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Preview: Workplace Fairness: today's workplace

Workplace Fairness: today's workplace



Your source for the latest developments in workplace rights and employment law. "Today's Workplace" is the the blog (weblog) written by Paula Brantner, Program Director of Workplace Fairness. In each entry, Paula focuses on legal and political information



 



Walmart raises minimum pay again, while Sam's Club closes many stores
Walmart wants you to read the good news: it’s raising its minimum wage from $9-10 to $11 an hour, and expanding paid parental leave benefits. Donald Trump wants you to read that the company is giving credit for that move to the recent Republican corporate tax cuts. Neither of them wants you to think much about the years-long worker organizing campaign to demand improved wages and benefits, and they definitely don’t want you to think about the news that also just came out that Sam’s Club, the Walmart warehouse chain, is closing dozens of stores, if not more.



King and Meany Brought Civil Rights and Labor Together for a Legacy That Continues Today
Beginning in 1960, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and then-President George Meany of the AFL-CIO began a relationship that would help bring the labor and civil rights movements together with a combined focus on social and economic justice.



Republicans Are Taking Voter Suppression to the Workplace
In December, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) invited public commentary on a possible revocation of a rule that makes employers provide union organizers with contact information for workers in advance of a representation election.



Do Fewer OSHA Inspectors Matter?
One sign that anti-OSHA conservatives are getting nervous about articles (and television appearances) highlighting the declining number of OSHA inspectors are articles questioning whether government plays a useful role in protecting workers.



Wisconsin bill would ban cities from passing worker-friendly laws
Wisconsin is considering a bill that would prevent local governments from enacting worker-friendly ordinances relating to overtime, discrimination, benefits, and wages. On Wednesday, the Senate held a public hearing on the GOP-backed bill.



Workers' lives take a back seat under Donald Trump
In the months after President Donald Trump took office, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration lost 40 inspectors through attrition and made no new hires to fill the vacancies as of Oct. 2, according to data obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request.



4 actresses call out E! for gender discrimination — while live on E!
Messing was discussing the purpose of the “Time’s Up” campaign, an initiative started by “prominent actresses and female agents, writers, directors, producers and entertainment executives” to fight systemic gender inequality. Pay equality, Messing said, was an important part of that effort. Then she turned her attention to E!.



HR Has Never Been on the Side of Workers. #MeToo Is More Proof.
While some have presented HR departments as a solution, the above experiences make clear that HR is at best a distraction from the real solution to workplace abuse: collective organizing led by, and accountable to, workers themselves.



Pro-Working People Laws Catching on Around the Country
As the new year begins, New York, Nevada and Washington state are implementing paid family leave laws, and Rhode Island will join them in July. Rhode Island will bring the total number of states with a paid family leave law to eight.



Union to Southwest: $1,000 worker bonuses don’t make up for years of stagnant pay
Southwest Airlines this week announced that it would be awarding its employees with a $1,000 bonus following the passage of the GOP tax bill, which the company’s board of directors said would “result in meaningful corporate income tax reform.” Union leaders say it hardly makes up for years of unfair treatment.



Trump took credit for airline safety in 2017. What about the surge in coal miner deaths?
In the coal mining sector, data from the Trump administration’s Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), the federal government’s mine safety agency, show coal mining deaths nearly doubled in 2017. But unlike the aviation statistics, Trump isn’t taking any personal responsibility for the coal mining deaths. What’s more, he tapped a former coal executive with a record of safety violations to head MSHA.



Hollywood stars donate millions to empower more women to speak out against sexual assault
The initiative, called Time’s Up, brings together “prominent actresses and female agents, writers, directors, producers and entertainment executives” to fight fight systemic gender inequality in both Hollywood and “blue-collar workplaces” nationwide.



OSHA Is Bleeding: Shrinking Government and Killing Workers
Some of OSHA’s regional staff state that because of the hiring freeze, OSHA’s enforcement and whistleblower programs are “falling apart at the seems.” The agency is “just bleeding.”



What #MeToo Can Teach the Labor Movement
Whether in in our movement or not, serious sexual harassment isn’t really about sex. It’s about a disregard for women, and it shows itself numerous ways.



2017 was a year of eroding workers’ rights
With these new additions, the Department of Labor has been busy dismantling protections for workers. Here are some of the biggest ways the Trump administration rolled back workers’ rights in 2017.



The Trump Labor Board Just Made It Harder for Fast-Food Workers to Hold Corporate Bosses Accountable
On December 14, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) overturned a 2015 policy that had made it easier for workers—particularly fast-food workers—to unionize and challenge their employers over unfair labor practices.



Lifelong Wage Warrior Larry Mishel Takes On Trump’s Tax Scam
What we need instead, Mishel said, is structural changes that will lead to real wage growth and improved working-class living standards.



Murdoch downplays sexual harassment at Fox News, women threaten to ‘go public with the truth’
Robert Murdoch attempted to downplay Fox News’ alleged culture of sexual misconduct as limited to “isolated incidents” with former CEO Roger Ailes — a characterization that was met with fierce criticism from the women on the media mogul’s payroll who say they were victimized by employees of Fox News.



Trump Dept. of Labor Rule Would Legalize Employers Stealing Workers’ Tips
Last week, the Trump administration launched yet another front in its war on workers when the Department of Labor (DOL) proposed a new rule that would allow restaurants and other employers of tipped workers to begin legally pocketing their workers’ tips.



Is Time for Bag Searches Compensable in California?
In the new year the California Supreme Court will address the question of whether employee bag searches should be compensated under California law.



AFL-CIO Joins CWA Call for $4,000 Wage Increase for Working People
Working people know better than to believe the boss’ promises unless they are in writing. That’s why my union has asked some of our biggest employers to sign an agreement that says if the tax plan passes, working people will get their $4,000.



OSHA Rejects GAO Poultry Recommendations: Sees No Problem With Workers’ Restroom Access
In a surprising and disappointing apparent rollback of OSHA’s enforcement policy related to poultry inspections, Acting Assistant Secretary Loren Sweatt has rejected recommendations from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) designed to address findings that poultry workers are intimidated about reporting health and safety problems to OSHA, particularly about their inability to get bathroom breaks.



The Supreme Court hits pause on gay and lesbian rights
For the second time in a week, the Supreme Court signaled on Monday that it may no longer be a friendly place for victims of discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.



Labor Department Proposes Legalizing Wage Theft
The Labor Department is moving quickly to establish a new rule that would make tips the property of restaurant owners instead of workers.



Slate column asks readers to see the ‘upside’ of sexual harassment in the office
On Tuesday, Slate published another example of a powerful person abusing that power and thus endangering women in the workplace.



How Bosses Use “Open Shop” Campaigns to Crush Unions
But union supporters must grapple with an uncomfortable fact about our system of labor relations, which bases the very existence of a union, as well as the additional expenses of pensions, health insurance and other “fringe” benefits, on the individual firm level. In any industry that is not 100% unionized, the decision by workers to form a union really can make a company less competitive. And high-union-density industries are just juicier targets for vampires like Airbnb and Uber to compete by undercutting those standards.



The Blue-Collar Hellscape of the Startup Industry
The news of rancorous working conditions for Tesla employees is merely the latest in a series. Vaughn’s case signals the broader social and physical perils of couching traditional factory models within the frenzied, breakneck tech-startup framework of high demand, long hours and antipathy toward regulation.



Dodd-Frank Court Case Could Redefine Whistleblowing
The U.S. Supreme Court is mulling a case with major implications for would-be whistleblowers. At issue is fuzzy language in the whistleblower protections of the Dodd-Frank Act. At stake is the fate of people like Paul Somers, who was fired after he reported wrongdoing, and anyone who might blow the whistle in the future.



Help the Women of Walmart Today
My story isn’t unique: you can walk into any Walmart store and hear stories just like mine. Being a Walmart worker means being expected to put up with poverty pay, inflexible schedules, and disrespect from bosses.For the majority of store associates like me, the regular folks who stack the shelves and work the registers, working at Walmart often means being punished when we need to be there for our families.



You ARE Entitled: Workers Making Money Stretch
On a national level, workers are organizing for their rights. On a personal level, there are a wide variety of schemes, rights and techniques you can employ to make sure you are getting everything you are entitled to.



Working People Need a Strong CFPB with a Leader Who Supports Its Existence
We learned the hard way from the financial crisis in 2008 that working people need the CFPB. We need the bureau to fight to protect us from predatory lenders and, in order to be effective in doing that, it needs to be led by a strong, full-time director who believes in its mission. Consumer financial protection is a full-time job, not a side gig for someone who things it’s a "joke."



Workers’ rights are being abused as they rebuild in the wake of Hurricane Harvey
Day laborers, many of them undocumented, are reportedly being exploited as they rebuild after Hurricane Harvey, and their health and economic well-being are are stake.



Don't Pass Huge Tax Cuts for the Wealthy on the Backs of Working People
Republican leaders in the U.S. Senate have proposed a job-killing tax plan that favors the super-rich and wealthy corporations over working people. We cannot afford to let this bill become law.



One Last Time: OSHA Extends Recordkeeping Reporting Deadline
Other parts of the “electronic” recordkeeping regulation are being challenged in court and are under reconsideration by OSHA. The agency also announced today that OSHA is currently reviewing the other provisions of its final rule to Improve Tracking of Workplace Injuries and Illnesses, and intends to publish a notice of proposed rulemaking to reconsider, revise, or remove portions of that rule in 2018.”



These corporations have declared war on Thanksgiving
So instead of sitting down to a family dinner, corporations like Walmart, Target, Best Buy, and others coerce or sometimes force hundreds of thousands of minimum wage employees and countless more shoppers to forego the federal holiday and instead work extra long shifts hawking cheap televisions, refrigerators, or Nickelback CDs.



This is the elaborate system Congress created to protect sexual predators on Capitol Hill
Congress has created an elaborate system that protects sexual predators on Capitol Hill, including members of Congress and their staff. In the private sector and elsewhere in the government, victims of sexual harassment have the option of immediately filing a lawsuit and getting their grievances heard in court. But Congress has created a much different set of rules for victims who work on Capitol Hill.



Republicans want to give corporations yet another tax cut and call it paid family leave
The bill would give companies a tax credit for a small proportion of the worker’s pay, companies only get the credit at the end of the year—so if they can’t afford to offer leave up front, they can’t take advantage of it—and it expires in 2019.



Conservatives will not stop pushing the ‘Pence rule’ as a solution to sexual harassment
Not only is it absurd, but it is also deeply harmful to the careers of women in the workplace. When men avoid women for fear of looking “improper” or for fear that they can’t control themselves, they deprive women of opportunities to gain sponsors in their careers and to build better working relationships with colleagues and supervisors.



Murray, DeLauro Call on USDA to Reject Chicken Council’s Petition to Increase Line Speeds
The Chicken Council has been waging a long campaign speed up production.But as a recent NPR story describes, worker groups are fighting back, warning that “higher line speeds increase the risks for foodborne illness and worker injuries in an industry that has an already spotty safety record.”



Fight for $15 Just Scored a Big Win in Maryland. We Have Unions to Thank.
It’s a meaningful victory for the Fight for $15, the union-inspired campaign to raise wages nationally. Montgomery is the most populous county in the state, with a larger population than the nearby cities of Washington, D.C., or Baltimore. It’s also a bellwether for Maryland politics, where organizing has begun already ahead of the 2018 statewide elections, including organizing aimed at improving Maryland’s wage laws.



House of Representatives has a sexual harassment policy — but it’s designed to protect the harasser
House lawmakers met on Capitol Hill Tuesday to review the chamber’s sexual harassment policies. This review process comes on the heels of sweeping allegations of sexual misconduct and harassment among some of the nation’s most powerful institutions and industries — including the U.S. Congress.



Workforce Intermediaries Advance Equity and Diversity Through Apprenticeship
As we kick off National Apprenticeship Week, it is more important than ever to shine a light on the ways government agencies, employers and joint labor-management programs can focus their resources on fostering greater equity, diversity and inclusion in the American workforce.



In victory for workers’ rights, London panel rules that Uber drivers aren’t self-employed
A British employment tribunal has delivered a major blow to Uber, ruling that its drivers needed to be classified as workers and receive a minimum wage, sick leave and paid time off.



How Business Unionism Got Us to Janus
Overcoming the fallout from Janus will require reimagining union membership by inverting hierarchical relations that replicate disempowerment on the job. To do this, unions need to grapple with a number of pressing questions.



For Women Restaurant Workers, Sexual Harassment Starts with the Day You’re Hired
It would be hard to design a context more conducive to being sexually harassed by co-workers, and indeed, like 80 percent of women restaurant workers in a 2014 Restaurant Opportunities Center United (ROC United) survey, we all were.



Labor-Backed Candidates Win Big in Tuesday’s Elections
It was a big night for labor’s agenda as pro-worker candidates won election from coast to coast Tuesday.



Deepwater Horizon: Is the CSB Preparing to Retreat on Worker Participation?
The Chemical Safety Board may be preparing to take a significant step backwards in its advocacy for worker participation in preventing chemical facility incidents, including catastrophes like the Deepwater Horizon oil spill.



California Just Passed Landmark Law to Stop Bosses From Discriminating Against People with Convictions
The fair hiring movement has gained considerable steam in recent years. AB 1008 makes California the 10th state to ban the box for public and private sector workers.



Billionaire Trump donor puts 115 people out of work after some joined a union
Last week, writers at the news sites DNAinfo and Gothamist joined a union. This week, the sites’ Trump-supporting billionaire owner, Joe Ricketts, shut them down, putting 115 people out of work.



Do Nondisclosure Agreements Perpetuate a Toxic Workplace Culture?
The mere fact that an entire group of employees at one company is seeking to be unmuzzled is testament to a deep problem. Nor is it limited to the entertainment industry. NDAs and “hush money” settlements are common in every employment sector, including government agencies.



After 41 Years, The Teamsters Reform Movement Is Finally Building Power
The talk during the upcoming convention, according to Paff, will focus on winning strong contracts, converting part-time jobs into full-time work, boosting wages that start for some at $11 an hour and protecting pensions that have been under attack.



Congress Just Killed Your Right to a Day in Court
By casting the tie-breaking vote to kill the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s arbitration rule – which allowed consumers to band together to sue banks, financial institutions and credit card companies – Pence showed just how much power Wall Street has amassed on Capitol Hill and on Pennsylvania Avenue.



Hotel Housekeepers: Tipping as Hazard Pay?
Are tips the solution to dangerous working conditions, or is elimination of hazards the solution to safe working conditions? The Occupational Safety and Health Act says that all workers have a right to a safe workplace, whether they receive tips or not.



This man was denied a job as a sheriff’s deputy just because he has HIV. Now he’s suing.
A Louisiana man has filed a federal lawsuit against the Iberia Parish Sheriff’s Office (IPSO) for allegedly discriminating against him in 2012. According to the complaint, filed last week by Lambda Legal, IPSO was prepared to hire Liam Pierce as a deputy sheriff, but allegedly opted not to after learning that Pierce has HIV.



GOP Smash-And-Burn Tax Plan Does Nothing for Workers
Corporations have gotten tax breaks before and haven’t done that. And they’ve got plenty of cash to share with workers right now and don’t do it. Instead, they spend corporate money to push up CEO pay. Over the past nine years, corporations have shelled out nearly $4 trillion to buy back their own stock, a ploy that raises stock prices and, right along with them, CEO compensation. Worker pay, meanwhile, flat-lined.



Houston hurricane clean-up workers face wage theft and unsafe conditions
Organizers are ready to fight to improve working conditions and stop wage theft, but Texas makes it a big job, and the hurricane recovery only makes it a bigger one.



The pay gap and sexual harassment must be addressed simultaneously
Over the past few days, more and more men have continued to resign or at the very least publicly confront accusations of sexual harassment, and this trend shows no sign of slowing down.



Forced Arbitration Protects Sexual Predators and Corporate Wrongdoing
And forced arbitration clauses do not only hide wrongdoing in sexual harassment cases. Corporations also use forced arbitration to isolate victims and cover up massive, widespread wrongdoing in the financial sector.



When VPP Companies Kill
But, of course, the VPP program is more than just a recognition program, it also exempts VPP participants from programmed inspections — those inspections that stem from National or Regional Emphasis Programs, or any other OSHA targeting program. Despite the goals of the program, sometimes things don’t go as expected, as we have seen recently at Valero and Nucor.



Can federal workers blatantly discriminate against LGBTQ people? Jeff Sessions isn’t sure.
More than two years ago, when he was still in the Senate, Sessions was one of the original co-sponsors of the First Amendment Defense Act (FADA), a bill that would grant those who have religious objections to same-sex marriage a license to discriminate. Many of the provisions in the new guidance mirror FADA’s language.



The National Park Service has a serious workplace harassment problem
In a week that has exposed the pervasiveness of sexual harassment in Hollywood, a new federal survey released Friday by the Department of the Interior points to a similar culture within the agency’s National Park Service (NPS).



Poultry lobbyists hope Trump will okay dangerous chicken processing speed-up Obama rejected
Poultry workers are almost twice as likely to suffer from serious injuries as workers in private industry, and more than six times as likely to have a work-related illness. Two poultry and meat processing plants, Tyson Foods and JBS/Pilgrim’s Pride, are among the 10 companies with the highest number of work-related amputations and hospitalizations, out of more than 14,000 companies reporting to the federal government, Berkowitz, a former Obama Labor Department official, discovered.



Why the Best Protectors for Workers Are Other Workers
“It’s easy to see a broken arm and treat it. It’s more difficult to see trauma to our brains or hearts,” Morrison said. “Everyday, work for fire fighters and paramedics can be traumatic. Mass-casualty events can be much worse. We want to make sure our members understand the signs and symptoms of traumatic stress injuries, so we can treat them.”



SCOTUS Is on the Verge of Decimating Public-Sector Unions—But Workers Can Still Fight Back
“Right to work” laws, currently on the books in 27 states, strip the requirement that union members pay union dues. Unions claim this creates a “free rider” problem, allowing workers to enjoy the benefits of union membership without contributing a dime.



Stop asking women to change to make men feel comfortable in the workplace
The best solution is for men to be as considerate to their female colleagues as they are to their male colleagues, to no longer shut them out of business meetings for the sake of “appearances,” and to work to create an environment that supports their female colleagues when they do come forward with harassment allegations. Here’s another thought: They could also stop sexually harassing women.



A Trailblazing New Law in Illinois Will Dramatically Expand Temp Workers’ Rights
Beginning next summer, a sweeping new law will take effect in Illinois, ending many of the routine injustices suffered by the state’s nearly 850,000 temp employees who often work under miserable conditions.



Can an employee on FMLA leave from work attend a night concert?
The Northern District of Texas judge shut down the woman’s claim with Beyoncé-like finality. But it raises the legitimate question of whether people on medical leave or family leave are entitled to enjoyment of life or expected to sit at home and recuperate in stoic solitude.



Trump’s new rule allows employers to drop birth control coverage with no oversight
New contraception rules outlined by the Trump administration will allow employers to stop covering birth control — with zero government oversight.



Trump’s Justice Department Is Trying to Turn Back the Clock on Workers’ Rights 100 Years
The question of whether an employee can give up her right to act in concert with other workers may seem technical, but it implicates the very core of collective action.



Miners Working with Congress to Solve Pension Crisis
Strong bipartisan legislation has been introduced in recent congressional sessions to solve the pension crisis currently facing America’s mine workers.



Construction job sites: the silent killer of immigrant workers
The New York City Council voted unanimously on Wednesday to approve a safety bill that establishes safety protocols as a way to prevent construction worker deaths, following eight months of intensive review by lawmakers, day laborers, unions, real estate developers, and contractors.



The Trump Administration’s Backdoor Plan to Erode the Rights of Workers to Act Collectively
On October 2, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear a case that implicates the very concept of collective action. NLRB v. Murphy Oil asks whether it is a violation of workers’ rights to force them to enter into arbitration agreements that prohibit collective or class litigation. Such agreements, often entered into as conditions of employment, require workers who want to sue their employers to do so individually in a private arbitration setting, rather than as a class of aggrieved workers who can pool their resources and knowledge.



Supreme Court takes up case that will devastate public sector unions
In what is all but certain to be a terrible blow to organized labor, the Supreme Court announced on Thursday that it will hear Janus v. AFSCME, a case seeking to defund public sector unions. The case presents an issue that was recently before the Court, and where the justices split 4-4 along party lines.



Divide and Conquer: Employers' Attempts to Prohibit Joint Legal Action Will be Tested in Court
On Monday, October 2, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in the most consequential labor law cases to come to the Court in a generation, which could fundamentally alter the balance of power between millions of American workers and the people who employ them.



NFL Players Association Responds to Attacks on Free Speech
No man or woman should ever have to choose a job that forces them to surrender their rights. No worker nor any athlete, professional or not, should be forced to become less than human when it comes to protecting their basic health and safety.



Supreme Court opens its new term with a direct attack on workers’ rights
The three cases — National Labor Relations Board v. Murphy Oil USA, Ernst & Young LLP v. Morris, and Epic Systems v. Lewis — all involve employment contracts cutting off employee’s rights to sue their employer for legal violations.



This Lawyer Helped Reagan Bust the Air Traffic Controllers Union. Now Trump Wants Him on the NLRB.
Thirty-six years later, Reagan’s lead attorney in the air traffic controllers case is poised to make decisions about thousands of unfair labor practices throughout the country.



Seattle's minimum wage increase deals a blow to yet another Republican scare tactic
Seattle’s minimum wage for large employers went to $13 an hour in 2016—and a recent study from the University of Washington School of Public Health finds that the increase didn’t affect grocery prices in the city.



9th Circuit Revists Ruling on Unequal Pay in Some Situations
The EEOC contends that the ruling enables the pay gap’s vicious cycle. If men are routinely paid more than women, their salary history will dictate they be paid more at the next job, and so on.



How the Canadians Are Trying to Use NAFTA to Raise Your Wage
The Canadian negotiating team did something big: They told the U.S. negotiators that U.S. laws that interfere with people’s freedom to negotiate on the job are dragging down standards for Canada and need to be abolished. Guess what? Canada is right.



Wage gap between blacks and whites is larger today than it was 40 years ago
It’s near impossible for black Americans to achieve parity with their white counterparts in the labor market, according to two new studies which show that they are underpaid and discriminated against throughout the hiring process.



The Right Wing Has a Vast, Secret Plot to Destroy Unions for Good. Here’s How to Fight Back.
SPN and ALEC have aggressively pursued so-called “right-to-work” legislation as a means of bankrupting unions and knocking out a key component of their opponents’ get-out-the-vote operation. Twenty-eight states now have these anti-union laws on the books.



OSHA's Claims About Hiding Information on Worker Deaths Fall Flat
Two weeks ago, the agency responsible for enforcing workplace safety and health—the Occupational Safety and Health Administration—removed the names of fallen workers from its home page and has stopped posting information about their deaths on its data page.



Racial Inequality Is Hollowing Out America’s Middle Class
This wealth decline is a threat to the viability of the American middle class and the nation’s overall economic health. Families with more wealth can cover emergencies without going into debt and take advantage of economic opportunity, such as buying a home, saving for college, or starting a business.



Freelancing Ain't Free
When is the moment in time for a freelance writer that a late payment becomes wage theft, and what do you do about it?



Lost wages, serious illness and poor labor standards: The dangers of rebuilding Texas and Florida
Past abuses after similar natural disasters have left laborers without all of their wages and with serious illnesses that could have been prevented with proper supervision and training, labor experts say.



With All Eyes on DACA, the Trump Administration Is Quietly Killing Overtime Protections
On September 5, the administration of Donald Trump formally announced that they won’t try to save Obama’s overtime rule, effectively killing a potential raise for millions of Americans.



Canadian Mounties to the Rescue of American Workers
Canada is stipulating that the United States eliminate laws that empower corporations and weaken workers.



When the Parades Are Over, Who Stands With Unions?
The Labor Day parades are over. The bands have packed up. The muscular speeches celebrating workers are finished.



How Ending DACA Hurts All Low-Wage Workers
Ending DACA will destroy the educational and employment prospects of 800,000 young immigrants who did nothing wrong, while at the same time hurting the wages and labor standards of American workers



Labor unions are trying to take back politics in the Midwest
On Labor Day — designated a federal holiday in 1894 to honor America’s labor movement — at least eight Democratic candidates will hold rallies in five Midwest cities to tell workers just how far the country has veered from its pro-labor roots.



Labor Day 2017: Working People Take Fewer Vacation Days and Work More
In the survey, the majority of America’s working people credit labor unions for many of the benefits they receive.



Trump blocks Obama effort to combat pay discrimination
Donald Trump is blocking the rule from going into effect as scheduled next spring because it’s just too hard for businesses to report how much they pay their workers.



Ivanka Trump supports her father’s decision to stop monitoring the wage gap
Despite her supposed support for equal pay, Ivanka Trump backed a recent White House decision to end an Obama administration rule that would have required businesses to monitor the salaries of employees of different genders, races, and ethnicities in an effort to prevent employment discrimination.



Wisconsin’s Foxconn Deal Enriches Billionaires With Taxpayer Cash
Keeping the pressure on workers — no matter the consequences — has helped Foxconn’s Gou accumulate a personal fortune somewhere north of $6 billion. But Gou has also perfected another sure-fire strategy for piling up the big bucks. He gets taxpayers to give him money. Lots of it.



Trump’s transgender military ban met with backlash
A draft of this memorandum was reported on Wednesday, and there has been widespread criticism from trans activists, lawmakers, and current and former members of the military over the last few days.



Why Defending Workers’ Rights Means Fighting ICE’s Deportation Machine
ICE’s targeting of labor hearings falls into a much broader pattern of workplace immigration raids. The second term of the George W. Bush administration saw a boom in such policies, with authorities carrying out hundreds of sweeps targeting workers



The Skies Just Got Friendlier for Working People: Worker Wins
Our latest roundup of worker wins begins with flight attendants and air traffic controllers standing together to make the skies safer for working people and travelers and includes numerous examples of workers organizing, bargaining and mobilizing for a better life.



Working People Have 17 Recommendations for NAFTA. Here’s #2
Since the dawn of the modern trade era (roughly 1990), no trade deal has ever put working families first. But we know the rules we need to make it happen. But no one will fight for those rules if we don’t lead.



Sexual harassment of graduate students by faculty is a national problem
Graduate students hope to secure protection from harassment as they fight for their labor rights. Graduate students say that union representation and collective bargaining will help them get contracts that cover issues of sexual harassment.



Thousands rally for growing movement
Thousands of SEIU janitors are traveling to the City of Brotherly Love today to hold a massive rally in support of nearly 75,000 east coast janitors who are negotiating fair wages and benefits this fall.