Subscribe: Workplace Fairness: today's workplace
http://www.workplacefairness.org/rss/blog.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
court  harassment  labor  mdash  new  people  rights  sexual harassment  trump  unions  work  workers  working  workplace 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Workplace Fairness: today's workplace

Workplace Fairness: today's workplace



Your source for the latest developments in workplace rights and employment law. "Today's Workplace" is the the blog (weblog) written by Paula Brantner, Program Director of Workplace Fairness. In each entry, Paula focuses on legal and political information



 



House of Representatives has a sexual harassment policy — but it’s designed to protect the harasser
House lawmakers met on Capitol Hill Tuesday to review the chamber’s sexual harassment policies. This review process comes on the heels of sweeping allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment among some of the nation’s most powerful institutions and industries — including the U.S. Congress.



Workforce Intermediaries Advance Equity and Diversity Through Apprenticeship
As we kick off National Apprenticeship Week, it is more important than ever to shine a light on the ways government agencies, employers and joint labor-management programs can focus their resources on fostering greater equity, diversity and inclusion in the American workforce.



In victory for workers’ rights, London panel rules that Uber drivers aren’t self-employed
A British employment tribunal has delivered a major blow to Uber, ruling that its drivers needed to be classified as workers and receive a minimum wage, sick leave and paid time off.



How Business Unionism Got Us to Janus
Overcoming the fallout from Janus will require reimagining union membership by inverting hierarchical relations that replicate disempowerment on the job. To do this, unions need to grapple with a number of pressing questions.



For Women Restaurant Workers, Sexual Harassment Starts with the Day You’re Hired
It would be hard to design a context more conducive to being sexually harassed by co-workers, and indeed, like 80 percent of women restaurant workers in a 2014 Restaurant Opportunities Center United (ROC United) survey, we all were.



Labor-Backed Candidates Win Big in Tuesday’s Elections
It was a big night for labor’s agenda as pro-worker candidates won election from coast to coast Tuesday.



Deepwater Horizon: Is the CSB Preparing to Retreat on Worker Participation?
The Chemical Safety Board may be preparing to take a significant step backwards in its advocacy for worker participation in preventing chemical facility incidents, including catastrophes like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.



California Just Passed Landmark Law to Stop Bosses From Discriminating Against People with Convictions
The fair hiring movement has gained considerable steam in recent years. AB 1008 makes California the 10th state to ban the box for public and private sector workers.



Billionaire Trump donor puts 115 people out of work after some joined a union
Last week, writers at the news sites DNAinfo and Gothamist joined a union. This week, the sites’ Trump-supporting billionaire owner, Joe Ricketts, shut them down, putting 115 people out of work.



Do Nondisclosure Agreements Perpetuate a Toxic Workplace Culture?
The mere fact that an entire group of employees at one company is seeking to be unmuzzled is testament to a deep problem. Nor is it limited to the entertainment industry. NDAs and “hush money” settlements are common in every employment sector, including government agencies.



After 41 Years, The Teamsters Reform Movement Is Finally Building Power
The talk during the upcoming convention, according to Paff, will focus on winning strong contracts, converting part-time jobs into full-time work, boosting wages that start for some at $11 an hour and protecting pensions that have been under attack.



Congress Just Killed Your Right to a Day in Court
By casting the tie-breaking vote to kill the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s arbitration rule – which allowed consumers to band together to sue banks, financial institutions and credit card companies – Pence showed just how much power Wall Street has amassed on Capitol Hill and on Pennsylvania Avenue.



Hotel Housekeepers: Tipping as Hazard Pay?
Are tips the solution to dangerous working conditions, or is elimination of hazards the solution to safe working conditions? The Occupational Safety and Health Act says that all workers have a right to a safe workplace, whether they receive tips or not.



This man was denied a job as a sheriff’s deputy just because he has HIV. Now he’s suing.
A Louisiana man has filed a federal lawsuit against the Iberia Parish Sheriff’s Office (IPSO) for allegedly discriminating against him in 2012. According to the complaint, filed last week by Lambda Legal, IPSO was prepared to hire Liam Pierce as a deputy sheriff, but allegedly opted not to after learning that Pierce has HIV.



GOP Smash-And-Burn Tax Plan Does Nothing for Workers
Corporations have gotten tax breaks before and haven’t done that. And they’ve got plenty of cash to share with workers right now and don’t do it. Instead, they spend corporate money to push up CEO pay. Over the past nine years, corporations have shelled out nearly $4 trillion to buy back their own stock, a ploy that raises stock prices and, right along with them, CEO compensation. Worker pay, meanwhile, flat-lined.



Houston hurricane clean-up workers face wage theft and unsafe conditions
Organizers are ready to fight to improve working conditions and stop wage theft, but Texas makes it a big job, and the hurricane recovery only makes it a bigger one.



The pay gap and sexual harassment must be addressed simultaneously
Over the past few days, more and more men have continued to resign or at the very least publicly confront accusations of sexual harassment, and this trend shows no sign of slowing down.



Forced Arbitration Protects Sexual Predators and Corporate Wrongdoing
And forced arbitration clauses do not only hide wrongdoing in sexual harassment cases. Corporations also use forced arbitration to isolate victims and cover up massive, widespread wrongdoing in the financial sector.



When VPP Companies Kill
But, of course, the VPP program is more than just a recognition program, it also exempts VPP participants from programmed inspections — those inspections that stem from National or Regional Emphasis Programs, or any other OSHA targeting program. Despite the goals of the program, sometimes things don’t go as expected, as we have seen recently at Valero and Nucor.



Can federal workers blatantly discriminate against LGBTQ people? Jeff Sessions isn’t sure.
More than two years ago, when he was still in the Senate, Sessions was one of the original co-sponsors of the First Amendment Defense Act (FADA), a bill that would grant those who have religious objections to same-sex marriage a license to discriminate. Many of the provisions in the new guidance mirror FADA’s language.



The National Park Service has a serious workplace harassment problem
In a week that has exposed the pervasiveness of sexual harassment in Hollywood, a new federal survey released Friday by the Department of the Interior points to a similar culture within the agency’s National Park Service (NPS).



Poultry lobbyists hope Trump will okay dangerous chicken processing speed-up Obama rejected
Poultry workers are almost twice as likely to suffer from serious injuries as workers in private industry, and more than six times as likely to have a work-related illness. Two poultry and meat processing plants, Tyson Foods and JBS/Pilgrim’s Pride, are among the 10 companies with the highest number of work-related amputations and hospitalizations, out of more than 14,000 companies reporting to the federal government, Berkowitz, a former Obama Labor Department official, discovered.



Why the Best Protectors for Workers Are Other Workers
“It’s easy to see a broken arm and treat it. It’s more difficult to see trauma to our brains or hearts,” Morrison said. “Everyday, work for fire fighters and paramedics can be traumatic. Mass-casualty events can be much worse. We want to make sure our members understand the signs and symptoms of traumatic stress injuries, so we can treat them.”



SCOTUS Is on the Verge of Decimating Public-Sector Unions—But Workers Can Still Fight Back
“Right to work” laws, currently on the books in 27 states, strip the requirement that union members pay union dues. Unions claim this creates a “free rider” problem, allowing workers to enjoy the benefits of union membership without contributing a dime.



Stop asking women to change to make men feel comfortable in the workplace
The best solution is for men to be as considerate to their female colleagues as they are to their male colleagues, to no longer shut them out of business meetings for the sake of “appearances,” and to work to create an environment that supports their female colleagues when they do come forward with harassment allegations. Here’s another thought: They could also stop sexually harassing women.



A Trailblazing New Law in Illinois Will Dramatically Expand Temp Workers’ Rights
Beginning next summer, a sweeping new law will take effect in Illinois, ending many of the routine injustices suffered by the state’s nearly 850,000 temp employees who often work under miserable conditions.



Can an employee on FMLA leave from work attend a night concert?
The Northern District of Texas judge shut down the woman’s claim with Beyoncé-like finality. But it raises the legitimate question of whether people on medical leave or family leave are entitled to enjoyment of life or expected to sit at home and recuperate in stoic solitude.



Trump’s new rule allows employers to drop birth control coverage with no oversight
New contraception rules outlined by the Trump administration will allow employers to stop covering birth control — with zero government oversight.



Trump’s Justice Department Is Trying to Turn Back the Clock on Workers’ Rights 100 Years
The question of whether an employee can give up her right to act in concert with other workers may seem technical, but it implicates the very core of collective action.



Miners Working with Congress to Solve Pension Crisis
Strong bipartisan legislation has been introduced in recent congressional sessions to solve the pension crisis currently facing America’s mine workers.



Construction job sites: the silent killer of immigrant workers
The New York City Council voted unanimously on Wednesday to approve a safety bill that establishes safety protocols as a way to prevent construction worker deaths, following eight months of intensive review by lawmakers, day laborers, unions, real estate developers, and contractors.



The Trump Administration’s Backdoor Plan to Erode the Rights of Workers to Act Collectively
On October 2, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case that implicates the very concept of collective action. NLRB v. Murphy Oil asks whether it is a violation of workers’ rights to force them to enter into arbitration agreements that prohibit collective or class litigation. Such agreements, often entered into as conditions of employment, require workers who want to sue their employers to do so individually in a private arbitration setting, rather than as a class of aggrieved workers who can pool their resources and knowledge.



Supreme Court takes up case that will devastate public sector unions
In what is all but certain to be a terrible blow to organized labor, the Supreme Court announced on Thursday that it will hear Janus v. AFSCME, a case seeking to defund public sector unions. The case presents an issue that was recently before the Court, and where the justices split 4-4 along party lines.



Divide and Conquer: Employers' Attempts to Prohibit Joint Legal Action Will be Tested in Court
On Monday, October 2, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in the most consequential labor law cases to come to the Court in a generation, which could fundamentally alter the balance of power between millions of American workers and the people who employ them.



NFL Players Association Responds to Attacks on Free Speech
No man or woman should ever have to choose a job that forces them to surrender their rights. No worker nor any athlete, professional or not, should be forced to become less than human when it comes to protecting their basic health and safety.



Supreme Court opens its new term with a direct attack on workers’ rights
The three cases — National Labor Relations Board v. Murphy Oil USA, Ernst & Young LLP v. Morris, and Epic Systems v. Lewis — all involve employment contracts cutting off employee’s rights to sue their employer for legal violations.



This Lawyer Helped Reagan Bust the Air Traffic Controllers Union. Now Trump Wants Him on the NLRB.
Thirty-six years later, Reagan’s lead attorney in the air traffic controllers case is poised to make decisions about thousands of unfair labor practices throughout the country.



Seattle's minimum wage increase deals a blow to yet another Republican scare tactic
Seattle’s minimum wage for large employers went to $13 an hour in 2016—and a recent study from the University of Washington School of Public Health finds that the increase didn’t affect grocery prices in the city.



9th Circuit Revists Ruling on Unequal Pay in Some Situations
The EEOC contends that the ruling enables the pay gap’s vicious cycle. If men are routinely paid more than women, their salary history will dictate they be paid more at the next job, and so on.



How the Canadians Are Trying to Use NAFTA to Raise Your Wage
The Canadian negotiating team did something big: They told the U.S. negotiators that U.S. laws that interfere with people’s freedom to negotiate on the job are dragging down standards for Canada and need to be abolished. Guess what? Canada is right.



Wage gap between blacks and whites is larger today than it was 40 years ago
It’s near impossible for black Americans to achieve parity with their white counterparts in the labor market, according to two new studies which show that they are underpaid and discriminated against throughout the hiring process.



The Right Wing Has a Vast, Secret Plot to Destroy Unions for Good. Here’s How to Fight Back.
SPN and ALEC have aggressively pursued so-called “right-to-work” legislation as a means of bankrupting unions and knocking out a key component of their opponents’ get-out-the-vote operation. Twenty-eight states now have these anti-union laws on the books.



OSHA's Claims About Hiding Information on Worker Deaths Fall Flat
Two weeks ago, the agency responsible for enforcing workplace safety and health—the Occupational Safety and Health Administration—removed the names of fallen workers from its home page and has stopped posting information about their deaths on its data page.



Racial Inequality Is Hollowing Out America’s Middle Class
This wealth decline is a threat to the viability of the American middle class and the nation’s overall economic health. Families with more wealth can cover emergencies without going into debt and take advantage of economic opportunity, such as buying a home, saving for college, or starting a business.



Freelancing Ain't Free
When is the moment in time for a freelance writer that a late payment becomes wage theft, and what do you do about it?



Lost wages, serious illness and poor labor standards: The dangers of rebuilding Texas and Florida
Past abuses after similar natural disasters have left laborers without all of their wages and with serious illnesses that could have been prevented with proper supervision and training, labor experts say.



With All Eyes on DACA, the Trump Administration Is Quietly Killing Overtime Protections
On September 5, the administration of Donald Trump formally announced that they won’t try to save Obama’s overtime rule, effectively killing a potential raise for millions of Americans.



Canadian Mounties to the Rescue of American Workers
Canada is stipulating that the United States eliminate laws that empower corporations and weaken workers.



When the Parades Are Over, Who Stands With Unions?
The Labor Day parades are over. The bands have packed up. The muscular speeches celebrating workers are finished.



How Ending DACA Hurts All Low-Wage Workers
Ending DACA will destroy the educational and employment prospects of 800,000 young immigrants who did nothing wrong, while at the same time hurting the wages and labor standards of American workers



Labor unions are trying to take back politics in the Midwest
On Labor Day — designated a federal holiday in 1894 to honor America’s labor movement — at least eight Democratic candidates will hold rallies in five Midwest cities to tell workers just how far the country has veered from its pro-labor roots.



Labor Day 2017: Working People Take Fewer Vacation Days and Work More
In the survey, the majority of America’s working people credit labor unions for many of the benefits they receive.



Trump blocks Obama effort to combat pay discrimination
Donald Trump is blocking the rule from going into effect as scheduled next spring because it’s just too hard for businesses to report how much they pay their workers.



Ivanka Trump supports her father’s decision to stop monitoring the wage gap
Despite her supposed support for equal pay, Ivanka Trump backed a recent White House decision to end an Obama administration rule that would have required businesses to monitor the salaries of employees of different genders, races, and ethnicities in an effort to prevent employment discrimination.



Wisconsin’s Foxconn Deal Enriches Billionaires With Taxpayer Cash
Keeping the pressure on workers — no matter the consequences — has helped Foxconn’s Gou accumulate a personal fortune somewhere north of $6 billion. But Gou has also perfected another sure-fire strategy for piling up the big bucks. He gets taxpayers to give him money. Lots of it.



Trump’s transgender military ban met with backlash
A draft of this memorandum was reported on Wednesday, and there has been widespread criticism from trans activists, lawmakers, and current and former members of the military over the last few days.



Why Defending Workers’ Rights Means Fighting ICE’s Deportation Machine
ICE’s targeting of labor hearings falls into a much broader pattern of workplace immigration raids. The second term of the George W. Bush administration saw a boom in such policies, with authorities carrying out hundreds of sweeps targeting workers



The Skies Just Got Friendlier for Working People: Worker Wins
Our latest roundup of worker wins begins with flight attendants and air traffic controllers standing together to make the skies safer for working people and travelers and includes numerous examples of workers organizing, bargaining and mobilizing for a better life.



Working People Have 17 Recommendations for NAFTA. Here’s #2
Since the dawn of the modern trade era (roughly 1990), no trade deal has ever put working families first. But we know the rules we need to make it happen. But no one will fight for those rules if we don’t lead.



Sexual harassment of graduate students by faculty is a national problem
Graduate students hope to secure protection from harassment as they fight for their labor rights. Graduate students say that union representation and collective bargaining will help them get contracts that cover issues of sexual harassment.



Employees are not fully protected by the First Amendment
Recent developments have people wondering if they can be fired for speaking their mind or expressing political views, especially off the clock and away from work. In many cases, the answer is yes, when “free speech” activities reflect poorly on the company or violate company policy or employment agreements.



Workers May Have Just Killed Missouri’s Right to Work Law
In a badly needed victory for organized labor, a coalition of workers’ rights groups in Missouri is poised to halt a devastating new anti-union law from taking effect later this month.



Donald Trump's policies will mean more workers dead on the job
Each day in the United States, 13 people are killed as a direct result of hazardous working conditions. And, more than 10 times that number die of work-related diseases that are less sudden but no less devastating.



In Their Own Words: Why Immigrant Worker Protections Must Be Extended
More than 1 million working people are in danger of having their work permits stripped away if the Trump administration ends the Temporary Protected Status and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals programs. This is unacceptable. We will fight for and with them just as they have fought for and with all of us.



Defense secretary reveals the trans military ban is in limbo
In the meantime, thousands of transgender personnel, who are already serving and have not disrupted the readiness of the military, await news about the fate of their careers.



Oregon passes law protecting workers from predatory scheduling by bosses
Good news for Oregon workers in the retail and fast food industries. The state has become the first to pass a law protecting workers from some of the worst scheduling abuses employers love so much.



Elon Musk May Be a “Visionary,” But His Vision Doesn’t Seem To Include Unions
That’s because, since last November, Tesla has required employees to sign confidentiality agreements which prevent them from discussing workplace conditions. This policy has faced increased criticism since February, as workers at Tesla’s Fremont, Calif. plant have expressed concern over wages, safety and their right to unionize.



Labor Department wants to reward financial advisors at the expense of consumers
The Labor Department would like to delay a rule that would require financial advisors to act in the best interest of their customers and their retirement accounts.



EEOC lawsuits allege sex discrimination in physical ability tests
Three different cases. Three different theories of gender discrimination. But one common thread – an old school presumption that certain blue-collar jobs are a “man’s work.”



You do not have a constitutional right to be extremely sexist at work
Viewed this way, the decision to fire Damore was not censorship. It was a decision to protect women from a hostile workplace environment. Google prioritized the well-being of its workers and the company’s overall success over one man’s career.



Trump’s Bid to Pit Black and Brown Workers Against Each Other
What the nation needs is not an assault on immigration, but an assault on the effects of structural racism and economic inequality. Instead of dismantling affirmative action, we need investments in schooling for African-American children that start at preschool – and before.



The UAW Vote in Mississippi is a Battle for the Soul of the U.S. Labor Movement
After years of painstaking work by United Auto Workers (UAW) organizers to build support for a union at the big Nissan auto and truck assembly plant near Canton, Miss., the workers themselves will vote today and tomorrow on whether to accept UAW their collective bargaining voice at the plant.



Sarbanes Oxley Whistleblower Protection Law at 15 Years: Know Your Rights
In the wake of Enron and other corporate scandals that wiped out retirement savings and left millions unemployed, Congress enacted the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX), which contains a robust whistleblower protection provision.



Trump is about to make America much crueler to unionized workers
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) began the process of confirming the first of Trump’s two nominees to the NLRB on Monday. When both nominees sit on the Board, a swift rollback of union rights is likely.



Black Women's Equal Pay Day shows how far from equality we are and how slow progress is
July 31 is Black Women’s Equal Pay Day. That means that this is the day in 2017 when black women have finally caught up with what white men were paid in 2016.



Don’t Dawdle on Economic and National Security
Each mill and smelter that remains operating is too vital. Each is too crucial to the economic viability of a corporation, a community, and thousands of workers and their families.



Trump has bad news for millions of workers in line for overtime pay under Obama
In the final days of the Obama administration, the Labor Department had appealed the judge’s decision blocking implementation of the raise, and Trump’s Labor Department agreed in court that it has the power to set the eligibility threshold. But Labor Secretary Alexander Acosta plans to use that power in a very different way than Tom Perez did under Obama.



Justice Department brief argues against protections for LGBTQ workers
On Wednesday evening, the Department of Justice moved to undermine rights for LGBTQ people to ensure they are treated fairly in the workplace



The GOP’s Trojan Horse on Health Care Repeal
We’ve shown an incredible persistence in our fight. We’ll show plenty more when it comes to holding politicians accountable for a vote that favors big-money bullying over the people they’re supposed to represent.



New CFPB Rule – a Poster Child for Regulation
Hurrah for the CFPB! Its new rule is supported by psychology, economics, and political philosophy. Nonetheless, the new rule is under serious threat.



Eight years after the last minimum wage increase, Democrats want to give 41 million workers a raise
The federal minimum wage has been stuck at $7.25 an hour since July 24, 2009—for eight years.



On the CFPB’s Birthday, Stand Against Sharks
The CFPB has provided an extraordinary amount of help to millions of Americans in just six years. Now it needs our help.



As Media Focuses on Russia Collusion, Trump Is Quietly Stacking the Labor Board with Union Busters
It might not get as much press coverage as other Donald Trump administration calamities, but the U.S. president is set to appoint a known union buster to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), push the body to a Republican majority and reverse Obama-era protections that rankle Big Business.



Republicans Working Against Workers
The high point of unionization in America, the 1950s, was the low point in income inequality. It is called the time of the great compression. And a new study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research reaffirms that unionization produced better wages.



Washington state gets paid family leave
The state legislature passed and Gov. Jay Inslee has signed a law giving workers up to 12 weeks of paid family leave for birth, adoption, or the worker’s own or a family member’s medical condition, and up to 16 weeks in a year



Working People Need to Know If We Can Trust Donald Trump’s NLRB Nominees to Protect Our Freedoms
These two men, Marvin Kaplan and William Emanuel, have records of actively trying to strip working people of their freedoms.



Jimmy John’s Fired Workers for Making a ‘Disloyal’ Meme. A Court Just Ruled That’s Okay.
Like the non-compete agreements, the July 3 court decision is an unwarranted attack on labor rights, says William B. Gould IV, a labor law professor at Stanford University and former chairman of the federal labor board.



Get Back Your Right To Take Your Bank To Court
The target this time is a rule issued this week by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau that is designed to restore the ability bank and credit card customers, as individuals or as a group, to take a financial dispute to court.



News from Congress: VA Employees' Civil Service Protections Slashed
Pub.L. 115-41 renews the push to cut back VA civil service protections, after the prior attempt under the last Administration saw adverse actions reversed at the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) and portions of the statute struck down as unconstitutional.



New study confirms widespread reports of science’s sexual harassment problem
Women, and particularly women of color, working within the astronomical and planetary sciences are vastly more likely than their male colleagues to experience a hostile work environment based on their race or gender.



The SEC Whistleblower Program
Enforcement actions resulting from whistleblower tips have enabled the SEC to recover nearly $1 billion in financial remedies from wrongdoers, much of which has been returned to investors.



18 states are suing Betsy DeVos for putting for-profit college fraudsters over student borrowers
They would also ban mandatory arbitration agreements, which have prevented many aggrieved students from suing schools that they believe have defrauded them.



The Trump administration is quietly making it easier to abuse seniors in nursing homes
An Economic Policy Institute study of employment cases, for example, found that employees are less likely to prevail before an arbitrator, and that they typically receive less money if they do prevail.



As Universities are Gutted, Grad Student Employee Unions Can Provide a Vital Defense
The exploitation of academic workers has simmered for decades. Now, buoyed by a National Labor Relations Board ruling that graduate employees at private universities have the right to unionize, a new generation is organizing unions across private universities—defying a wave of pushback from administrations.



Prescription Drug Spending is Consuming a Bigger Share of Wages
While it is generally recognized that drugs are expensive, many people are unaware of how large a share of their income goes to paying for drugs because much of it goes through third party payers, specifically insurance companies and the government.



When three days sick means losing a month's grocery budget
Without the ability to earn paid sick days, workers must choose between going to work sick (or sending a child to school sick) and losing much-needed pay.



Recognizing Signs of Age Discrimination in the Workplace
For an employer, it’s not only a bad idea to discriminate against someone because of his or her age – it’s also against the law.



Davis-Bacon Is Not Racist, and We Need to Protect It
Davis-Bacon has been an undeniable success—lifting millions of working people into the middle class, strengthening public-private partnerships and guaranteeing that America’s infrastructure is built by the best-trained, highest-skilled workers in the world.



If Trump Has His Way, You’ll Certainly Miss This Agency You Probably Don’t Even Know Exists
The only federal agency devoted to women’s economic security — the Department of Labor’s Women’s Bureau — is on the chopping block.



Kellyanne Conway says people who lose Medicaid should just find better jobs. It’s not that simple.
While many of those people might prefer to take advantage of employer-offered health care, a large percentage do not have that option. Only 46 percent of employers offer health care coverage, according to the latest KFF data.



Thousands rally for growing movement
Thousands of SEIU janitors are traveling to the City of Brotherly Love today to hold a massive rally in support of nearly 75,000 east coast janitors who are negotiating fair wages and benefits this fall.