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Preview: Best Syndication - Type 2 - diabetes

Best Syndication - Type 2 - diabetes





 



Lack of Coenzyme Q10 and Impaired Energy Production may cause Muscle Pain when taking Statins

Thu, 03 Jan 2013 21:08:12 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers from the University of Copenhagen found that low levels of coenzyme Q10 and glucose intolerance might be factors that contribute to muscle pain symptoms with people taking statins to lower LDL cholesterol levels. The findings were reported in the Journal of American College of Cardiology.

Around 75 percent of people who take statins could complain of having muscle pain, explained Professor Flemming Dela from the Center for Healthy Aging at the University of Copenhagen. This research demonstrates that statins affect the muscle’s ability to produce energy.

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Intensive Lifestyle Intervention helped to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Wed, 19 Dec 2012 05:28:06 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found that overweight type-2 diabetes patients increased their chances of partial and complete remission with intensive lifestyle intervention. The results, which showed modest remission rates, were reported in the December 19, 2012 issue of JAMA.

Many people diagnosed with type-2 diabetes wonder if the disease is reversible. Diabetes is thought of as a disease that is progressive that will eventually lead to vascular and neuropathic damage. Other studies involving bariatric surgery on type 2 diabetes patients suggested that some cases could be resolved. There were no studies on the rate of remission with lifestyle modifications alone. This prompted Edward W. Gregg, Ph.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and his colleagues to investigate.

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Calorie Counting and Activity Tracking Mobile App helped with Weight Loss

Tue, 11 Dec 2012 07:48:04 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - People lost an average of 15 pounds when they used a mobile phone app to track calories and physical activity during a study conducted by researchers from Northwestern University. The study results were published in the online first edition of the December 10, 2012 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine.

The researchers point out that the mobile app was only partly responsible for the weight loss; the participants also attended regular classes that educated them about proper nutrition and exercise. The study also found that the people participating in the study were able to keep the weight off for more than one year.

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Topical Simvastatin accelerated wound healing in diabetic mice

Thu, 29 Nov 2012 06:20:21 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study involving diabetic mice found that applying simvastatin topically to the wound sped-up healing. The research suggests that the topical simvastatin could offer a similar benefit for humans dealing with problems like a diabetic foot ulcer and other wounds that are slow to heal. The researchers published their findings in The American Journal of Pathology.

The study was conducted at the Departments of Dermatology and Ophthalmology of Kyoto Prefectural University School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan; the Department of Dermatology at Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Hamamatsu, Japan; and the Shiseido Innovative Scientific Research Center, Yamamoto, Japan.

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Women in Midlife benefited from Walking over 6,000 Steps Daily

Mon, 26 Nov 2012 04:50:31 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Get moving and counting at least 6,000 steps daily may improve the health outcome for women in midlife. A study found that increasing activity decreased the risk for diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The researchers will be publishing their findings in the journal of the North American Menopause Society, Menopause.

While walking is the most obvious way to get 6,000 steps, it need not be from that activity. There were 292 women between 45 and 72 years old participating in the study. They wore pedometers that counted the number of steps they took each day. The participants were also measured for cholesterol, blood sugar levels, and waist and hip circumference. The researchers categorized the women who took over 6,000 steps as being active; those who stepped less were considered inactive.

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Drinking Black Tea Regularly might reduce the risk for Type 2 Diabetes

Fri, 09 Nov 2012 03:15:07 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found that people in countries who drank black tea on a regular basis were at a reduced risk for developing type-2 diabetes. The study results were published in the online journal BMJ Open.

The researchers mined for information on black tea consumption rates in over 50 countries by using an independent market research firm to determine 2009 sales. Then they compared data from the World Health Organization (WHO) to determine the rates of respiratory, infectious, cardiovascular diseases, as well as cancer and diabetes rates.

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Resveratrol Supplements did not benefit Healthy Women

Fri, 26 Oct 2012 05:20:23 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study on healthy middle-aged women found no benefit gained by taking resveratrol supplements, a compound found in red wine. The study was reported in the October 25 online edition of Cell Metabolism.

Previous research had suggested that resveratrol in red wine could help reduce heart disease risk and increase lifespan. People have been taking resveratrol in hopes of better health. The U.S. resveratrol supplement business has grown into a $30 million a year industry. People take supplements because they would have to drink large amounts of red wine to gain the benefit – at least that was the conventional wisdom. Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis wanted to see if taking resveratrol supplements was beneficial to otherwise healthy women.

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Eating Legumes helps reduce heart disease risk and control blood sugar

Tue, 23 Oct 2012 04:47:39 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - According to a new study, eating one cup of legumes in conjunction with a diet full of low-glycemic foods on a daily basis helped to control blood sugar levels and reduce the risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) in people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The randomized controlled trial study results were reported in the Online First by Archives of Internal Medicine publication.

The study involved 121 patients who have type-2 diabetes. They were randomly assigned to either a low-glycemic index diet based around legumes, or they were assigned to follow a low-glycemic index diet with the emphasis around eating whole-wheat foods. The legume group was asked to eat a minimum of one cup of legumes daily, such as dried beans, lentils, or chickpeas.

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High Blood Pressure reduced in Men treated for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

Mon, 15 Oct 2012 03:25:51 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study investigated men for sleep apnea to see if treating the breathing disorder would have a positive effect on their hypertension and diabetes. The researchers found that treating men with positive airway pressure (PAP) while sleeping also reduced their blood pressure. The study results were published in the Oct. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

"All types of patients may benefit from this treatment, even those with other chronic medical conditions," said Bharati Prasad, MD, MS, the study's principal investigator. "It's important to now do a prospective study enrolling different types of patients with sleep apnea."

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Increased Risk for Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Death from Extended Sitting

Mon, 15 Oct 2012 03:02:33 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A European study found people who sat for extensive periods of time had an increased risk for diabetes, heart disease, and death. The study results were published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

Lead author, Dr. Emma Wilmot, a research fellow in the Diabetes Research Group at the University of Leicester, and colleagues investigated the results of 18 other studies that had a combined 794,577 participants. There investigation found that people who sat for long periods were at a two-fold increased risk for diabetes, heart disease, and death.

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Heart Disease and Stroke - Eating Egg Yolks almost as bad as Smoking Cigarettes

Thu, 16 Aug 2012 06:17:10 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A new study found that a person who ate egg yolks on a regular basis had an increased risk for developing atherosclerosis. They also had a two-thirds increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries as a person who smoked cigarettes. The study results were published in the online edition of the journal Atherosclerosis.

Coronary artery disease, called atherosclerosis, occurs when plaque accumulates in the arteries. It is believed that the plaque is accelerated by excess cholesterol in the blood. The plaque builds up on the inside walls of the arteries and pieces could break off, which could lead to a heart attack or a stroke.

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Blocking a Protein prevented Weight Gain in a Mice Study

Fri, 03 Aug 2012 04:48:29 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that blocking an enzyme called fatty acid synthase (FAS) in mice aided them against gaining weight even when eating a high-fat diet. The mice that were not having the FAS blocked were given the same high-fat diet and became obese. The research may help develop new treatments for obesity and type 2 diabetes in humans. The study results were published in the online edition of the journal Cell Metabolism.

The blocked FAS enzyme made the mice become more sensitive to insulin. The researchers engineered the mice so that they would not make FAS in their fat cells.

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Early Puberty and Problems of Infertility associated with Childhood Obesity

Wed, 01 Aug 2012 05:07:32 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - An overview of childhood obesity emphasizes the potential impact it has for early puberty and infertility problems, particularly with girls. Patrick Chappell, an assistant professor of veterinary medicine at Oregon State University, is the author of the report, which was published in Frontiers in Endocrinology.

Chappell explains that nutritional conditions play a vital role in reproduction. Obesity is known to be associated with metabolic syndrome, which can affect fertility. The lack of nutrition can also cause reproduction problems.

Generally, girls are starting puberty earlier and it has accelerated.

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Weight Loss Pill Qsymia gains FDA Approval

Wed, 18 Jul 2012 04:55:15 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A new weight loss pill, Qsymia (phentermine and topiramate), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today. Taking phentermine and topiramate weight-loss medication along with a diet and exercise program could help a person lose weight.

The drug was approved for adults that have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. Additionally, adults with a BMI of 27 or more who have either high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, or high cholesterol are also approved to take the medication.

Qsymia is made up of two other FDA approved medications – phentermine and topiramate. Qsymia is an extended release formulation. The short-term weight loss is associated with taking phentermine. Topiramate was initially given to people with epilepsy for seizures, and to prevent migraine headaches.

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Glycemic Index of Rice Varieties range between 48 to 92

Tue, 10 Jul 2012 01:49:36 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - All rice is not created equal on the glycemic index (GI) rating scale, according to a new study. Researchers from the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) Food Futures Flagship tested 235 different worldwide varieties of rice and found a wide range of glycemic index ratings – all the way from low to high.

The benefits of picking low glycemic index foods is that they will keep blood sugar levels from rising too quickly. The higher the glycemic index, the faster the blood sugar spikes.

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Childhood Diabetes Rate higher in China than in US

Fri, 06 Jul 2012 05:01:08 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Chinese children had a higher rate of diabetes compared with United States rates, according to a recent study. Researchers from the University of North Carolina reported that the diabetes rate in Chinese teenagers were four times higher than the comparable age group in the US. The results will be published in the online edition of Obesity Reviews and will be published in the September issue of the print edition.

The researchers studied data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), which ran between 1989 and 2011 and involved over 29,000 people in over 300 communities in China. The CHNS study was a collaborative arrangement between the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Chinese Center for Disease Control (CCDC) National Institute of Nutrition and Food Safety.

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Heart Disease and Type 2 Diabetes - Increased risk seen with Fast Food Eaters in Singapore

Tue, 03 Jul 2012 04:23:14 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health found that people in Singapore who ate fast food on a regular basis were at an increased risk for developing coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The study was published in today’s online edition of American Heart Association's journal Circulation.

The researchers found that even eating fast food once weekly showed a 20 percent increased death risk from coronary heart disease compared to those who avoided dining at these places. There was a 50 percent increased risk of death from heart disease if the person ate out two-to-three times each week. There was an 80 percent increased risk of dying from coronary heart disease in those who ate fast food four or more times on a weekly basis.

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FDA grants approval for Belviq - Prescription Weight Loss Pill

Fri, 29 Jun 2012 22:26:05 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of approved Belviq (lorcaserin hydrochloride) for overweight and obese people who also have either high blood pressure (hypertension), type-2 diabetes, or elevated cholesterol levels (dyslipidemia).

In order to qualify for the weight loss medication, the person's body mass index (BMI) needs to be greater than 27 (this is considered overweight). A BMI over 30 is considered obese. There also has to be a secondary condition such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or type 2 diabetes present. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) over one-third of the US adult population is considered obese.

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Heart Failure Risk reduced with regular moderate Coffee Drinkers

Wed, 27 Jun 2012 03:58:00 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Drinking coffee in moderation on a regular basis might lower your chance for developing heart failure, a recent study suggests. The findings were published in the American Heart Association’s journal, Heart Failure.

The researchers compared results from prior studies that correlated coffee consumption and heart failure. The good news is that the researchers found significantly lower risk of developing heart failure with moderate coffee drinking. The bad news is that they found excessive coffee consumption might increase the risk of developing serious heart problems.

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Ursolic Acid found in an Apple Peel may increase the amount of Calories Burned

Thu, 21 Jun 2012 02:36:17 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Mice given ursolic acid burned more calories and reduced obesity levels compared with those that were not given the supplement. The study was an investigation on the potential of using ursolic acid as a way to reduce obesity. The research was published in the June 20 edition of the journal PLoS ONE.

Christopher Adams, M.D., Ph.D., UI associate professor of internal medicine, and a Faculty Scholar at the Fraternal Order of Eagles Diabetes Research Center at the UI, led the study.
Additional benefits of the mice taking the ursolic acid supplement were the increase in muscle mass and more brown fat. Increase in muscle mass and brown fat are believed to help burn calories efficiently.

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