Subscribe: Iowa Environmental Mesonet Daily Feature
http://mesonet.agron.iastate.edu/feature_rss.php
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
chart iem  chart  days  featured chart  featured  generate chart  generate  high  iem website  iem  state  website  year 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Iowa Environmental Mesonet Daily Feature

Iowa Environmental Mesonet Daily Feature



Iowa Environmental Mesonet Daily Feature



Last Build Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2017 21:09:36 -0500

 



Comparable January Low
(image)

Sioux City set a record low temperature on Saturday of 44 degrees! Such chilly weather was a far cry from the June we had experienced prior to this past weekend. To place the 44 within some context, the featured chart compares quantiles for low temperature between June and January for Sioux City. Such a comparison is more simply equating frequencies, so having a 44 degree low in June is as common as a low of -20 in January. Warmer weather arrives on Tuesday, but mild for this time of year.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Severe Warning Duration
(image)

A cold front helped to fire late afternoon thunderstorms over the state on Thursday with some of these storms reaching severe limits. The NWS issued a few warnings valid for Polk County (Des Moines) last night and the featured chart looks at the frequency of Severe Thunderstorm Warning duration for the county. An individual warning is issued for a prescribed amount of time. This warning can be cancelled early if the conditions warrant. The two lines on the chart thus represent the frequency of warning duration at issuance and then the final duration based on any cancellation that was done. From the chart, about 50% of warnings are issued for a duration of 45 minutes or longer.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Recent Days till accumulating 1"
(image)

Storms on Wednesday brought some more much needed rainfall to the state, but the most significant totals were again rather isolated in the state. The featured map uses NOAA MRMS precipitation estimates to total up the number of days until the location accumulates an inch of precipitation. The purple areas would indicate that an inch or more of rainfall has fallen in the past seven days. The yellow areas would indicate 4+ weeks of time has past! These are the areas that have mostly missed out on the more significant recent rainfalls. Hopefully they get covered by rain expected today.




Daily Soil Water Changes
(image)

The featured chart presents estimates of the soil water condition based on soil moisture observations by the ISU Soil Moisture station at the ISU Ames AEA Farm. Two measurements are used to estimated soil water between the 6 and 30 inch depth layer. The chart presents the day to day change in soil water through that depth. You may notice that the daily drain is a small fraction of the total water, but there are caveats. Not all of that soil water in the layer is available for uptake by the plant roots and the water depletion will increase as more roots enter this layer from above. The moral of the story is that we really need some rain to build up more reserves to make it through the growing season.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




GDD Probabilities
(image)

The featured chart displays probabilities of reaching a given amount of growing degree days by a date shown on the y-axis after a planting date on the x-axis for Des Moines. The left hand plot presents the overall frequencies and the right hand plot shows the scenario based frequencies based on this year's data appended to by each previous year on record. The chart would indicate that we are in pretty good shape this year thanks to our reach stretch of very warm weather that helped to make up deficits incurred during May.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




All June 81+ So Far
(image)

For Des Moines, the high temperature on Sunday was just 81 degrees, which is the coolest daily high so far for the month! So for the 1-18 June period, all 18 days were 81+ degrees, which is the first time this has happened on record. The featured chart presents the number of days each year that the high was 81+ plus for this same 1-18 June stretch of days. The average is only about 50% of days. And for 1998, the total was zero days for this same period!

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




FACTS Project
(image)

The IEM participates with a crop systems modelling effort within the ISU Department of Agronomy along with ISU Extension known as "Forecast and Assessment of Cropping sysTemS" (FACTS). The project takes intensive field measurements during the growing season and uses the data along with weather forecasts to produce forecasts and hindcasts of important variables like yield, soil moisture, and nitrogen usage. The IEM's role is to collect weather observations and produce growing season forecasts generated by NOAA models. The project website has a number of interesting diagnostics of the current crop condition over Iowa.

Visit the FACTS Website




Plenty of Dry Areas
(image)

While the storms yesterday brought rain to many parts of the state that needed rain, there are still plenty of locations that missed out. The featured map depicts NOAA MRMS estimates since 20 May, which is about the date that the widespread rainfalls of May stopped. The driest area is shown near Lamoni with totals less than an half inch for this period. Storm chances continue to be in the forecast, so hopefully more widespread rains can materialize.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Severe TStorm Warnings by Hour
(image)

Showers and thunderstorms finally made a good push into the state overnight with a good portion of the state seeing some rainfall. A few of the storms were initially severe prompting the issuance of Severe Thunderstorm Warnings. The Sioux Falls NWS office issued some of these for portions of northwestern Iowa late last evening. The featured chart displays the frequency of warning issuance by hour of the day for the office. The chart shows a peak during the 6 PM hour and minimum during the late morning hours.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Variability since Last Quarter Inch
(image)

Rain totals over the state on Monday were a bit more widespread than what we have recently seen, but plenty of locations missed out again. The featured map presents an analysis of the number of days since the last calendar day 0.25+ inch precipitation total based on NOAA MRMS estimates. Most of the light gray area depicted on the map was Monday's rainfall. The purple areas represent between 24 and 28 days, so almost a month's worth of time. Rain chances continue this week, but it remains to be seen of how widespread the storms are.




Growing Season Departures
(image)

The featured chart displays growing season (since 1 May) accumulated departures of growing degree days and precipitation for Ames. Our recent stretch of dry and hot weather has helped to reverse previous deficits of GDDs and surpluses of precipitation. The black lines on the chart are the long term averages, with the red lines being this year and the blue shaded area representing the range of accumulated data for each of the previous years. There are some chances of rain in the forecast with more warm temperatures this week.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Year of Last 100+ Degree High
(image)

The heat arrives in force today with forecasted highs expected to be in the upper 90s and perhaps some triple digit readings will be possible over the next few days. That begs the question of when was the last 100+ daily high temperature for sites in Iowa. The featured map displays that value for the NWS COOP / long term climate sites tracked in the state by the IEM. For most of the state, it has been 4-5 years since reaching 100+ degrees. Over northern Iowa, there are some locations that haven't reported such a temperature since the 1990s!




Reaching 95+
(image)

The big weather story is the expected heat for this weekend with record high temperatures possible on both Saturday and Sunday. The current forecasted high for Ames is 97 degrees both days! Is it typical to see such warm temperatures this early in the summer season? The featured chart looks at the combination of first date and total number of days that season with a high temperature at 95+ for Ames. So for early June, less than 20% of the years that even reached this warm of a high temperature had its first date by this day of the year. It is interesting to note that 36 years even failed to reach this warm of a high, which is about 30% of years since 1893.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




May 1 Precip Departures
(image)

Rainfall has been difficult to come by recently and some deficits are starting to appear as per the featured map of rainfall departures since 1 May. For Iowa, the largest deficits are depicted in far southeast with values in the 1-3 inch range. One needs not travel far south into Missouri to find significant wet departures. There are rain chances in the forecast, but it remains to be seen how widespread and if it will fall over the driest portions of the state.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Spring 70+ Highs
(image)

Yesterday's IEM feature noted the number of days this year in the 70s being 50% higher than average. Today's featured plot looks at the number of days with a high temperature of 70+ for the spring months of March, April and May for Des Moines. A simple trend line is fit to the data along with the long term mean. Plenty of variability makes the trend line not significant, but the majority of recent years have seen above long term average number of days. The highest value on the chart was the epic spring warmth of 2012.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Fourth 90+
(image)

The Des Moines Airport reached 90+ degrees for a high temperature on Monday for the fourth time this year. The featured chart looks at the number of days with a high temperature in the given range for this year, last year, and on average for the year to date period. The four days this year is well above the average of 1 and there were none this far during 2016. The chart also shows the same metrics for other ranges of high temperatures. For the 70s, we are 50% higher than average with 30 days this year vs the long term average of 20!

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




31 Day Dips below Average
(image)

The featured chart displays statewide averaged trailing precipitation departures over three different windows of time. The 31 day trailing departure has dipped the most below average for year so far. May and June are typically the wettest months of the year for the state, but our recent week or so of weather has seen shower activity fairly scattered. The current forecast is not very optimistic for significant rains in the state over the next seven days.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Below Avg 60+ Dew Points
(image)

Our recent stretch of pleasant temperatures and low humidities will be interrupted this weekend with a taste of summer-like conditions. Our recent low humidities have been par for the course this year as really muggy air has avoided the state. The featured chart displays the number of hours with a dew point at or above a given threshold temperature for this year and overall average for Des Moines for the year to date period. This chart shows below average values this year for levels above 60 degrees and nothing higher than 68 degrees.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Reaching 80+ in June
(image)

Our recent stretch of weather has not seen much in the way of hot weather. It has been since mid May that temperatures were well into the 80s and even some 90s. The featured chart looks at the frequency of daily high temperatures in June being at 80+ degrees for Des Moines. While we are past Memorial Day and into June, if this temperature level is your threshold for summer, we still have a week or so to go before this warmth rises above the 50% level (meaning more common than not). The actual forecast says a bit otherwise with warm and muggier air arriving tomorrow and sticking around for the weekend.

Generate This Chart on IEM Website




Wet Wisconsin
(image)

The featured map is an analysis of the maximum period between 24 hour precipitation totals of 0.25 inch since the 25th of April. This plot is an attempt to assess the maximum period during this period of days that conditions were "dry". The plot is smoothed and shows an interesting pattern over the Midwest US. This map places much of Wisconsin in the two to four day range, meaning the longest period over the past 36 days that the area went without picking up 0.25+ inches of precipitation was just two to four days. Iowa is shown in the four to seven day range and longer totals exist over North and South Dakota. These limited short periods of dry weather have made planting progress slow considerably.