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Russell Coker: Huawei Mate9

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 11:33:58 +0000

Warranty Etc I recently got a Huawei Mate 9 phone. My previous phone was a Nexus 6P that died shortly before it’s one year warranty ran out. As there have apparently been many Nexus 6P phones dying there are no stocks of replacements so Kogan (the company I bought the phone from) offered me a choice of 4 phones in the same price range as a replacement. Previously I had chosen to avoid the extended warranty offerings based on the idea that after more than a year the phone won’t be worth much and therefore getting it replaced under warranty isn’t as much of a benefit. But now that it seems that getting a phone replaced with a newer and more powerful model is a likely outcome it seems that there are benefits in a longer warranty. I chose not to pay for an “extended warranty” on my Nexus 6P because getting a new Nexus 6P now isn’t such a desirable outcome, but when getting a new Mate 9 is a possibility it seems more of a benefit to get the “extended warranty”. OTOH Kogan wasn’t offering more than 2 years of “warranty” recently when buying a phone for a relative, so maybe they lost a lot of money on replacements for the Nexus 6P. Comparison I chose the Mate 9 primarily because it has a large screen. It’s 5.9″ display is only slightly larger than the 5.7″ displays in the Nexus 6P and the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 (my previous phone). But it is large enough to force me to change my phone use habits. I previously wrote about matching phone size to the user’s hand size [1]. When writing that I had the theory that a Note 2 might be too large for me to use one-handed. But when I owned those phones I found that the Note 2 and Note 3 were both quite usable in one-handed mode. But the Mate 9 is just too big for that. To deal with this I now use the top corners of my phone screen for icons that I don’t tend to use one-handed, such as Facebook. I chose this phone knowing that this would be an issue because I’ve been spending more time reading web pages on my phone and I need to see more text on screen. Adjusting my phone usage to the unusually large screen hasn’t been a problem for me. But I expect that many people will find this phone too large. I don’t think there are many people who buy jeans to fit a large phone in the pocket [2]. A widely touted feature of the Mate 9 is the Leica lens which apparently gives it really good quality photos. I haven’t noticed problems with my photos on my previous two phones and it seems likely that phone cameras have in most situations exceeded my requirements for photos (I’m not a very demanding user). One thing that I miss is the slow-motion video that the Nexus 6P supports. I guess I’ll have to make sure my wife is around when I need to make slow motion video. My wife’s Nexus 6P is well out of warranty. Her phone was the original Nexus 6P I had. When her previous phone died I had a problem with my phone that needed a factory reset. It’s easier to duplicate the configuration to a new phone than restore it after a factory reset (as an aside I believe Apple does this better) I copied my configuration to the new phone and then wiped it for my wife to use. One noteworthy but mostly insignificant feature of the Mate 9 is that it comes with a phone case. The case is hard plastic and cracked when I unsuccessfully tried to remove it, so it seems to effectively be a single-use item. But it is good to have that in the box so that you don’t have to use the phone without a case on the first day, this is something almost every other phone manufacturer misses. But there is the option of ordering a case at the same time as a phone and the case isn’t very good. I regard my Mate 9 as fairly unattractive. Maybe if I had a choice of color I would have been happier, but it still wouldn’t have looked like EVE from Wall-E (unlike the Nexus 6P). The Mate 9 has a resolution of 1920*1080, while the Nexus 6P (and many other modern phones) has a resolution of 2560*1440 I don’t think that’s a big deal, the pixels are small enough that I can’t see them. I don’t really [...]



Dirk Eddelbuettel: #13: (Much) Faster Package (Re-)Installation via Binaries

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 02:07:00 +0000

Welcome to the thirteenth post in the ridiculously rapid R recommendation series, or R4 for short. A few days ago we riffed on faster installation thanks to ccache. Today we show another way to get equally drastic gains for some (if not most) packages. In a nutshell, there are two ways to get your R packages off CRAN. Either you install as a binary, or you use source. Most people do not think too much about this as on Windows, binary is the default. So why wouldn't one? Precisely. (Unless you are on Windows, and you develop, or debug, or test, or ... and need source. Another story.) On other operating systems, however, source is the rule, and binary is often unavailable. Or is it? Exactly how to find out what is available will be left for another post as we do have a tool just for that. But today, just hear me out when I say that binary is often an option even when source is the default. And it matters. See below. As a (mostly-to-always) Linux user, I sometimes whistle between my teeth that we "lost all those battles" (i.e. for the desktop(s) or laptop(s)) but "won the war". That topic merits a longer post I hope to write one day, and I won't do it justice today but my main gist that everybody (and here I mean mostly developers/power users) now at least also runs on Linux. And by that I mean that we all test our code in Linux environments such as e.g. Travis CI, and that many of us run deployments on cloud instances (AWS, GCE, Azure, ...) which are predominantly based on Linux. Or on local clusters. Or, if one may dream, the top500 And on and on. And frequently these are Ubuntu machines. So here is an Ubuntu trick: Install from binary, and save loads of time. As an illustration, consider the chart below. It carries over the logic from the 'cached vs non-cached' compilation post and contrasts two ways of installing: from source, or as a binary. I use pristine and empty Docker containers as the base, and rely of course on the official r-base image which is supplied by Carl Boettiger and yours truly as part of our Rocker Project (and for which we have a forthcoming R Journal piece I might mention). So for example the timings for the ggplot2 installation were obtained via time docker run --rm -ti r-base /bin/bash -c 'install.r ggplot2' and time docker run --rm -ti r-base /bin/bash -c 'apt-get update && apt-get install -y r-cran-ggplot2' Here docker run --rm -ti just means to launch Docker, in 'remove leftovers at end' mode, use terminal and interactive mode and invoke a shell. The shell command then is, respectively, to install a CRAN package using install.r from my littler package, or to install the binary via apt-get after updating the apt indices (as the Docker container may have been built a few days or more ago). Let's not focus on Docker here---it is just a convenient means to an end of efficiently measuring via a simple (wall-clock counting) time invocation. The key really is that install.r is just a wrapper to install.packages() meaning source installation on Linux (as used inside the Docker container). And apt-get install ... is how one gets a binary. Again, I will try post another piece to determine how one finds if a suitable binary for a CRAN package exists. For now, just allow me to proceed. So what do we see then? Well have a look: A few things stick out. RQuantLib really is a monster. And dplyr is also fairly heavy---both rely on Rcpp, BH and lots of templating. At the other end, data.table is still a marvel. No external dependencies, and just plain C code make the source installation essentially the same speed as the binary installation. Amazing. But I digress. We should add that one of the source installations also required installing additional libries: QuantLib is needed along with Boost for RQuantLib. Similar for another package (not shown) which needed curl and libcurl. So what is the upshot? If you can, consider binaries. I will try to write another post how I do that e.g. for Travis CI where all my tests us binaries. (Yes, I know. This mattered more in the [...]



Dirk Eddelbuettel: RVowpalWabbit 0.0.10

Thu, 14 Dec 2017 01:02:00 +0000

(image)

A boring little RVowpalWabbit package update to version 0.0.10 came in response to another CRAN request: We were switching directories to run tests (or examples) which is now discouraged, so we no longer do this as it turns that we can of course refer to the files directly as well. Much cleaner.

No new code or features were added.

We should mention once more that is parallel work ongoing in a higher-level package interfacing the vw binary -- rvw -- as well as plan to redo this package via the external libraries. In that sounds interesting to you, please get in touch.

More information is on the RVowpalWabbit page. Issues and bugreports should go to the GitHub issue tracker.

This post by Dirk Eddelbuettel originated on his Thinking inside the box blog. Please report excessive re-aggregation in third-party for-profit settings.




Steinar H. Gunderson: Compute shaders

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 23:13:00 +0000

(image)

Movit, my GPU-accelerated video filter library, is getting compute shaders. But the experience really makes me happy that I chose to base it on fragment shaders originally and not compute! (Ie., many would claim CUDA would be the natural choice, even if it's single-vendor.) The deinterlace filter is significantly faster (10–70%, depending a bit on various factors) on my Intel card, so I'm hoping the resample filter is also going to get some win, but at this point, I'm not actually convinced it's going to be much faster… and the complexity of managing local memory effectively is sky-high. And then there's the fun of chaining everything together.

Hooray for already having an extensive battery of tests, at least!




Bernd Zeimetz: Collecting statistics from TP-Link HS110 SmartPlugs using collectd

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 18:15:00 +0000

(image)

Running a 3d printer alone at home is not necessarily the best idea - so I was looking for a way to force it off from remote. As OctoPrint user I stumbled upon a plugin to control TP-Link Smartplugs, so I decided to give them a try. What I found especially nice on the HS110 model was that it is possible to monitor power usage, current and voltage. Of course I wanted to have a long term graph of it. The result is a small collectd plugin, written in Python. It is available on github: https://github.com/bzed/collectd-tplink_hs110. Enjoy!




Bits from Debian: Debsources now in sources.debian.org

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 17:40:00 +0000

Debsources is a web application for publishing, browsing and searching an unpacked Debian source mirror on the Web. With Debsources, all the source code of every Debian release is available in https://sources.debian.org, both via an HTML user interface and a JSON API.

This service was first offered in 2013 with the sources.debian.net instance, which was kindly hosted by IRILL, and is now becoming official under sources.debian.org, hosted on the Debian infrastructure.

This new instance offers all the features of the old one (an updater that runs four times a day, various plugins to count lines of code or measure the size of packages, and sub-apps to show lists of patches and copyright files), plus integration with other Debian services such as codesearch.debian.net and the PTS.

The Debsources Team has taken the opportunity of this move of Debsources onto the Debian infrastructure to officially announce the service. Read their message as well as the Debsources documentation page for more details.




Petter Reinholdtsen: Idea for finding all public domain movies in the USA

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 09:15:00 +0000

While looking at the scanned copies for the copyright renewal entries for movies published in the USA, an idea occurred to me. The number of renewals are so few per year, it should be fairly quick to transcribe them all and add references to the corresponding IMDB title ID. This would give the (presumably) complete list of movies published 28 years earlier that did _not_ enter the public domain for the transcribed year. By fetching the list of USA movies published 28 years earlier and subtract the movies with renewals, we should be left with movies registered in IMDB that are now in the public domain. For the year 1955 (which is the one I have looked at the most), the total number of pages to transcribe is 21. For the 28 years from 1950 to 1978, it should be in the range 500-600 pages. It is just a few days of work, and spread among a small group of people it should be doable in a few weeks of spare time. A typical copyright renewal entry look like this (the first one listed for 1955): ADAM AND EVIL, a photoplay in seven reels by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Distribution Corp. (c) 17Aug27; L24293. Loew's Incorporated (PWH); 10Jun55; R151558. The movie title as well as registration and renewal dates are easy enough to locate by a program (split on first comma and look for DDmmmYY). The rest of the text is not required to find the movie in IMDB, but is useful to confirm the correct movie is found. I am not quite sure what the L and R numbers mean, but suspect they are reference numbers into the archive of the US Copyright Office. Tracking down the equivalent IMDB title ID is probably going to be a manual task, but given the year it is fairly easy to search for the movie title using for example http://www.imdb.com/find?q=adam+and+evil+1927&s=all. Using this search, I find that the equivalent IMDB title ID for the first renewal entry from 1955 is http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0017588/. I suspect the best way to do this would be to make a specialised web service to make it easy for contributors to transcribe and track down IMDB title IDs. In the web service, once a entry is transcribed, the title and year could be extracted from the text, a search in IMDB conducted for the user to pick the equivalent IMDB title ID right away. By spreading out the work among volunteers, it would also be possible to make at least two persons transcribe the same entries to be able to discover any typos introduced. But I will need help to make this happen, as I lack the spare time to do all of this on my own. If you would like to help, please get in touch. Perhaps you can draft a web service for crowd sourcing the task? Note, Project Gutenberg already have some transcribed copies of the US Copyright Office renewal protocols, but I have not been able to find any film renewals there, so I suspect they only have copies of renewal for written works. I have not been able to find any transcribed versions of movie renewals so far. Perhaps they exist somewhere? I would love to figure out methods for finding all the public domain works in other countries too, but it is a lot harder. At least for Norway and Great Britain, such work involve tracking down the people involved in making the movie and figuring out when they died. It is hard enough to figure out who was part of making a movie, but I do not know how to automate such procedure without a registry of every person involved in making movies and their death year. As usual, if you use Bitcoin and want to show your support of my activities, please send Bitcoin donations to my address 15oWEoG9dUPovwmUL9KWAnYRtNJEkP1u1b. [...]



Rhonda D'Vine: #metoo

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 08:48:00 +0000

(image)

I long thought about whether I should post a/my #metoo. It wasn't a rape. Nothing really happened. And a lot of these stories are very disturbing.

And yet it still it bothers me every now and then. I was in school age, late elementary or lower school ... In my hometown there is a cinema. Young as we've been we weren't allowed to see Rambo/Rocky. Not that I was very interested in the movie ... But there the door to the screening room stood open. And curious as we were we looked through the door. The projectionist saw us and waved us in. It was exciting to see a moview from that perspective that was forbidden to us.

He explained to us how the machines worked, showed us how the film rolls were put in and showed us how to see the signals on the screen which are the sign to turn on the second projector with the new roll.

During these explenations he was standing very close to us. Really close. He put his arm around us. The hand moved towards the crotch. It was unpleasantly and we knew that it wasn't all right. But screaming? We weren't allowed to be there ... So we thanked him nicely and retreated disturbed. The movie wasn't that good anyway.

Nothing really happened, and we didn't say anything.

/personal | permanent link | Comments: 2 | Flattr this




Russell Coker: Thinkpad X301

Wed, 13 Dec 2017 08:02:29 +0000

Another Broken Thinkpad A few months ago I wrote a post about “Observing Reliability” [1] regarding my Thinkpad T420. I noted that the T420 had been running for almost 4 years which was a good run, and therefore the failed DVD drive didn’t convince me that Thinkpads have quality problems. Since that time the plastic on the lid by the left hinge broke, every time I open or close the lid it breaks a bit more. That prevents use of that Thinkpad by anyone who wants to use it as a serious laptop as it can’t be expected to last long if opened and closed several times a day. It probably wouldn’t be difficult to fix the lid but for an old laptop it doesn’t seem worth the effort and/or money. So my plan now is to give the Thinkpad to someone who wants a compact desktop system with a built-in UPS, a friend in Vietnam can probably find a worthy recipient. My Thinkpad History I bought the Thinkpad T420 in October 2013 [2], it lasted about 4 years and 2 months. It cost $306. I bought my Thinkpad T61 in February 2010 [3], it lasted about 3 years and 8 months. It cost $796 [4]. Prior to the T61 I had a T41p that I received well before 2006 (maybe 2003) [5]. So the T41p lasted close to 7 years, as it was originally bought for me by a multinational corporation I’m sure it cost a lot of money. By the time I bought the T61 it had display problems, cooling problems, and compatibility issues with recent Linux distributions. Before the T41p I had 3 Thinkpads in 5 years, all of which had the type of price that only made sense in the dot-com boom. In terms of absolute lifetime the Thinkpad T420 did ok. In terms of cost per year it did very well, only $6 per month. The T61 was $18 per month, and while the T41p lasted a long time it probably cost over $2000 giving it a cost of over $20 per month. $20 per month is still good value, I definitely get a lot more than $20 per month benefit from having a laptop. While it’s nice that my most recent laptop could be said to have saved me $12 per month over the previous one, it doesn’t make much difference to my financial situation. Thinkpad X301 My latest Thinkpad is an X301 that I found on an e-waste pile, it had a broken DVD drive which is presumably the reason why someone decided to throw it out. It has the same power connector as my previous 2 Thinkpads which was convenient as I didn’t find a PSU with it. I saw a review of the T301 dated 2008 which probably means it was new in 2009, but it has no obvious signs of wear so probably hasn’t been used much. My X301 has a 1440*900 screen which isn’t as good as the T420 resolution of 1600*900. But a lower resolution is an expected trade-off for a smaller laptop. The T310 comes with a 64G SSD which is a significant limitation. I previously wrote about a “cloud lifestyle” [6]. I hadn’t implemented all the ideas from that post due to distractions and a lack of time. But now that I’ll have a primary PC with only 64G of storage I have more incentive to do that. The 100G disk in the T61 was a minor limitation at the time I got it but since then everything got bigger and 64G is going to be a big problem and the fact that it’s an unusual 1.8″ form factor means that I can’t cheaply upgrade it or use the SSD that I’ve used in the Thinkpad T420. My current Desktop PC is an i7-2600 system which builds the SE Linux policy packages for Debian (the thing I compile most frequently) in about 2 minutes with about 5 minutes of CPU time used. the same compilation on the X301 takes just over 6.5 minutes with almost 9 minutes of CPU time used. The i5 CPU in the Thinkpad T420 was somewhere between those times. While I can wait 6.5 minutes for a compile to test something it is an annoyance. So I’ll probably use one of the i7 or i5 class servers I run to do builds. On the T420 I had chroot environments running with systemd-n[...]



Keith Packard: Altos1.8.3

Tue, 12 Dec 2017 17:44:24 +0000

(image)

AltOS 1.8.3 — TeleMega version 3.0 support and bug fixes

Bdale and I are pleased to announce the release of AltOS version 1.8.3.

AltOS is the core of the software for all of the Altus Metrum products. It consists of firmware for our cc1111, STM32L151, STMF042, LPC11U14 and ATtiny85 based electronics and Java-based ground station software.

This is a minor release of AltOS, including support for our new TeleMega v3.0 board and a selection of bug fixes

Announcing TeleMega v3.0

(image)

TeleMega is our top of the line flight computer with 9-axis IMU, 6 pyro channels, uBlox Max 7Q GPS and 40mW telemetry system. Version 3.0 is feature compatible with version 2.0, incorporating a new higher-perfomance 9-axis IMU in place of the former 6-axis IMU and separate 3-axis magnetometer.

AltOS 1.8.3

In addition to support for TeleMega v3.0 boards, AltOS 1.8.3 contains some important bug fixes for all flight computers. Users are advised to upgrade their devices.

  • Ground testing EasyMega and TeleMega additional pyro channels could result in a sticky 'fired' status which would prevent these channels from firing on future flights.

  • Corrupted flight log records could prevent future flights from capturing log data.

  • Fixed saving of pyro configuration that ended with 'Descending'. This would cause the configuration to revert to the previous state during setup.

The latest AltosUI and TeleGPS applications have improved functionality for analyzing flight data. The built-in graphing capabilities are improved with:

  • Graph lines have improved appearance to make them easier to distinguish. Markers may be placed at data points to show captured recorded data values.

  • Graphing offers the ability to adjust the smoothing of computed speed and acceleration data.

Exporting data for other applications has some improvements as well:

  • KML export now reports both barometric and GPS altitude data to make it more useful for Tripoli record reporting.

  • CSV export now includes TeleMega/EasyMega pyro voltages and tilt angle.




Joey Hess: two holiday stories

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 21:04:23 +0000

Two stories of something nice coming out of something not-so-nice for the holidays. Story the first: The Gift That Kept on Giving I have a Patreon account that is a significant chunk of my funding to do what I do. Patreon has really pissed off a lot of people this week, and people are leaving it in droves. My Patreon funding is down 25%. This is an opportunity for Liberapay, which is run by a nonprofit, and avoids Patreon's excessive fees, and is free software to boot. So now I have a Liberapay account and have diversified my sustainable funding some more, although only half of the people I lost from Patreon have moved over. A few others have found other ways to donate to me, including snail mail and Paypal, and others I'll just lose. Thanks, Patreon.. Yesterday I realized I should check if anyone had decided to send me Bitcoin. Bitcoin donations are weird because noone ever tells me that they made them. Also because it's never clear if the motive is to get me invested in bitcoin or send me some money. I prefer not to be invested in risky currency speculation, preferring risks like "write free software without any clear way to get paid for it", so I always cash it out immediately. I have not used bitcoin for a long time. I could see a long time ago that its development community was unhealthy, that there was going to be a messy fork and I didn't want the drama of that. My bitcoin wallet files were long deleted. Checking my address online, I saw that in fact two people had reacted to Patreon by sending a little bit of bitcoin to me. I checked some old notes to find the recovery seeds, and restored "hot wallet" and "cold wallet", not sure which was my public incoming wallet. Neither was, and after some concerned scrambling, I found the gpg locked file in a hidden basement subdirectory that let me access my public incoming wallet, and in fact two people had reacted to Patreon by sending bitcoin to me. What of the other two wallets? "Hot wallet" was empty. But "cold wallet" turned out to be some long forgotten wallet, and yes, this is now a story about "some long forgotten bitcoin wallet" -- you know where this is going right? Yeah, well it didn't have a life changing amount of bitcoin in it, but it had a little almost-dust from a long-ago bitcoin donor, which at current crazy bitcoin prices, is enough that I may need to fill out a tax form now that I've sold it. And so I will be having a happy holidays, no matter how the Patreon implosion goes. But for sustainable funding going forward, I do hope that Liberapay works out. Story the second: "a lil' positive end note does wonders" I added this to the end of git-annex's bug report template on a whim two years ago: Have you had any luck using git-annex before? (Sometimes we get tired of reading bug reports all day and a lil' positive end note does wonders) That prompt turned out to be much more successful than I had expected, and so I want to pass the gift of the idea on to you. Consider adding something like that to your project's bug report template. It really works: I'll see a bug report be lost and confused and discouraged, and keep reading to make sure I see whatever nice thing there might be at the end. It's not just about meaningless politeness either, it's about getting an impression about whether the user is having any success at all, and how experienced they are in general, which is important in understanding where a bug report is coming from. I've learned more from it than I have from most other interactions with git-annex users, including the git-annex user surveys. Out of 217 bug reports that used this template, 182 answered the question. Here are some of my favorite answers. Have you had any luck using git-annex before? (Sometimes we get tired of reading bug reports all day an[...]



Wouter Verhelst: Systemd, Devuan, and Debian

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 13:00:02 +0000

Somebody recently pointed me towards a blog post by a small business owner who proclaimed to the world that using Devuan (and not Debian) is better, because it's cheaper. Hrm. Looking at creating Devuan, which means splitting of Debian, economically, you caused approximately infinite cost. Well, no. I'm immensely grateful to the Devuan developers, because when they announced their fork, all the complaints about systemd on the debian-devel mailinglist ceased to exist. Rather than a cost, that was an immensely gratifying experience, and it made sure that I started reading the debian-devel mailinglist again, which I had stopped for a while before that. Meanwhile, life in Debian went on as it always has. Debian values choice. Fedora may not be about choice, but Debian is. If there are two ways of doing something, Debian will include all four. If you want to run a Linux system, and you're not sure whether to use systemd, upstart, or something else, then Debian is for you! (well, except if you want to use upstart, which is in jessie but not in stretch). Debian defaults to using systemd, but it doesn't enforce it; and while it may require a bit of manual handholding to make sure that systemd never ever ever ends up on your system, this is essentially not difficult. you@your-machine:~$ apt install equivs; equivs-control your-sanity; $EDITOR your-sanity Now make sure that what you get looks something like this (ignoring comments): Section: misc Priority: standard Standards-Version: Package: your-sanity Essential: yes Conflicts: systemd-sysv Description: Make sure this system does not install what I don't want The packages in the Conflicts: header cannot be installed without very difficult steps, and apt will never offer to install them. Install it on every system where you don't want to run systemd. You're done, you'll never run systemd. Well, except if someone types the literal phrase "Yes, do as I say!", including punctuation and everything, when asked to do so. If you do that, well, you get to keep both pieces. Also, did you see my pun there? Yes, it's a bit silly, I admit it. But before you take that step, consider this. Four years ago, I was an outspoken opponent of systemd. It was a bad idea, I thought. It is not portable. It will cause the death of Debian GNU/kFreeBSD, and a few other things. It is difficult to understand and debug. It comes with a truckload of other things that want to replace the universe. Most of all, their developers had a pretty bad reputation of being, pardon my French, arrogant assholes. Then, the systemd maintainers filed bug 796633, asking me to provide a systemd unit for nbd-client, since it provided an rcS init script (which is really a very special case), and the compatibility support for that in systemd was complicated and support for it would be removed from the systemd side. Additionally, providing a systemd template unit would make the systemd nbd experience much better, without dropping support for other init systems (those cases can still use the init script). In order to develop that, I needed a system to test things on. Since I usually test things on my laptop, I installed systemd on my laptop. The intent was to remove it afterwards. However, for various reasons, that never happened, and I still run systemd as my pid1. Here's why: Systemd is much faster. Where my laptop previously took 30 to 45 seconds to boot using sysvinit, it takes less than five. In fact, it took longer for it to do the POST than it took for the system to boot from the time the kernel was loaded. I changed the grub timeout from the default of five seconds to something more reasonable, because I found that five seconds was just ridiculously long if it takes about half[...]



François Marier: Using all of the 5 GHz WiFi frequencies in a Gargoyle Router

Mon, 11 Dec 2017 02:03:30 +0000

WiFi in the 2.4 GHz range is usually fairly congested in urban environments. The 5 GHz band used to be better, but an increasing number of routers now support it and so it has become fairly busy as well. It turns out that there are a number of channels on that band that nobody appears to be using despite being legal in my region.

Why are the middle channels unused?

I'm not entirely sure why these channels are completely empty in my area, but I would speculate that access point manufacturers don't want to deal with the extra complexity of the middle channels. Indeed these channels are not entirely unlicensed. They are also used by weather radars, for example. If you look at the regulatory rules that ship with your OS:

$ iw reg get
global
country CA: DFS-FCC
    (2402 - 2472 @ 40), (N/A, 30), (N/A)
    (5170 - 5250 @ 80), (N/A, 17), (N/A), AUTO-BW
    (5250 - 5330 @ 80), (N/A, 24), (0 ms), DFS, AUTO-BW
    (5490 - 5600 @ 80), (N/A, 24), (0 ms), DFS
    (5650 - 5730 @ 80), (N/A, 24), (0 ms), DFS
    (5735 - 5835 @ 80), (N/A, 30), (N/A)

you will see that these channels are flagged with "DFS". That stands for Dynamic Frequency Selection and it means that WiFi equipment needs to be able to detect when the frequency is used by radars (by detecting their pulses) and automaticaly switch to a different channel for a few minutes.

So an access point needs extra hardware and extra code to avoid interfering with priority users. Additionally, different channels have different bandwidth limits so that's something else to consider if you want to use 40/80 MHz at once.

The first time I tried setting my access point channel to one of the middle 5 GHz channels, the SSID wouldn't show up in scans and the channel was still empty in WiFi Analyzer.

I tried changing the channel again, but this time, I ssh'd into my router and looked at the errors messages using this command:

logread -f

I found a number of errors claiming that these channels were not authorized for the "world" regulatory authority.

Because Gargoyle is based on OpenWRT, there are a lot more nnwireless configuration options available than what's exposed in the Web UI.

In this case, the solution was to explicitly set my country in the wireless options by putting:

country 'CA'

(where CA is the country code where the router is physically located) in the 5 GHz radio section of /etc/config/wireless on the router.

Then I rebooted and I was able to set the channel successfully via the Web UI.

If you are interested, there is a lot more information about how all of this works in the kernel documentation for the wireless stack.




Andrew Cater: Debian 8.10 and Debian 9.3 released - CDs and DVDs published

Sun, 10 Dec 2017 17:27:10 +0000

Done a tiny bit of testing for this: Sledge and RattusRattus and others have done far more.

Always makes me feel good: always makes me feel as if Debian is progressing - and I'm always amazed I can persuade my oldest 32 bit laptop to work :)



Dirk Eddelbuettel: #12: Know and Customize your OS and Work Environment

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 22:30:00 +0000

Welcome to the twelveth post in the randomly relevant R recommendations series, or R4 for short. This post will insert a short diversion into what was planned as a sequence of posts on faster installations that started recently with this post but we will resume to it very shortly (for various definitions of "very" or "shortly"). Earlier today Davis Vaughn posted a tweet about a blog post of his describing a (term) paper he wrote modeling bitcoin volatilty using Alexios's excellent rugarch package---and all that typeset with the styling James and I put together in our little pinp package which is indeed very suitable for such tasks of writing (R)Markdown + LaTeX + R code combinations conveniently in a single source file. Leaving aside the need to celebreate a term paper with a blog post and tweet, pinp is indeed very nice and deserving of some additional exposure and tutorials. Now, Davis sets out to do all this inside RStudio---as folks these days seem to like to limit themselves to a single tool or paradigm. Older and wiser users prefer the flexibility of switching tools and approaches, but alas, we digress. While Davis manages of course to do all this in RStudio which is indeed rather powerful and therefore rightly beloved, he closes on I wish there was some way to have Live Rendering like with blogdown so that I could just keep a rendered version of the paper up and have it reload every time I save. That would be the dream! and I can only add a forceful: Fear not, young man, for we can help thou! Modern operating systems have support for epoll and libnotify, which can be used from the shell. Just how your pdf application refreshes automagically when a pdf file is updated, we can hook into this from the shell to actually create the pdf when the (R)Markdown file is updated. I am going to use a tool readily available on my Linux systems; macOS will surely have something similar. The entr command takes one or more file names supplied on stdin and executes a command when one of them changes. Handy for invoking make whenever one of your header or source files changes, and useable here. E.g. the last markdown file I was working on was named comments.md and contained comments to a referee, and we can auto-process it on each save via echo comments.md | entr render.r comments.md which uses render.r from littler (new release soon too...; a simple Rscript -e 'rmarkdown::render("comments.md")' would probably work too but render.r is shorter and little more powerful so I use it more often myself) on the input file comments.md which also happens to (here sole) file being monitored. And that is really all there is to it. I wanted / needed something like this a few months ago at work too, and may have used an inotify-based tool there but cannot find any notes. Python has something similar via watchdog which is yet again more complicated / general. It turns out that auto-processing is actually not that helpful as we often save before an expression is complete, leading to needless error messages. So at the end of the day, I often do something much simpler. My preferred editor has a standard interface to 'building': pressing C-x c loads a command (it recalls) that defaults to make -k (i.e., make with error skipping). Simply replacing that with render.r comments.md (in this case) means we get an updated pdf file when we want with a simple customizable command / key-combination. So in sum: it is worth customizing your environments, learning about what your OS may have, and looking beyond a single tool / editor / approach. Even dreams may come true ... Postscriptum: And Davis takes this in a stride and almost immediately tweeted a follow-up with a nice screen[...]



Craig Small: WordPress 4.9.1

Sat, 09 Dec 2017 06:23:57 +0000

After a much longer than expected break due to moving and the resulting lack of Internet, plus WordPress releasing a package with a non-free file, the Debian package for WordPress 4.9.1 has been uploaded!

WordPress 4.9 has a number of improvements, especially around the customiser components so that looked pretty slick. The editor for the customiser now has a series of linters what will warn if you write something bad, which is a very good thing! Unfortunately the Javascript linter is jshint which uses a non-free license which that team is attempting to fix.  I have also reported the problem to WordPress upstream to have a look at.

While this was all going on, there were 4 security issues found in WordPress which resulted in the 4.9.1 release.

Finally I got the time to look into the jshint problem and Internet to actually download the upstream files and upload the Debian packages. So version 4.9.1-1 of the packages have now been uploaded and should be in the mirrors soon.  I’ll start looking at the 4.9.1 patches to see what is relevant for Stretch and Jessie.




Craig Small: Back Online

Fri, 08 Dec 2017 10:58:35 +0000

I now have Internet back! Which means I can try to get the Debian WordPress packages bashed into shape. Unfortunately they still have the problem with the json horrible “no evil” license which causes so many problems all over the place.

I’m hoping there is a simple way of just removing that component and going from there.




Thomas Goirand: Testing OpenStack using tempest: all is packaged, try it yourself

Thu, 07 Dec 2017 23:00:31 +0000

tl;dr: this post explains how the new openstack-tempest-ci-live-booter package configures a machine to PXE boot a Debian Live system running on KVM in order to run functional testing of OpenStack. It may be of interest to you if you want to learn how to PXE boot a KVM virtual machine running Debian Live, even if you aren’t interested in OpenStack. Moving my CI from one location to another leads to package it fully After packaging a release of OpenStack, it’s kind of mandatory to functionally test the set of packages. This is done by running the tempest test suite on an already deployed OpenStack installation. I used to do that on a real hardware, provided by my employer. But since I’ve lost my job (I’m still looking for a new employer at this time), I also lost access to the hardware they were providing to me. As a consequence, I searched for a sponsor to provide the hardware to run tempest on. I first sent a mail to the openstack-dev list, asking for such a hardware. Then Rochelle Grober and Stephen Li from Huawei got me in touch with Zachary Smith, the CEO of Packet.net. And packet.net gave me an account on their system. I am amazed how good their service is. They provide baremetal servers around the world (15 data centers), provisioned using an API (meaning, fully automatically). A big thanks to them! Anyway, even if I planned for a few weeks to give a big thanks to the above people (they really deserves it!), this isn’t the only goal of this post. This is to introduce how to run your own tempest CI on your own machine. Because since I have been in the situation where my CI had to move twice, I decided to industrialize it, and fully automate the setup of the CI server. And what does a DD do when writing software? Package it of course. So I packaged it all, and uploaded it to the archive. Here’s how to use all of this. General principle The best way to run an OpenStack tempest CI is to run it on a Debian Live system. Why? Because setting-up a full OpenStack environment takes a lot of time, mostly spent on disk I/O. And on a live system, everything runs on a RAM disk, so installing under this environment is the fastest way one could do. This is what I did when working with Mirantis: I had a real baremetal server, which I was PXE booting on a Debian Live system. However nice, this imposes having access to 2 servers: one for running the Live system, and one running the dhcp/pxe/tftp server. Also, this means the boot server needs 2 nics, one on the internet, and one for booting the 2nd server that will run the Live system. It was not possible to have such specific setup at packet, so I decided to replicate this using KVM, so it would become portable. And since the servers at packet.net are very fast, it isn’t much of an issue anymore to not run on baremetal. Anyway, let’s dive into setting-up all of this. Network topology We’ll assume that one of your interface has internet access, let’s say eth0. Since we don’t want to destroy any of your network config, the openstack-tempest-ci-live-booter package will use a dummy network interface (ie: modprobe dummy) and bridge it to the network interface of the KVM virtual machine. That dummy network interface will be configured with 192.168.100.1, and the Debian Live KVM will use 192.168.100.2. This convenient default can be changed, but then you’ll have to pass your specific network configuration to each and every script (just read the beginning of each script to read the parameters). Configure the host machine First install the openstack-tempest-ci-live-booter package. This runtime depends on the i[...]



Chris Lamb: Simple media cachebusting with GitHub pages

Thu, 07 Dec 2017 22:10:08 +0000

GitHub Pages makes it really easy to host static websites, including sites with custom domains or even with HTTPS via CloudFlare. However, one typical annoyance with static site hosting in general is the lack of cachebusting so updating an image or stylesheet does not result in any change in your users' browsers until they perform an explicit refresh. One easy way to add cachebusting to your Pages-based site is to use GitHub's support for Jekyll-based sites. To start, first we add some scaffolding to use Jekyll: $ cd "$(git rev-parse --show-toplevel) $ touch _config.yml $ mkdir _layouts $ echo '{{ content }}' > _layouts/default.html $ echo /_site/ >> .gitignore Then in each of our HTML files, we prepend the following header: --- layout: default --- This can be performed on your index.html file using sed: $ sed -i '1s;^;---\nlayout: default\n---\n;' index.html Alternatively, you can run this against all of your HTML files in one go with: $ find -not -path './[._]*' -type f -name '*.html' -print0 | \ xargs -0r sed -i '1s;^;---\nlayout: default\n---\n;' Due to these new headers, we can obviously no longer simply view our site by pointing our web browser directly at the local files. Thus, we now test our site by running: $ jekyll serve --watch ... and navigate to http://127.0.0.1:3000/. Finally, we need to append the cachebusting strings itself. For example, if we had the following HTML to include a CSS stylesheet: ... we should replace it with: This adds the current "build" timestamp to the file, resulting in the following HTML once deployed: Don't forget to to apply it all your other static media, including images and Javascript: (image)