Subscribe: Best Syndication - Mind
http://www.bestsyndication.com/?q=taxonomy/term/53/all/feed
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
alzheimer’s disease  brain  disease  found  heart  news  people  percent  read  researchers  risk  study  syndication news  syndication 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Best Syndication - Mind

Best Syndication - Mind





 



Drinking Sweet Beverages associated with Increased Depression Risk

Mon, 14 Jan 2013 05:03:54 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found that people who drank sweetened beverages had an increased risk for depression. The risk was especially elevated with those who drank diet drinks. However, people who drank coffee had a slightly reduced risk for depression. The study results will be shared at the American Academy of Neurology’s 65th Annual Meeting in San Diego, which is scheduled to be held March 16-23, 2013.

The study author, Honglei Chen, MD, PhD, a member of the American Academy of Neurology, along with the National Institutes of Health in Research Triangle Park in North Carolina, explained that drinking sweetened beverages versus coffee and tea might affect mental health in addition to physical health.

read more




Beta Blockers taken for High Blood Pressure might prevent Alzheimer’s Disease and Dementia

Tue, 08 Jan 2013 07:00:51 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found that men who took beta-blockers for treating high blood pressure were less likely to have brain shrinkage and other anomalies that could signal Alzheimer’s disease or other kinds of dementia.

The Honolulu-Asia Aging Study involved 774 elderly Japanese-American men. After the men died, autopsies were conducted. Six-hundred-ten out of 774 men had high blood pressure or were being treated with high blood pressure medication.

Less than half, around 350, of the men had been taking blood pressure medication; 15 percent took only beta blocker medication, 18 percent took beta blockers with one or more other hypertensive medications, and the remaining took another type of blood pressure medication with no beta blockers.

read more




TFP5 compound shows promise to reverse Alzheimer’s Disease

Wed, 02 Jan 2013 23:15:25 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - Researchers injected TFP5 molecules into mice with Alzheimer’s disease and were able to restore their memory function. The new findings were published in the January 2013 issue of the FASEB Journal.

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health injected TFP5 molecules into mice that had a disease similar to the Alzheimer’s disease in humans. To measure against a control group, other brain diseased mice were injected with a placebo. The mice that received the TFP5 molecules had their symptoms reversed and they had regained their memory while the placebo group continued to decline as expected. The TFP5 did not demonstrate any toxic side effects in the mice.

read more




Extended Radiation Exposure could speed up Alzheimer’s disease in Astronauts

Wed, 02 Jan 2013 01:29:17 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A recent animal study suggests that cosmic radiation could speed up the onset of Alzheimer’s disease in astronauts traveling on deep space missions. The scientists published their findings in the journal PLOS ONE.

Senior study author, M. Kerry O’Banion, M.D., Ph.D., a professor in the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC) Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, explained the cancer health risk factor due to radiation exposure in space has already been acknowledged. However, their researchers wanted to see if there was a risk for developing cognitive problems from the radiation exposure, which could lead to an accelerated onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

The Earth’s magnetic field provides protection from much of the radiation, but when astronauts travel into space they exposed to a variety of radioactive particles.

read more




How to Stop Panic Attacks

Sat, 29 Dec 2012 04:31:06 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) Panic attacks can come on suddenly and peak usually within ten minutes – but can last even longer. The Mayo Clinic reports that these attacks could be triggered by something that is not dangerous but can be frightening and cause the sufferer to think they are losing control or even having a heart attack.

Most people may suffer two panic attacks in their lifetime, but frequent attacks can affect the quality of life. Small stressful situations could cause recurrent and unexpected attacks.

The panic attacks can release a sudden wave of adrenalin. This can increase heart rate.

read more




Heart Patients who meditate may reduce risk of Death, Heart Attack or Stroke

Wed, 14 Nov 2012 05:37:55 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - New research found that African Americans diagnosed with heart disease had a 48 percent reduced risk for suffering from a heart attack, stroke, or dying from all causes, if they did Transcendental Meditation instead of just attending a health education class. The researchers published their findings in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Two hundred and one people participated in the study over a five-year period. The group consisted of 42 percent women over the age of 59 with an income of less than $10,000 per year. The average body mass index (BMI) was 32, which is considered obese.

read more




Gargling Sugar Water could help improve Self-Control

Wed, 07 Nov 2012 23:56:07 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found that rinsing the mouth with glucose helped improved participants’ self-control. The research results were published in the Oct. 22 issue of Psychological Science.

The study was co-authored by University of Georgia professor of psychology Leonard Martin and Matthew Sanders, a doctoral candidate who is also in the UGA Franklin College of Arts and Sciences.

read more




Math Anxiety causes Brain to feel Physical Pain

Thu, 01 Nov 2012 05:16:00 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A study from the University of Chicago found that anxiety experienced doing math can cause a person to feel physical pain. The researchers found that the brain areas that register a threat of bodily harm, and in some instances physical pain, are activated when people are stressed over math problems.

Sian Beilock, professor of psychology at the University of Chicago, said that the brain response of a person suffering from math anxiety is similar to someone feeling physical pain. Sian said that the pain could be similar to a burning sensation experienced on a stove.

read more




Menopausal Hot Flashes reduced with Hypnosis

Thu, 25 Oct 2012 05:05:50 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A study found that women could reduce the number of menopausal hot flashes by up to 74 percent with hypnosis. The controlled, randomized study results were published in the online edition of the journal Menopause.

The researchers from the Mind-Body Medicine Research Laboratory at Baylor University, Waco, TX; the school of Nursing at Indiana University in Indianapolis, IN; and the College of Education at the University of Texas, Austin, worked together on this study. They randomly assigned postmenopausal women either to hypnosis or the control groups.

read more




Stroke risk associated with SSRI Antidepressant Medications

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 06:14:32 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found there is an increased risk for stroke from taking SSRI antidepressant medications; however the study did show that the risk was low. The study was published in the October 17, 2012 online issue of Neurology.

The researchers looked at data from 16 studies that investigated a combined 500,000 participants. The participants had been taking SSRIs antidepressant medication and in this meta-analysis they wanted to see if there was an increased rate for stroke in the SSRI medication group compared to a group that didn’t take the medication.

read more




Study: Boys with ADHD have more problems as Adults

Tue, 16 Oct 2012 07:05:57 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A 33-year follow-up study found that boys that were diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood grew up to have significantly worse outcomes with education, occupation, income, and social areas of their lives. The report was published in the Online First by Archives of General Psychiatry.

Rachel G. Klein, Ph.D., of the Child Study Center at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York, and colleagues, studied the outcomes of adult men who were diagnosed as being ADHD around the age of 8 years old. The study involved 135 men who were diagnosed with ADHD in childhood and 136 men who were not diagnosed with ADHD.

read more




Elderly Women’s Brains function better with Daily Low Dose Aspirin Regimen

Thu, 04 Oct 2012 06:05:48 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - Brain function declined less in elderly women who took a daily low-dose aspirin. These women, who were also at a high risk for heart disease, had less mental decline compared to women who did not take the daily aspirin. The study results were published in the online journal BMJ Open.

The researchers suggest that inflammation associated with heart disease may also influence the way the brain ages.

In the study, 681 women between 70 and 92 were investigated. Out of these women, 601 were at a high risk for having heart disease or a stroke. Their risk was at a 10 percent rate or higher, based on the Framingham scale.

read more




Benzodiazepine associated with higher risk of dementia for people over 65

Fri, 28 Sep 2012 05:45:45 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A study found that people over 65 who start taking benzodiazepine are at a 50 percent increased risk for developing dementia within 15 years compared to people who never took the anxiety and insomnia medication. The study was published in bmj.com today.

Benzodiazepine is prescribed to people over 65 in France at a rate of 30 percent, in Canada at 20 percent, and in Spain at 15 percent. In the UK and US it is prescribed less often, however, many patients have continued to take the medication for years even though the prescribing guidelines suggests to limit the medication. Other studies have found increased risk for dementia, while other study results did not see the risk.

read more




Aubagio (teriflunomide) Multiple Sclerosis drug gains FDA approval

Thu, 13 Sep 2012 04:34:34 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Aubagio (teriflunomide) to treat relapsing types of multiple sclerosis in adults. The treatment is a once-a-day tablet.

The clinical trial results showed around a 30 percent lower rate of relapse in multiple sclerosis patients taking Aubagio compared to a placebo. The side effects reported from Aubagio included diarrhea, abnormal liver test, nausea, and hair loss.

There will be a Boxed Warning that will notify the patient and the doctors about the possibility of liver problems, a risk of death, and a risk for birth defects. Because of liver problems, doctors are instructed to test the blood periodically and when starting Aubagio for liver function. The Boxed Warning also has been flagged for possibly causing fetal harm because of animal studies that demonstrated this problem. Women of childbearing age have to have a negative pregnancy test before starting Aubagio and they have to use a birth control during the treatment.

read more




Cocoa consumption might improve Memory Function in Elderly

Tue, 14 Aug 2012 05:20:06 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A study found that eating cocoa flavanols on a daily basis might help to improve mild cognitive impairment such as memory loss. The study results were published in the American Heart Association's journal Hypertension.

Flavonols are compounds that naturally occur in apples, tea, grapes, red wine, and cocoa. Other research has suggested that consumption of flavonols might reduce the risk of developing dementia.

One theory as to why flavonols may benefit the brain is that they could help improve blood flow. Another idea is that flavonols might work within the brain structure and thereby preserving function and neurons. The idea is that the flavonols might improve metabolism and may help with the molecular structure that is involved with memory.

read more




Recall announced for Gourmet Black Licorice sold at Costco and Smart & Final Stores

Mon, 13 Aug 2012 02:51:33 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A recall has been announced for lot number A3057 of the Lucky Country Aussie Style Soft Gourmet Black Licorice that were sold at Costco and Smart & Final stores in California, Arizona, and Utah because they exceeded the safe lead level standards for these states. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) along with the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced the recall.

The director of the CDPH and state health officer, Dr. Ron Chapman, said that the lead levels of the recalled licorice tested as high as 0.18 parts per million of lead. A serving of licorice could add up to 7.2 micrograms of lead. Children under the age of six should not have anything over 6.0 micrograms of lead each day from all sources of food.

read more




Parkinson’s Disease – Caffeine might help to Control Movement

Thu, 02 Aug 2012 03:52:05 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A study found that caffeine might help a person with Parkinson’s disease better control their movement. The research was carried out at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI MUHC) and was funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Webster Foundation. The results were published in Neurology, the official journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Dr. Ronald Postuma, lead author of the study, a researcher in neurosciences at the RI MUHC, and Professor of Medicine in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University, explained that this is one of the first studies to investigate caffeine and its potential help motoring functions with Parkinson’s disease patients. Other research has found a reduced risk of developing Parkinson’s disease among coffee drinkers.

read more




Chronic Heart Failure patients reduced Depression with Aerobic Exercise

Wed, 01 Aug 2012 06:52:34 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A study found that chronic heart failure patients who took part in an aerobic exercise routine showed a slight reduction in depression symptoms over a 12-month period compared to those who were given typical care. The study results were published in the August 1, 2012 issue of JAMA.

Heart failure affects around 5 million people in the United States. Every year, around half-a-million new cases of heart failure will be diagnosed. Depression is often found in as many as 40 percent of the heart failure patients. The worst clinical outcomes of heart failure are associated with those who have depression.

read more




Tai Chi Exercise increased Brain Size in Elderly

Wed, 20 Jun 2012 05:14:04 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - A study found that Chinese elderly people were able to increase brain volume and improve their memory and thinking skills when they did Tai Chi three times per week over an eight month period. Researchers from the University of South Florida and Fudan University in Shanghai, China reported their findings in the Journal of Alzheimer ’s disease.

The study was inspired from previous research that showed increased brain volume after people participated in aerobic exercise programs. These researchers conducted an 8-month randomized controlled trial that assigned one group to practice Tai Chi and the other had no change. During the same trial, the researchers found that the group that was part of lively discussions three times per week, also showed increased brain volume and mild cognitive improvements.

read more




West Nile Virus - First Confirmed Case in California for 2012

Tue, 19 Jun 2012 03:41:34 +0000

(image)

(Best Syndication News) - The California Department of Public Health (CDPH) announced the first confirmed case of West Nile virus infection for the 2012 season. The infected person is a 70-year old woman from Kern County. She was hospitalized, but is on the way to recovery. So far in 2012, there has been West Nile virus identified in 15 California counties.

Dr. Ron Chapman, state health officer and director of CDPH, said that the first case of West Nile virus infection of the season is a reminder for people to be careful and protect themselves and others against mosquito bites. He adds that the West Nile virus activity is at its peak in the summer months.

West Nile virus is usually transmitted from the bite of an infected mosquito. Humans and animals could become infected if bitten by the infected mosquito. The CDPH say that the risk for suffering a serious illness from the West Nile virus is low for most people.

read more