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Politics | The Guardian



Latest Politics news, comment and analysis from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice



Published: Fri, 15 Dec 2017 08:30:03 GMT2017-12-15T08:30:03Z

Copyright: Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2017
 



Theresa May tells EU: I’m still in control despite Brexit bill vote defeat

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 07:28:10 GMT2017-12-15T07:28:10Z

Prime minister seeks to allay leaders’ concerns as she lobbies for swift agreement on post-Brexit transition period

Theresa May lobbied for swift agreement on the terms of a post-Brexit transition period as she sought to reassure concerned leaders over dinner at an EU summit that she was still in control despite her Commons defeat.

The prime minister’s setback on Wednesday evening provoked questions in Brussels over Downing Street’s ability to negotiate the second phase of talks, along with hope in some quarters that the UK may eventually reverse its decision to leave the bloc.

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Dominic Grieve says he has had death threats after Brexit rebellion

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 19:28:21 GMT2017-12-14T19:28:21Z

Tory MP whose amendment led to defeat for Theresa May reports incidents to police, and questions Daily Mail’s reporting of vote

The Conservative MP Dominic Grieve has received death threats after leading a parliamentary rebellion that resulted in the prime minister’s first Commons defeat on Brexit.

The former attorney general, who has reported the most serious incidents to the police, said such threats should have “no part in the political process of a democracy”.

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Boris Johnson swigs can of peach juice from Fukushima

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 06:19:25 GMT2017-12-15T06:19:25Z

Foreign secretary drinks down gift from Japan’s foreign minister in attempt to show food and drink from region is safe after triple nuclear meltdown

“Yum.” That was foreign secretary Boris Johnson’s verdict on a can of peach juice from Fukushima – a gift from his Japanese counterpart, Taro Kono – during their meeting in London this week.

The moment, captured by Kono on his smartphone, was intended to prove that food and drink from Fukushima is safe, almost seven years after the triple nuclear meltdown.

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Woman in key No 10 role paid £15,000 less than men for same job

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 19:10:26 GMT2017-12-14T19:10:26Z

Katie Perrior, who quit as Downing Street communications director in April, earned less than successor and predecessor

Ministers are not serious about the gender pay gap, equality campaigners have said, after it emerged that the only female Downing Street communications director since 2010 was paid £15,000 less than men for the same role.

A Cabinet Office list of salaries for special advisers and other senior appointees in government released on Friday showed Robbie Gibb, the former BBC journalist hired to the role in July, makes £140,000 a year.

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MPs call for legal action over 'shocking' HS2 payouts

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 00:01:02 GMT2017-12-15T00:01:02Z

Public body overseeing £55bn rail project ‘lacks basic financial controls’ with outgoing staff overpaid by £1.76m, committee warns

MPs have called on the government to consider legal action against the former chief executive of the public body building the new high-speed rail network, over £1.76m in redundancy payments made in direct contravention of civil service rules.

HS2 Ltd, which is overseeing the £55bn project, paid a total of £2.76m to 94 individuals, while the statutory redundancy terms should have kept the bill at £1m.

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Government sets targets for gender and ethnic diversity in quangos

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 00:01:02 GMT2017-12-15T00:01:02Z

Cabinet Office says that within five years, half of all 5,500 public appointees should be women, and 14% from ethnic minorities

The government has for the first time committed to ensuring that a specific percentage of public appointees should be women and people from ethnic minority groups.

The Cabinet Office has said that within five years, half of all 5,500 existing public appointees should be females and 14% people from ethnic minorities. Its previous “aspiration”, made in 2013, was that 50% of new appointees should be women.

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David Davis's Brexit department tops government secrecy table

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 19:33:16 GMT2017-12-14T19:33:16Z

Exclusive: Department for Exiting the EU failed to respond to more than 60% of freedom of information requests

Theresa May’s key Brexit department has failed to respond to more than six out of 10 freedom of information requests over the past year, giving it the worst annual record for secrecy in Whitehall.

The Institute for Government (IFG) said the figures, included in an analysis shared exclusively with the Guardian, painted a “broader picture of government opacity” – particularly related to Britain’s departure from the EU.

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Minimum alcohol price will raise cost by up to 90% in Scotland – study

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 00:01:02 GMT2017-12-15T00:01:02Z

Institute for Fiscal Studies says 50p minimum unit price will have dramatic impact with cider and lager prices soaring

The Scottish government’s 50p minimum unit price for alcohol, which comes into force on 1 May 2018, will have a dramatic impact on prices, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

Some cider products will rise in price by as much as 90%, according to the IFS briefing note, which also found prices would increase across all alcohol types. The price of a 20 x 440ml pack of Strongbow would double, while a bottle of Tesco cream sherry would increase by 20%.

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Teachers warned not to dismiss sexual harassment as ‘banter’

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 20:56:05 GMT2017-12-14T20:56:05Z

Government guidelines for schools and colleges call for vigilance and warn that incidents are likely to be amplified by social media

Combating sexual harassment and violence among pupils requires teachers to be vigilant on and offline, according to the government’s long-awaited guidelines for schools and colleges.

The advice covers responses to sexual misconduct between students, including those of the same sex, and warns school leaders they must be aware that sexual harassment is likely to be amplified by social media.

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Unite likely to face hearing over Len McCluskey election

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 19:44:48 GMT2017-12-14T19:44:48Z

Regulator expected to set date to examine claim that 10 different rules were breached during union’s leadership campaign

Unite is likely to face a hearing into Len McCluskey’s election as general secretary in the new year after months of inquiries by the regulator.

The certification officer has been looking into complaints from Gerard Coyne since June, after he lost the union’s leadership election by fewer than 6,000 votes in April.

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Boxing champion awaits deportation after fighting for England six times

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:45:14 GMT2017-12-14T15:45:14Z

Kelvin Fawaz was a child when he came to the UK from Nigeria, a country that has said he cannot live there as he is not a citizen

A boxing champion who has represented England six times has been arrested and locked in an immigration detention centre, pending deportation to Nigeria, a country that has said it won’t allow him to live there as he is not a citizen.

Kelvin Fawaz, London’s current middleweight boxing champion, has been in the UK for 15 years, since he was a child. He is a gifted amateur boxer whom Team GB wanted to represent Britain in the 2012 and 2016 Olympics, writing twice to the Home Office on his behalf.

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After this week, I refuse to believe that Brexit is unstoppable | Martin Kettle

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 06:00:09 GMT2017-12-15T06:00:09Z

The government’s Commons defeat opens up new and far-reaching possibilities – of a second referendum and of the leaving process coming off the rails

Appearances matter a lot in politics. But in the end, the numbers matter more. On Brexit as on everything else, Theresa May has always behaved as if she is a prime minister with a clear parliamentary majority, a united party and a reconciled country behind her. But the reality is that she is none of these things, and Wednesday’s four-vote Commons defeat has found her out.

Related: Proud of themselves? The Tory Brexit rebels certainly should be | Polly Toynbee

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The Tories are savaging libraries – and closing the book on social mobility | John Harris

Fri, 15 Dec 2017 06:00:09 GMT2017-12-15T06:00:09Z

Since 2010, more than 478 libraries have closed in England, Wales and Scotland. It’s the old Tory con: talk up advancement, then attack the institutions that make it possible

If they weren’t already here, we’d have to invent them: public spaces, crammed with books, computers and information points, where events and meetings regularly take place, and children in particular get an early taste of the world beyond their own immediate experience.

Related: The UK no longer has a national public library system | Laura Swaffield

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The Guardian view on Rupert Murdoch: a man out of time | Editorial

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 19:42:23 GMT2017-12-14T19:42:23Z

The billionaire is leaving entertainment for news. That’s a worry since he indulges in trust-only-your-prejudice journalism. The UK regulator should call him out on it

It scarcely seems possible to think that Rupert Murdoch is walking away from the film and TV factories he spent a lifetime building. Yet on Wednesday the media mogul confirmed the rumours: he was out of the entertainment business – selling his Fox assets to Walt Disney, a bigger firm, in a $66bn deal. If the deal passes the regulatory hurdles, the Murdochs will be left with a 5% stake in the newly enlarged Disney company. This is a case of Mickey Mouse roaring and the Fox running. Battles are not won by retreating. Mr Murdoch has tasted defeat. He has turned away from popular culture, realising perhaps that he could not dominate the landscape as he would have liked.

Mr Murdoch did try: his studios produced the popular Simpsons cartoon and the X-Men movie franchise; he created Europe’s largest satellite TV provider; and his company ran one of India’s most-watched channels. But in a changing world he appeared like a man out of time. In entertainment the internet is undermining the dominance of mass media and handing power to new content providers such as Amazon and Netflix as well as tech giants like Apple, which plans an entertainment division. Viewers increasingly prefer to pay subscriptions to these providers for streamed content rather than for cable or satellite services. These web-based video-on-demand channels provided the must-see shows of recent years, such as House of Cards.

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The Guardian view on deporting rough sleepers: rights and wrongs | Editorial

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 19:40:02 GMT2017-12-14T19:40:02Z

For more than three years the Home Office ran a shaming and unlawful policy just to undermine the right to free movement

The high court has robustly rejected the Home Office case that citizens of the EU and the European Economic Area were abusing their right to be in the UK if they were sleeping rough. The government has finally been forced to acknowledge that it is not illegal to be too poor to pay for a roof over your head, and it is illegal to return such people to their country of origin.

This policy of picking up, detaining and then “sending home” EU citizens belongs entirely to Theresa May. Five years ago, when she was home secretary and Downing Street only a glint in her eye, she announced that she intended to create a “hostile environment” for people living in the UK illegally. Critics warned that it would turn landlords, GPs and teachers into immigration enforcement officers; the Home Office duly began hoovering up information from interactions between migrant workers and the state. Three years ago, jobseekers from EU and EEA countries were banned from claiming housing benefit, precipitating hundreds of low-paid workers into insecure housing and some on to the street. Soon, the idea that rough sleeping was an abuse of the right of free movement was being tested on the ground. In Operation Adoze, launched in November 2015, 127 rough sleepers from EEA countries were detained and removed in eight weeks. It became part of the official administrative removals policy; charities that work with street sleepers, like St Mungo’s and ThamesReach, were recruited to pass information about their clients to the Home Office, leading to their removal.

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Most of the Brexit rebels are lawyers. Maybe experts are useful after all | Schona Jolly

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 19:19:16 GMT2017-12-14T19:19:16Z

Without the intervention of 11 highly qualified Tory MPs, the government would have almost unchecked power over Brexit

• Schona Jolly is a human rights and equalities lawyer

The government’s EU withdrawal bill is one of the most significant pieces of draft legislation in decades. Rushed into parliament without a draft text, it bears profound flaws. Such complex legislation, with such critical implications for our constitutional future, should not be decided by a hurried command from ministers.

The precise wording of it matters because the implications affect us all, and the rule of law is threatened by uncertain laws. As the House of Lords constitutional committee said in September: “The executive powers conferred by the bill are unprecedented and extraordinary and raise fundamental constitutional questions about the separation of powers between parliament and government.”

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How the Tory rebellion could push May towards a softer Brexit

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 13:41:24 GMT2017-12-14T13:41:24Z

The PM is now under serious pressure to improve upon the thin gruel of an exit deal that may be heading MPs’ way

A little under a year from now, parliament has an opportunity to deliver a rebuke to the government’s Brexit strategy that would make its latest rebellion look like a gentle wag of the finger by comparison.

Lawyers are quick to caution that the dramatic vote on Wednesday night to amend the EU withdrawal bill does not in itself give MPs a right to veto Brexit next autumn. The revolt led by the former attorney general Dominic Grieve merely prevents the government from ploughing ahead with whatever exit deal it secures in Brussels without first establishing support in the House of Commons.

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Proud of themselves? The Tory Brexit rebels certainly should be | Polly Toynbee

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 11:36:11 GMT2017-12-14T11:36:11Z

Parliament’s refusal to march to the extremists’ drumbeat shows that the ‘mutineers’ now better reflect the will of the people than the Brexit press does

“Proud of yourselves?” splashes the Mail, with a rogues’ gallery of last night’s Tory rebels. “Yes,” should be their defiant reply. What’s more, they are likely to do it again if the government is foolish enough to put forward other Brexit clauses that defy democratic scrutiny of this most vital decision.

Next week they look set to reject the absurdity of fixing an arbitrary date of departure regardless of where we stand at the time.

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How did Conservative whips get Brexit bill rebellion so wrong?

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 09:22:56 GMT2017-12-14T09:22:56Z

Ministers were left scrabbling to salvage vote as relations between whips and rebels deteriorated over course of extraordinary day in Westminster

In recent days reports suggested that up to 20 Conservatives would rebel if the former attorney general Dominic Grieve pushed his amendment on the final Brexit deal to a vote in the Commons.

Related: Commons defeat 'not going to stop Brexit', says government - Politics live

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By 2022, half of the UK's public appointments should be women | Chris Skidmore

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 07:27:25 GMT2017-12-14T07:27:25Z

The number of women and people from ethnic minorities serving on public bodies has risen, but not fast enough, so a new action plan is needed


The race disparity audit published in October revealed uncomfortable truths about the ethnic disparities in our country. The prime minister has rightly tasked all of us in government to tackle these disparities and take action to improve opportunities for people from all backgrounds.

Related: Audit lays bare racial disparities in UK schools, courts and workplaces

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London must remain open to the world

Tue, 31 Jan 2017 11:55:27 GMT2017-01-31T11:55:27Z

The capital should have its own migration system to help it to help Britain survive leaving the EU

There are always exceptions. Since the nation voted to leave the European Union, the mayor of its capital city, Sadiq Khan, has declared that “London Is Open”, but he wouldn’t mind it being closed to Donald Trump. Hundreds of thousands of Londoners sympathise, judging by the map of signatories of the petition to stop the US president paying a state visit and making life difficult for the Queen.

This isn’t typical behaviour. In general, the capital welcomes foreigners, including those who, unlike Trump, plan to stick around and do something useful. About two million of the city’s work force of five million were born overseas, of which at least half come from elsewhere in the EU. London-haters find this frightening, a foretaste of foreignness eating the green and pleasant land. They hope Brexit will stem the alien tide, buttressing a fading Britannia of yore. They may not have yet grasped how damaging for them a cut in incomers from overseas could be.

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Brexit rebels and political books of the year – Politics Weekly podcast

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 17:32:34 GMT2017-12-14T17:32:34Z

Heather Stewart is joined by Jessica Elgot, Tom McTague, Jess Phillips and Gaby Hinsliff to discuss the government’s defeat on an amendment to the EU withdrawal bill and the political books of the year

Theresa May suffered a humiliating defeat in the Commons this week as rebel Conservatives forced the government to accept a greater role for parliament in agreeing the Brexit deal. Despite this, the prime minister arrived in Brussels to state that she is ‘on course to deliver Brexit’.

Joining Heather Stewart to discuss it all are political reporter Jessica Elgot, Labour MP Jess Phillips, Guardian columnist Gaby Hinsliff and Politico’s Tom McTague.

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David Davis ‘bright-eyed and bushy-tailed’ after Brexit defeat. Yeah, right | John Crace

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:19:06 GMT2017-12-14T15:19:06Z

The strain showed on the Brexit secretary’s face as Labour rubbed it in over the Tory rebellion on the EU withdrawal bill

With exquisite timing, just hours after the government had been defeated on a vote on the EU withdrawal bill, the Brexit secretary found himself back in the Commons to face departmental questions. Still, David Davis had had enough time to consider how best to respond to the setback – and he had decided to pretend that it hadn’t really happened. Or, if it had, that it was of little significance. A minor setback in the grand scheme of things.

It wasn’t long before Keir Starmer, the shadow Brexit secretary, tried to put him right. The government had suffered a “humiliating and avoidable” defeat, Starmer observed, and parliament had decided it should have a meaningful vote on a final deal. Could the minister now confirm there were no plans to overrule this at the report stage of the bill?

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The Snap: Theresa May – still prime minister, but for how long?

Sat, 10 Jun 2017 05:48:17 GMT2017-06-10T05:48:17Z

Tories (and press) turn on May … Labour wins in Kensington …most diverse parliament ever … and can DUP deal survive questions over hardline beliefs?

Here we are, the morning after the morning after, with Theresa May still in No 10, still prime minister and still without a majority.

Related: General election 2017: chastened Theresa May to name her team – live

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Following Theresa May’s great escape, Brexiters plan their final battle for Britain

Sun, 10 Dec 2017 06:00:28 GMT2017-12-10T06:00:28Z

As the smoke clears on the prime minister’s 11th-hour EU deal, it is becoming apparent that there are still more questions than answers

‘They can smell a rat. But they are keeping quiet for now because they are not yet sure which rat it is they can smell.” At the end of a week that began with humiliation for Theresa May but ended with much of the British press hailing her as a hero, this was how one UK diplomat summed up the muted reactions of Brexit-supporting MPs to the deal struck by the prime minister on Friday.

Was it the triumph that rightwing papers and cabinet ministers were claiming? Or was it, as they suspected, a sell-out that would be exposed as such in the coming days and weeks? No one was quite sure.

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Kezia Dugdale ‘deeply regrets’ effect of Celebrity trip on successor’s first weeks in job

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 18:46:51 GMT2017-12-13T18:46:51Z

Former Scottish Labour leader to receive written warning for agreeing to take part in reality show I’m a Celebrity without formal approval

Kezia Dugdale, the former Scottish Labour leader who angered colleagues by joining the reality show I’m a Celebrity … Get Me Out Of Here! just as her successor, Richard Leonard, was elected, has said she “deeply regrets” the effect of her decision on the first weeks of his leadership.

Dugdale arrived at Glasgow airport on Wednesday, having stayed in Australia until the conclusion of the show, and told waiting reporters that it was “good to be back”.

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Tory Brexit rebels inflict major defeat on Theresa May

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 07:16:44 GMT2017-12-14T07:16:44Z

MPs on both sides of Commons back amendment promising them a decisive vote on final Brexit deal

Conservative rebels inflicted a humiliating defeat on Theresa May in the House of Commons as they backed an amendment to her flagship European Union withdrawal bill over parliament’s right to a meaningful vote on the Brexit deal.

Related: How did your MP vote on the successful Brexit amendment?

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Dominic Grieve says he received death threats after Brexit rebellion - Politics live

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 17:43:18 GMT2017-12-14T17:43:18Z

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen, including David Davis taking questions in the Commons and Theresa May at the EU summit

This is what Brendan Cox, whose MP wife Jo was murdered by a far-right terrorist last year, tweeted this morning. It is fairly obvious to whom he is referring.

Passion in politics is essential but dehumanising those with alternative views poisons the whole system.

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Scotland’s highest earners to pay £164m more in income tax

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 15:05:53 GMT2017-12-14T15:05:53Z

SNP uses strengthened powers to raise higher and top tax rates by 1p to fund public services and tax cuts for low earners

Taxes for Scotland’s highest earners will rise by £164m next year to help fund pay rises for public sector workers, modest tax cuts for lower earners and £400m extra for the NHS.

Derek Mackay, the Scottish finance secretary, used the Scottish parliament’s recently strengthened tax powers to raise the higher and top rates of tax by 1p to 41p and 46p, boosting funding for public services.

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Davis rebuked over Brexit impact papers but not held in contempt

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 11:28:01 GMT2017-12-14T11:28:01Z

Speaker criticises Brexit secretary for being unclear with MPs about assessment papers that turned out not to exist

David Davis has escaped the possibility of being held in contempt of parliament over the non-existence of Brexit impact assessment papers, but was criticised by the Speaker, John Bercow, for being unclear to MPs when he discussed the matter.

Bercow, giving a rare public rebuke to a minister, also told the Commons it was “most regrettable” that Davis had taken so long to hand papers over to the Brexit select committee, and that he had redacted information from them.

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Theresa May awkwardly eating chips could be 2017's 'bacon sandwich'

Tue, 02 May 2017 14:43:52 GMT2017-05-02T14:43:52Z

Campaigning in Cornwall, the prime minister made a meal of eating one of the seaside’s most traditional offerings

There’s nothing more traditionally British on a visit to the seaside than eating chips in the open air, but during a campaign visit to Cornwall on Tuesday Theresa May looked distinctly uncomfortable while tucking into a cone of them.

Pictured on a walkabout in Mevagissey, May looked for all the world like she had never eaten chips before – or at least not without a knife and fork.

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Newspapers react to May's Commons defeat by Tory Brexit rebels

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 00:48:13 GMT2017-12-14T00:48:13Z

The Daily Mail asks 11 Tory rebels whether they’re proud of themselves, while the i calls the prime minister’s Commons fortunes a ‘bruising defeat’

“Proud of yourselves?” asked the Daily Mail. “Bruising defeat for May in Commons” splashes the i.

Newspapers in the UK have reacted to the government’s defeat in the House of Commons over parliament’s right to have a meaningful vote on the European Union withdrawal bill.

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Protests in Haringey and a revitalised civic society | Letters

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 19:37:22 GMT2017-12-14T19:37:22Z

We must resist the rightwing press’s attempts to persuade the nation that the Labour party is led by rabid Leninists, says David Curtis. Alison Watson writes that next May’s local elections in Haringey will now focus on housing. Gabriel Osborne says that Momentum must follow democratic principles over CLP selections. Plus letters from Martin Ball and Mary Langan

Aditya Chakrabortty’s article on the political goings-on in Haringey was a welcome antidote to tales of Momentum manoeuvrings and the “hard” left (Haringey taken over by Momentum? It’s just locals taking back control, 12 December). The rightwing media has been very successful in persuading us that the modern Labour party is led by rabid Leninists. If Jeremy Corbyn is to win the next election, he must rebut this perception as explicitly as he can.

The present shadow cabinet is doing a good job, but Corbyn should act quickly to make it much more representative of the party. If we want to hear a Labour voice effectively opposing Brexit, we turn to Chuka Umunna or Heidi Alexander; for home affairs we listen to Yvette Cooper; on far-right undercover shenanigans, Ben Bradshaw. To see May wrong-footed we watch and admire Ed Miliband. A good start to the new year would be for Corbyn to bring colleagues of this stature into his shadow cabinet. Were he to do so, he would greatly strengthen his grip on parliament, lead a genuinely authoritative opposition and, at the same time, show that he leads a broad, unified and collegiate Labour party.
David Curtis
Solihull, West Midlands

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Brexit defeat for Theresa May as MPs back curbing government powers – as it happened

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 20:41:35 GMT2017-12-13T20:41:35Z

Rolling coverage of the day’s political developments as they happen, including Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn at PMQs and MPs debating and voting on the EU withdrawal bill

Related: Tory Brexit rebels inflict major defeat on Theresa May

There were four votes this evening. After the government defeat, the government won a vote on a Labour amendment. (See 7.33pm.)

Then an SNP amendment saying the government should “publish a strategy for seeking to ensure that reciprocal healthcare arrangements continue after the UK leaves the EU” was defeated by 315 votes to 294 - a government majority of 21.

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How did your MP vote on the successful Brexit amendment?

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 08:23:58 GMT2017-12-14T08:23:58Z

The government suffered a narrow parliamentary defeat last night when Tory rebels joined the opposition to secure parliament a binding vote on the Brexit withdrawal deal. Find out how every MP cast their vote on amendment 7

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Trump undermines democracy with media attacks, says Cameron

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 22:05:23 GMT2017-12-13T22:05:23Z

Former British PM says US president should focus on threat from Russia rather than attacking CNN and BBC for fake news

David Cameron has accused Donald Trump of undermining democracy by attacking the media, saying the true threat posed by fake news lay with Vladimir Putin, his twitter bots and Russian efforts to use corruption as a weapon of foreign policy.

The former British prime minister also accused Russia of winning the right to stage the 2018 Fifa World Cup via corruption.

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Tory rebels warn May not to attempt to enshrine Brexit date in law

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 10:50:28 GMT2017-12-14T10:50:28Z

Dominic Grieve, who led 11 Conservative rebels to defeat government on Wednesday, says he hopes another rebellion ‘won’t be necessary’

Key Tory rebels who inflicted a Commons defeat on the government’s flagship EU withdrawal bill have warned Theresa May that she could be embarrassed again unless she concedes more ground.

Related: How did your MP vote on the successful Brexit amendment?

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