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The Django weblog



Latest news about Django, the Python Web framework.



Last Build Date: Tue, 12 Dec 2017 10:37:59 -0600

 



DSF travel grants available for PyCon Namibia 2018

Tue, 12 Dec 2017 10:37:59 -0600

About PyCon Namibia

PyCon Namibia held its first edition in 2015.

The conference has been held annually since then, and has been at the heart of a new open-source software movement in Namibia. In particular, through PyNam, the Namibian Python Society, Python has become the focus of self-organised community volunteering activity in schools and universities.

In the last two years, assisted greatly by Helen Sherwood-Taylor, Django Girls has become an important part of the event too.

PyCons in Africa

The conference has also been the direct prompt for further new PyCons across Africa; Zimbabwe in 2016, Nigeria in 2017 and a planned PyCon Ghana next year. In each case, PyCon attendees from another country have returned home to set up their own events.

An important aspect of these events is the opportunity to establish relationships with the international community. Numerous people have travelled from other corners of the world to meet African programmers in their own countries, and many have returned multiple times.

Be a Pythonista, not a tourist

There is enormous value in this exchange, which gives Python/Django programmers from beyond Africa a unique opportunity to encounter African programmers in their own country, and to visit not as passing tourists but as Pythonistas and Djangonauts who will form long-term relationships with their African counterparts. This helps ensure that the international Python community meaningfully includes its members, wherever in the world they may be, and represents a chance like no other to understand them and what Python might mean in Africa.

There is probably no better way to understand what Python might mean in Namibia, for example, than having lunch with a group of Namibian high-school pupils and hearing about their ideas and plans for programming.

This exchange enriches not only the PyCon itself, but also the lives of the Pythonistas that it embraces, from both countries, and the communities they are a part of.

About the travel fund

In order to help maintain this valuable exchange between international Python communities, the Django Software Foundation has set aside a total of US$1500 to help enable travellers from abroad to visit Namibia for next year's PyCon, 20th-22nd February.

The DSF seeks expressions of interest from members of the international Django community who'd like to take advantage of these funds.

Please get in touch with us by email. We'd like to know:

  • who you are
  • why you'd like to participate
  • where you are travelling from and how much you estimate you will need

PyCon Namibia will benefit most from attendees who are interested in developing long-term relationships with its community and attendees.

See the conference website for information about travel and more.




What it's like to serve on the DSF Board

Thu, 07 Dec 2017 08:27:55 -0600

I am currently the Vice-President of the Django Software Foundation, and have served as a member of the DSF Board for two years. This article is intended to help give a clearer picture of what's involved in being on the DSF Board, and might help some people decide whether they wish to stand for election. What we do Each month we - the six directors - have a board meeting, via Hangout. This lasts about an hour. We follow an agenda, and discuss questions that have arisen, have report on the state of our finances, and vote on any questions that have come up. Each month a number of the questions we vote on are about grant applications for events (conferences, Django Girls and so on) and nominations for new members. Mostly it's fairly routine business, and doesn't require much deliberation. Occasionally there are trickier questions, for example that might concern: matters where we are not sure what the best way forward is legal questions about what the DSF is and isn't allowed to do disagreements or contentious questions within the DSF or Django community On the whole we find that when it's a matter of judgement about something, that we come to agreement pretty quickly. At each meeting we'll each agree to take on certain administrative tasks that follow on from the discussion. During the month a number of email messages come in that need to be answered - mostly enquiries about support for events, use of the Django logo, and so on, and also several for technical help with Django that we refer elsewhere. Any one of us will answer those, if we can. Some members of the board have special duties or interests - for example the Treasurer and Secretary have official duties, while I often take up enquiries about events. Overall, it's a few hours' work each month. What you need to be a board member The board members are officially "Directors of the Django Software Foundation", which might make it sound more glamorous and/or difficult than it really is. It's neither... If you can: spare a few hours each month spare some personal energy for the job take part in meetings and help make decisions answer email read proposals, requests, applications and other documents carefully help write documents (whether it's composing or proof-reading) listen to people and voices in the Django community then you probably have everything that's required to make a genuine, valuable contribution to Django by serving on the board. Obviously, to serve as the Treasurer or Secretary requires some basic suitable skills for those roles - but you don't need to be a qualified accountant or have formal training. In any case, no-one is born a DSF board member, and it's perfectly reasonable that in such a role you will learn to do new things if you don't know them already. What it's like I can only speak for myself - but I enjoy the work very much. Everyone on the board has a common aim of serving Django and its community, and the way the board works is friendly, collaborative and supportive. There's room for a variety of skills, special knowledge and experience. Different perspectives are welcomed. There's also a very clear Django ethos and direction, that aims at inclusivity and generosity. The sustainability of the project and the well-being of people involved in it are always concerns that are visibly and explicitly on the table in board discussions. It's a very good feeling each month to have our board meeting and be reminded how true the "boring means stable" equation is. Django is a big ship, and it sails on month after month, steadily. It requires some steering, and a shared vision of the way ahead, but progresses without big dramas. As a member of the board, this makes me feel that I am involved in something safe and sustainable. I've been on the DSF board for nearly two years. Serving on the board does require some extra energy and time in my life, but it very rarely, if ever, feels like wasted or useless expenditure of energy. What we do makes sense, and has actual, tangible, useful results. If you ha[...]



Results of the Django/PyCharm Promotion 2017

Wed, 06 Dec 2017 15:14:45 -0600

We’re happy to report that our second iteration of the Django/PyСharm fundraising campaign - which we ran this summer - was a huge success. This year we helped raise a total of $66,094 USD for the Django Software Foundation! Last year (2016) we ran a similar campaign which resulted in a collective contribution of $50,000 USD to the cause. We’re happy we could raise even more money this year for the Django community!

If you missed the campaign here’s the essence of the past promotion: For 3 weeks this summer, Django developers could effectively donate to Django Software Foundation by purchasing a new individual PyCharm Professional annual subscription at 30% off, with all proceeds from the sales going to the Django Software Foundation. Read more details here.

All the money raised goes toward Django outreach and diversity programs: supporting DSF, the Django Fellowship program, Django Girls workshops, sponsoring official Django conferences, and other equally incredible projects.

We want to say huge thanks to the DSF for their active collaboration and making this fundraiser happen. We hope that in 2018 we’ll be able to make this yearly event even more successful!

The DSF general fundraising campaign is still on-going, and we encourage everyone to contribute to the success of Django by donating to DSF directly.

If you have any questions, get in touch with us at fundraising@djangoproject.com or JetBrains at pycharm-support@jetbrains.com.




Django 2.0 released

Sat, 02 Dec 2017 09:32:01 -0600

The Django team is happy to announce the release of Django 2.0.

This release starts Django’s use of a loose form of semantic versioning, but there aren’t any major backwards incompatible changes (except that support for Python 2.7 is removed) that might be expected of a 2.0 release. Upgrading should be a similar amount of effort as past feature releases.

The release notes cover the assortment of new features in detail, but a few highlights are:

You can get Django 2.0 from our downloads page or from the Python Package Index. The PGP key ID used for this release is Tim Graham: 1E8ABDC773EDE252.

With the release of Django 2.0, Django 1.11 has reached the end of mainstream support. The final minor bug fix release, 1.11.8, was issued today. As a long-term support release, Django 1.11 will receive security and data loss fixes until April 2020.

Django 1.10 has reached the end of extended support. All Django 1.10 users are encouraged to upgrade to Django 1.11 or later to continue receiving fixes for security issues.

See the downloads page for a table of supported versions and the future release schedule.




DSF calls for applicants for a Django Fellow

Thu, 16 Nov 2017 08:18:07 -0600

After three years of full-time work as the Django Fellow, I'd like to scale back my involvement to part-time. That means it's time to hire another Fellow who would like to work on Django 20-40 hours per week. The position is ongoing - the successful applicant will have the position until they choose to step down.

The position of Fellow is primarily focused on housekeeping and community support - you'll be expected to do the work that would benefit from constant, guaranteed attention rather than volunteer-only efforts. In particular, your duties will include:

  • monitoring the security@djangoproject.com email alias and ensuring security issues are acknowledged and responded to promptly
  • fixing release blockers and helping to ensure timely releases
  • fixing severe bugs and helping to backport fixes to these and security issues
  • reviewing and merging pull requests
  • triaging tickets on Trac
  • answering user questions on IRC and the django-developers mailing list
  • helping new Django contributors land patches and learn our philosophy

Being a committer isn't a prerequisite for this position; we'll consider applications from anyone with a proven history of working with either the Django community or another similar open-source community.

Your geographical location isn't important either - we have several methods of remote communication and coordination that we can use depending on the timezone difference to the supervising members of Django.

You'll be expected to post a weekly report of your work to the django-developers mailing list.

If you don't perform the duties to a satisfactory level, we may end your contract. We may also terminate the contract if we're unable to raise sufficient funds to support the Fellowship on an ongoing basis (unlikely, given the current fundraising levels).

Compensation isn't competitive with full-time salaries in big cities like San Francisco or London. The Fellow will be selected to make best use of available funds.

If you're interested in applying for the position, please email us with details of your experience with Django and open-source contribution and community support in general, the amount of time each week you'd like to dedicate to the position (a minimum of 20 hours a week), your hourly rate, and when you'd like to start working. The start date is flexible and will be on or after January 1, 2018.

Applications will be open until 1200 UTC, December 18, 2017, with the expectation that the successful candidate will be announced around December 22.

Successful applicants will not be an employee of the Django Project or the Django Software Foundation. Fellows will be contractors and expected to ensure that they meet all of their resident country's criteria for self-employment or having a shell consulting company, invoicing the DSF on a monthly basis and ensuring they pay all relevant taxes.

If you or your company is interested in helping fund this program and future DSF activities, please consider becoming a corporate member to learn about corporate membership, or you can make a donation to the Django Software Foundation.




Django 2.0 release candidate 1 released

Wed, 15 Nov 2017 17:54:38 -0600

Django 2.0 release candidate 1 is the final opportunity for you to try out the assortment of new features before Django 2.0 is released.

The release candidate stage marks the string freeze and the call for translators to submit translations. Provided no major bugs are discovered that can't be solved in the next two weeks, Django 2.0 will be released on or around December 1. Any delays will be communicated on the django-developers mailing list thread.

Please use this opportunity to help find and fix bugs (which should be reported to the issue tracker). You can grab a copy of the package from our downloads page or on PyPI.

The PGP key ID used for this release is Tim Graham: 1E8ABDC773EDE252.




Nominations for the Malcolm Tredinnick Memorial Prize 2017

Fri, 10 Nov 2017 10:12:46 -0600

Malcolm Tredinnick was an early member of Django's core team. He contributed a great deal of code to the Django Project, and a vast amount of his time helping and encouraging others.

Malcolm died young, in March 2013. In his memory, the Malcolm Tredinnick Memorial Prize is awarded annually. It is intended to recognise someone who participates in the Django community in the same spirit as Malcolm: welcoming, nurturing and suppporting newcomers and helping other people.

You can read more about Malcolm and his contribution to Django, and about the prize.

We invite your nominations for this year's prize. Please drop us a line at foundation@djangoproject.com, telling us whom you'd like to nominate and why you think their contribution is a worthy continuation of Malcolm's work for the Django community.

Anyone is welcome to nominate a candidate.

Nominations will remain open for two weeks (until Friday 24th November 2017).




2018 DSF Board Election Application

Tue, 07 Nov 2017 21:33:49 -0600

It is that time of year again to think about next year’s Django Software Foundation’s Board of Directors!

As you know, the Board guides the direction of the marketing, governance and outreach activities of the Django community. We provide funding, resources, and guidance to Django events on a global level. Further we provide support to the Django community with an established Code of Conduct and make decisions and enforcement recommendations for violations. We work closely with our corporate and individual members to raise funds to help support our great community.

In order to for our community to continue to grow and advance the Django Web framework, we need your help. The Board of Directors consists of volunteers who are elected to one year terms. This is an excellent opportunity to help advance Django. We can’t do it without volunteers, such as yourself. For the most part, the time commitment is a few of hours per month. There has been some confusion on this in the past, but anyone including current Board members, DSF Members, or the public at large can apply to the Board. It is open to all.

If you are interested in helping to support the development of Django we’d enjoy receiving your application for the Board of Directors. Please fill out the application form by 9 December 2017 to be considered. If it is still 9 December somewhere in the world, applications will remain open.

If you have any questions about applying, the work, or the process in general please don’t hesitate to reach out via email to foundation@djangoproject.com and one of us will get back with you shortly.

Thank you for your time and we look forward to working with you in 2018.

The 2017 DSF Board of Directors




Django bugfix release: 1.11.7

Wed, 01 Nov 2017 20:39:45 -0500

Today we've issued the 1.11.7 bugfix release.

The release package and checksums are available from our downloads page, as well as from the Python Package Index. The PGP key ID used for this release is Tim Graham: 1E8ABDC773EDE252.




Django 2.0 beta 1 released

Mon, 16 Oct 2017 21:09:10 -0500

Django 2.0 beta 1 is an opportunity for you to try out the assortment of new features in Django 2.0.

Only bugs in new features and regressions from earlier versions of Django will be fixed between now and 2.0 final (also, translations will be updated following the "string freeze" when the release candidate is issued). The current release schedule calls for a release candidate in a month from now with the final release to follow about two weeks after that around December 1. Early and often testing from the community will help minimize the number of bugs in the release. Updates on the release schedule schedule are available on the django-developers mailing list.

As with all alpha and beta packages, this is not for production use. But if you'd like to take some of the new features for a spin, or to help find and fix bugs (which should be reported to the issue tracker), you can grab a copy of the beta package from our downloads page or on PyPI.

The PGP key ID used for this release is Tim Graham: 1E8ABDC773EDE252.