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Last Build Date: Fri, 20 Oct 2017 05:45:26 +0000

 



Global Journalist: The Overpopulation Debate

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 02:06:19 +0000

Overpopulation has been debated since British economist Thomas Malthus famously warned in 1798 that humans could reproduce far faster than they could increase their food supply. But since Malthus's time, world population has grown from 800 million to 7.5 billion today. Yet worries about overpopulation are back. In part that's because lots more people are on the way, complicating efforts to deal with problems like climate change and water scarcity. The UN forecasts that in the near future the world will add about 83 million people annually. By 2100, world population will grow to 11.2 billion. On this edition of Global Journalist: a look at the growth of human population and the debate about its risks.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/20171019GLOBAL.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for October 19, 2017

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 22:53:27 +0000

Regional News from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Hawley Takes Dim View of Attorney General Reviewing Police-Involved Killings Ameren Making $130M in Repairs to Missouri Nuclear Plant Columbia School Board Approves Lee Elementary Renaming Committee Members Federal Regulators Release Documents Detailing Patient Abuse at Mercy Hospital in Springfield Missouri Proposes Innovation Corridor for Amazon's Second Home Hartzler Outlines Plans for New Farm Bill Before Congressional Discussion


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/newscastpm1019final.mp3




Morning Newscast for October 19, 2017

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 12:53:49 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Hawley Takes Dim View of Attorney General Reviewing Police-Involved Killings Judge Considers Planned Parenthood Challenge to New Missouri Abortion Restrictions Judge Fines Missouri Prosecutor for Denying Public Records Hartzler Outlines Plans for New Farm Bill Before Congressional Discussion


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/OCT19AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for October 18, 2017

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 23:23:30 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: MU Campus All Clear After 'Active Threat' Alert MU Searching for Vice Chancellor of Civil Rights, Title XI and ADA Missouri Unemployment Rate Drops Slightly in September Judge Fines Missouri Prosecutor For Denying Public Records Judge Considers Planned Parenthood Challenge to New Missouri Abortion Restrictions MU Nursing Dean To Retire In December


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/1018newcast.mp3




MU Searching for Vice Chancellor of Civil Rights, Title XI and ADA

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 22:53:00 +0000

The University of Missouri has created a committee tasked with finding someone to fill the role of Assistant Vice Chancellor for Civil Rights, Title IX and ADA. The Assistant Vice Chancellor for Civil Rights, Title IX and ADA will be responsible for things like ensuring compliance with all Title IX laws and providing training for the MU community.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/FORUM1018_mixdown_0.mp3




Views of the News: Weinstein's Woes Mount

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 19:23:43 +0000

Harvey Weinstein remains in rehab undergoing treatment for a sex addiction while his peers expel him from the Motion Picture Academy and the Producers Guild and his company crumbles financially. Meanwhile, NBC execs deny claims they quashed a reporter’s work on the story and football commentator jokes on Sunday Night Football. We’ll break down the developments in the Weinstein saga. Also, President Donald Trump’s threat to go after broadcast licenses, why the New York Times felt a need to update its social media policy and why it’s so hard for some people to ad lib on TV. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/20171018VIEWS.mp3




Morning Newscast for October 18, 2017

Wed, 18 Oct 2017 12:56:34 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Missouri Unemployment Dropped Slightly In September Boone County Sheriffs' Department to Send Out Patrols U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill Didn't Object to Weakening DEA Power New CEO of Fulton Medical Center To Meet With Community Members


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/1017AM_0.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for October 17, 2017

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 23:32:54 +0000

Regional coverage from the KBIA newsroom, including: African American Heritage Trail to Take Shape in Downtown Columbia Missouri Governor Headed to United Kingdom, Switzerland City Council Approves Plan to Install Gates in Columbia's Parking Garages Schnieders Chosen as UM Director of Government Relations MU Law School and Family Impact Center to Offer Free Estate Planning


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/1017pmaudio_mixdown.mp3




Commentary: Gerrymandering and the Court

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 18:33:03 +0000

The Supreme Court is back in business after its summer recess. It is hearing oral arguments on several cases that have landmark potential. Perhaps the most consequential is Gill v Whitford, a Wisconsin case about gerrymandering. Gerrymandering is the ancient practice of drawing legislative district boundaries to flagrant partisan advantage. Both parties do it when they can – that is, when they control their state governments – but Republicans, using sophisticated computer software, got to work in the 1990s and completed their project in the 2016 election by capturing more state legislative seats and chambers than at any time since 1922. Beginning in the 1960s the Supreme Court has mandated one-person-one-vote redistricting everywhere, from Congress to the Columbia City Council and the Boone County Commission. More recently it has declared unconstitutional redistricting that denied equal protection to black or Hispanic voters. But it has never said purely partisan gerrymanders are


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/TPSHOW.mp3




'Do They Want to See Him When He's 55 Years Old? I Don't Think So'

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 18:23:16 +0000

Kelley Thorson lives in Pulaski County with her husband, Donald, and their three sons. I have known Kelley for years, as my Dad was her son Kyle’s teacher. Her youngest son Kyle has a very rare, severe disability called Phelan-McDermid Syndrome. According to the Phelan-McDermid Syndrome Foundation, there are at least 1,400 cases worldwide. Kyle is now a fully-grown, 24-year-old man and is also non-verbal, so Kelley spoke with me about the anxiety she is experiencing now that Kyle has reached adulthood. Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/MHTSHOW_0.mp3




An Interview with 'Beach Boy' Mike Love

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 17:36:25 +0000

KBIA’s Darren Hellwege interviews Mike Love, a founding member of the Beach Boys. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame members will be playing Monday, Oct. 23rd in Jesse Auditorium. Tickets are available online via Ticketmaster .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/mike_love.mp3




Morning Newscast for October 17, 2017

Tue, 17 Oct 2017 12:20:13 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: McCaskill, Blunt Pitch Missouri Cities for Amazon's Second Headquarters UM System Hires Director of Governmental Relations to Oversee Day-to-Day Operations Missouri Lawmakers Who Made 'Hang 'Em' Facebook Post Will Face Ethics Complaint Missouri Governor Headed to United Kingdom, Switzerland


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/OCT17AM_mixdown.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for October 16, 2017

Mon, 16 Oct 2017 22:36:31 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom including: Missouri Governor Headed to United Kingdom, Switzerland MU Extension Program Works to Stop Food Deserts Ethics Panel to Review Complaint Against Missouri Lawmakers 'Project Connection' Connects with People of Color at MU


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/Newscast1016.mp3




GEORGE KENNEDY: How Safe is Columbia from Threats of Gunfire?

Mon, 16 Oct 2017 21:25:57 +0000

A 20-year-old man was shot and killed Saturday in a student-housing complex in south Columbia. The same night, four young people were shot and injured outside the appropriately named Ruckus bar on Business Loop 70. Those are just the most recent reports of gunplay that have some of us longtime residents wondering whether our town is becoming dangerous. We’re not St. Louis or Chicago, but we’re not exactly peaceful Collegetown USA any more. Or are we? Read the complete column online at the Missourian


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/KENNEDYSHOW24.mp3




Discover Nature: Spiders Ballooning

Mon, 16 Oct 2017 14:52:39 +0000

This week on Discover Nature, watch for spiders spinning silken webs, and “ballooning.”


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/dn_180_for_web_0.mp3




Morning Newscast for October 16, 2017

Mon, 16 Oct 2017 14:00:34 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: 5 Arrested After Latest St. Louis-area Protests Students Tackle Real-world Problems at TigerHacks Joplin Schools Haggle with FEMA Over Cost of Tornado Repairs Columbia Humane Society Vets Donated City Land for New Facility


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/OCT16AM.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for October 13, 2017

Fri, 13 Oct 2017 23:11:57 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: EPA Sets New Restrictions on Dicamba Granny's House Moves to New Home MU and KU Basketball Will Face Off for Hurricane Relief Greitens Appoints Judge to 13th Judicial Circuit


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/1013PM.mp3




Off the Clock - MU's Quidditch Team Breathes New Life into an Old Rivalry

Fri, 13 Oct 2017 22:00:00 +0000

When the University of Missouri left the Big 12 Conference to join the Southeastern Conference, it effectively ended one of the biggest rivalries in college sports. But, at least one MU club sport is making sure that rivalry lives on.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/otcshow_1.mp3




Thinking Out Loud: Disabilities and Doing Business

Fri, 13 Oct 2017 21:51:00 +0000

Area businesses are working to be more inclusive of those with disabilities. On this week's episode of Thinking Out Loud, KBIA's Darren Hellwege talked with a local business leader and economic developer at MU about creating meaningful work for those with different abilities.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/kat_cunningham_for_web_0.mp3




Global Journalist: Kenya Tensions Spike Amid Electoral Dispute

Fri, 13 Oct 2017 15:29:52 +0000

A decade ago a disputed presidential election in Kenya led to violence that left more than 1,400 people dead and forced 600,000 from their homes. Now political tensions are again running high after another disputed election in August. The country's electoral board declared incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta the victor by 1.4 million votes over opposition candidate Raila Odinga. But Kenya's Supreme Court nullified the result, saying the poll had been marred by "irregularities" and ordered a new election. That poll was scheduled to take place Oct. 26, but its future is now in doubt after Odinga pulled out saying the new election would also not be free and fair. Odinga's supporters have taken to the streets and the government has sought to quell the upheaval by banning public protests in three major cities. On this edition of Global Journalist, we take an in-depth look at the political crisis in a country once considered a beacon of stability in Africa.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/10/GLOBAL101217.mp3