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Best Syndication - AIDS





 



Federal Stimulus Money For HIV Research

Fri, 06 Nov 2009 02:13:25 +0000

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Scanning electron micrograph of HIV-1 (in green) budding from cultured lymphocyte. Multiple round bumps on cell surface represent sites of assembly and budding of virions.
Image source: CDC

(Best Syndication News) UCSF HIV researchers have received two NIH grants of $1 million each to study the use of web-based, patient controlled personal health records to improve health and HIV prevention outcomes for HIV positive patients.

Both studies are funded through the federal stimulus bill, The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

One study will look at using mobile phone text messages linked to a web-based personal health record to help HIV patients’ adherence to pill-taking regimens.

“Patients participating in the study will not only be assisted with taking their HIV medications, but also with medications for conditions like diabetes and hypertension. At least half the patients we see in our clinic have at least one other chronic disease that requires medication to control. Our hypothesis is that using individualized text message reminders linked to personal health records will help patients better succeed in self-management of their multiple health challenges,” said James S. Kahn, MD, professor of clinical medicine at the UCSF Positive Health Program at San Francisco General Hospital.

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HIV Cure May Involve Gene Therapy – Bone Marrow Transplant For Leukemia and AIDS Removes Virus – Delta 32 Mutation Needed

Fri, 14 Nov 2008 00:54:58 +0000

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Diagram of HIV - CLICK TO ENLARGE

(Best Syndication News) Amazing research from Europe suggests that bone marrow from specific individuals can cure HIV (see video below). More tests and research needs to be done, but it appears that a bone marrow transplant cured a patient’s leukemia and Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection (AIDS).

It is believed that the bone marrow must be from a donor with a Delta 32 mutation from both parents. Found in only one in 1000 European and Americans, the genetic mutation prevents HIV from attaching itself to cells by blocking CCR5, a receptor that acts as a kind of gateway. People with this mutation are “resistant” to HIV.

According to Patrick McGroarty with the Associated Press, the patient was being treated for both HIV and leukemia. Dr. Gero Huetter, the patient’s doctor at Berlin's Charite hospital and medical school, suspected that this type of therapy would work because of previous research. "I read it in 1996, coincidentally," Huetter said. "I remembered it and thought it might work."

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People With Aids on the Brink of Foreclosure Will Receive Federal Housing Grant

Fri, 22 Aug 2008 18:59:10 +0000

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Best Syndication News

One can’t help but feel for people who lost their homes to foreclosure. The past months have left many without houses, and it’s still taking away other people’s homes.

It’s even worse to see sick people who, despite their condition, are forced out of their residences. Losing their homes would make it more difficult for these people to take care of their health, like those who are inflicted with HIV/AIDS. For them, losing their health to the HIV virus is as hard as losing their dwellings to foreclosure.

It’s fortunate that there is money allotted for building houses specifically for people suffering from AIDS. The government, through its housing arm the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), is giving a housing grant worth $1.4 million to the Los Angeles Housing Department to provide permanent housing to people with the disease.

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More New HIV Infections Than Previously Thought – Charts And Graphs For AIDS Information – Total Deaths Can Cases

Sun, 03 Aug 2008 08:51:41 +0000

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See Larger Charts Below

(Best Syndication News) Previous estimates that only 40,000 Americans were infected with HIV each year since 2000 are too low, according to a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). During the previous decades the figures ranged from 10,000 to 80,000 infections per year(see the charts below). New techniques for measuring HIV indicate that the disease is not on the decline (See Videos Below).

According to previous figures released by the CDC, the disease peaked in the early 1990s at about 80,000 new cases per year and then started to drop off (see charts below). Since 1998 they estimated that there were a little over 40,000 new cases per year. The CDC is always looking for ways to improve their estimates. Recent advances in testing and reporting have helped give a more accurate picture of HIV.

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Gator Blood Protein Could Treat Burn Patients MRSA And Diabetes Ulcers That Lead To Amputations – Could Also Help in AIDS

Mon, 07 Apr 2008 23:32:25 +0000

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American Alligator

(Best Syndication) Doctors are always looking for help in fighting drug resistant illnesses, and new research suggests that alligator blood may hold the key to some of these infections. Biochemists in Louisiana reported at the 235th national meeting of the American Chemical Society that a protein in the gator blood could be a source for “powerful” antibiotics.

It was already known that alligators have a very strong immune system, but this is the first study to investigate the antimicrobial activity of alligator blood in detail. They found that the gator’s antibiotic proteins are especially lethal to fungi, viruses, and bacteria without having prior exposure to them. The proteins are very adept at fighting Candida albicans yeast infections, which are a serious problem in AIDS patients and transplant recipients, who have a weakened immune system.

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HERV Virus Target For HIV Vaccine – University of California San Francisco Research AIDs Vaccination or Possible Treatment

Fri, 09 Nov 2007 02:36:52 +0000

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(Best Syndication) Scientists at the University of California in San Francisco (UCSF) and the University of Toronto say they have found a possible target for treating HIV infections. Their research suggests that HIV could enable HERV expression in cells. HERV (human endogenous retroviruses) is a remnant of an ancient virus that has become part of every human cell.

There is evidence that suggests HIV infection could enable HERV expression by disrupting the normal controls that keep HERV in check. Some patients are able to use their “infection fighting T-cells” to target HERV expressing cells.

Since HIV constantly mutates, the disease has been especially hard to fight. The researchers say that if they can find other ways for the immune system to target HIV-infected cells, they can overcome the problem in making an HIV vaccine. Keith E. Garrison, PhD, post-doctoral fellow in UCSF’s Division of Experimental Medicine says HERV may provide a good target to test.

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AIDS Drug Viracept Has Cancer Causing Chemicals – Advisory For Pediatric and Pregnant Patients With HIV

Tue, 11 Sep 2007 04:54:02 +0000

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Viracept

(Best Syndication) The protease inhibitor (PI) drug Nelfinavir (Viracept) used to treat human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 and HIV-2) in patients with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) may contain chemicals known to cause cancer. The US marketer of the drug, Pfizer notified the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that the drug contains traces of ethyl methanesulfonate.

The chemical is an impurity created in the manufacturing process. Although there is no data for humans, it was found to be carcinogenic in animal studies. Back in June Roche recalled all of the drugs in Europe, but Pfizer has not recalled the drug in the US yet. The drug may also be used in combination with other drugs.

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Macular Degeneration – Researchers discovers link with Zinc

Tue, 28 Aug 2007 20:45:13 +0000

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[Best Syndication] Researchers found that eye tissue samples from patients that have age-related macular degeneration (AMD) had deposits that contained a large amount of zinc. The research was published in the journal, Experimental Eye Research.

The researchers point out that zinc supplements are often used to boost weakened immune systems. Another study from the National Eye Institute, conducted in 2001, found that high amounts of zinc along with antioxidants slowed the progression of blindness.

The researchers were prompted to study the deposits for zinc levels because Alzheimer’s disease as well as Parkinson’s disease have found zinc in these plaque deposits. The researchers thought it could be possible that AMD was also related to excess zinc in the deposits. AMD is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and affects around 13 million Americans.

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Insulin Resistance increase with excessive Upper Body Fat on Chest and Back

Mon, 20 Aug 2007 22:21:08 +0000

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[Best Syndication] Researchers from the San Francisco VA Medical Center found an increased risk of insulin resistance when a person had extra fat located on their chest and back. Insulin resistance is a early symptom that develops before type 2 diabetes is diagnosed.

The researchers looked at HIV infected participants and those without HIV which were used as a control subject in a Study of Fat Redistribution and Metabolic Change in HIV Infection (FRAM), which is a long-term study of HIV patients that are taking antiretroviral therapy.

The researchers found that extra fat in between and surrounding internal organs was also another type of fat that increased the risk of insulin resistance in both groups. Both the extra fat on the chest and back and the visceral fat in the organs contributed to insulin resistance. They both were contributing to the increase of insulin resistance even when the other type of fat wasn’t present.

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Can Flaxseed Help With Arthritis Pain?

Mon, 06 Aug 2007 18:07:25 +0000

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Living with arthritis can be a very difficult challenge. Every movement hurts, from sitting down, to standing up to just walking across the room, you just can’t seem to be able to live comfortably. If you have problems with arthritis, try flaxseed oil. Studies have shown that flaxseed oil may help relieve the pain from arthritis. You may find yourself asking, why would I want to try flaxseed oil if I can get on prescription drugs? Some people don’t have the option of taking prescriptions, however, and others would rather use natural products to help relieve their arthritis pain. The thing you have to keep in mind is that flaxseed is natural and it doesn’t cost hundreds of dollars as many prescriptions do. The only drawback is that all natural ingredients such as flaxseed aren’t covered by insurance so you have to weigh the good and the bad before taking flaxseed oil for your arthritis pain.

Not Covered By Insurance

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Gene Found That Helps Protect Against AIDS – Three Genes Could Be Used To Fight Off HIV

Sat, 21 Jul 2007 02:50:06 +0000

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David Goldstein

(Best Syndication) Scientists have identified three gene variants that have helped patients fight off the HIV virus and delay the onset of full-blown AIDS. This research could lead to a treatment that could help boost the protective effects of one or more of these genes, and help the body’s own immune system overcome an infection.

The research, which appears in the July 19th online journal Science, was directed by David Goldstein at Duke University and is the first large cooperative study with major findings arising from the Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology, (CHAVI). The scientists used the latest in genome-wide screening technology.

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HIV Drug Passes FDA Advisory Panel Hurdle – Prevents HIV From Entering Cells - New Class of Drugs – Undetectable Viral Loads

Wed, 25 Apr 2007 03:26:14 +0000

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(Best Syndication) A Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory panel recommended approval of Pfizer’s Maraviroc drug for use in treating HIV Tuesday. Although the FDA has no obligation to approve the recommendations of their advisory panels, they usually do.

Maraviroc blocks HIV from entering white blood cells through a pathway present in some patients. Pfizer says this is the first in a new class of oral HIV medicines in more than a decade. The vote was unanimous (12-0) in favor of approval for the antiretroviral agents for treatment-experienced patients infected with CCR5-tropic HIV-1.

Unlike other drugs, Maraviroc tries to fight the disease by blocking viral entry to human cells, rather than fighting HIV inside white blood cells. The drug prevents the virus from entering uninfected cells by blocking its predominant entry route, the CCR5 co-receptor.

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New AIDS Drugs Can Help Those Not Responding To Current Treatments – Phase 3 Clinical Trial Results Revealed in Los Angeles HIV

Thu, 01 Mar 2007 05:17:37 +0000

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Infects via CD4, CXCR4, CCR5
Receptors - Arizona Education

(Best Syndication) Researchers say that two new drugs may benefit patients with AIDS who are now running out of medical options. The results of phase 3 clinical trials of the new drugs were announced Wednesday at the 14th annual Retrovirus Conference in Los Angeles.

John Mellors moderated the discussion involving the drugs raltegravir and maraviroc. He said "I would not be going out on a limb to say these results are as exciting for experienced patients as were the results of the original trials with combination highly active antiretroviral therapy." Mellors is professor of medicine at the University of Pittsburgh.

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HIV infection risk reduced for Circumcised Heterosexual Men in Kenya

Thu, 14 Dec 2006 22:09:18 +0000

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A study from the University of Illinois at Chicago found that circumcised males that had heterosexual intercourse in Kenya, had a 53 percent less chance of acquiring the HIV infection. The study was stopped early because of preliminary results of infection rates, and during a Data Safety and Monitoring Board met Dec. 12th, they asked for the National Institutes of Health to stop the trial and have all the men that are uncircumcised that are currently participating in the trial to be offered circumcision.

"Circumcision is now a proven, effective prevention strategy to reduce HIV infections in men," said Robert Bailey, professor of epidemiology in the UIC School of Public Health and principal investigator of the study.

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Gene Therapy Promise For Treating AIDS – Replication Stopped by “Monkey Wrench” – Improved Immune Function In Patients With HIV

Tue, 07 Nov 2006 07:48:59 +0000

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Early tests using Gene therapy provide hope for treating AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome). We reported that a similar technique was used to treat patients with Melanoma skin cancer in September.

Gene therapy involves removing immune T-cells and in this case genetically modifying them for (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) HIV resistance. Typically, gene therapy involves growing more cells outside the body and then placing them back into the patient.

Instead of chemical or protein based HIV replication blockers, this approach is genetic and uses a disabled AIDS virus to carry an anti-HIV genetic payload. The modified AIDS virus is added to immune cells that have been removed from the patients’ blood by apheresis. The immune cells are then purified, genetically modified, and expanded by a process that the researchers developed. The modified immune cells are then returned to the patients’ body by simple intravenous infusion.

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New Drug Resistant TB Has Spread – All Regions of World Affected By New Strain - AIDS Has Potential to Fast Track XDR-TB

Mon, 11 Sep 2006 06:35:43 +0000

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It is feared that an extremely dangerous and drug resistant strain of tuberculosis (TB) has spread across the border from South Africa into other countries. There were victims “all over the place… you can almost be sure there will be infection in Mozambique and even farther [abroad] because people travel”, according to Willem Sturm in a report from the Tribune News Service.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has expressed concern about the emergence of this virulent strain. In a press release they say the strain is virtually untreatable with existing drugs and they have called for the strengthening of prevention measures.

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AIDS Researchers Found Molecular Switch that Turns off Immune Cells – HIV Exhausts Killer T-cells

Mon, 21 Aug 2006 23:24:17 +0000

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In an international effort, researchers have found that a molecular switch or pathway is “turned off” in people with AIDS, which prevents the immune system from removing the virus. One of the mysteries involved in the search for a cure for AIDS has been the CD8 cells that don’t seem to be doing their jobs in AIDS patients.

According to Doctor Bruce Walker, “Back in 1987 our MGH team confirmed the existence of HIV-specific CD8 cells, the cytotoxic T lymphoctyes that should destroy virus-infected cells. But it didn't make sense that these cells were found in high numbers in persons with late-stage disease (AIDS), indicating that they were somehow not doing their job. These new findings finally make sense out of our early discoveries and subsequent findings by others in the field: The immune cells are there, but they have been turned off in persons with high viral loads." Walker is director of the Partners AIDS Research Center (PARC) and principal investigator of the Nature study.

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HIV Infection Requires Accomplice – So Called B-cells supply a Molecule Aiding in AIDS Infection of T-cells

Sun, 13 Aug 2006 08:16:04 +0000

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Researchers in Pittsburg say that the HIV infection of T cells requires activation of a molecule on the surface of B cells. They consider this another pathway that the virus uses to attack the immune system.

Dr. Charles R. Rinaldo said "The research supports a new role for B cells in the development and spread of HIV between cells, with important implications for future studies and drug development efforts that focus on reservoirs of HIV in cells other than T cells." Rinaldo is professor and chairman of the department of infectious diseases and microbiology at Pitt's Graduate School of Public Health (GSPH) and the study's senior author.

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