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Preview: KQED's The California Report Podcast

KQED's The California Report



KQED's statewide half-hour radio news program, providing daily coverage of issues, trends and public policy decisions affecting California and its diverse population.



Last Build Date: Sat, 27 May 2017 10:52:47 PDT

Copyright: Copyright 2011 KQED
 



First Latina in Space, The Minor Leagues, W. Kamau Bell

Fri, 26 May 2017 23:00:00 PDT

Meet the first Latina to travel to space-- Ellen Ochoa, who grew up near San Diego. She was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame a few days ago. Photographer Tabitha Soren talks about her new book that follows a group of baseball players from minor league teams in the Central Valley on the path to big-league stardom or out of pro sports. And the program talks to broadcaster and comedian W. Kamau Bell.



First Latina in Space, The Minor Leagues, W. Kamau Bell

Fri, 26 May 2017 18:30:00 PDT

Meet the first Latina to travel to space-- Ellen Ochoa, who grew up near San Diego. She was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame a few days ago. Photographer Tabitha Soren talks about her new book that follows a group of baseball players from minor league teams in the Central Valley on the path to big-league stardom or out of pro sports. And the program talks to broadcaster and comedian W. Kamau Bell.



The California Report Magazine

Fri, 26 May 2017 23:27:41 PDT

Meet the first Latina to travel to space-- Ellen Ochoa, who grew up near San Diego. She was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame a few days ago. Photographer Tabitha Soren talks about her new book that follows a group of baseball players from minor league teams in the Central Valley on the path to big-league stardom or out of pro sports. And the program talks to broadcaster and comedian W. Kamau Bell.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcrmag/2017/05/2017-05-26-tcrmag.mp3




Tabitha Soren Captures the Other Side of Baseball in New Book

Fri, 26 May 2017 16:30:00 PDT

During her eight years on the MTV News Desk in the '90s, Tabitha Soren brought journalistic gravitas to a network that focused on celebrity and drama. She covered Bill Clinton's presidential campaigns, and interviewed stars like Mariah Carey and TuPac. These days, she's behind a camera. She's a fine arts photographer. Her muse? Baseball. The Oakland A's.



W. Kamau Bell: 'Everything Gets Better When it Gets Awkward'

Fri, 26 May 2017 16:30:00 PDT

We sit down with Bay Area comedian and TV host W. Kamau Bell, who tells us about some of his toughest interviews: from talking with a hooded Klansman about white supremacy, to asking his nearly 80 year old mother about her sex life.



Meet Ellen Ochoa, the First Latina in Space

Fri, 26 May 2017 16:30:00 PDT

Ellen Ochoa was the first Latina to travel to space, aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery's 1993 mission. She was inducted into the U.S. Astronaut Hall of Fame this month. Ochoa, who grew up near San Diego, spoke with KPBS's Marissa Cabrera about her passion for space exploration.



'When You're Undocumented and Asian, You're Invisible'

Fri, 26 May 2017 16:30:00 PDT

On the show, we've met young immigrants known as 'dreamers,' people brought to the U.S. as children who have relief from deportation, at least for now. Many of them are born in Latin America. We rarely hear about dreamers from Asian countries. They face unique challenges. Stefanie De Leon Tzic brings us this profile as part of our series "At Risk in the Trump Era." It's a collaboration with student reporters at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism.



The California Report

Fri, 26 May 2017 17:23:59 PDT

Reporters Get Closer Look at Huge Landslide in Big Sur. How One Salinas Mother Grapples With Her Son's Murder. Breathing New Life Into Santa Cruz's Cemetery for Everyone. San Francisco and Santa Clara Counties Lead Fight Against Trump's Threats on Sanctuary Cities. Guess the Sounds From a Special Underwater Microphone, Part III. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-26-tcr.mp3




Reporters Get Closer Look at Huge Landslide in Big Sur

Fri, 26 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Since the massive landslide in Big Sur, Caltrans offered reporters an epic look. KCBX's Greta Mart was there.



How One Salinas Mother Grapples With Her Son's Murder

Fri, 26 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

In the past four years, there have been 94 murders in Salinas. Many of them caused by gang violence. We talk to one mother whose son was murdered.



Breathing New Life Into Santa Cruz's Cemetery for Everyone

Fri, 26 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Santa Cruz is known for its free spirit and eclectic mix of people. Look no farther than the Evergreen Cemetery to see that it's a culture that dates back to the 1800s. After decades of sitting in disrepair, there's renewed energy to restore the historic site.



San Francisco and Santa Clara Counties Lead Fight Against Trump's Threats on Sanctuary Cities

Fri, 26 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

There have been several developments this week on President Donald Trump's executive order to pull federal funds from so-called sanctuary cities. We find out how San Francisco and Santa Clara counties are leading the fight.



Guess the Sounds From a Special Underwater Microphone, Part III

Fri, 26 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

This week, we're exploring the sounds of the waters off the coast and asking you what you think they are. The sounds are recorded by a special underwater microphone called a hydrophone. It's part of a project by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.



The California Report

Thu, 25 May 2017 18:19:00 PDT

CBO: California Could Lose $24 Billion in AHCA Funding. Are Robots the Future of Farming?. Guess the Sounds From a Special Underwater Microphone, Part II. Political Giant Leon Panetta Weighs In On The Political Climate. State Weighs Funding Artist Housing Improvements in Wake of Ghost Ship Fire. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-25-tcr.mp3




CBO: California Could Lose $24 Billion in AHCA Funding

Thu, 25 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office released an updated analysis on Wednesday of the GOP health bill, which would be the U.S. House replacement for Obamacare. Health reporter April Dembosky explains how the bill would and would not affect Californians.



Are Robots the Future of Farming?

Thu, 25 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

In Monterey County, where the farms that produce half of the country's lettuce are struggling to find workers. Tech is working on a solution. Valerie Hamilton has our story.



Guess the Sounds From a Special Underwater Microphone, Part II

Thu, 25 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

This week, we're exploring the sounds of the waters off the coast and asking you what you think they are. The sounds are recorded by a special underwater microphone called a hydrophone. It's part of a project by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.



Political Giant Leon Panetta Weighs In On The Political Climate

Thu, 25 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Yesterday we spoke with native son and political giant Leon Panetta on a range of issues, including the political future of Senator Diane Feinstein and Trump's alleged ties with Russia.



State Weighs Funding Artist Housing Improvements in Wake of Ghost Ship Fire

Thu, 25 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

We begin with the consequences of last year's deadly Ghost Ship warehouse fire in Oakland, which killed 36 people. State lawmakers on Wednesday took a look at a lack of affordable housing for artists.



The California Report

Wed, 24 May 2017 16:12:30 PDT

Al Sharpton Pushes State Lawmakers to Renew Focus on Police Reforms. Study: GPS Satellites Give More Accurate Tsunami Warnings. Monterey Peninsula Gets a New Futuristic Water Supply. Guess These Sounds From a Special Underwater Microphone. State Lawmaker Moves to Limit UC President's Office. Monterey County Flower Growers Look to a Different Kind of Flower. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-24-tcr.mp3




Al Sharpton Pushes State Lawmakers to Renew Focus on Police Reforms

Wed, 24 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

We begin at the State Capitol, where powerful spending committees will decide the fate of hundreds of bills this week, including a police reform bill which got the attention of Rev. Al Sharpton. KQED's California Politics and Government Desk, Guy Marzorati has more.



Study: GPS Satellites Give More Accurate Tsunami Warnings

Wed, 24 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

KQED's Science Editor Craig Miller reports that scientists have developed a new tool for detecting tsunamis using GPS satellites.



Monterey Peninsula Gets a New Futuristic Water Supply

Wed, 24 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Here are two things the Monterey Peninsula is running out of: water and time. The state has ordered the region's water supplier to stop overdrawing on the Carmel River by the end of 2021, or face severe rationing. Part of the solution is a first-of-its-kind water recycling plant. From KAZU in Monterey, Krista Almanzan reports.



Guess These Sounds From a Special Underwater Microphone

Wed, 24 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

This week, we'll be exploring the sounds of the waters off the coast and asking you what you think they are. The sounds are recorded by a special underwater microphone called a hydrophone. It's part of a project by the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute.



State Lawmaker Moves to Limit UC President's Office

Wed, 24 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

The past few weeks, we've been telling you about how the University of California kept state auditors in the dark about parts of their budget. A California state senator now wants to dramatically limit the University of California's independence.



Monterey County Flower Growers Look to a Different Kind of Flower

Wed, 24 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Take a minute to ponder the recreational cannabis conundrum: legally you can't get high on your own supply. That's because while it's legal to smoke recreational marijuana in California, it is against the law to grow it until at least 2018. But in Monterey County, some longtime flower growers are keeping their eye on the bud.



The California Report

Tue, 23 May 2017 15:56:09 PDT

Single-Payer Plan's Price Tag in California: $400 Billion Per Year. Push to Limit Money Bail Gains Steam in California. Feds Approve $647 Million Grant for Caltrain Electrification Project. State Lawmakers Push for a Stricter Cap-and-Trade Plan. Bill Would Fine Coastal Property Owners Who Don't Permanently Fix Sea Walls. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-23-tcr.mp3




Single-Payer Plan's Price Tag in California: $400 Billion Per Year

Tue, 23 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Lawmakers who want to establish a single-payer health care system for California have come up with an estimate of how much it would cost: $400 billion a year. That's more than twice the amount of the entire California state budget. So where would that money come from?



Push to Limit Money Bail Gains Steam in California

Tue, 23 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

If fixing our health care system seems daunting, what about updating a century-old bail system that critics say favors the rich. Every year in California, nearly 1 million people are arrested and booked into jail. If you can pay, you're free on bail. But if you can't, you're stuck in jail. Now, California and two dozen other states are looking at upending this system. KQED reporters Sukey Lewis and Marisa Lagos have been digging into the debate.



Feds Approve $647 Million Grant for Caltrain Electrification Project

Tue, 23 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Federal officials have OKd funds for a Bay Area transit project that's been at the center of a partisan dispute in the state's congressional delegation. KQED's Dan Brekke reports on a victory for commuters and California Democrats.



State Lawmakers Push for a Stricter Cap-and-Trade Plan

Tue, 23 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

California set ambitious goals last year to reduce green house gas emissions. Now, how to get there? KQED's Politics and Government Desk, Guy Marzorati reports that supporters of stricter environmental rules have leverage.



Bill Would Fine Coastal Property Owners Who Don't Permanently Fix Sea Walls

Tue, 23 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Assemblymember Mark Stone wants property owners with emergency sea walls to make more permanent fixes. A bill working its way through the state Legislature would fine people who don't. Stone joined The California Report's John Sepulvado to explain why this is a priority for him.



The California Report

Mon, 22 May 2017 13:50:26 PDT

California Warns Consumers of Canned Food Lined with BPA. A California Regulator's Curious Crusade to Remake the Clean Air Act. Party Insider Claims Democratic Party Chair After Tough Race. Why Do Birds Eat Plastic, Don't They Know Better?. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-22-tcr.mp3




California Warns Consumers of Canned Food Lined with BPA

Mon, 22 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

A recent consumer watchdog study found that four big food outlets, including Safeway, sell canned food lined with BPA, a chemical known to cause cancer and birth defects. KQED's Lindsey Hoshaw has more on how the state is alerting consumers.



A California Regulator's Curious Crusade to Remake the Clean Air Act

Mon, 22 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

California environmental officials have made it no secret they want to stop the Trump administration from changing air and water pollution rules. One emerging battle is over a congressional bill to delay clean air deadlines and shift the priorities of the Clean Air Act -- and it's got the support of a state air regulator. Sasha Khokha takes us to the San Joaquin Valley.



Party Insider Claims Democratic Party Chair After Tough Race

Mon, 22 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

California Democrats have voted on a new party leader after a tight race at this weekend's state convention that hearkened back to last year's fight between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders.



Why Do Birds Eat Plastic, Don't They Know Better?

Mon, 22 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Part of our Trash Talk Series with Lindsey Hoshaw. She talks with host, John Sepulvado, about why birds love to eat plastic out of the ocean.



U2s Joshua Tree, Juvenile Offenders, Musicians Against Trump

Fri, 19 May 2017 23:00:00 PDT

This year marks the 30th anniversary of U2s landmark album, The Joshua Tree, an album that probably wouldnt have sounded the same without the influence of the American Southwest. The albums iconic black and white photos were shot on a visit to Death Valley. L.A. Bureau Chief Steven Cuevas goes in search of the location of one particular photoand one particular Joshua tree. Plus, They Call Us Monsters is a new documentary about teenagers whove committed violent crimes and are charged as adults, some facing sentences more than a hundred years long. It airs next week on the PBS series Independent Lens. It follows screenwriter Gabriel Cowan as he works with three of those teens, teaching them screenwriting inside a high security facility that houses LA Countys juvenile offenders. And one Los Angeles bandknown as Jacob the Horseis raging against President Trumps incendiary stance on Muslims, Jews, and immigrants. Just like legendary balladeer Woody Guthrie, this band is taking up arms with its best weapons: fascist-killing guitars and lyrics with a cutting edge. All that and May music releases.



U2s Joshua Tree, Juvenile Offenders, Musicians Against Trump

Fri, 19 May 2017 18:30:00 PDT

This year marks the 30th anniversary of U2s landmark album, The Joshua Tree, an album that probably wouldnt have sounded the same without the influence of the American Southwest. The albums iconic black and white photos were shot on a visit to Death Valley. L.A. Bureau Chief Steven Cuevas goes in search of the location of one particular photoand one particular Joshua tree. Plus, They Call Us Monsters is a new documentary about teenagers whove committed violent crimes and are charged as adults, some facing sentences more than a hundred years long. It airs next week on the PBS series Independent Lens. It follows screenwriter Gabriel Cowan as he works with three of those teens, teaching them screenwriting inside a high security facility that houses LA Countys juvenile offenders. And one Los Angeles bandknown as Jacob the Horseis raging against President Trumps incendiary stance on Muslims, Jews, and immigrants. Just like legendary balladeer Woody Guthrie, this band is taking up arms with its best weapons: fascist-killing guitars and lyrics with a cutting edge. All that and May music releases.



The California Report Magazine

Fri, 19 May 2017 23:57:16 PDT

This year marks the 30th anniversary of U2s landmark album, The Joshua Tree, an album that probably wouldnt have sounded the same without the influence of the American Southwest. The albums iconic black and white photos were shot on a visit to Death Valley. L.A. Bureau Chief Steven Cuevas goes in search of the location of one particular photoand one particular Joshua tree. Plus, They Call Us Monsters is a new documentary about teenagers whove committed violent crimes and are charged as adults, some facing sentences more than a hundred years long. It airs next week on the PBS series Independent Lens. It follows screenwriter Gabriel Cowan as he works with three of those teens, teaching them screenwriting inside a high security facility that houses LA Countys juvenile offenders. And one Los Angeles bandknown as Jacob the Horseis raging against President Trumps incendiary stance on Muslims, Jews, and immigrants. Just like legendary balladeer Woody Guthrie, this band is taking up arms with its best weapons: fascist-killing guitars and lyrics with a cutting edge. All that and May music releases.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcrmag/2017/05/2017-05-19-tcrmag.mp3




30 Years On, U2's 'The Joshua Tree' Still Draws Fans to Edge of Death Valley

Fri, 19 May 2017 16:30:00 PDT

We take a trip back in time, and into the California desert. This year marks the 30th anniversary of U2's landmark album "The Joshua Tree." It's an album that probably wouldn?t have sounded the same without the influence of the American West. It sure would've looked a lot different. The album's iconic black and white photos were shot in Death Valley. The mysterious location of one photo in particular has become a kind of secret pilgrimage site for U2 fans. We set out to find it.



'They Call Us Monsters': New Documentary Follows Juvenile Offenders Facing Life Sentences

Fri, 19 May 2017 16:30:00 PDT

Next week, PBS debuts the documentary "They Call Us Monsters." The film is set in an L.A. County high-security facility inside a juvenile detention center. It's a kind of jail inside a jail for youngsters who've committed violent crimes and are awaiting trial. The film follows three teens -- Jared Nava, Juan Gamez and Antonio Hernandez -- who all could eventually be charged as adults. Some of them are in for gang-related murder or attempted murder, and are facing prison sentences more than 100 years long. As they await trial, they're doing something surprising: writing a screenplay with instructor Gabriel Cowan. Cowan joins us to talk about the film.



L.A. Band Trades Love Songs for Presidential Protest

Fri, 19 May 2017 16:30:00 PDT

This week we continue our series "At Risk in the Trump Era," exploring the impact of the first few months of the Trump presidency on vulnerable communities in Southern California. It's a collaboration with student reporters at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism. Today's story is about a rock band that once played sappy love songs, and is now raging against President Trump's incendiary stance on Muslims, Jews and immigrants. Ashley Eady introduces us to the band Jacob the Horse.



New Jazz Releases From Alice Coltrane and the Music Action Ensemble

Fri, 19 May 2017 16:30:00 PDT

Every month, jazz critic Andrew Gilbert join us to chat about some of the latest releases from Golden State musicians. This time he's listening to some spiritual music from Alice Coltrane, plus a collaboration that brings together young musicians from across the globe.



The Trump Effect on Colleges? Fewer International Students Applying

Fri, 19 May 2017 14:59:45 PDT

The Trump Effect on Colleges? Fewer International Students Applying. A Low-Ranked San Diego Charter School With Straight A's?. California Goes to Court With 14 States to Keep Obamacare Subsidies. Democratic Heavyweight John Burton Exiting the Political Stage. Fresno County Authorities Bust A Nearly $1 Million Bee Theft. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-19-tcr.mp3




The Trump Effect on Colleges? Fewer International Students Applying

Fri, 19 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

We're going to wrap up our series Trump Ed today, and we're going to start in Southern California. On Thursday, the UC system capped enrollment from students outside the state. The irony is that California public university campuses say they're seeing double digit drops in the number of overseas applications. And officials say they know why: President Trump's campaign rhetoric and policy proposals.



A Low-Ranked San Diego Charter School With Straight A's?

Fri, 19 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

We consider the outcome of Gompers High in San Diego. Brad Racino and his team from I News Source looked into what was happening at Gompers High, a charter school.



California Goes to Court With 14 States to Keep Obamacare Subsidies

Fri, 19 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

The state has taken the U.S. government to federal court over Affordable Care Act subsidies for health insurance. Attorney General Xavier Becerra made the announcement Thursday at a community clinic in L.A.



Democratic Heavyweight John Burton Exiting the Political Stage

Fri, 19 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

This weekend, the annual state Democratic Convention is being held in Sacramento. The chair of the California party, known for his passion and profanity, is stepping down this weekend after decades in politics.



Fresno County Authorities Bust A Nearly $1 Million Bee Theft

Fri, 19 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Earlier this week, we told you about 200,000 bee hive heists this year, many of them believed to be connected to Russian criminals. We hear from the officer who made a big bust in the bee case this week.



Former FBI Director Rober Mueller Appointed to Oversee Russia Probe

Thu, 18 May 2017 15:07:24 PDT

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller Special Counsel to Oversee Russia Probe. California Could Set a Sliding Scale for Traffic Fines. Trump Backs California Charter Schools, But the Feeling Isn't Mutual. Kevin McCarthy: Trump's Man in Congress?. Oakland Assemblyman Drops Bill to Allow Communists in State Government. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-18-tcr.mp3




Former FBI Director Robert Mueller Special Counsel to Oversee Russia Probe

Thu, 18 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

The man who oversaw the FBI after the September 11, 2001 attacks will lead the investigation on Russia's tampering with 2016 presidential election. Mueller served as U.S. attorney from 1998 until 2001 for the Northern District of California.



California Could Set a Sliding Scale for Traffic Fines

Thu, 18 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Getting a traffic ticket can be a pain for any of us. But for people who can't afford California's high fines, the consequences can be truly severe. We look at a new bill that aims to overhaul California's traffic fine system.



Trump Backs California Charter Schools, But the Feeling Isn't Mutual

Thu, 18 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Charter schools are sprouting up in Los Angeles like a radioactive chia pet. The city is home to more charter schools than any other U.S. city. The the thing about charters is that they're basically privately operated schools funded with public money. With President Trump looking to expand charter school funding, we asked KPCC's Kyle Stokes to check out Green Dot, a charter school.



Kevin McCarthy: Trump's Man in Congress?

Thu, 18 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Let's start with a joke -- Did you hear the one about Russians paying off the president of the United States? House Majority and Representative Kevin McCarthy of Bakersfield definitely has. According to the Washington Post, he was the one who made it. This news comes out at the same time a big profile from McCarthy was published by our friends at Cal Matters. The author of that profile, CAL Matter's politics reporter Laurel Rosenhall joins us this morning from Sacramento.



Oakland Assemblyman Drops Bill to Allow Communists in State Government

Thu, 18 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

We told you recently about Oakland Assembly member Rob Bonta's bill that would have allowed Communist party members to work in state government. That bill was killed this week. And with that, we launch a new segment about legislative bills in Sacramento that died in this new segment called Kill Bill.



The California Report

Wed, 17 May 2017 16:07:17 PDT

New Study Forecasts Die Off of Several California Salmon Species. California Looks to Shut Down the Last Sand Mining Operation in the U.S. Think Vouchers Would Be A Ticket To San Diego's Top Schools? Think Again. Proposed Tesoro Refinery Expansion Jumps Local Air Quality Hurdle. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-17-tcr.mp3




New Study Forecasts Die Off of Several California Salmon Species

Wed, 17 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Things aren't looking good for California's salmon and trout, according to a new study. The drought took a major toll, but these fish face problems from all sides.



California Looks to Shut Down the Last Sand Mining Operation in the U.S.

Wed, 17 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

In Monterey County, the last coastal sand mining operation in the U.S. is under scrutiny. The Cemex plant in Monterey County digs up sand from beaches and sells it for things like golf course sand traps. Scientists think it's accelerating coastal erosion.



Think Vouchers Would Be A Ticket To San Diego's Top Schools? Think Again

Wed, 17 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Say you're unhappy with your local public schools, but private school is out of the question. Well, some states use taxpayer dollars to fund vouchers, giving families the option to send their kids to eligible private schools. They're not allowed here in California. But that could change under President Trump, who backs vouchers. Our series called "Trump ED" continues in San Diego, where we visit two independent schools with different takes on "school choice."



Proposed Tesoro Refinery Expansion Jumps Local Air Quality Hurdle

Wed, 17 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

In Los Angeles, neighborhood activists are trying to figure out what their next move is. That's because late last week, state regulators issued approval for a plan to expand the Tesoro Refinery. That refinery is major west coast processor of crude oil, and it's in an area of the city made up of lower-income minorities. Some activists say the environmental approval is a major setback.



The California Report

Tue, 16 May 2017 15:24:43 PDT

Revised State Budget Plans to Staff Up Attorney General's Office. Is This Nevada Family's School Choice a Lesson for California?. 9th Circuit Brings Trump Administration Lawyers Back to Court. Bill Aims to Increase Transparency of Police Surveillance.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-16-tcr.mp3




Revised State Budget Plans to Staff Up Attorney General's Office

Tue, 16 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

We look at the ongoing battle of California vs. the Trump administration. What did Gov. Jerry Brown's revised budget have to say about California as the center of the resistance?



Is This Nevada Family's School Choice a Lesson for California?

Tue, 16 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Imagine getting a check in the mail and using it to send your kids to any school you wanted. Some states already do this through tax-credit scholarships. And President Trump and Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos want to make them available to families across the country. Here in California, some education experts have rejected this idea, saying it hurts public schools and violates the separation of church and state. We check out how the program is working out for our neighbors in Nevada.



9th Circuit Brings Trump Administration Lawyers Back to Court

Tue, 16 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Government lawyers were back in court Monday, defending President Donald Trump's ban on travel from six majority-Muslim countries against a lawsuit claiming the ban is unconstitutional. And Trump's campaign pledge to bar Muslims from the U.S. is continuing to haunt him.



Bill Aims to Increase Transparency of Police Surveillance

Tue, 16 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

While cyborg law enforcement officers are still science fiction, many of the tools utilized by law enforcement have a distinctly futuristic ring to them. This includes facial recognition readers, social media scrubbers, bio metric scanners and on and on. Bay Area state senator Jerry Hill is trying to pass laws that would extend current privacy rules to all current technologies.



The California Report

Mon, 15 May 2017 15:19:05 PDT

Humboldt Bay Dredging Faces Setbacks From State and Federal Agencies. Trash Talk: Space Junk. How Could Trump Impact California Schools?. End Music.


Media Files:
http://www.kqed.org/.stream/mp3splice/radio/tcr/2017/05/2017-05-15-tcr.mp3




Humboldt Bay Dredging Faces Setbacks From State and Federal Agencies

Mon, 15 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

Dredging on Humboldt Bay could be done this year. So why is that such a big deal? Because it's been a decade since the bay has been cleaned and some 80 million gallons of mucky, goopy sludge has piled up. But in order to dredge the bay, the harbor district and city of Eureka need approval from the Environmental Protection Agency, along with other federal and state agencies about where to put that gunk. And those approvals are moving about as fast as boats in thick mud.



Trash Talk: Space Junk

Mon, 15 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

We heard this week that a California company is trying -- no joke -- to build a recycling program for space. And if we're talking recycling or refuse, you know it's time for our occasional segment, Trash Talk.



How Could Trump Impact California Schools?

Mon, 15 May 2017 08:50:00 PDT

This week we launch our series on how education policies from the Trump Administration could play out in California. We'll be covering everything from school choice and vouchers to foreign students at state colleges and universities. We begin with scholarship support to private schools and how that could be expanded and we also hear from some students about what they think.