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Preview: Best Syndication - Parkinson's Disease

Best Syndication - Parkinson's Disease





 



Parkinson’s Disease – Caffeine might help to Control Movement

Thu, 02 Aug 2012 03:52:05 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that caffeine might help a person with Parkinson’s disease better control their movement. The research was carried out at the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI MUHC) and was funded by Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Webster Foundation. The results were published in Neurology, the official journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

Dr. Ronald Postuma, lead author of the study, a researcher in neurosciences at the RI MUHC, and Professor of Medicine in the Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery at McGill University, explained that this is one of the first studies to investigate caffeine and its potential help motoring functions with Parkinson’s disease patients. Other research has found a reduced risk of developing Parkinson’s disease among coffee drinkers.

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Early Parkinson’s Disease Diagnosis with a Simple Blood Test

Wed, 30 Nov 2011 18:45:33 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers for the United Kingdom have developed a simple blood test for early diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease. The new breakthrough was reported in the December issue of the FASEB Journal. The blood test is called “phosphorylated alpha-synuclein,” which is a common substance found in the blood of people with Parkinson’s disease.

The UK researchers took blood samples from Parkinson’s patients and from a second group of healthy people. They measured each group for levels of phosphorylated alpha-synuclein in the blood. They found that the Parkinson’s disease patients had increased levels compared to the healthy people. Because of this discovery, the researchers developed a blood test that could measure for the elevated phosphorylated alpha-synuclein levels.

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Dr. Oz and Michael J. Fox talk about Parkinson’s disease on Oprah

Wed, 01 Apr 2009 00:09:41 +0000

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Always Looking Up CD - Fox

[Best Syndication News] ‘The Oprah Winfrey’ show had an interesting show with Dr. Oz and Michael J. Fox discussing Parkinson’s disease. Fox has been living with Parkinson’s disease and has shown on the show today that even though he is suffering from this nervous system disease he doesn’t stop living his life. He has had Parkinson’s for the past 18 years.

Fox’s wife Tracy Pollen has been his rock he said to Dr. Oz. Fox meant that as a compliment. They seemed to really love each other and have been married for 20 years.

Dr. Oz asked Pollen how their relationship has changed since being diagnosed with Parkinson’s. She said that when they were first married he was working all the time, which has changed and he now has more time with her. The children said that he is shaky. Pollen said that their children are extremely empathetic. Fox said that sometimes it can be difficult if he has to do something with them at school. Fox seemed to value his time with his children.

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The Mediterranean Diet looks like it might be the best way to Prevent Disease

Fri, 12 Sep 2008 23:34:27 +0000

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[Best Syndication News] If you are wondering which is the healthiest way to eat to ward off such things as heart disease, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s disease then you might want to change your eating habits to be most like the Mediterranean Diet.

What is the Mediterranean Diet?

It is a diet that closely reflects that to the area of people that live in the Mediterranean. The name was coined by Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University's School of Public Health back in the mid-1990s. Willett noticed a food pattern of people in Crete, most of Greece and the southern part of Italy during the 1960’s who seemed to have good health.

The Meditterranean Diet consists of eating primarily plant based foods of legumes, vegetables and fruit. The main staple of dietary fat comes from dairy products such as yogurt or cheese. Meat, such as fish and chicken are consumed only in moderate amounts. Eggs are eaten anywhere from 0 – 4 times per week. Red meat is consumed less frequently and also in small amounts. Wine is consumed, but only in low to moderate amounts.

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High Levels of Urate In Blood Lowers Risk For Parkinson’s Disease Progression – Boston Researchers

Wed, 16 Apr 2008 04:47:13 +0000

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Uric Acid

(Best Syndication) High levels of urate in the blood are associated with slower progression of Parkinson’s disease, according to researchers in Boston. Urate is a derivative of uric acid and is considered a powerful antioxidant. It helps prevent the oxidative process in human cells.

Oxidation damages cells causing “oxidative stress” which can contribute to the loss of brain cells that produce dopamine. This stress and damage to the cells can lead to Parkinson’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. It seems natural that a powerful antioxidant would have this type of affect.

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Rosemary Herb helps protect Brain from Free Radical Damage found in Alzheimer’s and Stroke Patients

Wed, 31 Oct 2007 19:57:30 +0000

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[Best Syndication] Gourmet cooking could be good for you with rosemary herbed entrees offering health benefits to your brain. Researchers from the Burnham Institute for Medical Research (Burnham Institute) in La Jolla, CA and in Japan found that rosemary contains carnosic acid (CA) which can protect the brain from free radicals.

Damage to the brain occurs when chemical free radicals occur such as with a stroke or neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. There were two researchers that reported how carnosic acid protects the brain cells from free radicals. They first published their findings in the Journal of Neurochemistry and Nature Reviews Neuroscience.

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Gene Abnormality Linked To Parkinson’s Disease

Tue, 18 Sep 2007 00:04:41 +0000

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(Best Syndication) Researchers say they have found a gene abnormality that predisposes a person to Parkinson’s disease before the age of 50. The gene abnormality was found in 22 percent of people who were diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease before age 50. They found that 10 percent of those with the gene abnormality had Parkinson’s disease after the age of 50.

The gene, called the glucocerebrosidase (GBA) gene, is mutated in five percent of people without the disease. Of the people with the disease, 14 percent had the gene mutation. The gene mutation is a risk factor for the disease, but obviously it is not the only cause. People with the gene mutation develop Parkinson’s an average of two years earlier than those without the mutation.

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Parkinson’s Disease Gene Therapy Breakthrough Reduces Symptoms – Advanced Condition When Patients Fail To Respond Medicines

Fri, 22 Jun 2007 23:21:51 +0000

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Dr. Andrew Feigin

(Best Syndication) Scientists in New York say that a special gene therapy treatment may help advanced Parkinson’s disease sufferers who do not or stopped responding to current medicines.

Gene therapy may be a better way to treat Parkinson’s disease. “Gene therapy could be a more natural way to treat the disease,” said Dr. Andrew Feigin, MD,director of Neuroscience Experimental Therapeutics at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research. He collaborated with Parkinson’s disease researchers at the New York Presbyterian Hospital-Weill Cornell Medical Center in Manhattan.

The study involved one woman and 11 men who were in advanced stages of the illness and who were no longer responding to medications. The patients were given an infusion of fluid containing a viral vector and genes for a protein called GAD, glutamic acid decarboxylase. The Feinstein’s David Eidelberg, MD, took brain scans before, during and after the treatment.

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Parkinson’s Disease Halted Or Slowed Using Common Medicine For Hypertension And Stroke - Blood Pressure Drug Shows Promise

Wed, 13 Jun 2007 07:03:19 +0000

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James Surmeier

(Best Syndication) Researchers at Northwestern University say that a commonly used drug for hypertension and stroke can slow and even halt the progression of Parkinson’s disease. Isradipine can do this by restoring stressed-out dopamine neurons to their vigorous younger selves.

In Parkinson’s patients, neurons in the brain that release dopamine die, causing movement to become more and more difficult. Dopamine is a critical chemical messenger in the brain that affects a person's ability to direct their movements. This can lead to a person losing the ability to walk, talk and do other simple tasks.

"Our hope is that this drug will protect dopamine neurons, so that if you began taking it early enough, you won't get Parkinson's disease, even if you were at risk." said D. James Surmeier. Surmeier is the Nathan Smith Davis Professor and chair of physiology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine.

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UCLA Scientists Make Embryonic Stem Cells From Adult Stem Cells – Could Treat Parkinson’s Diabetes Leukemia And Other Diseases

Wed, 06 Jun 2007 21:10:04 +0000

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Kathrin Plath

(Best Syndication) Scientists at the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) say that normal tissue cells can be reprogrammed to become cells with the same unlimited properties as embryonic stem cells. The implications of this research for the treatment of disease could be “staggering”.

By programming adult stem cells into becoming embryonic stem cells, scientists could generate a potentially limitless source of immune-compatible cells for tissue engineering and transplantation medicine. The embryonic stem cells could then be prodded into becoming various cell types. These cells could treat many diseases.

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Behavior Good Predictor Of Dementia With Lewy Bodies

Tue, 29 May 2007 04:39:04 +0000

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James E. Galvin

(Best Syndication) Researchers in the US say that a simple personality test could help doctors detect dementia with Lewy bodies sooner. This form of dementia is often confused with Alzheimer’s disease because it shares characteristics with both Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

The researchers evaluated 290 people. The participants were tested every year for an average of about five years. By the end of the study 128 of the participants had confirmed cases of dementia with Lewy bodies, 128 had Alzheimer’s and 34 had no form of dementia. The researchers followed the participants through death, before conducting autopsies.

They found that even before a diagnosis, people with dementia with Lewy bodies displayed passive personality changes, including diminished emotional response, a disinterest in hobbies, repetitive behaviors, and a growing apathy or lack of interest, as compared to those with Alzheimer’s disease.

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Parkinson’s Disease Patch Approved By FDA – Neupro Patch OK For Early Symptoms – Schwarz Pharma To Seek Advanced Stages Approval

Fri, 11 May 2007 07:32:23 +0000

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Neupro

(Best Syndication) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the Neupro patch (rotigotine transdermal system) designed to treat symptoms of early Parkinson's disease (PD). The maker of the Neupro hopes to get the drug approved for advanced PD as well.

The drug had not been approved in the United States and Neupro is the first transdermal patch approved for the treatment of symptoms of Parkinson's disease. The FDA says that the drug has been shown to be effective in randomized, double-blinded, and placebo-controlled studies for the treatment of the disease. The studies include one fixed-dose response study and two flexible-dose studies.

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Creatine Phase III Clinical Trials For Parkinson’s Disease

Fri, 23 Mar 2007 03:28:19 +0000

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(Best Syndication) Creatine has been used by body builders for years as a supplement to help build muscle mass, but recently there has been interest in it as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease. The phase III of the study will try to determine if creatine will slow the progression of the disease.

Doctor Elias A Zerhouni said “This study is an important step. We are pleased to have so many sites participating in this study, which may help us move more quickly toward developing a therapy that could change the course of this devastating disease.” Zerhouni is director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

“The goal is to improve the quality of life for people with Parkinson's for a longer period of time than is possible with existing therapies,” says Zerhouni. So far no treatment has been shown to slow the progression of Parkinson’s disease.

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Medical Treatment for Restless Leg Syndrome could Spur Compulsive Gambling Disorder

Fri, 09 Feb 2007 21:40:30 +0000

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Two separate cases are being reported by a new Mayo Clinic study showing that patients treated medically for Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) developed a compulsive gambling problem that caused debt over $100,000. These patients did not have any previous gambling problems before the treatment began for the RLS. The study was published in the January 23rd issue of Neurology.

The medication used is called dopamine agonists for the treatment of RLS patients. The researchers do not know the extent of the problem for compulsive gambling disorder to develop from the treatment. They suspect that it is only a small number of RLS patients that develop the gambling bug. The researchers from the Mayo Clinic suggest that proper screening for RLS patients should be completed to determine if they are susceptible to compulsive behaviors before being prescribed the dopamine agonist medication. One thing that they noticed was the more the medication doseage was increased, the worse the gambling became.

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Coffee is Good For Most People – Reduces Risk For Heart Disease Parkinsons And Diabetes – Antioxidants Can Reduce Inflammation

Thu, 08 Feb 2007 10:36:51 +0000

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A new study suggests that coffee can reduce the risk of inflammation and cardiovascular disease. This is more good news for coffee drinkers. Researchers have known that both coffee and tea are high in antioxidants which help remove unstable molecules in your body called free radicals.

Free radicals contribute to the oxidative process and over time can cause inflammation and other unhealthy changes in your cells. This study involved 27,000 postmenopausal women and concluded that by inhibiting inflammation, the drink will also inhibit cardiovascular disease.

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Manganese- Benefits, Dosage, Deficiency, Sources

Wed, 08 Nov 2006 20:40:28 +0000

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The correction of bone deformity in poultry with manganese was discovered in 1936 by Norris and Lyons. Later studies in 1961 by Hurley and Everson pronounced importance of manganese in growth, bone development, reproduction, and central nervous system.

The human body contains 10-20 mg of manganese, and is widely distributed in body specially in intestinal track, liver and reproductive organs. It absorption and excretion is on similar lines as of Iron. It is stored in the blood and liver. The serum manganese level gets raised following a heat attack. The defence mechanism of body on manganese. It is excreted in the faeces, which gets enhanced with high calcium intakes. The urine has only traces of it.

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Parkinson’s Disease Condition Improves with Implantation of Brain Electrodes – Alleviate Symptoms Better than Medication

Thu, 31 Aug 2006 00:14:46 +0000

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Researchers say that conditions for Parkinson’s patients can be improved by placing electrodes into their brains. They say this is better than maintaining the patients on the best available medicinal treatments.

This new study backs up brain stimulation as an effective treatment. UPI reports that about 60 percent of patients undergoing deep brain stimulation achieved significant improvement compared to no change for those patients on medicine in the randomized, controlled clinical trial.

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