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Last Build Date: Wed, 23 Aug 2017 19:35:06 +0000

 



Legacy of Lead: The Right Place to Teach Mining

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 17:39:00 +0000

Today, Missouri is home to three major lead districts and the state has accounted for more than 90 percent of the nation’s lead production over the last century. But actually getting that lead out of the ground requires a lot of scientific knowledge and the hard work of underground laborers. Missouri University of Science and Technology in Rolla plays an important role in the history of lead mining in Missouri. “The university is really, really good,” Professor Paul Worsey said, “It’s got a good reputation, for practical engineers.” Worsey has been teaching mining and explosives engineering at Missouri S&T for 35 years. He says a big strength of the program is the experimental mine about five minutes away from the Rolla campus. “One of the great things about this mine is that students get to do things,” Worsey said, “They get grubby, they get dirty, they have realistic conditions, and when they leave here, they know what it is all about.” The land for the mine was first purchased


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/LEAD4.mp3




When Did Lead Become Dangerous? How Our Understanding of Risks Changed Over Time

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 16:49:43 +0000

Bill Haggard is the mayor of Herculaneum, Missouri, a town of 4,000 about a 30 minute drive south of St. Louis. He’s also the fire chief, president of the historical society and a retired teacher, among other distinctions, although he identifies first as a “lifelong resident.” For more than a century this town was built up around the lead smelter that sat along the Mississippi River. Today, though, most of the houses remaining in the hollowed out center of town are marked in spray paint with a bright orange ‘X.’ “If they have an ‘X’ on them they’re coming down,” Haggard says while driving by houses slated for demolition.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/HWSHOW_mixdown.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 23, 2017

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 13:58:06 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: NAACP Forum Draws a Crowd to Talk About Community Policing, Other Issues Suit: Teen Incarcerated Despite Video Proving His Innocence Gov. Greitens Postpones Marcellus Williams’ Execution Due to New DNA Evidence Backlash to Lawmaker's Trump Assassination Comment Continues


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0823AM.mp3




Big River Still Dealing With Lead Mining Waste

Tue, 22 Aug 2017 22:54:27 +0000

With a tackle box and a fishing pole, Gary Sanders baits his hook with a worm and casts his line into the river outside of Desloge, Missouri. “ I caught a couple little bass,” he says. ”I think they were small mouth. They weren’t very big. They were only about that big -- only 6 inches long.” Sanders is posted up at the Big River. He moved here from St. Louis a few years ago to live a more outdoors lifestyle. You won’t see him or many other fishermen in this area take home their catch for a fish fry though. That’s because these waters are still dealing with lingering contamination from lead mining.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/LEAD1.mp3




Discover Nature: Blue-Winged Teal

Tue, 22 Aug 2017 19:47:04 +0000

Discover Nature this week as a swift-flying, migratory duck begins returning to Missouri from the north.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/blue_winged_teal_for_web.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 22, 2017

Tue, 22 Aug 2017 13:02:25 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Preliminary MU Enrollment Statistics Offer Mixed Picture McCaskill Spending Offers Glimpse at Campaign Groundwork Missouri Prepares for Second Execution of 2017; Requests to Halt It Still Pending Proposed Increase in Transit Fares Sparks Discussion at Council Meeting


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/AUG22AM_mixdown.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 21, 2017

Mon, 21 Aug 2017 12:16:43 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Kansas City Confederate Memorial to be Moved After Vandalism Missouri State Parks: Don't Use Eclipse Glasses Agency Sold Midwest Innocence Project Asks Missouri Governor to Halt Tuesday's Execution Democratic, GOP Leaders Call for Chappelle-Nadal to Resign Over Trump Assassination Comment


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/AUG21AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscasts for August 18, 2017

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 22:57:04 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Lawmaker who Made Trump Assassination Remark may Face Ouster Stephens College Sued for Gender Discrimination McCaskill, Roberts Discuss Protecting Nation's Food Supply Explosive Device Tossed, Detonates Near Missouri Patrol Car Missouri Death Row Inmate Appeals to US Supreme Court Missouri State Parks: Don't use Eclipse Glasses Agency Sold


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0818NEWSCASTS_0.mp3




Thinking Out Loud: Planning Columbia's Business Loop 70

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 21:41:00 +0000

The Business Loop Community Improvement District , or the Loop CID aims to make a historic commercial artery in Columbia a more inviting place to visit and shop. Funded via a sales tax and voluntary tax among property owners, Loop leaders are planning their future . The Loop CID's Director Carrie Gartner and Board Chair Dave Griggs visited with KBIA's Trevor Harris about their plans for the future of The Loop.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/gartner_and_griggs_for_web_08182017.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 18, 2017

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 13:23:13 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Case of Autistic Missouri Teen Who Was Tasered After Stopping to Tie His Shoe Moves Forward Democratic, GOP Leaders Call for Chapelle-Nadal to Resign Over Trump Assassination Comment McCaskill, Possible Rival Hawley Meet at Missouri State Fair Trump Signs Bill to Help Vets Exposed to Mustard Gas


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/AUG18AM.mp3




Global Journalist: North Korea's Nuclear Standoff

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 02:55:10 +0000

Sixty-four years ago, a ceasefire brought a halt to the Korean War and left Korea divided. But in recent weeks the frozen conflict on the Korean peninsula threatened to re-erupt over the North’s nuclear weapons program. President Trump threatened North Korea with “fire and fury” and the North’s Kim Jong Il countered with a plan to launch an “enveloping fire” of missiles towards the U.S. territory of Guam. The showdown has tested the credibility of both leaders and raised anew the prospect of nuclear war in East Asia. On this edition of Global Journalist: a look at how such a war might come about and how a more stable peace could be achieved.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/20170817GLOBAL.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for August 17, 2017

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 21:16:23 +0000

Regional news from the KBIA newsroom, including: State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal: No Plans to Resign over Trump Post Survey: Drought Still Burdening Rural Economy in 10 States St. Louis Cardinals Taking Claim of Rally Cat


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/AUG17PM1.mp3




Farm Your Yard: Fertilizing 101

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 18:38:00 +0000

I like to preserve what I can of my harvest, which is why I over plant some things, with the idea to enjoy them over the winter months. Tomatoes are pretty high up there on my “I want to eat some now, but I mostly want to eat them later” list.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/fyy_for_web_08172017.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 17, 2017

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 13:34:48 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Politically Speaking: Reps. Arthur and Carpenter on how St. Louis, Kansas City Fare in Legislature Missouri Regulators Reject Massive Midwest Wind Power Line MU Scientists, Volunteers to Gather Data for NASA During Eclipse


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0817AM_0.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for August 17, 2017

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:58:28 +0000

Regional headlines from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri Regulators Reject Massive Midwest Wind Power Line St. Louis, Black Firefighters Group Settle Promotions Suit Schmitt Will Not Run for U.S. Senate, Backs Hawley Initial Numbers Show Higher Enrollment in Columbia Public Schools


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/NEWSCAST0816.mp3




Commentary: Mind Your Own Business

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:41:42 +0000

As children we were all told by someone – another kid, a parent, a teacher – to “Mind your own business.” Usually good advice, not always heeded, of course. Kids who frequently didn’t mind their own business often grew up to become lawyers. Just kidding.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/TPSHOW0817.mp3




Discover Nature: Total Solar Eclipse

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 15:45:30 +0000

On summer evenings, as day turns to night, insects and wildlife undergo a routine changing-of-the-guard. This week on Discover Nature, we take a look at what to expect in nature as a rare total solar eclipse casts a shadow across the middle of Missouri.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/dn_206_for_web_0.mp3




Here Comes The Eclipse: How Will Midwest Livestock, Crops React?

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 13:37:43 +0000

During the Aug. 21 solar eclipse, spectators will turn their eyes upward to see the moon pass in front of the sun. But many Midwest scientists will turn their eyes and cameras to the plants and animals here on the ground. And they're not sure what will happen. "It's never really been studied systematically," says Angela Speck , director of astronomy at the University of Missouri Columbia. "We have ideas about: Is this an illumination thing? The amount of light they're receiving goes down. Is that what it is? Is it a temperature effect? Is it all of that?" Speck says a different part of the Earth experiences a total eclipse about once a year and that makes tracking changes in animal and plant behavior challenging. "The place that gets to see that total eclipse is only about 0.1 percent of the surface of the Earth," she says. "So even though they happen every year in a given location, they are very rare." On Aug. 21, a 70 mile-wide ribbon from Oregon to South Carolina called the " path


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/eclipseresearchhpmweb.mp3




Here Comes The Eclipse: How Will Midwest Livestock, Crops React?

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 16:04:05 +0000

During the Aug. 21 solar eclipse, spectators will turn their eyes upward to see the moon pass in front of the sun. But many Midwest scientists will turn their eyes and cameras to the plants and animals here on the ground. And they're not sure what will happen. “It's never really been studied systematically,” says Angela Speck , director of astronomy at the University of Missouri Columbia. “We have ideas about: Is this an illumination thing? The amount of light they’re receiving goes down. Is that what it is? Is it a temperature effect? Is it all of that?”


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/EclipseResearchForWeb.mp3




Morning Newscast for August 15, 2017

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 13:21:39 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: St. Louis Tourism Official: NAACP Advisory Hurting Hotels University of Missouri Adjusts to Budget Cuts Attorney for Missouri Death Row Inmate Requests Stay of Execution over New DNA Evidence Missouri District Strips 2 Gay Students' Yearbook Quotes


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/08/0815AM_0.mp3