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Preview: Best Syndication - Stroke

Best Syndication - Stroke





 



FDA grants approval for Eliquis to prevent Strokes in Atrial Fibrillation Patients

Mon, 31 Dec 2012 06:58:20 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted approval of Eliquis (apixaban) tablets for people who have atrial fibrillation that is not related to a heart-valve problem. The medication would be used as a way to reduce the risk of stroke by preventing blood clots from forming.

Atrial fibrillation causes the heart to beat irregularly and rapidly. The two upper chambers of the heart do not squeeze correctly to insure proper blood flow. This inadequate pumping can cause blood clots to form. The risk of a stroke occurs when the blood clot breaks free and prevents blood flow to parts of the brain. Additionally, the blood clot could break free and travel to other parts of the body, such as the lungs or legs.

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Healthy Diet reduced risk for having second Heart Attack or Stroke

Tue, 04 Dec 2012 05:49:02 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Eating a heart-healthy diet after having a heart attack or stroke can help prevent future events, according to a new study published in the American Heart Association journal Circulation.

Study author, Mahshid Dehghan, Ph.D, a nutritionist at the Population Health Research Institute, McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, said that if patients rely on medicine to lower their blood pressure and cholesterol, they may not think eating a heart-healthy diet is very important. The study found that dietary changes offer additional benefits to patients taking aspirin, angiotensin modulators, cholesterol lower medications, and beta-blockers.

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Heart Patients who meditate may reduce risk of Death, Heart Attack or Stroke

Wed, 14 Nov 2012 05:37:55 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - New research found that African Americans diagnosed with heart disease had a 48 percent reduced risk for suffering from a heart attack, stroke, or dying from all causes, if they did Transcendental Meditation instead of just attending a health education class. The researchers published their findings in the American Heart Association journal Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes.

Two hundred and one people participated in the study over a five-year period. The group consisted of 42 percent women over the age of 59 with an income of less than $10,000 per year. The average body mass index (BMI) was 32, which is considered obese.

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Wrong Dosage of Blood Thinning Medication given to 75 Percent of Patients

Tue, 06 Nov 2012 22:44:44 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers at the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute found that 75 percent of the patients taking blood thinners were not given the correct dosage. The study investigated 521 patients taking clopidogrel (Plavix) and prasugrel (Effient) and found that many had dosage amounts that were not effective. The study results were presented today at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2012 in Los Angeles.

The wrong dosage could be serious either way. Too much medication could cause uncontrolled bleeding, while too little medication puts the patient at an increased risk for developing blood clots. Blood thinning medication is often used as a way to prevent blood clots from forming. These clots can cause strokes and heart attacks.

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Stroke risk associated with SSRI Antidepressant Medications

Thu, 18 Oct 2012 06:14:32 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found there is an increased risk for stroke from taking SSRI antidepressant medications; however the study did show that the risk was low. The study was published in the October 17, 2012 online issue of Neurology.

The researchers looked at data from 16 studies that investigated a combined 500,000 participants. The participants had been taking SSRIs antidepressant medication and in this meta-analysis they wanted to see if there was an increased rate for stroke in the SSRI medication group compared to a group that didn’t take the medication.

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Study finds Increased Rate of Younger People having Strokes

Thu, 11 Oct 2012 05:33:21 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Strokes are happening more often at a younger age, according to a new study. The researchers published their findings in the October 10, 2012 online issue of Neurology.

Study author, Brett Kissela, MD, MS, with the University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine in Ohio and a Fellow of the American Academy of Neurology, suggests that the increasing stroke numbers in younger people may be related to diabetes, obesity, and high cholesterol. Another reason may be from improved MRI imaging, which could lead to a better diagnosis for stroke.

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Reduced Risk of Stroke from eating Tomatoes

Tue, 09 Oct 2012 04:51:36 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Researchers found that people who had the highest levels of lycopene in their blood had a 55 percent reduced risk for stroke compared to those who had the lowest levels. Tomatoes contain an abundant amount of lycopene, which is an antioxidant. The study results were published in the October 9, 2012 print edition of Neurology.

The research involved 1,031 men from Finland between 46 and 65 years of age. The men were followed for an average of 12 years. At the start of the study, their blood levels of lycopene were measured. Over the duration of the study, 67 men suffered a stroke.

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Elderly Women’s Brains function better with Daily Low Dose Aspirin Regimen

Thu, 04 Oct 2012 06:05:48 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - Brain function declined less in elderly women who took a daily low-dose aspirin. These women, who were also at a high risk for heart disease, had less mental decline compared to women who did not take the daily aspirin. The study results were published in the online journal BMJ Open.

The researchers suggest that inflammation associated with heart disease may also influence the way the brain ages.

In the study, 681 women between 70 and 92 were investigated. Out of these women, 601 were at a high risk for having heart disease or a stroke. Their risk was at a 10 percent rate or higher, based on the Framingham scale.

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TIA ‘Mini’ stroke could lead to Serious Disability

Fri, 14 Sep 2012 04:08:38 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that a transient ischemic attack (TIA) could develop into a serious disability in the first 90 days of the event. TIA or “mini” strokes are often considered too mild to treat. The study was published in the American Heart Association journal Stroke.

Coutts, M.D., lead author of the study at Foothills Hospital in Calgary, Alberta, Canada, said that TIA and minor stroke patients are at a significant risk for becoming disabled and that patients should be imaged earlier and more aggressive treatments with thromboloysis should be used if a blockage is seen.

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Weight Loss Pill Qsymia gains FDA Approval

Wed, 18 Jul 2012 04:55:15 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A new weight loss pill, Qsymia (phentermine and topiramate), was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) today. Taking phentermine and topiramate weight-loss medication along with a diet and exercise program could help a person lose weight.

The drug was approved for adults that have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 or more. Additionally, adults with a BMI of 27 or more who have either high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, or high cholesterol are also approved to take the medication.

Qsymia is made up of two other FDA approved medications – phentermine and topiramate. Qsymia is an extended release formulation. The short-term weight loss is associated with taking phentermine. Topiramate was initially given to people with epilepsy for seizures, and to prevent migraine headaches.

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Scientists suggest RDA of Vitamin C should be doubled to Reduce Disease Risk

Tue, 17 Jul 2012 06:22:12 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The US recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamin C should be increased to 200 milligrams per day for adults, scientists from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University suggests. The current RDA for vitamin C for women is 75 milligrams and 90 milligrams for men. The scientists from the institute put forward that an increase in the RDA could reduce heart disease, stroke, and cancer. The call for the higher intake of vitamin C was published in Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition.

Balz Frei, a professor and director of the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University, said that some clinical trials were essentially imperfect. Of course, the Linus Pauling Institute has long been recommending vitamin C for improving health.

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Heart Disease and Type 2 Diabetes - Increased risk seen with Fast Food Eaters in Singapore

Tue, 03 Jul 2012 04:23:14 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health found that people in Singapore who ate fast food on a regular basis were at an increased risk for developing coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes. The study was published in today’s online edition of American Heart Association's journal Circulation.

The researchers found that even eating fast food once weekly showed a 20 percent increased death risk from coronary heart disease compared to those who avoided dining at these places. There was a 50 percent increased risk of death from heart disease if the person ate out two-to-three times each week. There was an 80 percent increased risk of dying from coronary heart disease in those who ate fast food four or more times on a weekly basis.

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FDA grants approval for Belviq - Prescription Weight Loss Pill

Fri, 29 Jun 2012 22:26:05 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced the approval of approved Belviq (lorcaserin hydrochloride) for overweight and obese people who also have either high blood pressure (hypertension), type-2 diabetes, or elevated cholesterol levels (dyslipidemia).

In order to qualify for the weight loss medication, the person's body mass index (BMI) needs to be greater than 27 (this is considered overweight). A BMI over 30 is considered obese. There also has to be a secondary condition such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol, or type 2 diabetes present. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) over one-third of the US adult population is considered obese.

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Cholesterol Lowering Statins might reduce the risk of a Repeat Cardiovascular Event

Tue, 26 Jun 2012 03:37:40 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that there was a reduced risk for a cardiovascular event in people taking cholesterol-lowering statin medications. However, there was no associated reduction in all-cause mortality or stroke occurrence in women. The study results were published in the June 25, 2012 issue of the JAMA’s Archives of Internal Medicine.

Jose Gutierrez, M.D., M.P.H., of Columbia University Medical Center, New York, and colleagues investigated results of 11 clinical trial results; when combined this involved a total of 43,191 participants. The researchers wanted to investigate if statin medications offered better prevention of recurring cardiovascular events compared to a placebo.

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Most Recent Stop-Smoking Ad Campaign boosts the number of Quitters

Fri, 15 Jun 2012 04:02:48 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported a dramatic increase in people calling the quit helplines and visiting a federal government website to help them stop smoking. The CDC attributes the increase to the recent public service announcements featuring people with serious health conditions caused by smoking.

There were almost 200,000 more phone calls made to 1-800-QUIT-NOW, which helps connect people to state quitlines. There were also over 400,000 more unique visitors to www.smokefree.gov, which is a federal website that offers a step-by-step guide on how to quit smoking.

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Pre-diabetes might increase Stoke Risk

Fri, 08 Jun 2012 06:29:59 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study found that some patients identified as having pre-diabetes may be at a higher risk for having a stroke. The study was published online at bmj.com.

Pre-diabetes is typically diagnosed with a fasting blood glucose test. The person fasts for 12 hours and is tested after not eating any food. The normal range for blood glucose after a fast is between 70.2 to 100 mg/dl. The pre-diabetes range for this test is between 100 to 126 mg/dl.

Pre-diabetes can be resolved with diet and exercise. However, if pre-diabetes is left untreated it could become type 2 diabetes. Unfortunately, pre-diabetes patients have the same vascular risk factors as those that have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. These factors include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and obesity. However, the future stroke risk had not been recognized in pre-diabetes patients.

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Eating Foods High in Vitamin D might reduce Stroke Risk in Japanese-American Men

Tue, 29 May 2012 02:29:54 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A 34-year study of Japanese-American men found an increased stroke risk later in life with those who did not eat a diet high in vitamin D. The study was published in Stroke, an American Heart Association journal.

The study’s lead author, Gotaro Kojima, M.D., said that eating foods high in vitamin D might be helpful for preventing strokes. Dr. Kojima is a geriatric medicine fellow from John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu.

Vitamin D interested researchers because of the possibility that it may help reduce the risk of diseases such as cancer and diabetes. Vitamin D has long been established as a necessary nutrient for preventing rickets in children and to help prevent bone loss in adults.

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New Treatment for Brain Swelling

Wed, 23 May 2012 07:29:39 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) European researchers say they have come up with a new treatment to save the life of people suffering from swelling of the brain. Their method can safely manipulate the blood vessels in the brain to allow for a periodic opening of the channels between the blood vessels and the brain cell lining.

The goal is to relieve acute pressure on the brain caused by stroke, brain injury, tumors, or other conditions that can cause swelling. Over the years, there has been little change in the treatment of this condition, according to Dr. Matthew Campbell, of the Ocular Genetics Unit at Trinity College Dublin.

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Dwelling next to Highway reduces Survival Rate after Heart Attack

Tue, 08 May 2012 01:34:34 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - A study from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center found that people who survived a heart attack and lived less than 328 feet from a highway had a 27 percent increased death risk within 10 years compared to survivors that lived over 3280 feet from the major roadway. The US Environmental Protection Agency and the National Institute of Environmental Health Science funded this study.

Murray Mittleman, MD, DrPH, a physician in the CardioVascular Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of BIDMC's cardiovascular epidemiological research program reasons that air pollution and noise could play a role in the increased death risk.

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Gum Disease not the cause of Heart Disease or Stroke

Thu, 19 Apr 2012 02:45:06 +0000

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(Best Syndication News) - The American Heart Association assembled a committee of cardiologists, dentists, and infectious disease specialists to investigate if gum disease causes heart disease or stroke. The committee concluded that gum disease does not cause atherosclerotic heart disease or stroke. Additionally, the treatment of gum disease has not been proven to prevent heart disease or stroke. The new statement by the committee was published in Circulation, which is an American Heart Association journal.

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