Subscribe: Peter Bagge: Reason Magazine articles.
http://www.reason.com/staff/show/137.xml
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
abner  annie  art  bagge  capp life  capp  comic  contrary  creator  due  good  humor  life  man  new  peter bagge  quickly  strip 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Peter Bagge: Reason Magazine articles.

Peter Bagge: Reason.com articles.





Updated: 2016-12-10T00:00:00-05:00

 



Let's Ruin Cuba!

2016-05-15T06:00:00-04:00




Life Out on the Political Fringe

2015-03-29T12:00:00-04:00

(image)

(image)

(image)

(image)

Click pages to enlarge.




Eggheads of the World, Unite!

2014-06-21T10:00:00-04:00

You can click on each image to see a larger version. - Editor.

(image)

(image)

(image)

(image)




The Death of the Age of Stuff

2013-11-04T07:00:00-05:00

(image)

(image)

(image)

(image)




The Wizard of Dogpatch

2013-02-26T10:30:00-05:00

Al Capp: A Life to the Contrary, by Michael Schumacher and Denis Kitchen, Bloomsbury, 336 pages, $30. Everything about the life and art of Al Capp, creator of the mid-century comic strip masterpiece Li'l Abner, was brash and over the top. Even the way he lost his left leg at the age of nine was right out of a Warner Brothers cartoon: He got run over by a street car. As one might expect, that traumatic event affected the rest of Capp's life for good and for ill. It inspired him to become good at something not requiring the use of two legs, yet it also compounded his innate and profound self-loathing. The lifelong pain and embarrassment it caused him (he always walked with an awkward, comical gait) only contributed to his negative, curmudgeonly psyche. Even before the accident, Capp had a tough row to hoe, as Michael Schumacher and Denis Kitchen reveal in their fine new biography, Al Capp: A Life to the Contrary. Born Alfred Caplin in New Haven in 1909 to Jewish immigrants from Lithuania, Capp quickly exhibited the traits that defined him throughout his life: ambition, creativity, and a wicked sense of humor along with an explosive, hair-trigger temper. His lovable yet ne'er-do-well father dragged his family from city to city, starting one failed business after another, while his stoic, no-nonsense mother occasionally had to rummage through the neighbors' trash at night looking for something to feed her children the next morning. As a young man in the 1930s, Capp had to drop out of school just to feed himself, while cunningly sneaking into one art school after another and disappearing before his tuition payment was due. As with many Depression survivors, these hardscrabble beginnings eventually turned him into a money-obsessed miser who by the '60s grew to despise the younger generation for having it so easy in comparison. Debuting in 1934, Li'l Abner was a unique mix of bawdy, burlesque humor presented in an adventure/continuity format. It also quickly transcended its "hillbilly" setting as it took on a strong satirical tone. Capp used his strip to spoof not just other comic strips (most famously with Fearless Fosdick, his send-up of Dick Tracy) but also theater, movies, and politicians. He basically was doing what Mad magazine became famous for a full decade before Mad even existed. His strip was also intricately well-crafted: simultaneously and in equal measures loud, gaudy, sexy, and detailed. It was a masterful blend of high and low humor, "pretty" and "ugly" art. The strip also clearly was not for children, not only because of the sophisticated references but also due to the blatant sexual innuendos and the impossibly curvy, scantily clad women who populated the Yokums' hometown of Dogpatch. In terms of both art and humor, Li'l Abner was unlike any newspaper strip before or since, and during its late-'40s/early-'50s heyday it was the undisputed king of the funny pages, both artistically and commercially. Contrary to what you might assume, Li'l Abner was never meant to be an insult directed at Southern and/or rural folk. As a teen, Capp hitchhiked through the South, and he was struck by how friendly and big-hearted the natives were, particularly to a Jewish Yankee like himself. In his strip, the sincere country folk always win out in the end. Capp already had a family of his own by the time Li'l Abner got started. Prior to that he eked out a meager living mainly by assisting other daily strip cartoonists, most notably Ham Fisher, creator of the then-popular boxing strip Joe Palooka. Little did Capp know it at the time, but in Fisher he was looking at his own future self: a man of great success and wealth with an insatiable appetite for fame, praise, and beautiful women. While encouraging to the younger artist to his face, Fisher pathologically tried to undermine Capp's career at every turn. Capp sussed this out immediately, and understandably exploited every opportunity to trick, insult, or humilia[...]



Detroit

2013-01-03T10:30:00-05:00

(image)

(image)

(image)

(image)




Shenanigans!

2012-08-10T16:30:00-04:00

(image)

(image)

(image)

(image)




Caged Warmth

2011-07-01T13:30:00-04:00

(image)

(image)

(image)

(image)




I.M.P.

2010-09-21T12:58:00-04:00

(image)

(image)

(image)

(image)




I.M.P.: The Isabel Paterson Story

2010-09-14T07:00:00-04:00

(image)

(image)

(image)

(image)




I.M.P.

2010-07-27T07:00:00-04:00

(image)

(image)

(image)

(image)







Comics for Freedom Lovers

2009-11-03T07:00:00-05:00

Fans of reason’s longtime cartoonist Peter Bagge will be pleased to know that his strips for the magazine are now available in a new collection published by Fantagraphics, Everybody Is Stupid Except For Me (and Other Astute Observations). We asked Bagge to suggest three more comics where good art intersects with an outlook congenial to libertarians.

  1. Louis Riel: A Comic-Strip Biography, by Chester Brown: “A casual reader might see the comic as the story of race-based conflict in the New World (Riel was the leader of the Metis, mixed-race Native American/French Canadians). However, once you are aware of Brown’s libertarianism, you can’t help but interpret his sympathies with Riel as being due to his defiance of all-powerful central government.”
  2. Mr. A, by Steve Ditko: “Spider-Man co-creator and notorious recluse Ditko created the white-suited reporter/vigilante in the late ’60s. Everything about the character, including his name (‘A is A’), was inspired by Ayn Rand’s philosophy.”
  3. Little Orphan Annie, by Harold Gray: “In Annie: The Musical, Annie and Daddy Warbucks are seen singing at the top of their lungs, arm in arm with Franklin Roosevelt. This is nothing short of a (perhaps inadvertent) kick in the teeth to the late cartoonist, who was one of the best-known and vociferous FDR haters, not only throughout the Depression but even during World War II. The strip was frequently dropped by New Deal–supporting newspapers—and just as quickly reinstated by an apolitical public that loved it.”



In Search of the Perfect Human

2008-03-28T16:00:00-04:00




The War on Fornication

2008-01-30T12:00:00-05:00