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Tobacco



All Reason.com articles with the "Tobacco" tag.



Published: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Last Build Date: Wed, 28 Sep 2016 16:43:48 -0400

 



More Evidence That Vaping Is Not a Gateway to Smoking

Mon, 19 Sep 2016 00:01:00 -0400

Three years ago, Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),warned that "many kids are starting out with e-cigarettes and then going on to smoke conventional cigarettes." That fear is one of the main justifications for the CDC's hostility toward vaping and the Food and Drug Administration's onerous new e-cigarette regulations, which are expected to cripple the industry. Yet there is no evidence that Frieden's claim is true and considerable evidence that it's not, especially since smoking rates among teenagers have fallen to record lows even as more and more of them experiment with vaping. Two new studies cast further doubt on the idea that e-cigarettes are a "gateway" to the real thing. Frieden and other e-cigarette alarmists make much of the fact that the percentage of teenagers who report vaping has risen dramatically in recent years. They like to focus on the percentage of teenagers who have ever tried e-cigarettes and the percentage who have used them in the last month, without asking how many are experimenters or occasional users and how many are daily vapers—the sort who might get hooked on nicotine and eventually progress to conventional cigarettes. It turns out there's a good reason for the CDC's lack of curiosity on this point: Survey data show that few teenagers who have never smoked use e-cigarettes and that even fewer do so on a regular basis. "Many fear that e-cigarette use by non-smoking students will lead many to nicotine addiction and subsequent cigarette smoking," notes University of Michigan health economist Kenneth Warner in anAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine article published last month. But based on data from the Monitoring the Future Study (MTF), which surveys students in the eighth, 10th, and 12th grades, Warner finds that "non-smoking high school students are highly unlikely to use e-cigarettes" and even less likely to use them regularly. Among the 12th-graders who had never tried conventional cigarettes, 94 percent had not used an e-cigarette in the previous month. Among the never-smokers who reported using e-cigarettes in the previous month, 60 percent used them on only one or two days. Less than 1 percent of never-smokers had vaped on 20 or more days in the previous month. The MTF numbers, which are similar to the findings of British surveys, suggest it is quite unlikely that "many kids are starting out with e-cigarettes and then going on to smoke conventional cigarettes," because nonsmokers rarely use e-cigarettes often enough to develop a nicotine habit. Another point Warner emphasizes makes Frieden's claim even less plausible: "A large proportion of students use e-cigarettes containing no nicotine." Warner cites a 2014 study that found most never-smoking Connecticut teenagers who vaped used nicotine-free e-liquid. The significance of that point is underlined by another recently published analysis of MTF data. Richard Miech and three of his colleagues at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research (which conducts the survey) report in the journal Tobacco Control that nearly two-thirds of teenagers who have tried vaping consumed "just flavoring" the last time they did it. "Nicotine use came in a distant second," Miech et al. write, "at about 20 percent in 12th and 10th grade and 13 percent in 8th grade." The other options were marijuana and "don't know." Consider the CDC's practice of counting vaping as "tobacco use," which leads it to claim there has been "no decline in overall youth tobacco use since 2011," even though that is clearly not true. It was already absurd to pretend teenagers were using tobacco when they weren't, especially since the CDC used that inaccurate terminology to imply that the rising popularity of vaping somehow cancels out the health gains from the continuing decline in smoking, a far more dangerous habit. Now that it's clear the typical adolescent vaper is not even using nicotine, the CDC cannot assume any chemical connection between e-cigarettes and tobacco. In fact, as Miech et al. note, even calling[...]



Two New Studies Discredit the CDC's Dire Warnings About E-Cigarettes and Teenagers

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 06:30:00 -0400

(image) For several years now, the CDC has been freaking out about adolescent e-cigarette use, which it warns will boost smoking by getting teenagers hooked on nicotine in a more palatable form. But as I explain in my latest Forbes column, that does not seem to be happening, and new research suggests it probably never will:

Three years ago, Thomas Frieden, director of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC),warned that "many kids are starting out with e-cigarettes and then going on to smoke conventional cigarettes." That fear is one of the main justifications for the CDC's hostility toward vaping and the Food and Drug Administration's onerous new e-cigarette regulations, which are expected to cripple the industry. Yet there is no evidence that Frieden's claim is true and considerable evidence that it's not, especially since smoking rates among teenagers have fallen to record lows even as more and more of them experiment with vaping. Two new studies cast further doubt on the idea that e-cigarettes are a "gateway" to the real thing.

Read the whole thing.




Most Adolescent Vapers Are Not Nicotine Users

Fri, 02 Sep 2016 10:20:00 -0400

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA), having decided to regulate tobacco-free e-cigarettes as tobacco products because they deliver tobacco-derived nicotine, now has the challenge of explaining how even nicotine-free e-liquids can qualify for the same label. E-cigarette alarmists at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have a similar problem. They insist on counting vaping as "tobacco use," which leads them to claim there has been "no decline in overall youth tobacco use since 2011," even though that is clearly not true. Now a new study in the journal Tobacco Control reveals the CDC's position to be even more ridiculous than it already seemed, showing that a large majority of teenagers who vape are not only not consuming tobacco; they are not consuming nicotine either. Based on data from the 2015 Monitoring the Future Study, which surveys students in the eighth, 10th, and 12th grades, Richard Miech and three of his colleagues at the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research (which conducts the survey) report that nearly two-thirds of teenagers who have tried vaping consumed "just flavoring" the last time they did it. "Nicotine use came in a distant second," Miech et al. write, "at about 20% in 12th and 10th grade and 13% in 8th grade." The other options were marijuana and "don't know." The survey data indicate that the more frequently teenagers vape, the more likely they are to vape nicotine. Among high school seniors, 47 percent of those who had vaped six or more times in the previous month reported consuming nicotine, compared to 23 percent of those who had vaped one to five times in the previous month. But "in no case did the prevalence of nicotine vaping reach 50% or greater." The fact that most adolescent vapers do not vape nicotine was mentioned in a summary of the 2015 survey results published last year, as Pennsylvania anti-smoking activist (and harm reduction advocate) Bill Godshall pointed out at the time. I noted that finding in a blog post last April and a column last June. But the Tobacco Control article presents more-detailed data on this question and highlights the CDC's mendacity. It was already absurd to claim teenagers were using tobacco when they weren't, especially since the CDC used that inaccurate terminology to imply that the rising popularity of vaping somehow cancels out the health gains from the continuing decline in smoking, a far more dangerous habit. Now that it's clear the typical adolescent vaper is not even using nicotine, the CDC cannot assume any chemical connection between e-cigarettes and tobacco. Furthermore, its warnings that teenagers might start smoking after they get hooked on nicotine by vaping look even more overblown than they did before. As Meich et al. note, even the practice of referring to vaporizers as "electronic nicotine delivery systems" (as both the CDC and the FDA do) is quite misleading, at least in the context of adolescent use. "The majority of US youth who use vaporisers and e-cigarettes do not vape nicotine," the authors write. "This finding challenges many common assumptions and practices." The numbers "suggest that the recent rise in adolescent vaporiser use does not necessarily indicate a nicotine epidemic," and they show how misleading the CDC's equation of vaping with tobacco use is. Meich et al. note that counting every vaper as a tobacco user doubles the supposed prevalence of tobacco use among 12th-graders and nearly triples it among 10th- and eighth-graders. If vapers are counted as tobacco users only when they vape nicotine (still a dubious maneuver), the effect is much less dramatic. "If vaporiser users are considered nicotine users only if they last vaped nicotine in the last 30 days," the researchers say, "then national estimates of nicotine prevalence increase by a much smaller percentage of 23–38% across the three grades," compared to the increases of 100 percent to 200 percent seen with the CDC's method. In referring to "national estimates of nicotine prev[...]



Experiment Confirms Lifesaving Potential of E-Cigarettes

Mon, 22 Aug 2016 08:53:00 -0400

A new experimental study—the first of its kind, according to the authors—confirms that smokers can dramatically reduce their exposure to toxins and carcinogens by switching to e-cigarettes. "They are safer," the lead author, Maciej Goniewicz, a toxicologist at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, told Buffalo Business First. "It's the first time we have very strong evidence that we will be able now to give [smokers] that the answer is, yes, this you should consider a transition, a substitute for your tobacco cigarette that will save your life." The study, reported last week in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research, involved 20 Polish smokers who were encouraged to replace their cigarettes with the M201, a pen-style vaping system popular in Poland. Each week during the two-week experiment, the researchers supplied the subjects with 20 tobacco-flavored cartridges, each containing 11 milligrams of nicotine in a solution of propylene glycol and vegetable glycerin. Goniewicz and his colleagues used questionnaires and urine tests to assess the subjects at the beginning of the study, after a week, and after two weeks. Nine of the subjects stopped smoking completely, while the rest cut back, from an average of 16 cigarettes a day at the beginning of the study to an average of just one a day at the end. Based on tests for seven nicotine metabolites, the researchers found that nicotine intake stayed the same, while exposure to tobacco-related toxins and carcinogens fell. Goniewicz et al. measured biomarkers for 13 toxins and carcinogens; all but a few declined substantially after the smokers started using e-cigarettes. For example, exposure to NNK, a tobacco-specific nitrosamine "directly associated with lung cancer risk," had fallen by 64 percent after the second week. Exposure to the volatile organic compounds acrolein, ethylene oxide, benzene, and 1,3-butadiene fell by 56 percent, 61 percent, 76 percent, and 84 percent, respectively. "The observed decline in various urine toxicant biomarker levels in our study was similar to decline among smokers who have quit smoking completely and did not substitute with any other product," Goniewicz et al. write. "This observation suggests that e-cigarettes are not a significant source of exposure to those toxicants." Based on chemical analyses of e-cigarette vapor, other researchers have estimated that switching from smoking to vaping reduces health risks by at least 95 percent. Goniewicz et al. also found declines in reports of chest tightness, visual disturbances, daytime coughing, difficulty concentrating, irritability, and phlegm, although only the first two changes were statistically significant. A larger sample with a longer follow-up period probably would supply further evidence of health improvement. The authors note that a 2014 survey of 19,000 e-cigarette users "suggest[s] use of these products pose minimal side effects to users and can in fact improve reported health issues experienced when using tobacco cigarettes," including respiratory symptoms caused by asthma and chronic obstructive lung disease. "This study showed for the first time that after switching from tobacco to e-cigarettes, nicotine exposure remains unchanged, while exposure to selected carcinogens and toxicants is substantially reduced," Goniewicz et al. conclude. "These findings suggest that e-cigarettes may effectively reduce exposure to toxic and carcinogenic substances among smokers who switched to these products."[...]



FDA Says Nicotine-Free E-Liquids Are Tobacco Products in 'Certain Circumstances'

Fri, 19 Aug 2016 09:16:00 -0400

This week, responding to one of the lawsuits challenging its e-cigarette regulations, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) further muddied the question of whether those regulations apply to products that do not contain tobacco-derived nicotine. The lawsuit, which was brought by Nicopure, a manufacturer of e-liquids and vaping systems, argues that such a result would be unfair, illogical, and illegal. In response, the FDA says Nicopure has failed to show that any of its nicotine-free liquids are actually covered by the regulations and therefore has no standing to challenge that aspect of the rules. At the same time, the FDA concedes that "e-liquids marketed as 'nicotine-free' may properly be considered tobacco products—or components or parts thereof—under certain circumstances." What circumstances are those? "Some e-liquids 'claiming to be nicotine-free actually contain[] high levels of nicotine," the FDA says, quoting its regulations. "Others are tobacco flavored, and are thus 'made or derived from tobacco' regardless of their nicotine content." Does that mean e-liquids are not subject to the FDA's burdensome, prohibitively expensive regulations as long as they do not contain nicotine or any other tobacco derivative? No, because the FDA's definition of "tobacco product" does not require nicotine or any other tobacco derivative. The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, the statute that gave the FDA authority over tobacco products, defines them as products "made or derived from tobacco that [are] intended for human consumption, including any component, part, or accessory of a tobacco product." In deeming e-cigarettes to be tobacco products, the FDA defined "component or part" as "any software or assembly of materials intended or reasonably expected...to alter or affect the tobacco product's performance, composition, constituents, or characteristics" or "to be used with or for the human consumption of a tobacco product." Hence vaping equipment, whether a closed, disposable e-cigarette or an open system with a refillable tank and parts that can be switched out, is a "component or part" of a tobacco product, which means it is also a tobacco product. Does that mean a nicotine-free e-liquid is a "component or part" of a tobacco product—i.e., the vaporizer? The FDA can't or won't give a straight answer to that question. "The only nicotine-free e-liquids that the rule brings under the FDA's regulatory authority are those that are made or derived from tobacco (such as tobacco-flavored varieties) or that otherwise meet the definition of a 'component' or 'part,'" it says. "Thus, nicotine-free e-liquids not made or derived from tobacco are subject to the deeming rule only where they meet the definition of a 'component or part.'...Whether nicotine-free e-liquids meet this definition 'will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.'" That means a company like Nicopure cannot know ahead of time which of its products are covered by the regulations. It can only find out by asking the FDA about each one, a process that will carry its own costs, even if they do not rise to the hundreds of thousands or millions of dollars that each "premarket tobacco product application" is expected to cost. The FDA's position is that Nicopure can't challenge the potential regulation of its nicotine-free e-liquids because it does not know whether they will actually be regulated. Never mind that it doesn't know because the FDA won't say.[...]



FDA E-Cigarette Regulations Give Smoking a Boost

Mon, 15 Aug 2016 00:01:00 -0400

The Food and Drug Administration's e-cigarette regulations, which took effect last week, immediately struck two blows against public health. As of Monday, companies that sell vaping equipment and the fluids that fill them are forbidden to share potentially lifesaving information about those products with their customers. They are also forbidden to make their products safer, more convenient, or more pleasant to use. The FDA's censorship and its ban on innovation will discourage smokers from switching to vaping, even though that switch would dramatically reduce the health risks they face. That effect will be compounded by the FDA's requirement that manufacturers obtain its approval for any vaping products they want to keep on the market for longer than two years. The cost of meeting that requirement will force many companies out of business and force those that remain to shrink their offerings, dramatically reducing competition and variety. All of this is unambiguously bad for consumers and bad for public health. Yet the FDA took none of it into account when it estimated the costs imposed by its regulations, simply assuming that good intentions would ensure good results. Although preventing fraud is the official intent of the FDA's speech restrictions, the agency's rules prohibit statements that are accurate and highly relevant to consumers choosing between smoking and vaping. Nicopure, one of the companies that is challenging the FDA's regulations in federal court, used to tell consumers that in vaping "nothing is burned," "no smoke is released," and "no ash" is generated. It also noted that the aerosol produced by e-cigarettes contains "no tar" and only "a fraction of the 4000 chemicals currently found in standard tobacco cigarettes." Although all of these statements are indisputably true, they are illegal under the FDA's reading of the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. That law gave the FDA authority over tobacco products, a category to which it has arbitrarily assigned tobacco-free e-cigarettes, even when they contain nicotine that is not derived from tobacco or no nicotine at all. The Tobacco Control Act prohibits unapproved "modified risk" claims, including any "explicit or implicit representation that [a] tobacco product or its smoke does not contain or is free of a substance or contains a reduced level of a substance, or presents a reduced exposure to a substance in tobacco smoke." According to the FDA, that means e-cigarette companies are not allowed to advertise the main advantage of their products. Even describing an e-cigarette as "smokeless" or "smoke-free" is asking for trouble, since "the Agency will evaluate an [e-cigarette] manufacturer's use of 'smokeless' or 'smoke-free' (and similar descriptive terms) on a case-by-case basis." Instead of immediately banning all e-cigarettes and e-fluids, the FDA gave manufacturers a couple of years to seek approval for each of their products. But that grace period does not apply to any variations introduced after August 8, 2016, so the FDA has in effect banned product improvements. In a declaration supporting Nicopure's lawsuit, CEO Jeff Stamler notes that his company "introduced approximately 288 new e-liquid products, 6 new vaporizer products, and 23 new vaporizer components" in 2015 alone. Now any new product requires premarket approval, so "as a practical matter Nicopure will be unable to introduce new products for several years." The ban applies even to minor changes. The American Vaping Association notes that "any variation of the nicotine level, bottle size, flavor amount, ingredient type, etc. in a current product (i.e., one being marketed on August 8, 2016) will result in a 'new' product that will be illegal to sell without preapproval from the FDA." But the FDA is also blocking substantial improvements in the designs of vaping systems and their components, changes that could make them easier or cheaper to use[...]



FDA Assigns Zero Value to Smokers Who Die Because of Its E-Cigarette Regulations

Fri, 12 Aug 2016 06:30:00 -0400

(image) The FDA's e-cigarette regulations, which were published last May, took effect this week. As I explain in my latest Forbes column, the rules will dramatically reduce competition, variety, and innovation, retarding the replacement of smoking with a much safer alternative:

The Food and Drug Administration's e-cigarette regulations, which took effect this week, immediately struck two blows against public health. As of Monday, companies that sell vaping equipment and the fluids that fill them are forbidden to share potentially lifesaving information about those products with their customers. They are also forbidden to make their products safer, more convenient, or more pleasant to use.

The FDA's censorship and its ban on innovation will discourage smokers from switching to vaping, even though that switch would dramatically reduce the health risks they face. That effect will be compounded by the FDA's requirement that manufacturers obtain its approval for any vaping products they want to keep on the market for longer than two years. The cost of meeting that requirement will force many companies out of business and force those that remain to shrink their offerings, dramatically reducing competition and variety.

All of this is unambiguously bad for consumers and bad for public health. Yet the FDA took none of it into account when it estimated the costs imposed by its regulations, simply assuming that good intentions would ensure good results.

Read the whole thing.




Brickbat: Don't Smoke 'Em if You Got 'Em

Mon, 08 Aug 2016 04:00:00 -0400

(image) Michigan State University has banned the use of all tobacco products, vaporizers and e-cigarettes anywhere on campus, even in private vehicles.




War on Vaping an Effort To Prop up Tobacco Taxes?

Fri, 01 Jul 2016 00:01:00 -0400

The last time I wrote about tobacco-related measures, I concluded that California legislators and health advocates have let a bit of Puritanism get the better of them. Why else would the governor sign a law that makes no distinctions between smoking dangerous, combustible tobacco products (cigarettes) and puffing on vaping devices that are a safer, alternative product? I still think some Puritanism is at work—it bothers activists that smokers find vaping enjoyable, as opposed to arm patches, nasal sprays and ten-step programs. But some readers reminded me of an even bigger and more cynical reason for the state's approach: officials are addicted to their cut of tobacco-related revenues. Smoking rates are declining. As smokers give up their bad habit, anti-smoking programs lose tax dollars. Taking dollars from government agencies and government-addicted nonprofits makes them as grumpy as taking the last pack of cigarettes from a habitual smoker. Even though the state passed several new laws—raising the smoking age to 21 and regulating e-cigarettes like tobacco, for instance—anti-tobacco activists have qualified an initiative for the November ballot that would go even further. The "California Healthcare, Research and Prevention Tobacco Tax Act of 2016" is, as its name suggests, all about hiking tax rates. California has one of the nation's lower tobacco taxes. The initiative provides a $2 per pack tax boost on cigarettes (from 87 cents to $2.87). It raises taxes on other tobacco products by an equivalent amount. I'm no fan of tax increases. And sin taxes are regressive—they impose a particularly high burden on the poor. But at least advocates are trying to do something that might improve public health by discouraging the use of a dangerous product. But this line in the initiative suggests the anti-vaping craze is mainly about the money: "Tobacco products also shall include electronic cigarettes." To be clear, the liquid that is heated and "vaped" is not tobacco, even though most—but not all—liquids contain nicotine. The nicotine is the point. Smokers are addicted to it. These products provide a safer way to get that fix—95 percent safer, according to Public Health England. If the initiative passes, the state will have another way to get its fix of taxes. In fact, the measure would boost taxes on vaping products by 320 percent, according to industry estimates. The Legislative Analyst's Office explains the $1 billion a year in expected new revenues will go to replace lost tobacco-related revenues. A small portion will go to the Board of Equalization to administer the tax. Law enforcement will grab $48 million. The University of California will grab $40 million for "physician training." The Department of Public Health will get a $30-million cut and the state auditor will get some money to conduct audits. "Many believe this misguided measure is driven more [by] money than protecting California's public health due to the fact that tobacco tax revenues are declining as adult consumption rates continue to fall," Joshua Kane, president of the California chapters of the Smoke Free Alternatives Trade Association, argued in his recent testimony to the Legislature. Only 4.3 percent of the current $1.52 billion in smoking-related excise taxes and settlements actually are spent on smoking prevention and cessation programs, he added. That reinforces the cynics' view: The government wants its dollars. And so does the tobacco industry, of course. The Los Angeles Times obtained an email from a tobacco lobbyist suggesting the industry would pay up to $10 per signature to place a possible referendum on the ballot overturning the age-21 measure. It would have driven up signature costs and endangered this tax initiative and other proposals slated for the ballot. That's cynical politics, too. Politics aside, the ant[...]



E.U. Survey Finds E-Cigarettes Helped 15 Million Smokers Quit or Cut Back

Mon, 27 Jun 2016 10:20:00 -0400

(image) A large survey of Europeans indicates that more than 6 million have quit smoking with the help of e-cigarettes, while more than 9 million have cut back, according to a study recently published by the journal Addiction. "These are probably the highest rates of smoking cessation and reduction ever observed in such a large population study," says the lead researcher, Konstantinos Farsalinos, a cardiologist at the Onassis Cardiac Surgery Center in Athens. "The European Union data show that the use of electronic cigarettes seems to have a positive impact on public health for two main reasons: 1) High smoking cessation and reduction rates are observed, and 2) electronic cigarette use is largely confined to smokers (current and former), with minimal use by nonsmokers."

The study, based on responses from 27,460 participants in the Eurobarometer survey, found that 48.5 million citizens of E.U. countries have tried e-cigarettes, while 7.5 million are current vapers. Within the latter group, 35 percent reported that e-cigarettes helped them quit smoking, while 32 percent said they were smoking less thanks to e-cigarettes. Such self-reports are not conclusive, since the study did not independently verify smoking status, smokers who try to quit by vaping are probably different from those who don't, and it's possible these outcomes could have been achieved without e-cigarettes. But policy makers and regulators should not lightly dismiss the experiences of millions who say e-cigarettes helped them make changes that dramatically reduced the health hazards they face.

Critics of vaping say the risk that it will lead to smoking in people who otherwise never would have used tobacco products must be weighed against the success stories of people who believe they'd still be smoking if it weren't for e-cigarettes. But this study found very little evidence of such a risk. Just 0.8 percent of respondents who had ever tried tobacco products said they had tried e-cigarettes first (which does not necessarily mean that the latter led to the former). Only 1.3 percent of never-smokers reported using e-cigarettes with nicotine-containing liquids, and only 0.09 percent did so every day. "In nonsmokers we observed some experimentation with electronic cigarettes, but regular use is minimal," says one of Farsalinos' collaborators, Jacques Le Houezec, a neuroscientist at the French National Research Institute for Health and Medical Research. "The concern that electronic cigarettes can be a gateway to smoking is largely rejected by our findings."




Teenagers Smoke Less As They Vape More

Mon, 20 Jun 2016 04:38:00 -0400

Public statements from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) take an alarmist view of e-cigarettes, portraying them as a menace to the youth of America, who supposedly will start smoking again in droves once they try vaping and get hooked on nicotine. But the CDC's data tell a different story. This month CDC released the latest results from its National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (NYRBS), which is conducted every two years. The 2015 numbers show that cigarette smoking continues to fall among teenagers even as more and more of them experiment with vaping. But as usual, the CDC chose to accentuate the negative. "Current cigarette smoking is at an all-time low, which is great news," CDC Director Tom Frieden conceded. "However, it's troubling to see that students are engaging in new risk behaviors, such as using e-cigarettes. We must continue to invest in programs that help reduce all forms of tobacco use, including e-cigarettes, among youth." You see what he did there? Frieden, as is his wont, called vaping "tobacco use," even though e-cigarettes do not contain tobacco. In fact, data from the Monitoring the Future Study indicate that the e-cigarette liquids used by teenagers typically do not even contain nicotine. Even when teenagers use e-cigarettes to inhale nicotine, they face far smaller health risks than smokers do—a crucial point that the CDC recklessly and routinely obfuscates by implying that the rising popularity of vaping wipes out any public health benefit from the ongoing decline in smoking. That decline has been dramatic. According to the NYRBS, the share of high school students who reported smoking cigarettes during the previous month fell from more than 36 percent in 1997 to less than 11 percent in 2015—a 70 percent drop. Other surveys, including Monitoring the Future and the CDC's National Youth Tobacco Survey, show a similar downward trend, even as interest in e-cigarettes has increased dramatically. The CDC has been raising the alarm about rising adolescent e-cigarette experimentation since 2012, based on answers to survey questions added in 2011. Yet the NYRBS shows that past-month cigarette smoking fell from 18.1 percent in 2011 to 10.8 percent in 2015. The CDC's own numbers belie the notion that vaping is renewing interest in smoking. A study published last week in the journal Pediatrics purports to show that vaping is nevertheless renewing interest in smoking. But that is not what the study actually shows. Jessica Barrington-Trimis, a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Southern California, and her eight collaborators started with the Children's Health Study, which has been following more than 5,000 kids in Southern California since 2002. The researchers focused on 213 subjects who in 2014, when they were juniors or seniors in high school, reported that they had never smoked. Barrington-Trimis et al. got 146 of those teenagers to complete new questionnaires an average of 16 months later. They found that teenagers who had reported trying e-cigarettes in 2014 were six times as likely as those who hadn't to report in the follow-up survey that they had tried conventional cigarettes. The researchers conclude that "e-cigarette use in never-smoking youth may increase risk of subsequent initiation of cigarettes and other combustible products during the transition to adulthood when the purchase of tobacco products becomes legal." Then again, it may not. While Barrington-Trimis et al. found a strong association between vaping and smoking, it does not necessarily follow that the former causes the latter. It may simply be that the sort of teenagers who are inclined to try vaping are also inclined to try smoking, and that they try the former first because it smells and tastes better and causes less disc[...]



If Vaping Causes Smoking, Why Are Cigarettes Less Popular Than Ever With Teenagers?

Fri, 17 Jun 2016 07:30:00 -0400

(image) Data released last week by the CDC show that smoking continues to decline among teenagers, reaching a record low last year. But as I explain in my latest Forbes column, the CDC is still worried that the rising popularity of e-cigarettes will renew adolescent interest in the real thing:

Public statements from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) take an alarmist view of e-cigarettes, portraying them as a menace to the youth of America, who supposedly will start smoking again in droves once they try vaping and get hooked on nicotine. But the CDC's data tell a different story.

Last week the CDC released the latest results from its National Youth Risk Behavior Survey (NYRBS), which is conducted every two years. The 2015 numbers show that cigarette smoking continues to fall among teenagers even as more and more of them experiment with vaping. But as usual, the CDC chose to accentuate the negative.

Read the whole thing.




Clueless Legislators Deter Smokers From Vaping

Mon, 30 May 2016 00:01:00 -0400

On May 4, the day before the Food and Drug Administration officially classified e-cigarettes as "tobacco products," California did the same thing. Gov. Jerry Brown signed SBX2 5, which expands the definition of tobacco product under several statutes to include "an electronic device that delivers nicotine or other vaporized liquids to the person inhaling from the device." Among other things, the change means that vaping will be banned everywhere that smoking is prohibited and, since another bill signed by Brown raises the age for buying tobacco products from 18 to 21, adults younger than 21 will no longer be allowed to buy e-cigarettes. California's policy shift is not as consequential as the onerous FDA regulations unveiled the next day, which will shut down thousands of e-cigarette and e-liquid businesses. But it is equally misguided, and the arguments used by its supporters show that the people driving policy in this area are either remarkably clueless or brazenly dishonest. Mark Leno, the state senator who introduced SBX2 5, might be both. A riddle attributed to Abraham Lincoln asks: If you call a tail a leg, how many legs does a dog have? The answer: Four, because calling a tail a leg does not make it a leg. Likewise, legislators (or bureaucrats empowered by them) can call e-cigarettes "tobacco products," but that does not change the fact that they contain no tobacco and generate no smoke.  Leno, a Democrat whose district includes San Francisco, has 18 posts on his website that mention e-cigarettes, one of which is titled "E-Cigarettes Are Tobacco Products." Visitors who click on that link in the hope of finding something resembling an argument will be disappointed. The post consists of a photograph showing Leno posing with supporters of his bill next to a placard that says "E-Cigarettes Are Tobacco Products."  It's true that the nicotine e-cigarettes often are used to deliver is derived from tobacco, but that is also true of the nicotine in smoking cessation aids such as gum, patches, and inhalers, which neither the FDA nor the state of California considers tobacco products. Furthermore, Leno's definition of tobacco product includes nicotine-free e-liquids and the devices that turn them into inhalable aerosols, neither of which have anything to do with tobacco. The erroneous identification of e-cigarettes with tobacco products is closely tied to the misconception that e-cigarettes are just as dangerous as the conventional, combustible kind. "Whether you get people hooked on e-cigarettes or regular cigarettes, it's nicotine addiction and it kills," Leno told Reuters last year. "We're going to see hundreds of thousands of family members and friends die from e-cigarette use, just like we did from traditional tobacco use." No one this ill-informed has any business writing legislation that deals with e-cigarettes. Contrary to what Leno seems to think, nicotine addiction is not inherently deadly. What kills smokers is not nicotine; it's the tobacco combustion products they inhale along with nicotine. If nicotine were the cause of smoking-related disease and death, how could the FDA possibly have approved products like Nicorette gum and Nicoderm CQ as safe and effective ways to quit smoking? E-cigarettes build on the same idea, offering a less hazardous way to consume nicotine—one that is more appealing to many smokers because it more closely resembles their current habit. Although e-cigarettes probably are not quite as safe as the pharmaceutical versions of nicotine replacement, they are close. "While vaping may not be 100% safe," said a 2015 report from Public Health England, "most of the [...]



California Undermines Public Health by Treating E-Cigarettes Like the Real Thing

Fri, 27 May 2016 06:48:00 -0400

(image) E-cigarettes, a.k.a. electronic nicotine delivery systems, do not contain tobacco and do not burn anything. A new California law neverthless describes them as "tobacco products." As I explain in my latest Forbes column, this misclassification undermines public health by deterring smokers from switching to a much less dangerous habit:

On May 4, the day before the Food and Drug Administration officially classified e-cigarettes as "tobacco products," California did the same thing. Gov. Jerry Brown signed SBX2 5, which expands the definition of tobacco product under several statutes to include "an electronic device that delivers nicotine or other vaporized liquids to the person inhaling from the device." Among other things, the change means that vaping will be banned everywhere that smoking is prohibited and, since another bill signed by Brown raises the age for buying tobacco products from 18 to 21, adults younger than 21 will no longer be allowed to buy e-cigarettes.

California's policy shift is not as consequential as the onerous FDA regulations unveiled the next day, which will shut down thousands of e-cigarette and e-liquid businesses. But it is equally misguided, and the arguments used by its supporters show that the people driving policy in this area are either remarkably clueless or brazenly dishonest. Mark Leno, the state senator who introduced SBX2 5, might be both.

Read the whole thing.




California's Anti-Vaping Law Puts Puritanism Above Health

Fri, 20 May 2016 00:01:00 -0400

I like to quote H.L. Mencken's definition of Puritanism: "The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy." It often applies in the California state capitol, with one of the latest anti-tobacco bills—five of which were signed into law by Gov. Jerry Brown (D) earlier this month—being an obvious example of what Baltimore's favorite cynic was talking about. Most attention has focused on the law raising the smoking age from 18 to 21. But the most significant new law—the one that evokes Mencken—actually deals with vaping. S.B. X2-5, sponsored by state Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco), "recasts and broadens the definition of 'tobacco product' in current law to include electronic cigarettes." It applies all the current tobacco-related rules and restrictions, including the new age 21 rule, to vaping products. Leno says the new law closes a "loophole" that allowed e-cigarettes to be treated differently than tobacco. But there was no loophole. E-cigarettes heat a liquid and create vapor, not smoke. They are not tobacco. Many of the smoking solutions have nicotine in them, but others do not. Experts estimate vaping presents no more than 5 percent of the risk of smoking real cigarettes. Why would the state classify a non-tobacco product as tobacco? It's part of an ideological war on tobacco. There's no reason to cut tobacco companies any slack, given the inherent dangers of the products they sell. But it's disturbing when the state, succumbing to the influence of public-health activists, decides to embrace a crusade mentality that could cause serious harm to public health. Study after study find vaping is a safer—note the word safer, not safe— alternative to smoking cigarettes. The United Kingdom's well-respected Royal College of Physicians recently released a study that acknowledges what anti-smoking activists say: "Smoking is the biggest avoidable cause of death and disability, and social inequality in health, in the UK." It notes quitting smoking is difficult for most people, who are addicted to nicotine. But it finds "in the interests of public health it is important to promote the use of e-cigarettes." Although anti-smoking activists may promote the use of nicotine patches and other such treatments to help people break their bad habit, e-cigarettes "appear to be more effective when used by smokers as an aid to quitting smoking," according to the study. That's because it's more enjoyable to take a break and puff on an e-cigarette than to chew nicotine gum, wear a patch or use nasal spray. I think it's the enjoyment factor that sets off these anti-vaping zealots. State and federal officials counter that vaping may be a gateway to tobacco use. That sounds plausible, except it doesn't appear to be true. "There are concerns that e-cigarettes will increase tobacco smoking by renormalizing the act of smoking, acting as a gateway to smoking in young people," reported the study. "To date, there is no evidence that any of these processes is occurring to any significant degree in the UK. Rather, the available evidence to date indicates that e-cigarettes are being used almost exclusively as safer alternatives to smoked tobacco, by confirmed smokers who are trying to reduce harm to themselves or others, or to quit smoking completely." The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is taking an anti-vaping approach with its new regulations, which led my R Street Institute colleague Cameron Smith to conclude the agency apparently "wants more people to die of lung cancer." Without vaping, more people will keep smoking a deadly product. Nothing is assuredly 100 percent safe. The question is about harm reduction. Vaping clearly reduces harm, but it does [...]