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Preview: Jacobs School of Engineering News: Top Stories

Jacobs School of Engineering News: Top Stories



Top Stories



Published: Fri, 13 Oct 2017 12:42:00 PDT

Last Build Date: Fri, 13 Oct 2017 12:42:00 PDT

Copyright: Copyright 2017, Regents of the University of California.
 



Model predicts how E. coli bacteria adapt under stress

Fri, 13 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Researchers at UC San Diego have developed a genome-scale model that can accurately predict how E. coli bacteria respond to temperature changes and genetic mutations. The work sheds light on how cells adapt under environmental stress and has applications in precision medicine, where adaptive cell modeling could provide patient-specific treatments for bacterial infections. 


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Bloomberg Connects with Jacobs School of Engineering Students at UC San Diego

Fri, 13 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

The engineering and computer science students at UC San Diego who visited the Bloomberg networking event on Warren Mall on October 10 got an exciting – and taco-filled – start to Fall 2017 UC San Diego Science and Technology Career Fair.


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Laser cavities take on new shapes and functionalities

Thu, 12 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Bending laser light around sharp turns and corners—without scattering—is now possible thanks to a new laser cavity developed by electrical engineers at UC San Diego. This is the first laser cavity that can fully confine and propagate light in any shape imaginable: triangle, square, loop with jagged edges. The work could lead to faster computers and optical fibers that perform well even when they’re bent in different directions.


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Contextual Robotics Forum 2017: designing the intelligent vehicles of 2025

Thu, 12 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

The University’s Contextual Robotics Institute is convening world experts on autonomy, robotics, user experience and computer vision for its fourth annual Contextual Robotics Forum on Oct. 27. The theme this year is “Intelligent Vehicles 2025” in preparation for that date. Register to attend the Forum here.


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UC San Diego Cybersecurity expert Stefan Savage receives prestigious MacArthur Foundation fellowship

Wed, 11 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Stefan Savage, a renowned cybersecurity expert and professor of computer science at the University of California San Diego, has been awarded a fellowship by the MacArthur Foundation. Perhaps better known as the MacArthur “genius” award, the prestigious no-strings attached five-year fellowship awards a total of $625,000 to each recipient.


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This soft robotic gripper can screw in your light bulbs for you

Tue, 10 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

How many robots does it take to screw in a light bulb? The answer: just one, assuming you’re talking about a new robotic gripper developed by engineers at the University of California San Diego. The engineering team has designed and built a gripper that can pick up and manipulate objects without needing to see them and needing to be trained.  The gripper is unique because it brings together three different capabilities. It can twist objects; it can sense objects; and it can build models of the objects it’s manipulating. This allows the gripper to operate in low light and low visibility conditions, for example.


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Researchers receive NSF award to build nanolabs on a chip

Fri, 06 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Engineers at the University of California San Diego are leading a project to develop high-density nanowire arrays that can be used to measure and control multiple individual cells in large networks. Researchers envision that these nanodevices, combined with a patient’s own cells, could create low-cost, predictive drug-screening platforms to accelerate drug discovery and personalized treatments for neurological and cardiac diseases. 


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The discovery of ordered, segregation-induced superstructures at general grain boundaries challenges a traditional view in physical metallurgy

Thu, 05 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

A team of researchers found that randomly selected, high-angle, general grain boundaries in a nickel-bismuth (Ni-Bi) polycrystalline alloy can undergo interfacial reconstruction to form ordered superstructures, a discovery that enriches the theories and fundamental understandings of both grain boundary segregation and liquid metal embrittlement in physical metallurgy. 


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Using Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living

Thu, 05 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

“UC San Diego is a community of changemakers and innovators,” said UC San Diego Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla Sept. 28 as he welcomed a crowd in Atkinson Hall at the IBM-UC San Diego signing ceremony celebration. “It is not an exaggeration to say that at this campus, which in its short time of 57 years is the top ten in the country and top 15 in the world, we must have done something right. And I think what we did right was really understand how to solve problems that impact humanity on a day-to-day basis. This partnership that we are putting in place right now, and we are here to celebrate, is actually addressing one of those problems.”


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Computer Scientist Receives National High-Risk, High-Reward Award

Wed, 04 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Melissa Gymrek, an assistant professor in the School of Medicine and Department of Computer Science and Engineering, will receive the NIH Director’s Early Independence Award. The award is part of the National Institute of Health’s (NIH) 2017 High-Risk, High-Reward Research Program. 


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UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering Hires 26 New Faculty in Fall 2017

Mon, 02 Oct 2017 00:00:00 PDT

The University of California San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering hired 26 professors this year. In the last four years alone, the Jacobs School has hired more than 75 new professors. Women and men from groups traditionally underrepresented in engineering make up one third of these hires. 


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Smart molecules trigger white blood cells to become better cancer-eating machines

Thu, 28 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

A team of researchers has engineered smart protein molecules that can reprogram white blood cells to ignore a self-defense signaling mechanism that cancer cells use to survive and spread in the body. Researchers say the advance could lead to a new method of re-engineering immune cells to fight cancer and infectious diseases. The team successfully tested this method in a live cell culture system. [...]


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Alan Turing Memorial Scholarship Celebrates Diversity in Computer Science

Thu, 28 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

The Center for Networked Systems (CNS) at UC San Diego established the Alan Turing Memorial Scholarship in 2015 to encourage a more diverse community in computer science education and research. The award honors the memory of Alan Turing, the mathematician and cryptanalyst who founded the field of computer science. During World War II, he devised the techniques that led to breaking codes produced by Germany’s Enigma machine—a breakthrough credited with accelerating the Allied victory by more than a year. After the war, he was persecuted for being gay. He died by his own hand in 1954.


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IBM Research and UC San Diego Collaborate to Advance the Use of Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living

Thu, 28 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

IBM (NYSE: IBM) and the University of California San Diego have announced a multi-year project to enhance quality of life and independence for aging populations through the new Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living Center (AIHL), located on the campus of UC San Diego. The groundbreaking center will bring together the technology, artificial intelligence and life sciences knowledge of IBM and UC San Diego to promote critical research and applications in two thematic areas: Healthy Aging and the Human Microbiome.


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Good Bugs v. Bad Bugs: New breakthroughs in Microbiome Technology

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

San Diego, Calif., September 20, 2017 - The second in a series on disruptive technology, Good Bugs v. Bad Bugs was put on by the MIT Enterprise Forum San Diego on September 20, 2017 at Knobbe Martens in San Diego, and featured Rob Knight, professor of pediatrics and computer science and engineering and director of the Center for Microbiome Innovation at UC San Diego, Richard Gallo, MD, Ph.D., chair of the department of dermatology at the UC San Diego School of Medicine and Mark S. Wilson, co-founder and CEO of MatriSys Bioscience, Inc


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From self-folding robots to computer vision: UC San Diego makes strong showing at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems

Wed, 20 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

From self-folding robots, to robotic endoscopes, to better methods for computer vision and object detection, researchers at the University of California San Diego have a wide range of papers and workshop presentations at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems (or IROS) which takes place from Sept. 24 to 28 in Vancouver, Canada. UC San Diego researchers also are organizing workshops on a range of themes during the event.


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Squeezing light into infinitesimally thin lines

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Researchers have demonstrated a new mode of electromagnetic wave, called a "line wave," which travels along an infinitesimally thin line along the interface between two adjacent surfaces with different electromagnetic properties. The scientists expect that line waves will be useful for the efficient routing and concentration of electromagnetic energy, such as light, with potential applications in areas ranging from integrated photonics, sensing and quantum processes to future vacuum electronics.


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When Artificial Intelligence is Funny

Fri, 15 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

What do you do if you’re an animal shelter and have to name a big litter of guinea pigs that suddenly become available for adoption and need to be named? Why, contact Janelle Shane, who earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering at UC San Diego, of course. Shane works on lasers in her day job, but her hobby is using neural networks to create paint color names, band names and much more.Her efforts have received an onslaught of media coverage, from Gizmodo, to Wired, to The Atlantic Online. When the Morris Animal Refuge in Portland, Ore., came to her, Shane agreed.


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The Patentbiome of Microbiomes

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

On September 6, the UC San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation (CMI) hosted a Patent & Pizza Seminar on the topic, "The Patentbiome of Microbiomes", in partnership with the UC San Diego Office of Innovation and Commercialization. 


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CMI Researchers Receive Grant to Address Grand Challenges in Microbiome Science

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

UC San Diego Center for Microbiome Innovation (CMI) researchers have been awarded $140,000 to address one of the grand challenges in microbiome science workflows – establishing standards for validating microbiome-focused workflows and enabling robust meta-analyses. The grant was awarded by CMI and was made possible in partnership with BASF, Biota, Illumina, Janssen and QIAGEN.


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These mutations could be key to understanding how some harmful conditions develop

Mon, 11 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

A team of researchers led by a bioinformatician at the University of California San Diego has developed a method to help determine whether certain hard-to-study mutations in the human genome, called short tandem repeats or microsatellites, are likely to be involved in harmful conditions. The team, which also includes scientists from the New York Genome Center, Harvard University, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, details their findings in the Sept. 11 issue of Nature Genetics.



New dental imaging method uses squid ink to fish for gum disease

Thu, 07 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Squid ink might be a great ingredient to make black pasta, but it could also one day make getting checked for gum disease at the dentist less tedious and even painless. By combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, a team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed a new dental imaging method to examine a patient’s gums that is non-invasive, more comprehensive and more accurate than the state of the art.


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Engineers develop tools to share power from renewable energy sources during outages

Tue, 05 Sep 2017 00:00:00 PDT

 A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed algorithms that would allow homes to use and share power from their renewable energy sources, such as solar panels, during power outages. The approach involves strategically disconnecting the devices, called solar inverters, from the grid. 


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Computer Scientists Receive NSF Grant to Model Human-Robot Teamwork in Uncertain Environments

Tue, 29 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Laurel Riek, associate professor of computer science at the University of California San Diego, will lead a three-year National Science Foundation project on new methods for coordinating teams of robots and people in complex, uncertain environments.The $750,000 award* is shared by UC San Diego and Northeastern University, where Riek’s collaborator, Christopher Amato, is a professor in the College of Computer and Information Science. 


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Drone Truthing

Fri, 25 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

A team of researchers from across UC San Diego is developing a new approach for detecting damage to buildings during earthquakes and other extreme events. They came together at the Geisel Library recently to use lasers and drones to create a digital record of the structure that will serve as a baseline health assessment. In the event that a sizeable earthquake hits nearby, the team will reconvene to retake the digital measurements and assess any damage to the building such as tilting or cracks. (View photo gallery.) 


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Four Physician-Engineer Teams Funded by UC San Diego

Fri, 25 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Four physician-engineer teams from UC San Diego have been selected to receive the 2017 Galvanizing Engineering in Medicine (GEM) awards. This is an initiative of UC San Diego Altman Clinical and Translational Research Institute (ACTRI) and UC San Diego Institute of Engineering in Medicine (IEM). It brings engineers and clinicians together to develop innovative technologies that can be applied to solving challenging problems in medical care. This year’s projects address challenges in the areas of cardiology, ophthalmology, radiology, and reproductive medicine.


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Help UC San Diego Scientists Study Link between Body Bacteria and Autoimmune Diseases

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

The public's help is being enlisted in the Microbiome Immunity Project, what's thought to be the biggest study to date of the human microbiome — the communities of bacteria and other microbes that live in and on the human body, where they influence our health. 


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Incoming Graduate Student Co-Authors Guide to 'Machine Learning for Humans'

Wed, 23 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Samer Sabri is an incoming first-year M.S. student in Computer Science at the University of California San Diego. He is part of a two-person writing team that developed "Machine Learning for Humans," an easy-to-read online primer on what machine learning is all about. Together with entrepreneur Vishal Maini, Sabri wrote the five-part "roadmap" that went live on the website Medium on Aug. 19. The full series is available for download (and will soon be published as an e-book).


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Stretchable biofuel cells extract energy from sweat to power wearable devices

Tue, 22 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

A team of engineers has developed stretchable fuel cells that extract energy from sweat and are capable of powering electronics, such as LEDs and Bluetooth radios. The biofuel cells generate 10 times more power per surface area than any existing wearable biofuel cells. The devices could be used to power a range of wearable devices. 


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A $100K gift from Cognex to UC San Diego Supports Research at Intersection of Deep Learning and 3-D Image Reconstruction

Fri, 18 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

The University of California San Diego has received a $100K gift from Cognex Corporation, a leader in machine vision. The gift will allow teams of professors and graduate students at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering to explore research at the intersection of deep learning and 3-D image reconstruction. 


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What's Your Gut Instinct?

Thu, 17 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

It’s no secret that diet, exercise, medicine usage, and other habits affect your health and lifestyle, but how they do so is different for everyone. The Internet is filled with opinions on the matter. A quick Google search on “how do diet, exercise, medicine usage, and other habits affect your health and lifestyle” yields more than 3,000,000 results! A new project at UC San diego has set out to help alleviate some of the confusion by creating an educational platform for people to ask and answer gut health-related questions.


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Drug-delivering micromotors treat their first bacterial infection in the stomach

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half the width of a human hair, swim rapidly throughout the stomach while neutralizing gastric acid and then release their cargo of antibiotics at the desired pH. 


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Computer Security Experts Honored for Research that Stands the Test of Time

Wed, 16 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Denial of service attacks (DoS) have crippled even the likes of Google and Amazon in recent years, topping at a reported 1.1 terabits per second in 2016. But they were a relatively unexplored phenomenon in the year 2000, when three computer scientists from the University of California San Diego set out to find out how prevalent they were. Their research and resulting academic paper won the Best Paper award when it was presented at the 10th USENIX Security Symposium in 2001. 


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Researchers receive an NSF award to develop new neural mapping technologies of the brain

Tue, 15 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Researchers at the University of California San Diego have developed a new way to record neural activity in the brain by combining macro-scale electrophysiology with micro-scale optical imaging. The combination of the two recording modalities will provide temporal and spatial resolution previously unattained. The new imaging capability could lead to new discoveries on information processing in the brain and circuit dysfunctions for neurological disorders such as epilepsy, depression and memory disorders. 


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Qualcomm Institute's CARI Therapeutics Awarded NIH Grant for Opioid Sensor

Thu, 10 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Researchers at the University of California San Diego, in collaboration with CARI Therapeutics of the University's Qualcomm Institute Innovation Space, have begun development of a biosensor that will detect the presence of opioids in patients in recovery and might ultimately transform the way opioid use disorders are diagnosed, monitored, and treated. The sensor also relies on research by Drew Hall, a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.  


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Nature Names UC San Diego a Top 15 Research Institution Worldwide

Wed, 09 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

The University of California San Diego is the world’s 14th best university for developing research that is used to create products or services that benefit society and spur economic growth. The new rankings by Nature, one of the world’s leading academic journals, also praise the campus for its research output: nearly half of UC San Diego’s natural science papers appear in the Nature index, which measures research productivity in the globe’s top science journals. 


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2017 Massry Prize Honors Microbiome Research Pioneers

Wed, 09 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Microbiome researchers Rob Knight, PhD, University of California San Diego, Jeffrey Gordon, MD, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and Norman Pace, PhD, University of Colorado Boulder, will share this year’s Massry Prize, splitting the $200,000 honorarium. These researchers lead a field that works to produce a detailed understanding of microbiomes — distinct constellations of bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms that live within and around us — and methods for manipulating microbiomes for the benefit of human and environmental health.The Meira and Shaul G. Massry Foundation established the Massry Prize in 1996 to recognize outstanding contributions to the biomedical sciences and the advancement of health. The nonprofit foundation promotes education and research in nephrology, physiology and related fields. Shaul Massry, MD, is professor emeritus at the Keck School of Medicine of University of Southern California. The Massry Prize Lectures, which the winners give every year, are held on the USC Health Sciences campus. This year’s lectures are scheduled for October 2017. Twelve Massry Prize recipients have gone on to win Nobel Prizes.


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UC San Diego Teams with Toyota on Autonomous, Connected Vehicle Safety Technologies

Tue, 08 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

After five years of working with Toyota on automotive safety technologies, the Laboratory for Intelligent and Safe Automobiles (LISA) at the University of California San Diego is launching a new research effort with the automaker’s Collaborative Safety Research Center (CSRC).On July 26, Toyota’s CSRC announced a sweeping set of new research programs to study the opportunities and address the challenges of emerging vehicle technologies. The 11 projects, launched in partnership with eight leading research universities in North America and the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, are the first launched under CSRC Next, a five-year program begun last January to support “a safer transition to the future of mobility.”


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Students Developing Low-Cost Device for Monitoring HIV Levels in Blood Win National Competition

Fri, 04 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

A team of UC San Diego students is working to help curb the HIV epidemic by developing a low-cost device for people in low-resource areas to monitor the amount of HIV virus in their bloodstream. They recently took first place in the National Academy of Engineering 2017 Global Grand Challenges Summit (GGCS) business plan competition. The team will use the $25,000 in prize money to help them translate their research to the clinic as part of a public benefit corporation they recently created called Worldcare Technologies.


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4D camera could improve robot vision, virtual reality and self-driving cars

Fri, 04 Aug 2017 00:00:00 PDT

Engineers at Stanford University and the University of California San Diego have developed a camera that generates four-dimensional images and can capture 138 degrees of information. The new camera — the first-ever single-lens, wide field of view, light field camera — could generate information-rich images and video frames that will enable robots to better navigate the world and understand certain aspects of their environment, such as object distance and surface texture. 


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