams, there are lots of things we still don't know – but we might do soon. A new book seeks some answers

Astronomers face an embarrassing conundrum: they don't know what 95% of the universe is made of. Atoms, which form everything we see around us, only account for a measly 5%. Over the past 80 years it has become clear that the substantial remainder is comprised of two shadowy entities – dark matter and dark energy. The former, first discovered in 1933, acts as an invisible glue, binding galaxies and galaxy clusters together. Unveiled in 1998, the latter is pushing the universe's expansion to ever greater speeds. Astronomers are closing in on the true identities of these unseen interlopers.

Continue reading...What's at the bottom of a black hole? See question 17. Photograph: AlamyWhat's at the bottom of a black hole? See question 17. Photograph: Alamy


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How to handle the heat (with science) | Dean Burnett

Thu, 17 Jul 2014 11:30:04 GMT2014-07-17T11:30:04Z

Many are reporting that this weekend could see a heatwave in the UK. But wherever and whenever they are, intelligent humans have developed ways to cool down, some of which are more drastic than othersHot out there. At least, that’s what people are saying. Weather forecasts are predicting a heatwave in the UK this weekend, and what could be more reliable than a weather forecast? It’s summer in the northern hemisphere, so you’d expect it to be hot. But despite this pattern having existed for several billion years, it still seems to take people in the UK by surprise. I don’t know how people in traditionally warmer countries cope with high temperatures, but I imagine it’s not by constantly pointing it out to anyone who will listen. But then, maybe climate change is messing up everyone’s heat-based coping strategies? Who can say. Continue reading...The heat can be too much for some people to handle. Ensure you don't suffer the same fate. Photograph: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty ImagesThe heat can be too much for some people to handle. Ensure you don't suffer the same fate. Photograph: TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP/Getty Images[...]


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Addictive and probably carcinogenic: scientist reveals dangers of Daily Mail | Dean Burnett

Tue, 07 Oct 2014 11:54:46 GMT2014-10-07T11:54:46Z

While many view the Daily Mail as a harmless, recreational newspaper, a newly published study definitively absolutely 100% proves it is actually highly addictive, causes mental judgement problems and damages health

While viewed by many as a harmless newspaper read by people who just want to relax and unwind – or perhaps do some recreational experimentation with different ideologies – a new study has provided unquestionable proof that the notorious newspaper actually inflicts considerable damage on all those who read it, link to it, or even so much as look directly at it.

The detailed study looked at reports of the effects of reading the Daily Mail from the last 20 years. To clarify, it wasn’t a “20-year study”; who would make that sort of mistake? You might see those nostalgia shows like I love the 80s, but you don’t call them a “decade-long TV show”. That would be misleading. It would appear to be that you’re ridiculously exaggerating something for your own ends.

Continue reading...The Daily Mail: a harmful substance?The Daily Mail: a harmful substance?


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