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Preview: Best Syndication - Weight Loss

Best Syndication - Weight Loss





 



Consuming Less Added Sugar reduces Body Weight Slightly

Wed, 16 Jan 2013 04:40:45 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Reducing sugar intake may slightly lower body weight, according to a new study,. The researchers found sugar intake reductions helped reduce body weight by an average of 1.76 pounds. The study results were published online at bmj.com.

Previous research suggested that an excessive intake of sugar is related to obesity. One common finding: people who drank sugar-sweetened beverages were at an increased risk for becoming obese. However, the authors noted that some studies could not establish a significant link between sugared beverages and obesity.

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New Year’s Resolutions bring Weight Loss Programs Center Stage

Fri, 04 Jan 2013 00:13:30 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - With the New Year comes a list of resolutions or goals that people want to achieve during the coming year. One of the top goals is to lose weight and to get physically fit. To help get on the right track, there are many weight loss programs and books available. Many of the weight loss programs cost money, but there are some free ones available.

Some of the trends in weight loss are counting and tracking the calories you eat, focusing on eating nutritionally dense foods, keeping physically active, and staying away from processed foods. Here are some of the weight loss tools that are interesting in 2013.

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Intensive Lifestyle Intervention helped to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Wed, 19 Dec 2012 05:28:06 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found that overweight type-2 diabetes patients increased their chances of partial and complete remission with intensive lifestyle intervention. The results, which showed modest remission rates, were reported in the December 19, 2012 issue of JAMA.

Many people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes wonder if the disease is reversible. Diabetes is thought of as a disease that is progressive that will eventually lead to vascular and neuropathic damage. Other studies involving bariatric surgery on type 2 diabetes patients suggested that some cases could be resolved. There were no studies on the rate of remission with lifestyle modifications alone. This prompted Edward W. Gregg, Ph.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and his colleagues to investigate.

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Aerobic Exercise is best at Fat Burning and Weight Loss

Sun, 16 Dec 2012 23:37:29 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Duke researchers found aerobic exercise offered optimum fat burning and weight loss compared to weight lifting (resistance training), or a combination of the two exercises. The study results were reported in the December 15, 2012 issue of the Journal of Applied Physiology.

To investigate, researchers conducted a randomized trial with 234 overweight and obese adults. The participants were randomly assigned to a resistance group, an aerobic group, or a combination of resistance and aerobic exercise group.

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Calorie Counting and Activity Tracking Mobile App helped with Weight Loss

Tue, 11 Dec 2012 07:48:04 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - People lost an average of 15 pounds when they used a mobile phone app to track calories and physical activity during a study conducted by researchers from Northwestern University. The study results were published in the online first edition of the December 10, 2012 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The researchers point out that the mobile app was only partly responsible for the weight loss; the participants also attended regular classes that educated them about proper nutrition and exercise. The study also found that the people participating in the study were able to keep the weight off for more than one year.

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Menopause combined with obesity and overeating encourages Breast Cancer Tumor Growth

Mon, 10 Dec 2012 02:41:51 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Using a rat model, researchers investigated breast tumor growth associated with menopause, obesity and overeating. The rat model demonstrated the potential increased risk for breast-cancer tumor growth and progression with post-menopausal women who are obese and overeat. The results were published in the American Association for Cancer Research journal, Cancer Research.

Paul S. MacLean, Ph.D., associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado Anschutz Health and Wellness Center in Aurora, Colorado explained that obese post-menopausal women are at an increased risk for developing breast cancer and for having less desirable clinical outcomes.

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A Low Fat Diet can aid Weight Loss without Trying

Fri, 07 Dec 2012 06:09:45 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers from the University of East Anglia found that reducing the amount of fat in a person’s diet could help them lose around three-and-one-half pounds without reducing their food intake. In addition to slimming down, the participants had shown reductions in their “bad” LDL cholesterol levels. The study trial results were published in the British Medical Journal.

The weight loss occurred when the person was picking low-fat foods. The report was commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) Nutrition Guidance Expert Advisory Group (NUGAG) Subgroup on Diet and Health to determine if their recommendations for total fat intake were up-to-date.


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Childhood Obesity risk factor can be calculated at Birth

Fri, 30 Nov 2012 05:16:53 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers have devised a method to calculate a baby’s chance of becoming obese during childhood. The risk factor is determined by the baby’s birth weight, the parent’s body mass index (BMI), how many people live in the household, the mother’s professional status, and if she smoked during pregnancy. The study was published today in the journal PLOS ONE.

The researchers developed this method to identify risk factors by analyzing information from 4,000 children in Finland that were followed starting in 1986. First, the researchers tried to determine genetic profiles that could predict obesity, but that failed to work. Then they looked at non-genetic information that was collected at the time of birth. The formula they finally developed worked in the Finnish cohort. So they tested the calculations using information collected in the US and Italy. With that data they were able to predict childhood obesity from the risk factors.

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Poorer Children at higher risk for becoming Obese

Tue, 13 Nov 2012 05:02:25 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researcher from Rice University found that children living in poorer neighborhoods were at almost a 30 percent higher risk for becoming obese than children who were living in high-class neighborhoods. Another factor contributing to obesity risk was lower levels of education. The study did not investigate factors such as family composition or individual features.

Rice sociologists Rachel Tolbert Kimbro, director of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research's Urban Health Program, and Justin Denney, associate director of the program, investigated data collected on 17,530 children that were age 5. These children lived in 4,700 different neighborhoods nationwide. The researchers used factors such as socioeconomic status, maternal education, and television watching time to help determine their results.

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Mice gained Weight because of inappropriate Eating Times

Mon, 12 Nov 2012 19:36:14 +0000

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(Best Syndiaction News) - Researchers found that changing the time when mice ate caused the animals to gain weight. The study results suggest that there is a relationship between brain clock molecules and fat cell storage. The researchers published their findings in Nature Medicine.

Georgios Paschos PhD, a research associate in the lab of Garret FitzGerald, MD, FRS director of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Therapeutics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, along with colleagues, studied the effects of deleting the clock gene Arntl (also called Bmal1) in mice. These mice became obese when they changed the time when they normally ate at night.

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Gargling Sugar Water could help improve Self-Control

Wed, 07 Nov 2012 23:56:07 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found that rinsing the mouth with glucose helped improved participants’ self-control. The research results were published in the Oct. 22 issue of Psychological Science.

The study was co-authored by University of Georgia professor of psychology Leonard Martin and Matthew Sanders, a doctoral candidate who is also in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.

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Water Aerobics just as good as other Cardio Workouts

Tue, 30 Oct 2012 23:17:35 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Exercising in the water has just as much aerobic benefit as working-out on land, suggests a new study. The researchers found pedaling an exercise bike in a swimming pool had a similar aerobic effect to a typical stationary bike workout. The study was presented today at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress.

The immersible ergocycle, which is a stationary exercise bike that can be put in a swimming pool, was studied. Many people might assume that moving in water is not as difficult as moving on land. The researchers compared land and water bicycling workouts for effectiveness.

Healthy participants perform exercise tests in the water and on land. The water level was up to their chest level. The intensity of the workout was increased every minute until the riders were exhausted. The researchers found that the land-workout was almost the same when they compared the maximal oxygen consumption rates.

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Increased Risk for Overweight Children if Mom Smoked during Pregnancy

Tue, 30 Oct 2012 21:33:38 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Risk factors for children becoming overweight were assessed in a new study. The researchers found that children born to women who smoked during pregnancy had a higher risk of becoming overweight. In addition, children that were at a higher birth weight and had rapid weight gain during the first year of life were also at an increased risk for becoming overweight during childhood.

The study results were published in the online edition of the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Less Sleep and Obesity associated with Kids who have TV and Electronics in Bedroom

Tue, 23 Oct 2012 04:02:28 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Children who have a TV, computer, video game console, or mobile phone in their bedroom are at an increased risk for being overweight or obese, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of Alberta.

The researchers conducted a survey of almost 3,400 5th grade students in the province of Alberta, Canada. They wanted to see if there was a relationship between a child’s sleeping habits, the number of electronic devices in their bedroom, and their weight. Around half of the students surveyed had a TV, DVD player, or video game console in their bedroom. They discovered that 21 percent of the children had a computer, and 17 percent had a mobile phone. Only 5 percent of the students had all three kinds of electronics.

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USDA SuperTracker gets new Feature to Customize Calorie Intake Goals

Wed, 26 Sep 2012 07:04:26 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced a new feature available for their free online calorie-tracking tool called SuperTracker. This new feature helps nutritionists, dietitians, and health care providers work to tailor calorie intake for each person.

SuperTracker was created and is currently maintained by the USDA’s Center for Nutrition Policy and Promotion (CNPP). The free calorie tracking software also keeps track of exercise as well as diet. The new feature will allow the user to adjust their calorie target to what is recommended by their physician.

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Teens who abandon Sugared Drinks for Calorie Free Options Weighed Less than Peers

Mon, 24 Sep 2012 04:55:52 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that teens who switched from sugar-sweetened beverages to calorie-free beverages weighed less than their peers who continued to drink sugared drinks. After one year of drinking calorie free drinks instead of the sugared drinks, the teens weighed an average of four pounds less than those kids who continued to drink sugared drinks.

Cara Ebbeling, PhD (associate director) and David Ludwig, MD, PhD (director), both from the New Balance Foundation Obesity Prevention Center Boston Children’s Hospital, led the study.

The study involved 224 overweight or obese teenagers who were either 9th or 10th grade students. The participants all drank sugary drinks on a regular basis at the start of the study. One group was assigned to drink no-calorie beverages and gave up the sugared drinks completely. The control group was to continue drinking the sugared beverages.

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High amounts of Bisphenol A (BPA) showed increased risk for obesity in Children and Teens

Wed, 19 Sep 2012 06:25:29 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found children and teens that had higher amounts of the chemical bisphenol A (BPA) in their urine were at an increased risk of being obese. The study results were reported in the September 19 issue of JAMA.

Bisphenol A (BPA) is used in many consumer products. It can be found in plastics and in the lining of cans. Over the last four years, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has been investigating the safety of BPA. The FDA approved BPA in the 1960’s. Currently, the FDA says, “The scientific evidence at this time does not suggest that the very low levels of human exposure to BPA through the diet are unsafe.”

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Rural Living associated with Higher Rates of Obesity

Mon, 17 Sep 2012 05:01:22 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that rural living brings higher rates of obesity compared to living in the city. The findings were published in the National Rural Health Association's Fall 2012 Journal of Rural Health.

Researchers from the University of Kansas investigated data from the National Center for Health Statistics. The information gathered on heights and weights of people is the most recent in over 30 years. They reviewed the information in this self-reporting study.

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Women weigh less when they read Food Nutrition Labels

Fri, 14 Sep 2012 04:39:14 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that women who read the food nutrition labels weighed almost nine pounds less than those who did not. The researchers from the University of Santiago de Compostela used data from the US women consumers to determine their findings. Additionally, the University of Tennessee, Arkansas (USA) and the Norwegian Institute for Agricultural Finance Research also participated in the study.

What the researchers found is that the women who read the labels had a body mass index (BMI) rating that was 1.49 point less than those who would never look at the package nutrition information while shopping.

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Blocking a Protein prevented Weight Gain in a Mice Study

Fri, 03 Aug 2012 04:48:29 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that blocking an enzyme called fatty acid synthase (FAS) in mice aided them against gaining weight even when eating a high-fat diet. The mice that were not having the FAS blocked were given the same high-fat diet and became obese. The research may help develop new treatments for obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. The study results were published in the online edition of the journal Cell Metabolism.

The blocked FAS enzyme made the mice become more sensitive to insulin. The researchers engineered the mice so that they would not make FAS in their fat cells.

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