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Last Build Date: Wed, 22 Nov 2017 20:29:14 +0000

 



Intersection - United and Divided: Stories on Bridging the Urban-Rural Divide

Tue, 21 Nov 2017 23:59:00 +0000

Today, we’re bringing you United and Divided , a series of stories on bridging the urban-rural divide. It's reported by Harvest Public Media . In the wake of the 2016 presidential election one thing is clear: rural America and urban America see things differently. In this series of profiles, Harvest Public Media reporters introduce us to our fellow Americans and examine the issues that they hold dear. We re-discover the ties that bind us and learn more about the lines that divide us. And through these voices, we come to know Americans just a little bit better. Reporters from Missouri, Colorado, Iowa and Nebraska explore topics causing rift in the country, and how those differences define the future. They looked at schools, religion, immigration and trade policy.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/INTERSECTION.mp3




Discover Nature: Wild Turkeys

Tue, 21 Nov 2017 21:16:41 +0000

This week on Discover Nature, we give thanks, and recognize the king of North American game birds.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/wild_turkeys_for_web_0.mp3




What Missouri's Lost Woodlands Can Teach Us About Forest Management

Tue, 21 Nov 2017 18:22:09 +0000

This time of year, trees tend to attract more attention than usual. As the hours of sunlight shorten and temperatures fall, chemical changes in leaves bring out the bright yellows and reds across the canopies of Missouri’s many forests. You’d be forgiven for thinking that spectacle and those forests, are timeless. But the woods as we know them today are a relatively modern development and Missouri’s historical woodlands looked considerably different. Understanding that history can help conservationists better manage our modern forests to encourage diversity and benefit wildlife.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/moenv112217_mixdown.mp3




Green Burials Aim to Provide an Eco-Friendly End of Life

Tue, 21 Nov 2017 17:47:42 +0000

On an overcast Saturday morning, the weekend after Halloween a group of some 30 people gathered at one of St. Louis’s oldest cemeteries. Bellefontaine Cemetery is the final resting place of historical Missourians like William Clark and William S. Borroughs, but on this day the tour group was there to learn about how Bellefontaine is keeping up to date with green burials . The group was led by Dan Fuller, the volunteer coordinator and guide for the cemetery. "A contemporary burial produces this kind of a carbon footprint," he said, lifting his hand high to show the environmental impact of a typical modern burial. "An outer container, a metal coffin, an embalmed body, 6-foot deep with a headstone," all add to that footprint, he explained.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/MOENV110717_mixdown_0.mp3




Farm Your Yard: Welcoming Wildlife Into Your Garden

Mon, 20 Nov 2017 18:03:46 +0000

A few weeks ago I was poking around in out what I call the “back 40” of my garden. This is the part of my garden, for better or worse, where I kinda just plant something and then forget about it for the rest of the year.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/fyy_11142017.mp3




Thinking Out Loud: Studies in American Democracy

Sun, 19 Nov 2017 19:52:00 +0000

Jay Sexton is a professor of history at the University of Missouri and the Kinder Center chair of Constitutional Democracy. The historian visited with KBIA's Darren Hellwege about the ways history is taught, Sexton's upcoming study abroad trip to Oxford University , and his forthcoming book on the past, present and future of American democracy.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/jay_sexton_on_tol_11142017.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for November 17, 2017

Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:09:11 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Missouri Tax Credit on the Chopping Block McCaskill Donates Campaign Money from Franken PAC Amtrack Ridership Sees Growth Opioid and Heroin Overdoses Contribute to Rural Population Decline


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/1117PM_1.mp3




Off the Clock – Columbia College's Girls Who Game Event Connects Teen Girls to Electronic Sports

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 23:00:00 +0000

Allison Simmons is 13 years old, but she’s been playing video games since she was 7. She meets other gamers online all the time, and she maintains friendships with some of them. But, she said, it’s not so easy to find people her own age that like the game as much as she does. That’s one of the reasons Allison decided to go to Columbia College’s Girls Who Game event in September. The event was for girls ages 12 to 14 who are interested in gaming and game design. The girls played games in the campus’ “Gaming Hut,” which is also home to the Columbia College eSports team.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/otcshow_5.mp3




GEORGE KENNEDY: Steps Have Been Taken After 2015 Protests, But More Must Be Done

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 20:55:38 +0000

The destructive effects of the Concerned Student 1950 protest at our university two years ago are obvious and quantifiable. Enrollment is down. State support has diminished. Public perception is negative. The positive effects are only now emerging. Whether they will, in the end, outweigh the negatives is the important question that only time can answer. Well, time and lots of hard work. Read the complete column online at the Missourian .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/KENNEDYSHOW1116.mp3




Morning Newscast for November 17, 2017

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 15:04:16 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Greitens' Effort to Fire Board of Education Commissioner Faces Opposition Missouri's McCaskill Calls For Investigation of Franken St. Louis Police Ordered to Change Tactics With Protestors Committee Urges MU to End Use of Live Animals in Medical Training


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/NOV17AMmixdown.mp3




Global Journalist: Zimbabwe, South Africa in Transition

Fri, 17 Nov 2017 03:52:33 +0000

Two figures have dominated the politics of southern Africa in recent years. One is Zimbabwe’s 93-year-old President Robert Mugabe. The other is South Africa’s 75-year-old President Jacob Zuma. Now Mugabe is in military custody after an apparent coup d’etat brought an end to his 37-year rule. Meanwhile Zuma is set to be replaced as the leader of the ruling African National Congress next month, and may be forced to step down from his eight-year-old presidency before the end of his term in 2019. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at southern Africa in transition.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/20171116GLOBAL.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for November 16, 2017

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 23:16:44 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Review of Old Court Cases Continues in Ferguson Greitens' Effort to Fire Board of Education Commissioner Coming to a Head Missouri Sees Increase in Amtrak Ridership Math Pathways Initiative Is in Full Swing


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/pmnewscast1116_mixdown_2.mp3




‘I Wish I Could Spend the Rest of My Life in a Hospital, Because at Least People Care’

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 21:31:01 +0000

Robert Nickles lives in Columbia. He was recently diagnosed with lung cancer and has undergone numerous medical procedures throughout his life - including a colostomy. But there’s a major barrier standing between Robert and a healthy existence: Robert is homeless. In his own words, he has lived a life that “most people wouldn’t understand.” Robert spoke with KBIA’s Jonah McKeown about the stigma surrounding homelessness and about the barriers he faces getting healthcare. Missouri Health Talks gathers Missourians’ stories of access to healthcare in their own words. You can view more conversations at missourihealthtalks.org .


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/1116MHTSHOW.mp3




Morning Newscast for November 16, 2017

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 13:55:03 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Missouri Attorney General Sued Over Where He Lives Annual Missouri Report Cards Prove Difficult to Analyze Greitens' Effort to Fire Schools Chief Coming to a Head Federal Judge Orders St. Louis Police to Immediately Change How They Handle Protests


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/NOV16AM_mixdown.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for November 15, 2017

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 23:40:55 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom including: MU Announces New Initiatives for Out-of-State Students State Data Results Show Slight Decrease In Overall Performance for Columbia Public Schools Judge Orders St. Louis Police Must Change How They Handle Protests Columbia Public Schools To Open World Language Center


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/1115newcast.mp3




MU Annouces New Initiative for Out-of-State Students

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 22:37:01 +0000

Last week marked 100 days for MU Chancellor Alexander Cartwright. The University of Missouri held an event on Wednesday, Nov. 15 to celebrate the Chancellor and announce new initiatives for student success. Some of these initiatives are aimed at lowering costs. One is the Border State Scholars award. It will reduce out-of-state tuition by $2,500 for students coming to MU from one of the 8 states that border Missouri.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/CARTWRIGHT1115_0.mp3




Views of the News: Is The Media Stirring The Pot?

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 21:20:19 +0000

Is the media stirring the pot? Is the coverage of the sex scandals – now rocking entertainment, journalism and politics – potentially destroying innocent lives? In our attempts to listen to and be supportive of accusers are we denying the accused due process or benefit of the doubt? We’ll debate. Also, Donald Trump Jr.’s communication with WikiLeaks, why the New York Times is suing a woman who identified herself as one of the paper’s reporters and Simpsons’ fans, it’s time to talk about Apu. From the Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Ryan Thomas: Views of the News.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/20171115VIEWS_w-FULLOPEN.mp3




Intersection - Native Languages and Identity as MU Marks Native American Heritage Month

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 21:18:47 +0000

November is Native American Heritage Month. This week author and professor of Ojibwe at Bemidji State University Anton Treuer talks with host Sara Shahriari. MU professor of digital storytelling and citizen of Cherokee Nation Joseph Erb joins in the wide-ranging conversation on language's role in maintaining a culture, Truer's book Everything You Wanted to Know About Indians But Were Afraid to Ask, and the damage done by some mascots that mimic Native Americans.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/IntersectionNAH.mp3




Discover Nature: Black Bears Enter Dens

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 16:25:16 +0000

As days get shorter and temperatures drop, Missouri’s black bears are entering dens to spend the winter months when food supplies are scarce.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/bear_dens_for_web_0.mp3




Morning Newscast for November 15, 2017

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 15:23:44 +0000

Regional Stories from the KBIA Newsroom including: "Two Years Later" Event Reflects on Campus Protests "Everybody Eats" Enters 20 years of Thanksgiving Meals Finalists for Director of the Daniel Boone Regional Library Talk to Community Columbia Prepares for Winter Snow Removal


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2017/11/NOV15AM_0.mp3