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Last Build Date: Sat, 21 Apr 2018 04:51:33 +0000

 



Afternoon Newscast for April 20, 2018

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 22:09:48 +0000

Missouri Designates $3 Million For Sexual Assault Evidence Testing Missouri Legislature Several Election Changes Unknown Substance Sent To Missouri Lawmaker May Be Pesticide


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/PMnewscast0420.mp3




A Conversation With Local Author Julija Šukys

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 21:32:50 +0000

The Unbound Book Festival in Columbia runs from April 19 to April 21 and features several local authors. Julija Šukys is a local creative nonfiction author. We talked about her book Siberian Exile: Blood, War, and a Granddaughter's Reckoning.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/sukys_mixdown.mp3




A Conversation With Local Author Allison Coffelt

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 20:48:33 +0000

The Unbound Book Festival in Columbia runs from April 19 to April 21 and features several local authors. Allison Coffelt lives in Columbia. We talked about her book Maps Are Lines We Draw: A Road Trip Through Haiti.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/coffelt_mixdown.mp3




Morning Newscast for April 20, 2018

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 12:53:29 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Missouri Senate Approves Greitens' Ethics Commission Nominee Greitens Defense Fund Spent Nothing in March Missouri Bill Lowers Income Taxes for Guard and Reserves University of Missouri-Kansas City Announces Job Cuts Missouri House Passes Tax Overhaul


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/0420am_newscast.mp3




Global Journalist: Japan's #MeToo Movement

Fri, 20 Apr 2018 04:16:59 +0000

The #MeToo movement has spread from the United States to other parts of the world as women have increasingly spoken out about sexual assault and sexual harassment. One country where it has struggled is Japan, where discussions about sexual harassment and sexual assault remain highly taboo. Japanese women are much less likely than their U.S. counterparts to describe non-consensual sex as rape. Further, women who publicly accuse their attackers often face significant public backlash. On this edition of Global Journalist, a look at the conversation around the #MeToo movement in Japan, a country known for its technological and economic prowess but that lags behind many other industrialized countries in measures of gender equity.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/20180419GLOBAL.mp3




A Conversation with Author Melissa Scholes Young

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 22:26:29 +0000

The Unbound Book Festival in Columbia runs from April 19 to April 21 and features several local authors. Author Melissa Scholes Young was raised in Hannibal, and her Midwestern identity is central to her writing. We talked about her debut novel, FLOOD.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/young_mixdown.mp3




A Conversation With Local Author Nina Furstenau

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 22:25:41 +0000

The Unbound Book Festival in Columbia runs from April 19 to April 21 and features several local authors. Nina Furstenau is a local author who writes about culture through the lens of food. We talked about her book Biting Through the Skin: An Indian Kitchen in America's Heartland.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/Furstenau_mixdown.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for April 19, 2018

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 21:19:00 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Hawley Trails McCaskill in Missouri Senate Race Fundraising Authorities Investigating Unknown Substance Sent to Lawmaker Missouri Senate Approves Greitens' Ethics Commission Nominee Judge Refuses to Throw Out Felony Charge Against Greitens


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/0419_pm.mp3




Morning Newscast for April 19, 2018

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 13:49:33 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: Judge to Rule on Request to Dismiss Greitens Indictment Missouri House, Top Senate Budgeter Split on School Funding Prosecutor Faces Looming Deadline to Charge Greitens for Charity Donor List Hawley: Evidence Exists to Charge Greitens for Obtaining Charity Fundraising List


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/041918AM_0.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for April 18, 2018

Thu, 19 Apr 2018 00:00:28 +0000

Regional news coverage from the KBIA newsroom including: Columbia City Officials Consider Taxes for Short-Term Rentals Missouri House Passes Tax Overhaul IRS Extends Tax Filing Deadline Due to Computer Problems Morel Hunting Seasons Begin in Missouri Greitens Loses Legislative Leaders


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/pmnewscast0418.mp3




Intersection - Unbound Book Festival Authors Talk Inclusion, Lost Stories and Identity

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 22:20:12 +0000

Today on Intersection, we’re sharing interviews with local authors coming to the Unbound Book Festival this weekend, and also exploring concerns about diversity and expression at the festival. Unbound is a three-day event that brings authors from all over the world to Columbia to talk and share insight on their work. The event runs from April 19 to the 21, and will be held in venues across Columbia, including The Missouri Theatre and Stephens College. This year's headline speaker is author Zadie Smith. As we put together this show, we learned of people voicing concerns over diversity and inclusion at the Unbound Book Festival, particularly on several panels with all white participants. Ibtisam Barakat, a Palestinian-American author, posted a statement to Facebook about a week ago saying she was encouraged by these discussions to reveal racism experienced while participating in an Unbound panel last year. Barakat talked with producer Abby Ivory-Ganja about her experience. Sara Shahriari


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/0416Unbound_mixdown.mp3




Views of the News: Should Sean Hannity Have Told Viewers About His Connection to Michael Cohen

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 20:08:11 +0000

Sean Hannity is a commentator, not a journalist. But that still begs the question, did he owe it to viewers to disclose he’d discussed personal legal matters before it was revealed in open court? Also, coverage of the air strikes in Syria, James Comey’s first television interview, and what’s next for Governor Greitens. From Missouri School of Journalism professors Amy Simons, Earnest Perry and Mike McKean: Views of the News.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/20180418VIEWS.mp3




Report Says UM System Has $5B+ Impact on Missouri Each Year

Wed, 18 Apr 2018 12:41:20 +0000

A newly published Economic Impact report says that the University of Missouri System brings in over $5 billion dollars each year to the state of Missouri.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/0417UMREPORT.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for April 17, 2018

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 21:49:23 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Hawley: Evidence Exists to Charge Greitens for Obtaining Charity Fundraising List Council Approves Downzoning Request for 38 Properties in First Ward Two Meetings Scheduled This Week on Idea of Rules for Short-term Rentals


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/PMNewscast0417_Both.mp3




Special Report: Have We Backed Ourselves Into A Corner With Pesticides?

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 20:46:05 +0000

Pesticide drift during the 2017 growing was historic -- about 3.6 million acres of soybeans were damaged by the weed killer dicamba. The Environmental Protection Agency and several states have slapped on stricter guidelines for the 2018 growing season, but enough damage has been done that stakeholders across the industry are worried that we've forced farmers into a cycle of always needing a stronger chemical to combat weeds that have grown resistant to what's already on shelves.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/HPMSpecialReport0411ForWeb_0.mp3




Discover Nature: Callery Pear Trees

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 17:28:37 +0000

Head outside in mid-April and you’ll notice many trees springing into bloom. This week on D iscover Nature, we pay special attention to an unwelcome invader: the Callery pear tree. Callery pears, which include the commonly known Bradford pear, are easily identifiable right now: deciduous trees reaching mature heights of 30-50 feet, with a pyramid-shaped crown covered in clusters of tiny white flowers with an unpleasant odor. Not to be confused with native dogwoods or serviceberries, these invasive cultivars have brittle limbs, and cross-pollination in the wild often produces new generations with large, ominous thorns. Callery pears grow well in nearly every type of soil and spread easily – even infiltrating dense woods, choking-out beneficial native trees and wildflowers in short order. Help stop the spread of these trees – DO NOT PLANT THEM – and consider replacing existing Callery pears with Missouri-native species such as dogwoods, serviceberries, redbuds, or sassafras. Learn more


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/50_1.mp3




Morning Newscast for April 17, 2017

Tue, 17 Apr 2018 13:25:50 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA Newsroom, including: Missouri Lawmakers Return to Work Under Greitens Cloud Columbia Area Earth Day Festival to Be Held This Weekend Potential Greitens Impeachment Would Face Legal Ambiguities Council Comments of Cost of Comprehensive City Audit


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/0417AM_0.mp3




Afternoon Newscast for April 16, 2018

Mon, 16 Apr 2018 22:45:15 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including Judge to Decide on Possible Greitens Case Dismissal Thursday Agriculture Director Says State Looks to Cut Regulation for Farmers Missouri Ethics Committee: No Promises Made to Greitens Over 200 Million Eggs Recalled for Possible Salmonella Contamination


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/0416Newscast.mp3




Audio Postcard: Touring Rock Bridge State Park

Mon, 16 Apr 2018 22:25:57 +0000

As winter weather lingers in mid-Missouri, the group Sustain Mizzou visited Rock Bridge State Park. Jake Krell, the group’s outreach vice president, led a tour of the park to visitors. Krell served as a tour guide over the summer for the non-profit Friends of Rock Bridge. On the tour, Krell took the group through overlooks and into the cave. The group avoided certain areas of the park because of the spreading white-nose syndrome, a deadly disease that affects North American bats that's been problematic in Missouri. Members walked through snow, on water, in the daylight and the darkness of the cave in this audio postcard.


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/OTCShow.mp3




Morning Newscast for April 16, 2018

Mon, 16 Apr 2018 13:58:25 +0000

Regional stories from the KBIA newsroom, including: New Kansas City Airport Will Have 4 More Gates Missouri Considers Unprecedented Addiction Help for Moms Senate Cuts Prescription Drug Monitoring Program in Budget Proposal


Media Files:
https://cpa.ds.npr.org/kbia/audio/2018/04/0416_am_.mp3