Subscribe: The Guardian World News
http://www.guardian.co.uk/rssfeed/0,,1,00.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
back  continue reading  continue  day  final  government  life  made  new  people  reading  time  year  years     
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: The Guardian World News

The Guardian



Latest news, sport, business, comment, analysis and reviews from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice



Published: Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:21:16 GMT2017-11-24T13:21:16Z

Copyright: Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2017
 



Egypt mosque attack kills at least 85 people, says state news agency

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:48:44 GMT2017-11-24T12:48:44Z

Dozens more wounded after suspected militants target al-Rawdah mosque in north Sinai

At least 85 people have been killed and dozens more wounded after suspected militants targeted a mosque in Egypt’s north Sinai with a bomb and gunfire, the Mena state news agency reported on Friday.

Eyewitnesses reported ambulances ferrying casualties from the scene to nearby hospitals after the attack on al-Rawdah mosque in Bir al-Abed, west of Arish city. Another 75 people were wounded, Mena reported. It said its tolls were based on an official source.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c3f914ef9554785cbcf652d12881c74d850d6264/0_52_1000_600/master/1000.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=69b32269058c45fd6fb50cbd614826c8




Emmerson Mnangagwa promises 'democratic' elections in Zimbabwe

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:21:10 GMT2017-11-24T12:21:10Z

Former vice-president vows to tackle corruption and reimburse farmers as he is sworn in to replace Robert Mugabe

Profile: who is the ‘Crocodile’ taking power in Zimbabwe?
Road to ruin: how the Mugabes’ time ran out

Emmerson Mnangagwa has vowed to hold “democratic” elections next year as scheduled, while being sworn in as Zimbabwe’s second president since independence in 1980.

Mnangagwa took his oath of office in front of tens of thousands of jubilant Zimbabweans who he greeted with a raised fist at a stadium in Harare.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/b025ed2740f2e456a03cf46c6621ecdd3f2098f9/0_391_4139_2484/master/4139.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=053a7305319e07ecd7732bdd9d21de5a




Theresa May pushes for Brexit talks progress as she arrives in Brussels

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 10:13:28 GMT2017-11-24T10:13:28Z

With no sign of negotiations moving on to trade, PM prepares for EU summit and meeting with European council president

Theresa May has made clear she is willing to lay down extra money to meet the EU’s €60bn divorce bill demands only if the bloc’s leaders can guarantee the widening of talks to trade and the terms of a transition period.

The prime minister, speaking as she arrived at an EU summit in Brussels on Friday, will meet the president of the European council, Donald Tusk, at the end of the meeting. She told reporters: “These negotiations are continuing but what I am clear about is that we must step forward together. This is for both the UK and the European Union to move on to the next stage.”

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c6461d2108606d4f73e6fc778942aa4eb0b6505f/0_119_2456_1473/master/2456.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=321898f88d5e82d8f3785f8a27459602




Slow start for Black Friday in UK after days of early bargains

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:42:01 GMT2017-11-24T11:42:01Z

Retailers report fewer shoppers in-store and online, but John Lewis and Argos report heavy web traffic in run-up to day

Black Friday 2017: the best UK deals all in one place

Black Friday fever has been dampened by days of early discounts, with many online and high street shoppers choosing to stay in bed rather than battle for bargains in the early hours.

The number of shoppers online between midnight and 7am was 24% lower than last year, according to the e-commerce trends service PCA Predict, after an 11% rise in shopping over the previous week.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/7a10ccbcdb88d1f096047f8f42dc246431a71b4b/0_0_6011_3607/master/6011.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=4af541aec025e3fbaedecab39c081854




Teenage girl gets life for manslaughter of Katie Rough

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:11:48 GMT2017-11-24T13:11:48Z

Girl who killed seven-year-old in a York park given life sentence and ordered to be detained for minimum of five years

A teenager who killed a seven-year-old girl in a park has been given a life sentence and ordered to be detained for a minimum of five years by a judge who said it was a “truly exceptional case”.

Katie Rough died after she was smothered by the 16-year-old girl, who cannot be named and was 15 at the time, and then slashed with a Stanley knife in a park in York in January.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/ad75b19e3c9490187c8639619c7bb3f1cb8839f4/98_231_1801_1080/master/1801.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=40aaa2f362494269e84ed2f20e7a00d4




Ireland faces possible snap election over police scandal

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 10:50:20 GMT2017-11-24T10:50:20Z

Fianna Fáil party threatens to pull support for government unless deputy prime minister Frances Fitzgerald, of Fine Gael, resigns

Ireland is on the verge of a snap election after the party that props up the country’s minority coalition government threatened to pull down the administration over a police whistleblower scandal.

The prime minister, Leo Varadkar, faces the prospect of going to the polls as early as next month, in the middle of a crucial summit on the EU, Britain and Brexit at which the stakes are high for the Irish Republic.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/5def1a1f74be9a35dc22e0303b3b362d498a1da5/0_96_3500_2101/master/3500.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=11de76a7a708d0e71cc1d5902d68606e




Robber jailed for life for stabbing woman near her London home

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:15:48 GMT2017-11-24T12:15:48Z

Qingqing Rao is in persistent vegetative state and considered unlikely to regain consciousness after Barry Peacham’s attack

A man with a history of violent crime has been jailed for life with a minimum term of nine years for stabbing a woman metres from her home in an attack that left her in a persistent vegetative state.

Barry Peacham, 26, attacked business analyst Qingqing Rao, 30, as she walked home from work.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/a7bb69637876579097d423a57cb031a6fd720cdf/0_94_1393_836/master/1393.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=0eba4c4599d8678fe4bd39b3e011b677




Germany’s SPD says it is ready for talks to end political crisis

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:14:55 GMT2017-11-24T13:14:55Z

Martin Schulz, leader of centre-left SPD, under pressure from own party to rethink to stop Germany from sinking into paralysis

Germany’s Social Democrats have said they are ready to hold talks that may help Chancellor Angela Merkel resolve a deep political crisis without calling new elections.

“The SPD is of the firm conviction that there must be talks,” its general secretary, Hubertus Heil, said after an eight-hour, late-night meeting chaired by the SPD leader, Martin Schulz. “The SPD will not be closed to those talks.”

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/56d4a015a63b4d84677ed5b9dc65555d394713b1/136_266_4269_2561/master/4269.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=5492f0caf078c024c165ea46fd3f3cb9




No plan to make cycle helmets compulsory in safety review – minister

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:50:07 GMT2017-11-24T12:50:07Z

Jesse Norman rejects reports that UK bike riders will be forced to wear protective headgear as helmet debate continues

A government review of cycle safety will consider submissions calling for helmets to be made compulsory, but the Department for Transport has played down the likelihood of the idea becoming a reality.

Jesse Norman, the minister for roads and local transport, told a conference he would consider making helmets mandatory if groups or individuals made submissions calling for as much to the government’s cycle safety review.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/d5cf860e243df9739379384d08cb7c8faa99f490/358_175_2642_1585/master/2642.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=27af03b632f7f98625a8da6f79171b8b




Sports Direct seeks approval for £11m payout to Mike Ashley’s brother

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:20:18 GMT2017-11-24T13:20:18Z

Retailer asks shareholders to back payment after review by law firm says he was denied bonus due to concerns about PR

Sports Direct is seeking shareholder approval for an £11m payout to the brother of Mike Ashley, the company’s founder and majority shareholder, after an internal review into a controversial business deal concluded that he had been underpaid.

Last year, Sports Direct was heavily criticised by its own shareholders and corporate governance experts after it emerged the sportswear retailer was paying a company owned by John Ashley to deliver online orders outside the UK. The arrangement with Barlin Delivery Ltd, which was unwound earlier this year, had not been disclosed in Sports Direct’s annual report.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/2b16f824002f41f2df6a87285aab2bd1f77908ad/0_149_3500_2099/master/3500.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=b19bd6dc047c323194495d25db5502f4




Church of Sweden to stop referring to God as 'he' or 'Lord'

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:12:06 GMT2017-11-24T11:12:06Z

Head of largest Swedish Christian church says God is beyond human gender determination

The Church of Sweden is urging its clergy to use gender-neutral language when referring to the supreme deity, refraining from using terms such as “Lord” and “he” in favour of the less specific “God.”

The move is one of several taken by the national Evangelical Lutheran church in updating a 31-year-old handbook setting out how services should be conducted in terms of language, liturgy, hymns and other aspects.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/be308e5d152e964d118a2755c180b0cb85ba4a33/0_145_5760_3456/master/5760.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=2219a6ef619ebd1abd2469993a509a47




‘I didn't even enjoy the sparkle of champagne at my wedding’: why I wish I drank more

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:00:05 GMT2017-11-24T13:00:05Z

What do you do when everyone in your life loves a drink, but you’ve barely touched the stuff? Is 53 too old to develop a bad habit?

‘I wish you’d bloody drink, get some colour into your cheeks,” my father grumbled one day. I was 12, maybe 13. Then, and for many years afterwards, I shrugged it off. Now I wonder if I should have listened. My father was a restaurant critic for Queen magazine, Vogue and the London Evening Standard in the 50s and 60s, and a travel writer even though in a wheelchair; he was a bon vivant who loved booze. Good wine, of course, but also whisky, which he called “electric soup”. And always before lunch, in restaurants at least, Campari with fresh orange juice. On his drinks table at home in the 60s and 70s, there was a glamorous array of bottles, which stood sparkling next to something unthinkable these days (not least because of the vast expense): a huge ceramic bowl full of unopened packets of cigarettes, from which guests were expected to help themselves.

In one of my dad’s bottles was a niche spirit called marc de vipère. He had picked it up while on a trip round France to write a book about Michelin-starred chefs. Inside was a stiff dead snake, which had been cruelly drowned in the alcohol and, in its death throes, spewed out its venom. The murky liquid was said to be a traditional balm for the menstrual pains of the ladies of Lyon. My father said it tasted like a bird’s nest, and encouraged visitors to try it. The odd brave one did. Never me.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/8e35e5fcce639e030db46713db0b51a26b8ca675/0_507_7304_4382/master/7304.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=4384cb8692954a3644135b6237e6ed7e




How the sandwich consumed Britain | The long read

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 06:00:23 GMT2017-11-24T06:00:23Z

The world-beating British sandwich industry is worth £8bn a year. It transformed the way we eat lunch, then did the same for breakfast – and now it’s coming for dinner. By Sam Knight

The invention of the chilled packaged sandwich, an accessory of modern British life which is so influential, so multifarious and so close to hand that you are probably eating one right now, took place exactly 37 years ago. Like many things to do with the sandwich, this might seem, at first glance, to be improbable. But it is true. In the spring of 1980, Marks & Spencer, the nation’s most powerful department store, began selling packaged sandwiches out on the shop floor. Nothing terribly fancy. Salmon and cucumber. Egg and cress. Triangles of white bread in plastic cartons, in the food aisles, along with everything else. Prices started at 43p.

Looking upon the nation’s £8bn-a-year sandwich industrial complex in 2017, it seems inconceivable that this had not been tried before, but it hadn’t. Britain in 1980 was a land of formica counters, fluorescent lighting and lunches under gravy. Sandwiches were thrown together from leftovers at home, constructed in front of you in a smoky cafe, or something sad and curled beneath the glass in a British Rail canteen. When I spoke recently to Andrew Mackenzie, who used to run the food department at M&S’s Edinburgh store – one of the first five branches to stock the new, smart, ready-made sandwiches – he struggled to convey the lost novelty of it all. “You’ve got to bear in mind,” he said. “It didn’t exist, the idea.”

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/75b99eeae3778afb734015247e75a7882234a05f/0_1470_3388_2033/master/3388.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=5b630997aa4543fd67200151f1b90890




Christmas gift guide 2017

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:00:04 GMT2017-11-24T12:00:04Z

Find the perfect present using our interactive gift guide, full of unusual ideas. Share your favourites, drop heavy hints, and create your own ideal Christmas wish list

This article contains affiliate links to products. Our journalism is independent and is never written to promote these products although we may earn a small commission if a reader makes a purchase.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/40f625fb7b73ae22d62325fd1416ee66bc63055a/0_0_1134_680/master/1134.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=92805b20d09aa962821fb16e3d7294d8




Australia built a hell for refugees on Manus. The shame will outlive us all | Richard Flanagan

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 02:03:22 GMT2017-11-24T02:03:22Z

My country is now known as the inventor of a vile form of repression. Instead of thanking a refugee reporter for alerting us to what was happening, we enabled his imprisonment

• Manus Island police use long metal poles to beat refugees

So this is what we have come to as a nation.

The wretched of the earth, because they were no longer safe where they lived, sought to come here. With a determined cruelty, we kidnapped and imprisoned them in Pacific lagers. These lagers became synonymous with the idea of hellholes because it was important to our government that they be – ­and be known as – hellholes.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/e384f2abcaa4258ae2d292f5ac0740c34e88ec6b/506_52_983_590/master/983.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=4d4ffd4735b2c9083519089f39b9d04b




Tamara Ecclestone: ‘A lot of people think of my dad as emotionless, but he’s not like that’

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:59:05 GMT2017-11-24T12:59:05Z

The socialite says her mum was the disciplinarian while her father, Bernie Ecclestone, was soft, and talks of her devastation at her parents’ divorce and her dependence on her sister, Petra

I was a real tomboy and my mum put me in a frilly, white lacy dress for a birthday party, and there is a picture of me with a sulky face and my eyes are red, as I had been crying because I wanted to wear jeans or dungarees. For the longest time I was into sports – I was completely the opposite of what I became.

My mum was definitely the disciplinarian, but my parents weren’t strict. I was allowed to smoke in front of them when I was 18, and boyfriends were allowed to sleep over then, too. Mum’s mantra was: “No secrets, no lies.” Life was very open. The only time she got angry and lost her shit was if we lied to her. All my friends would come and talk to my mum if something was going on, too.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/912b4f9638f5ab429a41763db5cd7efe11f446e3/623_0_4876_2926/master/4876.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=d5c73c1f90809589dda61e4a341eef96




What I wore this week: leather that’s not black (or red) | Jess Cartner-Morley

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:59:05 GMT2017-11-24T12:59:05Z

When you wear a leather skirt in lilac, the leather becomes less of a Thing and the skirt becomes more wearable

In fashion as in life, there is nothing wrong with making mistakes, you just have to try not to keep making the same ones over and over again. A telltale sign that you are doing this is that you have a wardrobe full of clothes, but nothing to wear. Sound familiar?

In fashion, you pay for your errors in actual money, so boo-boos quickly add up. I have learned this the hard way, through being a leather idiot. It has taken me two decades to stop buying leather skirts and dresses that I don’t wear. That time I bought a leather jacket and realised I looked like Dennis Waterman rather than Debbie Harry was a bit of a downer, but not nearly as much as it was the time I did the same a year later. I did realise a long time ago that I can’t wear leather trousers, full stop, which is a blessing, because that would be a total money pit, as Theresa May’s £1,000 chocolate, flared PR hell testifies.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/dfcad5fb2d299300e4bfcb921553fba313b73c69/0_432_808_484/master/808.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=b26985625e389c79e6e6f4c5fa531365




Ungender, deprogram, urinate: how post-cyber international feminism can improve your life

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:01:46 GMT2017-11-24T13:01:46Z

Do you know your IRL from your AFK? Ever heard of the mercenaries of slime? And what does all this have to do with the gloriously liberated feminist future the web was supposed to deliver? A mind-boggling conference at the ICA had the answers

You don’t have to wear a hi-tech bodysuit to be a post-cyber feminist, though some did. The ICA’s recent Post-Cyber Feminist International conference drew an arty crowd of intellectuals, feminists and the intellectual, feminist, gender non-conforming. Want to know what self-determined, non-gendered DIY fashion looks like at the gorgeous, bleeding edge? This was the place: with everything from experimental tailoring to rubber face masks, at times the dressed-up vibe verged on Comic-Con for PhD candidates.

Foul-mouthed, irreverent and sexually liberated, the original Cyberfeminist Manifesto for the 21st century was written by the Australian collective VNS Matrix in 1991. Describing themselves as “mercenaries of slime” and proclaiming that “the future will be unmanned”, VNS Matrix evoked an era in which computer interactivity was radically sexualised and gloopily physical. They took the emerging technological paradigm ­– in which software penetrated hardware – and imagined its ultimate evolution. Six years later, the first Cyberfeminist International was held in Kassel, Germany, and the idea of a networked, feminist future was discussed in optimistic terms.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/f7aa7a02563dfb55bcf18b4a89c5f3c345945746/120_0_1800_1080/master/1800.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=1015f92d9a3a9d379843c4b70259e71f




Amsterdam aims to score more Brexit wins after luring medicines agency

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:12:14 GMT2017-11-24T13:12:14Z

Dutch leaders say the European regulator’s move from London is the result of years of effort to attract business

Like the prudent and pragmatic people they are, the team behind Amsterdam’s bid to host the European Medicines Agency had no champagne on ice the night the EU was choosing the new post-Brexit home for its drugs safety watchdog.

“We’d massively lowered our expectations – it would have been tempting fate,” said one. “We thought European politics would kick in, the way they usually do,” said another. “And you know, we Dutch are really good at coming second.”

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/e46e2d99971de7532532d7ca4d2a4987e0b7bbcd/0_341_5119_3072/master/5119.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=ab8dbb28443392219907ec95375d972c




Joe Root’s meticulous approach pays Ashes dividends for England | Ali Martin

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:50:33 GMT2017-11-24T12:50:33Z

Developing strategies for each member of an opposition is hardly revolutionary but when such work bears fruit it is nevertheless worth tipping the hat to the brains trust behind it

Joe Root may never be able to sport a beard as thick as the one that saw Mike Brearley dubbed the Ayatollah during the 1978-79 Ashes but when it comes to assessing his first experience of leading an England side in Australia, some encouraging growth can be reported.

It was a hard fought second day at the Gabba, one that saw this absorbing wrestle for control continue to unfold and belie predictions of the cricket being one way traffic on Vulture Street. And Root’s fingerprints could be found on much of what was good about England’s performance.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/4f47ffb66f375a71c86825332b26b42de414ceeb/0_90_5356_3213/master/5356.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=9270d15cc7823996e5e5e1a459a3bb17




Damian McKenzie the latest in a long line of All Black all-rounders

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:03:46 GMT2017-11-24T12:03:46Z

Diminutive full-back with blistering pace and wonderful awareness has come a long way in a short time for New Zealand

On the 1,000-acre dairy farm near Waikaka in the remote part of Southland where Damian McKenzie grew up there was plenty of time to dream. He would spend his days chucking a ball around with his older brother Marty, wondering if life would ever take him beyond Gore or Invercargill. Not too many rise from the bottom of New Zealand’s South Island – next stop Antarctica – to the top of world rugby.

Sitting at the back of the same room in Cardiff on Thursday, was one who did: Jeff Wilson, the all-round Kiwi wizard of his day, who played cricket and rugby for New Zealand and once scored 66 points in a schoolboy game when four-point tries still existed (it would have been 75 in today’s money). Then there was Brian McKechnie, born in Gore, who kicked the goal that denied Wales a famous 1978 win over the All Blacks after Andy Haden dived out of the final lineout at the old Cardiff Arms Park (though the argument over the exact penalised offence rages to this day).

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/0ed296c261e54e8e8d552ad2eb12680ed496b594/39_101_3481_2088/master/3481.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=df49f4af6f388628800bb0dbf55b025a







Marouane Fellaini suing New Balance for £2m over ‘defective’ boots

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:45:00 GMT2017-11-24T11:45:00Z

• Manchester United player says kitman had to steam and stretch boots
• New Balance says it sent new boots and Fellaini said they were ‘perfect’
• Mourinho fears Fellaini could leave United as contract talks drag on

A high court judge may have to examine a series of WhatsApp messages if asked to rule on a row over Marouane Fellaini’s boots.

The Manchester United midfielder says the sportswear company New Balance provided “defective quality” boots which had to be “steamed and stretched” by a club kitman before he could wear them.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/aa03fe6cd6a598abc7decb9cde32b1cba4ba630b/0_62_3485_2091/master/3485.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=c49e5d43db2ee1d33b003f2f7d0de5c5




Tonga the last obstacle to England’s first World Cup final in 22 years

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 08:00:25 GMT2017-11-24T08:00:25Z

James Roby is approaching every World Cup game as if it is his last and is one of seven men in the team beaten by New Zealand in the 2013 semi-final

James Roby is succinct and to the point when asked for his memories of England’s last World Cup semi-final four years ago: “Heartbreaking.” At 5am UK time on Saturday, Wayne Bennett’s side will aim to reach the final for the first time since 1995 when they face Tonga in Auckland. For anyone connected to English rugby league it will be hard not to think back to 24 November 2013.

That day, in the autumnal breeze at Wembley, Shaun Johnson’s try with seconds remaining broke English hearts and ensured New Zealand reached the final. Roby, one of seven survivors from that day who will face the Tongans, admits there are lessons from that performance the team can use to their advantage in the semi-final. “I think it might be in the back of a few people’s minds,” he says.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/83cb89fa04af5fbdca279e8ace1d44be27deeb13/58_113_3774_2264/master/3774.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=749460b828620157a35a7bcbb1105d29




Blistering Valentine Holmes hits Fiji for six in Australian demolition job

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:21:22 GMT2017-11-24T11:21:22Z

  • Kangaroos beat Fiji 54-6 in Rugby League World Cup semi-final in Brisbane
  • Holmes’ haul of six tries makes it 11 in two games as hosts charge into final

Less than a week after becoming the first Kangaroo to score five tries in a Test, Valentine Holmes broke his record with six in Australia’s 54-6 Rugby League World Cup semi-final rout of Fiji.

A ruthless Australia punished an ill-disciplined Bati side by running in 10 tries at Suncorp Stadium and advance to their 12th-successive World Cup decider. They await the winner of Saturday’s other final-four clash between England and Tonga, with the final also to be played in Brisbane on Sunday week.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/98313a993a70d4e0bb7797726625537de137159f/0_100_3000_1800/master/3000.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=dc879fea6db7542fc49eade398639d58




LTA admits child protection failings after coach abused players for years

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 13:28:44 GMT2017-11-23T13:28:44Z

• LTA: ‘The actions we took were not enough and we apologise sincerely’
• Former Wrexham TC head coach Daniel Sanders sentenced to six years

The Lawn Tennis Association, the governing body of the sport in Britain, has admitted to child protection failings for allowing a coach to remain in his role for years, despite repeated warnings, until he sexually abused an underage player and was sent to prison in July.

Daniel Sanders, 42, formerly the head coach at Wrexham Tennis Centre, one of the UK’s largest, was arrested in December, and pleaded guilty to seven counts of sexual activity with a girl, and one of causing her to engage in sexual activity. He was sentenced to six years in prison on 26 July, 10 days after Wimbledon ended with a record eighth victory for Roger Federer.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/3eaaed5af67a3f4ce13b40292a9abe045c40ebd9/0_97_2048_1229/master/2048.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=b47d66baaa2fe32a8a1af15a7b7a62a1




Talking Horses: The 33-1 shot Michael Owen should worry about at Ascot

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:18:15 GMT2017-11-24T11:18:15Z

The ex-England striker has a fine chance on Calder Prince in today’s charity race but his riding inexperience could cost him

Good luck to Michael Owen in his charity race at Ascot today, and also to the other ‘jockeys’ ranged against him, who have varied levels of experience. Judging by horses alone, Owen should have a right chance of actually winning, because he’s on Calder Prince, who is only 1lb off being the best in the race by ratings, copes well with some cut and has been in fair recent form.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/0f50cd3e673986033e730e773306a06c53afd688/0_316_1798_1077/master/1798.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=e3533f73f38ba8d50f2da329228dbe78




Tottenham’s Mauricio Pochettino spells it out to ‘fuming’ full-back Danny Rose

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 22:30:47 GMT2017-11-23T22:30:47Z

• Manager ‘doesn’t care’ whether player was upset at squad omission
• Lamela could be part of squad to face West Bromwich on Saturday

Danny Rose has been left in no doubt as to who calls the shots at Tottenham after Mauricio Pochettino said he “doesn’t care” whether his player was upset at being left out of the squad.

Rose said this week that he was “fuming” at missing out on selection for the game against Arsenal. But while player and manager say there is no issue between them, Pochettino took time to explain the situation before Saturday’s game against West Bromwich, which may see the return of Érik Lamela from injury.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/899ddd31057e9a8c370c4f7dabc601a4dfc74ef4/1085_119_2193_1316/master/2193.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=cf2e00ce83956f214fce8f7ddabb3b49




We need a culture shift, not just Rainbow Laces, for players to come out | Liam Rosenior

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 18:29:09 GMT2017-11-23T18:29:09Z

Society seems to be more inclusive than it was, but football still has its macho dressing-room as a barrier

My six-year-old daughter is football mad and her heroes are Neymar and Ronaldo. In the 21st century it’s not unusual for girls to choose football as their obsession and it’s natural that two of the best players in the world are her idols while I’m just proud to be her dad – who also happens to be a professional footballer.

Every school day she puts on her uniform, which comprises trousers, a shirt and tie and jumper – just like all of the boys at her school. This is her choice and we are fortunate that her school allows her to decide what she wants to wear rather than insisting she wear the traditional dress and blouse assigned to girls. They’re making an effort to have empathy with her choices, which makes me proud because it makes me feel like society is more open-minded and inclusive than it was even a decade ago.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/bec3e28c968cfe48e8999dfc7ce348efa578e7ab/0_256_5316_3190/master/5316.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=6497e096763213f2405031f0fc9a2ce7




Ashes diary: pool proposal makes a splash on day two in Brisbane

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:35:53 GMT2017-11-24T11:35:53Z

Glenn Maxwell’s message to Australia’s selectors, Shane Warne’s love of pizza and Kevin Pietersen reacts to taunts with a deliberate fashion faux pas

The swimming pool at the Gabba may end each day with a similar hue to a schooner of XXXX. But while it was still relatively clear after lunch, one plucky supporter – wearing just budgie smugglers, naturally, and sporting green-and-gold face paint – provided a heart-warming moment by proposing to his girlfriend in the shallows. Up went the roar from the stands when the offer was accepted, with another round of the amber nectar sculled for good measure. Ali Martin

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/fe5485a35c35a5d83e9614e1f27511e16a846595/244_394_5267_3160/master/5267.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=a043c71f95b83de38843b2eb2290f1be




Hamish McAlpine, the goalscoring goalie who inspired a piano ballad

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 10:27:47 GMT2017-11-24T10:27:47Z

Who do you turn to when your strikers keep missing penalties? Your crossbar-swinging, songwriter-bothering goalkeeper

By Graeme Webster for Nutmeg, part of the Guardian Sport Network

A pulsating Scottish Division One match between Kilmarnock and Raith Rovers was finely poised at 3-3 as the sun began to set behind the old Rugby Park. The 1,436 fans scattered around the ground on 12 September 1987 scanned the pitch for a potential hero. Sometimes heroes are the unlikeliest figures.

With the clock running down, Raith Rovers’ veteran goalkeeper, Hamish McAlpine, launched a kick from his own penalty area towards his opposite number, Barry Holland, in the Killie goal. Incredibly, the ball bounced once and flew beyond his baffled opponent into the back of the net. As the Raith Rovers fans celebrated, McAlpine looked on in bewilderment as he tried to figure out what had happened. Astonishment soon turned to joy and, in typical McAlpine style, he celebrated by lifting his boot up for one of his fellow defenders to kiss. The unlikely goal was not so joyful for the man on the receiving end. Holland was dropped for the following match and only made one more appearance for Kilmarnock.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c323ecab0b2de0b32eb674bf2498a74f52209ca4/0_113_4192_2515/master/4192.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=758b281c5bfa974ba53661612ab2653d




Sam Whitelock to captain All Blacks against Wales in Kieran Read’s absence

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 20:32:44 GMT2017-11-23T20:32:44Z

• Whitelock beats Beauden Barrett to role after Read ruled out through injury
• ‘I don’t think All Blacks are ever vulnerable,’ says Wales’ Warren Gatland

Sam Whitelock will captain New Zealand in Cardiff on Saturday after Kieran Read was ruled out of the All Blacks’ final Test of the year against Wales. Read has hip and back pain but Rieko Ioane has made a remarkable recovery from a shoulder injury and will start on the left wing.

The loss of Read is a significant blow to a touring squad already lacking some key forwards and the head coach, Steve Hansen, has opted to install the experienced Whitelock as replacement captain rather than the fly-half Beauden Barrett who did the job against the Barbarians. Whitelock’s brother Luke also led the All Blacks against a France XV in Lyon last week and the duo will now become the first pair of brothers to captain New Zealand since the 1920s.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/a429e2ea4fd17415f5bb35b038b29834c85624ea/0_114_3856_2313/master/3856.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=3c7e252693776bd725b9c3ac8e4d7524




Atalanta run Everton ragged on sorry Europa League night for David Unsworth

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 22:00:22 GMT2017-11-23T22:00:22Z

Everton did not pick the most auspicious day to announce they have just signed the land contract for a new stadium at Bramley Moore dock on the Mersey. With their doomed European non-adventure nearing its end a dead rubber against Atalanta fell a long way short of filling the present stadium. David Unsworth made nine changes from the side that drew at Crystal Palace at the weekend, and the only part of the ground where empty blue seats were not conspicuous was the section of the Bullens Road stand filled by 3,000 noisy Italians.

Incredibly, as the teams lined up on the pitch the stadium announcer introduced the visitors as Lyon. Still, by the time a new riverside home is designed, built and commissioned, there is every chance Everton will have found a new manager.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/f8c81f2b9fac76d38ef52c217cd5ed1610437bae/76_4_2392_1435/master/2392.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=1ac41980f50865f89c5c692066a79f5b




Crystal Palace v Stoke City: match preview

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:09:25 GMT2017-11-24T13:09:25Z

It may not yet be December, but it feels as if crunch time is already upon Crystal Palace. Roy Hodgson has overseen significantly improved performances over his side’s past five matches, yet the team have still won only once all term and are adrift at the foot playing catch-up from that wretched start. Stoke City, who have not won at Selhurst Park in a decade and are enduring their own inconsistencies, must surely be overcome if Palace’s confidence is to be bolstered before Tuesday’s derby at Brighton. This may be the time to fling Christian Benteke back into the fray from the start. Dominic Fifield

Kick-off Saturday 3pm

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c9846a53243b4fe9484f75a72f75a30ab8e2c8ec/0_283_1126_676/master/1126.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=0f2c4715f708130b4c26ebc9b94b4816




Australia go short but it may yet be an Ashes opportunity missed | Adam Collins

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 10:37:02 GMT2017-11-24T10:37:02Z

The hosts sparked an England collapse with some short stuff but the same tactic allowed the tail to eke out 53 runs for the final three wickets

The short ball. A point of fascination before the series, Australia used it belatedly on morning two, then superbly to open England up at a vital moment, but failed to put it away when more rudimentary means might have sufficed against the tail. Namely, hitting the stumps.

Of course, this enthusiasm stems from four years ago. But an unresponsive surface initially gave little opportunity to use the tactic. A day later, the track remained slow, but the game’s circumstances had changed.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/d3a70214de67dd4fb9ef07c3d7362afeb78123df/0_57_2222_1333/master/2222.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=46936738b3c606995cba4097a413eb08




Lewis Hamilton and Sebastian Vettel trade end-of-term F1 barbs in Abu Dhabi

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 16:48:17 GMT2017-11-23T16:48:17Z

• ‘I passed you,’ Hamilton reminds Vettel after backhanded praise for Mercedes
• ‘Sebastian won the last race and I don’t want to give him this one,’ Briton adds

With Lewis Hamilton having already secured the Formula One world championship, the Briton could afford to be relaxed in the buildup to the season finale this weekend in Abu Dhabi and the Mercedes driver was more than happy to engage in some verbal sparring with his title rival Sebastian Vettel.

Hamilton took the championship in Mexico having won nine races to Vettel’s five, but for much of the season the pair were engaged in a tight battle. However, while they have enjoyed some close racing only two passes have been made on the track against each other – both by Hamilton.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/a51b00c31f8042b215b245221b47f98fc283c25c/0_79_5568_3341/master/5568.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=00716cc0863d2ad813749f634d411ab6




Football transfer rumours: Liverpool's Daniel Sturridge to join Milan?

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 09:04:23 GMT2017-11-24T09:04:23Z

Today’s fluff is keeping it real

With the stock of Keylor Navas at Real Madrid having plummeted in recent weeks, the under-performing Spanish side remain in the market for a new goalkeeper. The Costa Rican has made quite the name for himself since signing shortly after the 2014 World Cup, but has recently fallen out of favour with Zinedine Zidane and the Mirror reports that Real have switched their attention from longtime target David de Gea to his Chelsea counterpart Thibaut Courtois. No stranger to Madrid, having spent three happy seasons on loan at Atlético before establishing himself as Chelsea’s first choice goalkeeper, the Belgian has yet to renew his contract, which runs until 2019.

Related: Chelsea did not give Mohamed Salah his chance to make it, claims Eden Hazard

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/a6d971fdb6b2a85d43c772158fb15dce73c75156/0_86_3000_1800/master/3000.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=8bc8c51713f254d7afc88bb0e77d6284




The Irish border problem is the ultimate barrier to hard Brexit | Simon Jenkins

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 10:41:12 GMT2017-11-24T10:41:12Z

Any sort of border in Ireland, whether physical or regulatory, is politically impossible and publicly unpopular. That’s bad news for hard Brexiteers

Is Northern Ireland the first crack in the dam? There is no solution to hard Brexit along the Irish border. Negotiators have been chasing this will-o-the-wisp for over a year. They have not found it because it does not exist. A border is a border, it is not “not-a-border”. It means barriers, checks, queues, papers, regulations, tariffs. No one wants it in practice. Does anyone want it in theory?

The trouble is politics. If Theresa May agrees special status for Northern Ireland to remain in a trading union with Ireland it will effectively “move the border” to Belfast. Her fragile Unionist coalition collapses. If the Irish prime minister, Leo Varadkar, fails to win such special status and sees a border installed, his coalition collapses. There is no way round this. It is the Schleswig-Holstein question of the age.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/074821b83308166783305e835f21805f9f883a03/0_30_2859_1716/master/2859.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=2a9d7cd6f1e202f32c9fee5374a15a68




Ken Clarke’s revelations show Murdoch’s influence still needs investigating | Tom Watson

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:54:15 GMT2017-11-24T11:54:15Z

Clarke’s comments, along with the latest phone-hacking payouts and sex scandals at Fox, demonstrate the clear need for a Leveson 2

• Tom Watson MP is deputy leader of the Labour party

Ken Clarke has suggested that David Cameron did “some sort of deal” to win the support of Rupert Murdoch’s newspapers in the run-up to the 2010 election. According to Clarke, in his evidence to the Competition and Markets Authority, when – at Cameron’s instigation – he held a meeting as justice secretary with Rebekah Brooks, she “described herself as running the government now in partnership with David Cameron”.

Clarke says that she tried to use this influence to get him to introduce prison ships. She failed in that particular lobbying effort – which turned out to be good news for some of her subsequently imprisoned former colleagues. But the Murdochs were interested in more than just prisons policy – they always have been.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/409b1c4d112436d702fa3ecf28bcf0d40e6727f6/337_0_2557_1535/master/2557.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=1fb987ffa4c56498c6fbee500f4cbf53




A moment that changed me: dressing as a woman for the first time at 69 | Robin Pickering

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 08:00:25 GMT2017-11-24T08:00:25Z

I don’t know why my feminine side lay undiscovered for so long, but finding the ‘other’ me has been a revelation

A couple of years ago, I was invited to take part in a murder mystery party with a script written by a friend, and we were asked to invent our own characters. I informed him straightaway that I would be a cross-dressing artist, and would attend in my female persona. Well, as an artist, I was already halfway there… The writer was sworn to secrecy.

I can’t say for certain what prompted me to choose that role. I had an establishment upbringing; my father was a military man and Tory county councillor, my mother a product of the Raj. After a public school education, I went into teaching, marrying and having children in my 20s. Although I soon enough forswore conservatism, becoming something of a contrarian and loving a flowery shirt, I had never consciously questioned my gender. Before that evening. At nearly three score years and ten.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/e60cacf8b88caca0e8e5fd106927929bfafba5d1/0_69_588_353/master/588.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=a95f318b62e1606e85c0a375929918ad




An innocent mother is in jail. We cannot forget Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe | Tulip Siddiq and Emma Thompson

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 09:00:00 GMT2017-11-24T09:00:00Z

We know what it’s like to be separated from your child. Nazanin is being held in Iran on spurious charges, and Britain must step up and protect its citizen

Our children may be 15 years apart in age, but any mother will tell you that anxiety and paranoia about your child never stop. Even in the middle of filming a Hollywood movie or questioning the prime minister, in the back of our heads we’re wondering whether our daughters have worn their gloves on this cold day, or whether they have eaten a full meal at school.

That is one reason why the case of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe – a British citizen who is imprisoned in Iran – resonates so strongly with us. It’s not just that she’s been imprisoned for 19 months on spurious charges, held in solitary confinement and denied medical access and legal advice. It’s also that she’s been separated from her three-year-old daughter, Gabriella, for more than a year and a half. That’s more than half of that little girl’s life.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c84ae994f55b19e21e49ab28e79d0bb508a29865/219_0_3281_1969/master/3281.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=4820e3a7ecd0d61eb6e840bd4256d37a




My prescription for dejected doctors? Stop harking back to a golden age that never was | Clare Gerada

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 06:00:23 GMT2017-11-24T06:00:23Z

Medicine’s a tough career and professionals are demoralised. But the good old days had their dark side too

• Clare Gerada is a former chair of the Royal College of General Practitioners

In the 17th century there was a disease so virulent it was able to wipe out whole armies. Sufferers experienced intense melancholia, anxiety and longing triggered by smell, touch, sight or thought of an object. This disease was nostalgia, described by a medical student and named after nosta for home, and algia for pain. It was prevalent in the Swiss mercenary army, and military physicians postulated it was caused by the unremitting clanging of cowbells in the Alps.

Dormant for centuries, the disease is returning, but this time the afflicted are drawn from a section of the ageing medical establishment. These doctors have developed a delusional system of beliefs that the past was always rosy, that doctors “all knew each other … the firm was a happy band of brothers”, as recalled by Harold Ellis, a surgeon who qualified in 1948. This was a time, they reminisce, where doctors were able to give their patients what they needed: a golden age of medicine, defined by American sociologist Eliot Freidson as the period between 1945 and 1965.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/37c1cb86bd5758537ca8f138094b21c127681eda/0_575_1346_807/master/1346.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=cfa813aa3550b8cc984d921632c3fb0a







The Tories should be insensible with shame over a lack of funds for fire safety in our homes

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 07:23:24 GMT2017-11-24T07:23:24Z

Philip Hammond’s budget has failed to fix the housing crisis but, worse, has left families living in fear with no reassurance over fire safety measures

Around the time of the 2016 spring budget, I wrote about a first-time buyer who had taken advantage of the Conservatives’ help to buy scheme. Ask most people to imagine such a homebuyer and you’d likely imagine a young professional couple, excitedly exchanging keys and shuffling Dulux swatches, earmarking the boxroom as an office, or maybe a nursery. You might not expect the first-time buyer to be in her sixties and married to a Tory MP who already owns property.

Related: Help to buy is riddled with loopholes that the privileged can easily exploit

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/3d63914aafd4f67ab99a62c04e20815b103f038f/909_171_2591_1555/master/2591.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=6a736c60a60859b42796df9eb7c19b97




Life isn’t always wonderful in small towns. But we can’t give up on them | Gaby Hinsliff

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 06:00:23 GMT2017-11-24T06:00:23Z

Provincial centres are struggling as younger people move away – yet the future isn’t all about big cities

Switzerland needs you. Or more precisely, the tiny Alpine community of Albinen needs you, badly enough that it’s offering £19,000 a head to anyone prepared to move into town and stay there. Its chief attraction is said to be lots of lovely fresh air; and if that sounds suspiciously like admitting it doesn’t have all that many attractions, therein perhaps lies the problem. Young people are leaving Albinen, shrinking its population to that of a modest hamlet, and not coming back. And that’s a problem not confined to Switzerland.

Small towns and villages all over Britain, from the sleepy shires to post-industrial towns, are now struggling to keep their footing in a world where youth, energy and prosperity are draining away to the city. A million young people have moved out of small communities over the past 30 years, according to the new thinktank Centre for Towns, launched this week by the election analyst Ian Warren with the help of Labour MP Lisa Nandy to focus minds on places that all too easily slip between the cracks of public debate; the Merthyr Tydfils and the Skegnesses, the Peterboroughs and the Swindons, and all the places that aren’t really rural or urban but awkwardly in between.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/0f001af91451a96ff00d5f006477734e0d4f3ca7/0_0_2560_1536/master/2560.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=37067c09215538b594688373aeeb1882




Watch out, manspreaders: the womanspreading fightback starts now | Radhika Sanghani

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 18:36:29 GMT2017-11-23T18:36:29Z

The #MeToo resistance is getting physical. I’m one of many women determined to reclaim my space

“Cross your legs.” “Don’t sit like that.” “Be more ladylike.” Like most women, I’ve been subjected to these kinds of messages since I was a child. Everyone from my mum to primary school teachers and distant relatives has chastised me to “sit like a lady”. Translation: rest your legs together, Duchess of Cambridge-style, and take up as little space as possible.

After spending my childhood and teen years being told to 'sit properly, for God’s sake', I decided to rebel

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/23a9242a9158bfa4975b095879937ade16a729e3/0_106_5256_3155/master/5256.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=6e1a8c684ff15277fd9100ba3d84bf96




We gave May clear evidence of tax avoidance. Why won’t she act? | Nick Hopkins

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 18:05:57 GMT2017-11-23T18:05:57Z

The Paradise Papers revealed immoral and unfair practice on an industrial scale – yet ministers seem reluctant to have a parliamentary or public inquiry

In the three weeks since the unveiling of the Paradise Papers, the government has clung to familiar arguments. These arguments have not been to do with the Panama Papers – the forerunner investigation into tax havens and offshore empires that the Guardian published last year. Instead, the echoes have come from another remarkable, though unrelated, case: the Edward Snowden intelligence leaks.

Related: Key revelations from the Paradise Papers

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/945f3818b0fd4341e5630e159af931eb8272f1c9/0_216_5516_3309/master/5516.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=7842dad746ef8680e73c4e8336b1c551




Number crushing: economists give Hammond's budget the big thumbs down | John Crace

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 17:49:43 GMT2017-11-23T17:49:43Z

In a dark room in central London, the Institute for Fiscal Studies pores over the figures behind Wednesday’s budget and finds little actually there

Call it the revenge of the geeks. On every other day of the year, politicians feel free to play fast and loose with the figures. Anything to massage them towards their own ends. But having stayed up all night going through Treasury forecasts, the day after the budget belongs to the experts. This is when they get to have their say on the government’s competency, and the chancellor can do little but sit back and suck it up.

Philip Hammond is quite happy to kick back his heels and listen to MPs from all parties delivering their verdicts in the Commons in the post-budget debate, as he knows that almost all of them are totally innumerate. So even if one of them does happen upon an accounting error there’s a fair chance no one will know if it’s accurate or not. But a big thumbs down from the nerds can be career ending. And there’s no one the chancellor fears more than the Institute for Fiscal Studies, an independent thinktank that has a far better track record of getting things right than anyone in the Treasury.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/78b3cf929a20341e46e143ea5ca343f04227960a/44_0_3241_1945/master/3241.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=b5ff430ebacfe0d1c7e4156471f8dff1




Brexit has created a political climate no budget can fix | Martin Kettle

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 19:43:42 GMT2017-11-23T19:43:42Z

Philip Hammond’s efforts are mostly futile. Old party loyalties are now torn and the Tories and Labour are in denial

Former chancellor Ken Clarke writes in his memoirs that in British political history there is nothing so dead and forgotten as old budgets. That must be reassuring news for Philip Hammond. The current chancellor’s sticking plasters this week are best understood as a far from glorious 21st-century application of Harold Macmillan’s advice to Tory chancellors that “we must do something, or else the socialists will promise everything”.

This short-term approach lay behind the measures on stamp duty, universal credit, the NHS and the regions. But Wednesday’s modest handouts were dwarfed by the historic slowing of growth, and the consequently falling real wages and living standards over which Hammond presides. These will shape British life in the coming decade far more than any of this week’s budget measures. None of Britain’s political parties have the measure of this yet.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/984c9160cbc013399b16f8c112a62e63b7945880/0_125_6388_3835/master/6388.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=cea9b01dfd7b2a4417732bb2a596df0e




Thames Water explains why nationalisation is suddenly popular | Nils Pratley

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 06:00:23 GMT2017-11-24T06:00:23Z

Privatised utility was seen as a financial instrument paying fat dividends to offshore owners while short-changing customers. Its new boss seems to think that game is now up

Hang out with executives from water companies and you’ll quickly learn than everybody loathes Thames Water. Insiders blame the firm for spoiling the reputation of the entire industry. They wonder if Labour’s calls for re-nationalisation would score so well in opinion polls if Thames hadn’t so precisely fulfilled the caricature of a privatised water utility – the one that draws firms as financial engineers who pay fat dividends to offshore owners while short-changing customers.

Not all those peers have pristine records themselves, but you can understand why they point at Thames. The company’s current corporate structure is baffling to ordinary mortals. Two Cayman Islands entities sit below the regulated utility and a chain of five companies stands between the main company and its shareholders. Complexity is one reason why it was impossible for outsiders to calculate the returns made by Macquarie during its decade as Thames’ dominant shareholder. Nobody, however, disputes that the Australian financial house made a packet.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/f81a7b30125aff99f4639f94fd9bc06fff2519bd/0_0_4438_2664/master/4438.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=2790ed4fe761077981c9f74eb77d948c




Why is the government waging a war against disabled people? | Peter Beresford

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 13:19:26 GMT2017-11-23T13:19:26Z

Ministers’ social care and welfare reforms represent a deliberately prejudiced, vicious attack on a significant minority of the population

A recent United Nations report on its inspection into the UK’s record on disabled people’s rights was described as a “17-page-long catalogue of shame” by one commentator, who wrote:

Over the past seven years, cuts to benefits, social care, the legal system and local authority funding have effectively put decades of slow, painful progress into reverse.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/67f367ec64f8b30b76c0433b0fb0aa5f07ea9e65/0_51_3205_1923/master/3205.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=d910c1a2b66a84b1a8d43f0d51cc81a5




Brexiters, Ireland won’t be tricked by your mendacity over the border issue | Brigid Laffan

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 17:54:26 GMT2017-11-23T17:54:26Z

Dublin is on the stronger side in demanding a settlement of the border question before EU trade talks can begin

In the run-up to next month’s critical EU summit, when the 27 heads of government will decide whether to move to talks on the future relationship between the EU and Britain, Ireland has assumed centre stage. This should come as no surprise to anyone in the UK, as successive Irish governments have been telling them since David Cameron first mooted a Brexit referendum in 2013. Brexit threatens Ireland’s core geopolitical and geoeconomic interests.

The taoiseach, Leo Varadkar, has in recent weeks become much more assertive in his insistence that the UK government addresses the border problem before trade talks can begin. This has earned him the ire of the British tabloid press and of the DUP leader, Arlene Foster, whose party holds the balance of power in Westminster but who warned Varadkar not to “play around with” Northern Ireland. The leak of an internal Irish government document in which the British approach to Brexit was described as “chaotic” won’t have reduced the tensions.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/3ed9abc8505acc9fd29b021e0f28cc53a0d49543/0_76_3521_2113/master/3521.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=71e8aba4c6811d557911033cdb386e64




No trolling, no threats, no swearing: the Manhattan mothers’ very civil war | Emma Brockes

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 17:25:24 GMT2017-11-23T17:25:24Z

The Mommas Facebook group was shut down after endless online fights, but their impeccable debating standards are a lesson to us all

Something exciting happened in the world of online mothers’ forums this week, and it wasn’t a list of 10 new ways to spy on your nanny. In Britain there is Mumsnet; in New York, until recently, there was the Upper East Side Mommas group, a Facebook community of some 28,000 women that many went to for the advice – but stayed for the fights.

A vibrant group crumbled because adults can’t tolerate other adults expressing passionate counter-views

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/d86361cc761eddcba54b96235b817bcf9e429e9f/0_65_5616_3370/master/5616.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=04907f4155f5aa5a1ea559949e9a41d4




I got a 'don't block my drive' note on my ambulance: this is what happened next

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 13:07:42 GMT2017-11-23T13:07:42Z

Crews are used to getting these messages but the tweet of this one spiralled out of control

My ambulance made headlines this month because someone left a note on the windscreen saying, “You may be saving lives, but don’t park your van in a stupid place and block my drive”. A colleague tweeted a picture of it that went viral.

We noticed it after arriving at hospital with a patient in a critical condition. It had been our first job of the day and when we had pulled up outside the property, people were waiting outside to meet us. I could tell from the expression of one man that he was very concerned. We weren’t going to be at the scene for long. The patient was vomiting blood. I told my colleague to get a stretcher.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/d836be9bdb61ef2b51c07a495ed9d45f1c9ac58c/0_260_5069_3044/master/5069.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=66bce03c633fc0bafe73e975acd87bc7




Portrait exhibition at Oxford showcases university's diversity

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:18:52 GMT2017-11-24T12:18:52Z

Oxonian subjects, including disabled, black and minority ethnic graduates, nominated by students and staff to defy stereotypes

An exhibition of portraits including a Winter Olympics bobsledder, several novelists, a human rights campaigner, two astro physicists, a sailor and a brilliant young mathematician opens in Oxford this week.

What the subjects have in common is their high intelligence and that although they gaze with calm confidence from their portraits – and in the case of the novelist Jeanette Winterson portrayed by Gerard Hanson, perched on a doorstep in well- polished boots, ready to dismantle any challenger - almost certainly there were moments for all of them when they felt like awkward outsiders during their time at Oxford university.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/a30e6dd3526109fe39be7147bc458e9a9ed179f1/2_21_796_477/master/796.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=e33b1bcc3988facf75dedb32fabcf60e




Britons told to prepare for cold as snow and ice hit many regions

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:37:21 GMT2017-11-24T11:37:21Z

Met Office issues weather warning for ice in northern parts of Britain and for the West Midlands

After a week in which temperatures hit the mid-teens in some parts of the UK, it appears normal service is being resumed, with Britons warned to prepare for cold weather as ice and snow hits many regions.

The Met Office has issued a yellow warning for ice in parts of the UK over Friday night and Public Health England has told people to take precautions.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/395be498b2b1eba0c154a095d7759bd7b255c955/44_0_4008_2405/master/4008.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=ebffdb48552c7854f32c4cc7b0c75b13




Kidney disease drug recommended by Nice 'may do more harm than good'

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:30:36 GMT2017-11-24T11:30:36Z

Exclusive: Little evidence that phosphate binders improve patient wellbeing, warn experts, while one type may contribute to increased risk of cardiovascular disease

The UK’s drug guidelines body is recommending a type of medication to treat chronic kidney disease despite no firm evidence that it benefits patients – and some signs that the drugs may do more harm than good, experts have warned.

Phosphate binders are commonly prescribed to lower blood phosphate levels in patients with advanced kidney disease, including those on dialysis. High phosphate has been linked to worse patient outcomes, including bone and muscle problems, a build-up of calcium in the blood vessels causing them to stiffen, and an increased death rate.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/668b9fc4efee2013f3542b13e3d0af2abfcf5f40/0_226_2656_1594/master/2656.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=17bee32ce3e0df4d15a3256583091d49




Man jailed for life for 1978 Aberdeen murder

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:02:42 GMT2017-11-24T12:02:42Z

Judge praises police and pathologists as he orders Riasat Khan to serve at least 16 years for killing Kazi Ahmad and fleeing to Pakistan

A man has been jailed for life for murdering a restaurant owner almost four decades ago.

Riasat Khan stabbed 41-year-old Kazi Ahmad seven times in the neck and chest at a flat in Aberdeen on 13 October 1978. He then fled the country for Pakistan, returning to the UK in the mid-1980s.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/95951ed068dd900209a7cf9069fb62e26591eb0c/0_18_5616_3370/master/5616.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=1b97aa138802fabb2bbd71cc29d7e039




Children with mental health problems 'guaranteed' treatment in four weeks

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 20:49:25 GMT2017-11-23T20:49:25Z

Exclusive: Leaked government paper reveals plan for waiting time cap – but cuts mean it cannot be rolled out for four years

Children with anxiety and depression will be guaranteed treatment within four weeks in a new effort to improve mental health care, but lack of NHS staff and funding means the plan cannot be fully introduced until 2021.

A leak from the forthcoming green paper on children’s mental health, due to be published in early December, reveals that for the first time, the government will introduce a maximum waiting time for youngsters needing such treatment.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/e7aa178bbdd14549e4f061c74af7ba76525f30b2/0_146_5760_3456/master/5760.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=59fe86c670c3541ceecc1ce0e4ae0f86




Join fight against 'titans of technology', UK union chief urges Catholics

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 06:01:22 GMT2017-11-24T06:01:22Z

‘Workers have become slaves to an app,’ TUC general secretary to tell Vatican summit aimed at fostering unity in fight for economic justice

The “global titans of technology” are forcing workers into a form of slavery, Britain’s trade union chief will tell Catholic and labour movement leaders at the Vatican on Friday.

Trade unions and the Catholic church must build “a popular alliance for economic justice”, Frances O’Grady, the TUC general secretary, is to say in a speech in Rome.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/1eb078abbf924d3e8824ac772ea8a34a66f4e051/68_71_3365_2018/master/3365.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=2927c3f6ee8b4cd66c6c8930b2a39b2f




Black Friday to cause spikes in air pollution and plastic waste, warn environmentalists

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:50:54 GMT2017-11-24T11:50:54Z

The shopping frenzy will see 82,000 diesel delivery vans on UK streets, with plastic toys and electronic goods among the most popular purchases

The online shopping frenzy of the Black Friday weekend will see 82,000 diesel vans and trucks on UK roads, raising concerns of air pollution spikes on residential streets as more than £7bn of purchases are delivered.

In the UK online shoppers are expected to spend up to £1.35bn today alone, according to analysts at IMRG, the UK’s online retail association. Plastic toys, games and electronic goods are among the most sought after items in the biggest weekend of shopping in Britain and the US, with environmentalists and health experts warning that it will add to the mountain of plastic waste and increase air pollution.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/13bbeac1480c844830bf57ba425a47596ef4df41/0_182_2835_1701/master/2835.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=46f50de9ba04faa17afa13332502d9ba




Conservatives will break NHS funding pledge, Labour claims

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 19:49:24 GMT2017-11-23T19:49:24Z

Government is not promising enough money to meet pledge to increase real-terms funding for NHS in each year of parliament, Labour says

Labour has accused the Conservatives of breaking a manifesto pledge to increase real-terms funding for the NHS in every year of this parliament by not promising sufficient extra funds in the budget.

An analysis carried out for Labour by the House of Commons library shows that despite the chancellor, Philip Hammond, announcing an extra £2.8bn in day-to-day funding, real-terms funding per head is set to fall in 2018-19, and remain flat for two years after that.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/0d2f2cecc9ed90af7d3ed08e35636d72b661bd02/0_80_4134_2480/master/4134.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=d32318365aa17031bd28a22da9afa024




Ken Clarke: Tories had deal with Rupert Murdoch for 2010 election

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 19:34:54 GMT2017-11-23T19:34:54Z

Former minister suggests deal involved appointment by prime minister David Cameron of Andy Coulson, former News of the World editor, to position at No 10

David Cameron may have done “some sort of a deal” with Rupert Murdoch to win the Sun’s support for the Conservatives in the 2010 general election, Ken Clarke, the former justice secretary, has claimed.

“Quite how David Cameron got the Sun out of the hands of Gordon Brown I shall never know,” Clarke said. “Rupert would never let Tony [Blair – Brown’s predecessor] down because Tony had backed the Iraq war. Maybe it was some sort of a deal. David would not tell me what it was. Suddenly we got the Murdoch empire on our side.”

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/a4329c909740979fdfbf0b348d4dc5e3eb9c1b9c/0_33_2832_1700/master/2832.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=45bda8250ad798803eb43d8483609d9c




UK faces two decades of no earnings growth and more austerity, says IFS

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 19:23:12 GMT2017-11-23T19:23:12Z

Thinktank’s budget analysis says forecasts for lower productivity, earnings and growth until 2022 were ‘pretty grim reading’

Britain’s leading financial thinktank has warned workers to expect an unprecedented two lost decades of earnings growth and many more years of austerity as a result of the marked slowdown in the economy announced in Philip Hammond’s budget.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies said in its traditional post-budget analysis that forecasts slashing productivity, earnings and growth in every year until 2022 made “pretty grim reading”, and predicted that even by the middle of the next decade, Britain’s public finances would still be in the red.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/2e0762abdcf9b940eaf9101047251b80028c26b0/0_228_3538_2123/master/3538.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=2f3ed26ac823f82a2f2060e6239f0950




London knife crime out of control, say murdered teenager's family

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 08:28:08 GMT2017-11-24T08:28:08Z

‘Truly horrific’ attack on apprentice carpenter Jason Isaacs is 18th fatal stabbing involving teenagers in capital this year

The family of an 18-year-old stabbed to death in an apparently unprovoked attack in north-west London have said knife crime is “out of control” in the capital.

Jason Isaacs, an apprentice carpenter, was with friends in Northolt on Saturday when they were targeted by balaclava-clad attackers on mopeds in what police say was a planned attack.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/746d7db5014ecd34154be77e5864f627ae9c3a61/0_109_546_328/master/546.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=a950fad134e6fe2c4571fa69c26c9991




Google clamps down on ticket resale sites

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 16:45:00 GMT2017-11-23T16:45:00Z

Search giant unveils restrictions against secondary ticketing sites such as Viagogo and StubHub including new controls on paid search

Google will impose tough new restrictions on ticket resale companies to prevent music and theatre fans needlessly paying above face value on websites such as Viagogo and StubHub.

In a move celebrated by fans’ campaign groups, ticket resale companies will be barred from claiming to be an “official” source of tickets in Google results when they are actually selling them secondhand.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/e69cad3c364a024207f8d1236cef56206eae3fc6/0_138_3000_1800/master/3000.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=3a8f4ab9cd5c5798f348f5ac8108d4ec




Ryanair crew told to sell more perfume and scratchcards or face action

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 19:04:20 GMT2017-11-23T19:04:20Z

Recruitment firms warn staff not selling enough merchandise on flights to up their game or risk ‘disciplinary proceedings’

Ryanair cabin crew have been told they could face “disciplinary proceedings” and have their working hours forcibly changed unless they sell more perfume and scratchcards.

The Irish airline has previously denied pressuring staff to hit specific sales targets, after it emerged they were encouraged to sell products in return for bonuses.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/50827704546260da62faae923bd9519601f169f2/0_85_2022_1213/master/2022.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=71565cf62a936142c06c6d1704c66db4




Mortuary errors 'avoidable if bodies treated like living patients'

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 00:05:15 GMT2017-11-24T00:05:15Z

Many serious mistakes – including identity mix-ups – could be avoided, according to study of 132 incidents reported in England

Serious mistakes made in mortuaries – including identity mix-ups - might be avoided if the deceased received the sort of management standards given to the living, according to a study.

Postmortems on the wrong bodies, and even people being buried or cremated by the wrong family, are some of the errors spotted by researchers who looked into 132 incidents reported in England to a national NHS database between 1 April 2002 and 31 March 2013.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/46e648d51b41231f21110afe319cb4a10a80ed54/824_960_3536_2122/master/3536.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=06d620af66c717b47d0874cb769a486d




Met police still failing on child protection policies, report finds

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 00:01:15 GMT2017-11-24T00:01:15Z

Over 90% of 135 cases inspected found to be substandard, despite force repeatedly being told it was endangering children

The Metropolitan police failed to adequately improve the way they followed child protection policies, despite repeatedly being told they were leaving children in danger, an official report found.

Over 90% of 135 cases inspected were substandard, said Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services (HMICFRS). In one case, a 15-year-old missing girl was found at the address of a registered sex offender. Other children who were in care and at risk of child sexual exploitation were also there.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/ac3cc544c1f0caa3e33f129346ba9eec8eff427d/0_146_3500_2100/master/3500.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=cfb69b7c53daf36a4e39dcbb5c5f4609




Whirlpool named ‘worst offender’ for white goods fires in London

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 00:01:15 GMT2017-11-24T00:01:15Z

Fire brigade data show appliance maker’s machines caused three times more blazes in capital over eight years than next worst offender Bosch

Tumble dryers and other white goods made by Whirlpool caused more than three times as many fires in London over the last eight years as the next worst offending manufacturer, according to new data obtained by the Guardian.

Official records of emergencies attended by the London Fire Brigade are dominated by a high number of incidents involving machines in Whirlpool Corporation ownership.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/1c2d61db29f55433bb6e5f82faa1bae1d988205d/144_0_4320_2592/master/4320.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=b89cd19d5a7b0b00ce6115c95a24ed8f




We're living longer but in poorer health, warns thinktank

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 06:30:23 GMT2017-11-24T06:30:23Z

Life expectancy is increasing, but the number of years of healthy life in retirement is not keeping up, with dramatic variations seen across the country

Adults are spending an increasing number of their retirement years in poor health, a thinktank on ageing and population has warned.

The report, which focuses on the situation facing those approaching retirement, also highlights the growing inequalities in life expectancy around the country.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/45896c859d851e255d28a4ce957949cc4c99df0a/0_171_5120_3072/master/5120.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=6b23fec06dd9188698bb32da1804ff6e




Michael Flynn breaks ties with Trump's lawyers over Russia investigation – reports

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 07:59:58 GMT2017-11-24T07:59:58Z

Move suggests former national security adviser could be seeking a deal with special counsel Robert Mueller over election interference

A lawyer for former national security adviser Michael Flynn has told President Donald Trump’s legal team that they are no longer communicating with them about the special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into Russian election interference.

The decision could be a sign that Flynn is moving to cooperate with Mueller’s investigation or to negotiate a deal for himself.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/90d442014331d7942918830258477ffdc1452971/0_0_5000_3000/master/5000.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=ace76122e51157979d4fb26861f285c8




South African court doubles Oscar Pistorius's prison sentence

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 09:18:03 GMT2017-11-24T09:18:03Z

State argued athlete’s original sentence of six years for murder of girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp was ‘shockingly lenient’

A South African appeal court has more than doubled the former Paralympian Oscar Pistorius’s prison sentence for murdering his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp.

The supreme court of appeal (SCA) increased Pistorius’s sentence from six years in prison to 13 years and five months.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/ff55e07b9535a25a63af493befc42014ddcb9ceb/0_68_3465_2080/master/3465.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=4e48790dcab151e557f6ab70af20727f




Japanese politicians force colleague with baby to leave chamber

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:09:23 GMT2017-11-24T12:09:23Z

Yuka Ogata took seven-month-old son to work to highlight difficulties parents have amid acute shortage of childcare places

Weeks after Ivanka Trump lauded Japan’s progress on women’s participation in the workforce, a female politician was forced to leave the chamber after her colleagues objected to the presence of her seven-month-old child.

Yuka Ogata had taken her son to a session of the Kumamoto municipal assembly on Wednesday to highlight the difficulties many Japanese parents – particularly women – face juggling their careers with raising children, amid an acute shortage of nursery places.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/584dd7b0195f0aa2db47824f441b92aef76a40e4/1264_822_2384_1430/master/2384.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=0a9f9d78ed3ebb23fa8a86ce6f9a3868




Amazon tribe saves plant lore with ‘healing forests’ and encyclopedia

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:40:33 GMT2017-11-24T12:40:33Z

In a bid to safeguard knowledge the Matsés in Peru have been planting “medicinal agroforestry” plots and written a 1,044-page two-volume book.

The seven indigenous Matsés elders were slowly meandering through the forest. They were explaining how different trees and plants are used for medicinal purposes, exchanging stories about how they had acquired their extraordinary knowledge and put it to good use. There were memories of an encounter with a jaguar and someone’s father struck by some kind of pain in the eye - “not conjunctivitis!” - while claims were made for successfully treating women haemorrhaging, snake-bite, a swollen leg and constipation.

The forest we were in was actually more of a garden - or “healing forest” or “medicinal agroforestry” plot - planted late last year by six young Matsés men under the expert guidance of elder Arturo Tumi Nëcca Potsad. “There are all types [of trees and plants] here,” Arturo told the Guardian, holding a spear made of peach palm and looking about him. “About 100 types, 3,000 plants.”

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/01ddce9f3660df713e1972030da4249626ac33d0/27_215_3818_2292/master/3818.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=d9b3780e7e6a04b07b8ddc74a940d41c




Saudi Arabia still blocking aid to Yemen despite pledge to lift siege

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 07:21:04 GMT2017-11-24T07:21:04Z

Saudi-led coalition has failed to lift blockade on Yemen’s ports, leaving tens of thousands without food and medicine

Aid agencies said Saudi Arabia had not fulfilled its promise to reopen humanitarian aid corridors into northern Yemen on Thursday, leaving the main aid lifeline closed for tens of thousands of starving people.

Following intense pressure from western governments, Saudi Arabia agreed on Wednesday to lift a fortnight-long blockade of the port of Hodeida from noon (9am GMT) on Thursday, but more than eight hours after the deadline, aid agencies said no permissions for humanitarian shipments had been given.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/b4f99c1fce7527b1b2f6944e18c6167ccfdcd60d/0_114_2642_1585/master/2642.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=16750b109c35a1438e8f695d1c5b67c3




Rules of war 'need urgent review' as civilian deaths hit record high

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 13:06:59 GMT2017-11-24T13:06:59Z

Germany and Austria urge UN member states to tackle ‘devastating harm’ caused by airstrikes and bombs in urban areas

The record number of civilians killed or injured by explosive weapons in worldwide conflicts last year has prompted calls for UN member states to conduct an urgent review of military rules of engagement.

Germany and Austria have urged states to prevent and reduce the “devastating harm” to civilians from airstrikes and bombs in urban areas.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/83510be90735db9f35dcfe951c2c04f49a385b63/0_182_5472_3283/master/5472.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=83e1ae6a90a71bd48a67d74030ebf69c




North Korean defector a 'nice guy' who likes watching CSI – surgeon

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 02:58:20 GMT2017-11-24T02:58:20Z

Doctor says 24-year-old known as Oh needed two bodies’ worth of blood transfusions to save him and has nightmares about being sent back over border

North Korea’s latest defector, a young soldier being identified only by his family name Oh, is a quiet, pleasant man who has nightmares about being returned to the North, his surgeon has said.

Related: North Korean defector's daring escape caught on video

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/2ad4a55fc79b16a775d8be9972661ff41673498d/0_263_2130_1277/master/2130.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=adcafaf4b384f83ffedabd9e28df1ffe




Indian newspapers run blank pages to protest journalist killing

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 06:29:46 GMT2017-11-24T06:29:46Z

Papers take step after Suddip Datta Bhowmick was allegedly shot dead on orders of an army official, the third reporter to have been murdered this year

Newspapers in the north-eastern Indian state of Tripura have run blank editorial pages to protest the murder of a journalist this week, the third prominent killing of a media worker in India since September.

Suddip Datta Bhaumik, a crime reporter, was allegedly shot dead on the orders of an army official on Tuesday while investigating a story on a paramilitary base.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/04684062d6bea0f07005a8d1e08d9d38c16b38f9/0_215_3500_2100/master/3500.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=71e10e135c13c737817acae022aa94e4




Briton arrested in Philippines with cache of guns and knives

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 08:34:18 GMT2017-11-24T08:34:18Z

Police also find 14 knives, five brass knuckles and a slingshot after Matthew George Marney, 38, is arrested in Pasig

A British man has been arrested in the Philippines after police said they had found five handguns, live ammunition and other weapons including combat knives and a stun gun in his possession.

Matthew George Marney was photographed in custody wearing an orange T-shirt bearing the acronym for the criminal investigation and detection group (CIDG), the primary investigation arm of the Philippine police force.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c2bedbaa8e0bd9a8b819238cafbea015de0df42d/208_1274_783_470/master/783.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=2eccda14d85b286e19aa10e817b671d1




'Indiana Joan': Perth woman, 95, accused of looting Egypt artefacts

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 08:04:15 GMT2017-11-24T08:04:15Z

Australia investigating allegations that Joan Howard would steal from archaeological sites during her husband’s diplomatic trips

The Australian government has confirmed it is looking into the case of a 95-year-old Perth woman accused of looting artefacts from countries including Egypt.

Monica Hanna of Egypt’s Heritage Taskforce posted an open letter to Australia’s ambassador to Egypt, Neil Hawkins, on Facebook this month, alleging Joan Howard spent most of her time during her husband’s diplomatic trips looting archaeological sites.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c8e7e2db8b1e0b65b2d2d96cd44ca812d9acd775/0_24_3454_2073/master/3454.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=3091c44c6bb79062960082308d2374f0




Argentina: grief and anger after 'explosion' near missing submarine

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 19:08:07 GMT2017-11-23T19:08:07Z

Sound described as ‘abnormal’ was heard on day that contact was lost, navy spokesman confirms

The families of the crew of a missing Argentinian navy submarine have reacted with grief and then anger to the possibility that an explosion hit the submarine around the time it sent its last signal on 15 November.

An abnormal sound detected in the South Atlantic ocean was “consistent with an explosion”, the navy spokesman Enrique Balbi said. The navy did not have enough information to say what the cause of the explosion could have been or whether the vessel – the ARA San Juan – might have been attacked, he said.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/2a43e7739aefb3095347e27e0a13eb69b78ef109/0_0_5937_3562/master/5937.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=d45987cea651652f0e8d7ffb60ca6de2




China horrified by allegations of child abuse at kindergarten

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 08:28:01 GMT2017-11-24T08:28:01Z

Authorities promise swift response after parents claims toddlers have been molested, spiked with needles and drugged with mysterious white pills

Chinese authorities are promising swift and decisive action after horrific allegations of child abuse surfaced at an upmarket nursery just a few miles east of the Communist party’s leadership compound in Beijing.

Since Wednesday, Chinese media outlets have reported claims from outraged parents that toddlers at the nursery in Beijing’s Chaoyang district were molested, spiked with needles and drugged with mysterious white pills.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/8dcee4127205bda1507c7c1f2628a724a4985f40/0_51_3500_2101/master/3500.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=5e3e4ec7430fb348883f0875eb971ba2




Firms ditch YouTube ads over predatory comments on videos of children

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 10:33:42 GMT2017-11-24T10:33:42Z

Global brands suspend YouTube and Google advertising after it was placed alongside videos paedophiles exploited

Big brands are pulling advertising from YouTube and Google after their ads were found to be displayed against content being exploited by paedophiles.

Despite YouTube promising to take an “even more aggressive stance” against predatory behaviour, the confectionery giants Mars and Cadbury, the supermarket Lidl, Deutsche Bank and Adidas have led a wave of brands removing advertising from YouTube.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/18d7d038ebb7c2ff50bcdc524dc87db7a9f161fa/0_115_5472_3283/master/5472.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=802395ce07f847d8c480ffa2f92dfad2




Hundreds of thousands of Spaniards call for ban on Franco foundation

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 16:35:03 GMT2017-11-23T16:35:03Z

Petition filed in parliament says foundations glorifying Hitler or Mussolini would be unthinkable in Germany or Italy

More than 200,000 Spaniards have signed a petition filed in parliament on Thursday asking the government to ban the National Francisco Franco Foundation (FNFF), which glorifies Spain’s former dictator.

“In Germany or in Italy, it would be unthinkable to have a Hitler foundation or a Mussolini foundation,” read the petition, filed by a group that included descendants of victims of the Franco regime, in power from 1939 to 1975.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c78016c1547a47aa68aa055da63b61a4d6bc6dc0/0_42_4500_2700/master/4500.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=c7ae805a9af47885a0a91e6ee33f2b49




Autocracies breed terror in Middle East, says Qatari foreign minister

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 16:15:47 GMT2017-11-23T16:15:47Z

Speech in London aims to present country as a more reliable ally in fight against terrorism than ‘crisis-making’ Saudi Arabia

Qatar’s foreign minister has claimed the root cause of Middle East terrorism lay in authoritarian rulers, and lack of human rights, presenting Qatar as a more reliable western ally in the fight against terror than “impulsive, crisis-making” Saudi Arabia.

Speaking in front of British ministers at a Qatar-sponsored anti-terror conference in London, Mohammed bin Abdulrahman al-Thani stressed his country’s commitment to use political and economic policies, as well as security measures to attack extremism’s “breeding ground of injustice and authoritarianism”.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/5bb4ac3c41b6804f4fb92c78b6579ecbe725af78/0_371_5568_3341/master/5568.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=6b21df945d2aac769a1fec3b5df6359b




Driver of jeep that slid off pier died of misadventure, inquest rules

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 20:04:00 GMT2017-11-23T20:04:00Z

Sean McGrotty was over the drink-drive limit when his car slid off Buncrana pier in Donegal killing him and four of his family

The driver of a jeep that slid off a pier and into an Irish lough killing him and four of his family died from misadventure, an inquest has found.

Sean McGrotty was over the drink-drive limit when his Audi 4x4 slid down Buncrana pier into Lough Swilly in County Donegal in the Irish Republic. At the time of the accident, in March 2016, the pier was said to be “slippery as ice” due to a covering of thick algae.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/589c5a2c87e717d335eb701e3b67276313b1be5a/0_214_3500_2100/master/3500.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=680146148162ad70e15ebf0a0bfee1ed




Slovenia PM facing impeachment over support for refugee

Thu, 23 Nov 2017 17:00:20 GMT2017-11-23T17:00:20Z

Miro Cerar accused of seeking to interfere with judiciary after he voiced support for Syrian man, Ahmad Shamieh, who is facing deportation

The prime minister of Slovenia, Miro Cerar, one of the few liberal leaders in central and eastern Europe, is facing impeachment over his support for a Syrian asylum seeker who is facing deportation.

Should the country’s rightwing opposition party be successful in their motion, Cerar, the leader of the centrist moderate party, could be dismissed from office by the Slovenian MPs, although government sources insist the prime minister has enough support in parliament to vote down the motion.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/7ed478e4de232df495e88af99921ad0cc9d8b397/1233_0_4383_2630/master/4383.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=33a291e203934d89aa8655cc972e283c




'I came down here to be forgotten': life in the tunnels beneath Las Vegas – video

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 12:00:19 GMT2017-11-22T12:00:19Z

An estimated 300 people live in the flood tunnels underneath Las Vegas, and many of them struggle with substance abuse and addiction. Paul Vautrinot was one of them, but he now works for the community organization Shine a Light, which offers services including housing and counseling to people living in the tunnels. Vautrinot visits the tunnels regularly to try to help residents find a way out

  • Outside in America is a year-long series on homelessness in the western US. The project focuses on people on the frontline of a devastating crisis and enables readers to take action to help solve the problem. Find out more and sign up to our monthly newsletter
Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/91983e3e848c2532566856e70f4d730ee1932e09/60_0_1800_1080/master/1800.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=1e898ff4d32f70760dfec885d8a5b79b




‘I’ve run out of tears’: inside London’s temporary housing crisis - video

Wed, 22 Nov 2017 07:26:42 GMT2017-11-22T07:26:42Z

Connect House in Mitcham, London, is a converted office block in the depths of an industrial estate that is temporarily home to vulnerable people, families and young children. We meet two young mothers who tell us what daily life is like there. An estimated 120,540 children with their families live in temporary accommodation across England, a  figure that has risen 37% since 2014.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/1b33b3388776a55dd459f7f0d1ec8db37e3d702a/60_0_1800_1080/master/1800.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=b1fa8eeeeca185f2f057eed500dc34be




City: the remarkable urban photographs of David Levene - video

Tue, 21 Nov 2017 10:00:55 GMT2017-11-21T10:00:55Z

Award-winning photographer David Levene has revealed an unparalleled cross-section of the urban 21st century over more than a decade documenting how people live and work in 70 cities. From east to west, using archive and never-before-seen images, we hear the story behind three of the most moving photographs in his new book - from Yangon in Myanmar, Ulaanbaatar in Mongolia​ ​and​ Calais in France​ - and follow him back to his birthplace as he hunts for the final picture

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/f6d81d6588f0767ede8ee600782b936382a0dc1f/60_0_1800_1080/master/1800.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=7c54f837815b0f5b31981c5f92d369fb




Why is first Ashes day-night Test and pink ball a big deal? – video explainer

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 18:21:34 GMT2017-11-20T18:21:34Z

When Australia host England at the Adelaide Oval on 2 December it will be the first day-night Test in an Ashes series. But just what are day-night Tests all about and why do they use a pink ball? Here we reveal all

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/ddbd46eeff6a9a095b3548188b95dd0e287d0aa3/164_51_1592_955/master/1592.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=8009039cf13b5971b443cd816bb37ccb




Be very afraid … robots can now do backflips - video

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 10:35:40 GMT2017-11-17T10:35:40Z

Not content with simply walking or carrying objects, Atlas, made by the robotics firm Boston Dynamics, can now jump across gaps, jump and spin 180°, and – most impressive of all – it can backflip, even using its arms to balance after landing just like a real gymnast

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/227264e08f93523b04d5352b511773f4f6d9cd2f/60_0_1800_1080/master/1800.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=36b0409cb5c57f3809c93491f34b3573




Joseph Stiglitz on why Trump is unfit to be US president - video

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 14:30:30 GMT2017-11-16T14:30:30Z

The economist and author of Globalisation and its Discontents talks to the Guardian's Larry Elliott about why he considers Donald Trump unfit to be US president. He says stagnant incomes, the opioid crisis and falling life expectancies all pointed towards a political problem in the US but no one imagined it leading to a Trump presidency

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/b3d7a9049f37086d607e56c8dd8de01b6ea7fa5a/120_0_1800_1080/master/1800.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=8095d7e1ac3b0d232276fe18fc191899




Lost in Paris review – Emmanuelle Riva beguiles in this funny little gem

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 11:00:02 GMT2017-11-24T11:00:02Z

French screen icon joins writer-directors Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon for one of her final appearances Here is one of the final screen appearances of Emmanuelle Riva, icon of movies from Michael Haneke’s Amour to Gillo Pontecorvo’s Kapò and Alain Resnais’s Hiroshima Mon Amour, who died in January at the age of 89. It is a delectably gentle, elegant, self-effacing performance. Riva plays a lovably scatty old lady called Marthe in this Tati-esque comedy from French writer-directors Dominique Abel and Fiona Gordon. The movie they have jointly devised, and in which they star, is a clever, funny and distinctly unworldly comedy with an insouciant line in visual humour. Fiona (Fiona Gordon) is a young goof from Canada who comes to Paris to visit her similarly away-with-the-fairies aunt Marthe (Riva). A mishap on the banks of, and then in, the Seine leads to an encounter with a romantic tramp called Dom (Dominique Abel). It’s a classic French entertainment that could have been produced almost any time in the last 60 years. There is a sophistication in its childlike guilelessness and also a cameo for veteran French comedy player Pierre Richard. This movie is as sweet-natured as Abel and Gordon’s debut film Rumba, and they break out some serious tango movies here, too. It’s a little gem. Continue reading...[...]


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/79eefaced5dcf5b039a9206de73a817fce43a8cd/11_0_1800_1080/master/1800.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=def63adf1fdde8444ecd8ddf74c9b4f0




You Should Come With Me Now by M John Harrison review – stories ​for the uncommon reader​

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 12:00:04 GMT2017-11-24T12:00:04Z

Funhouse​-mirror​ reflections of human nature emerge from these inventive fables and surreal spoofs – but th​e humour is as dry as etherOne of these brilliantly told stories, “The Walls”, begins: “A man, let’s call him D, is seen digging his way out through the wall of his cell. To help in this project, D has only the thinnest and least reliable tools: two dessert spoons (one stainless steel, one electro-plated nickel silver); half of a pair of curved nail scissors; some domestic knives lacking handles; and so on. The cell wall, constructed from grey, squarish cinder blocks about a foot on a side has been carelessly mortared and laid without much attention to detail. But this lack of artifice makes no difference; none of the knives is long enough to reach the last half inch of mortar at the back of each block, and the more D uses them the shorter they get. Each block must, eventually, be loosened and removed by hand, a task which can take several months, and which leaves him exhausted.”A close attention to detail characterises this story and contributes much to its effectiveness, and yet, like the careless mortaring of the cinder blocks, it makes no difference in the end. Why and how does D have two dessert spoons? What does he live on during these months (which become years)? Who brings it to his cell? We have nothing with which to fill in unstated facts, as we’re used to doing when reading fiction, because the story is consistent only in pulling the carpe[...]


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/0e640258e3c3bd482c253c37bd346cad9ecc5aa0/0_127_2289_1373/master/2289.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=077af4fdfa6c632e70e7f18f8bd97c47




Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward review – slow apocalypse of black America

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 07:30:24 GMT2017-11-24T07:30:24Z

This award-winning portrait of a Mississippi family blighted by drugs and prison is a fierce critique of US history

Sing, Unburied, Sing begins as it mostly means to go on: in blackness. A teenager named Jojo finds himself in a place of dirt and mud and slime and blood. His grandfather is showing him how to kill a goat: how to slit its throat, how to slice its stomach and reach in for its intestines. There are terrible bleating and gurgling sounds. The smell “overwhelms like a faceful of pig shit”. Buzzards hover above. Soon the youngster is throwing up in the grass. Not much later he’ll be eating the goat’s liver in a plate full of gravy.

If this sounds apocalyptic, it’s representing the slow apocalypse being experienced by black America. Jesmyn Ward’s gnarly, freighted novel is a portrait of a broken family living on the Gulf Coast of Mississippi. This family is headed by Leonie, a mother at 17, hooked on drugs, married to a white man named Michael whose cousin killed her brother and who is himself completing a jail sentence. Their son Jojo acts as a bridge between grandparents Pop and Mama (the former afflicted by memories; the latter dying of cancer) and his toddler sister.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/378cd6dad453465c9a1266a16522b662fbfb3907/0_273_3168_1901/master/3168.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=27cbc823170b5406f92eeefe0a8264d3




Marie Curie: The Courage of Knowledge review – sex and science in turn-of-the-century Europe

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 08:00:25 GMT2017-11-24T08:00:25Z

Soapy biopic of the Nobel prize-winning chemist which focuses more on her spicy personal life than her groundbreaking work

Director Marie Noelle’s biopic about Marie Curie, the Polish-born chemist who was the first woman to win the Nobel prize, is something of a tacky treat. Roughly 35% science talk and 65% soap opera, it has adulterous shenanigans and a strong-willed heroine (Polish actor Karolina Gruszka) defying sexism, xenophobia and antisemitism (even though she isn’t Jewish) to make it in a male profession.

The first part unfolds in a non-toxic soft-focus haze, all sun dapples and smiles, as Marie and her beloved hubby Pierre (Charles Berling) bask in acclaim after their crucial research on radiation is recognised by the Nobel committee.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/c606432b6fa9076a222117b0eda623e98770c3ad/0_22_2048_1229/master/2048.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=39e879e5759a00aee8da368bc8863c7d




'Facing disaster': children starve in siege of Syria's former breadbasket

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 05:00:21 GMT2017-11-24T05:00:21Z

With a political breakthrough unlikely at upcoming talks, people in eastern Ghouta face shortages of food, fuel and medicine

The sight of a woman weeping as she drags her malnourished children into a clinic is not rare in eastern Ghouta, which is under siege by forces loyal to Bashar al-Assad.

But when one mother told Abdel Hamid, a doctor, that she had fed her four starving children newspaper cutouts softened with water to stop them from screaming into the night, even he was stunned.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/a42d50cf69f27798f2f486e46bd87ff3c437f677/188_407_3982_2389/master/3982.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=d232f8b520b994e8e83131de69e44359




The $3bn subway station – and other urban white elephants

Fri, 24 Nov 2017 07:00:24 GMT2017-11-24T07:00:24Z

From Alaska’s ‘bridge to nowhere’ to Pyongyang’s Hotel of Doom, via a €1bn arts centre that leaks, here are the world’s most high-profile wastes of capital

How much should one subway station cost? The city of Toronto has an answer. The plan to extend transit in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough winds back at least a decade: at one time the plan was a seven-stop light-rail line; later a three-stop subway. Today, Scarborough is preparing to replace its six-stop automated train with just one single, solitary subway station, for a mere C$3bn (£1.8bn).

Is that a wise investment? Time will tell, but in a recently unearthed 2013 assessment the transport agency Metrolinx calls it “not a worthwhile use of money”. Many voters in Scarborough feel differently, and Toronto’s mayor, John Tory, has no plans to change course.

Continue reading...


Media Files:
https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/6375ba56beaa01bcdba5766dd9dfb7ac50418b44/0_329_5210_3126/master/5210.jpg?w=460&q=55&auto=format&usm=12&fit=max&s=942dee9d3c9dfd5869da17dd99d41c96