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Preview: pubmed: H5N1 epidemiology

pubmed: H5N1 epidemiology



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Highly Pathogenic Reassortant Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Clade 2.3.2.1a in Poultry, Bhutan.
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Highly Pathogenic Reassortant Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Virus Clade 2.3.2.1a in Poultry, Bhutan.

Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 12;22(12):2137-2141

Authors: Marinova-Petkova A, Franks J, Tenzin S, Dahal N, Dukpa K, Dorjee J, Feeroz MM, Rehg JE, Barman S, Krauss S, McKenzie P, Webby RJ, Webster RG

Abstract
Highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N1), clade 2.3.2.1a, with an H9-like polymerase basic protein 1 gene, isolated in Bhutan in 2012, replicated faster in vitro than its H5N1 parental genotype and was transmitted more efficiently in a chicken model. These properties likely help limit/eradicate outbreaks, combined with strict control measures.

PMID: 27584733 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




Genetically Different Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Viruses in West Africa, 2015.
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Genetically Different Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza A(H5N1) Viruses in West Africa, 2015.

Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 12;22(12):2132-2136

Authors: Tassoni L, Fusaro A, Milani A, Lemey P, Awuni JA, Sedor VB, Dogbey O, Commey AN, Meseko C, Joannis T, Minoungou GL, Ouattara L, Haido AM, Cisse-Aman D, Couacy-Hymann E, Dauphin G, Cattoli G, Monne I

Abstract
To trace the evolution of highly pathogenic influenza A(H5N1) virus in West Africa, we sequenced genomes of 43 viruses collected during 2015 from poultry and wild birds in 5 countries. We found 2 co-circulating genetic groups within clade 2.3.2.1c. Mutations that may increase adaptation to mammals raise concern over possible risk for humans.

PMID: 27389972 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses and Generation of Novel Reassortants, United States, 2014-2015.
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Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses and Generation of Novel Reassortants, United States, 2014-2015.

Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 07;22(7):1283-5

Authors: Lee DH, Bahl J, Torchetti MK, Killian ML, Ip HS, DeLiberto TJ, Swayne DE

Abstract
Asian highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) viruses spread into North America in 2014 during autumn bird migration. Complete genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of 32 H5 viruses identified novel H5N1, H5N2, and H5N8 viruses that emerged in late 2014 through reassortment with North American low-pathogenicity avian influenza viruses.

PMID: 27314845 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]




Debate Regarding Oseltamivir Use for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza.
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Debate Regarding Oseltamivir Use for Seasonal and Pandemic Influenza.

Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 06;22(6):949-55

Authors: Hurt AC, Kelly H

Abstract
A debate about the market-leading influenza antiviral medication, oseltamivir, which initially focused on treatment for generally mild illness, has been expanded to question the wisdom of stockpiling for use in future influenza pandemics. Although randomized controlled trial evidence confirms that oseltamivir will reduce symptom duration by 17-25 hours among otherwise healthy adolescents and adults with community-managed disease, no randomized controlled trials have examined the effectiveness of oseltamivir against more serious outcomes. Observational studies, although criticized on methodologic grounds, suggest that oseltamivir given early can reduce the risk for death by half among persons hospitalized with confirmed infection caused by influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 and influenza A(H5N1) viruses. However, available randomized controlled trial data may not be able to capture the effect of oseltamivir use among hospitalized patients with severe disease. We assert that data on outpatients with relatively mild disease should not form the basis for policies on the management of more severe disease.

PMID: 27191818 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]