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Published: Mon, 19 Feb 2018 22:18:44 -0800

Last Build Date: Mon, 19 Feb 2018 22:18:44 -0800

 



Civil Rights Memorial Mural - Selma, ALCivil Rights Memorial Mural - Selma, AL

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 22:18:44 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

In conjunction with the National Voting Rights Museum in Selma, AL is the Civil Rights Memorial Mural. The mural is located in a small park at the southern end of the Civil Rights landmark Edmund Pettus Bridge. The center of the mural features Martin Luther King Jr. with the Pettus Bridge. Here is the official description of this mural:

The lives depicted in the mural are: Jonathan Daniels (1939-1965); killed on August 20, 1965 after being released from jail for participating in a demonstration in Fort Deposit on August 14; Viola Gregg Liuzzo (1925-1965); shot to death in her car on on the last night of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March; Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968); assassinated on April 4, 1968, the day after supporting striking sanitation workers in Memphis; Rev. James Reeb (1927-1965); died on March 11, 1965 in Selma, after being attacked by a group of white supremacists and; Jimmie Lee Jackson (1938-1965); a Viet Nam war veteran who was shot twice in the abdomen by an Alabama state trooper on February 18, 1965 in Marion, Alabama and succumbed to his wounds eight days later.

The names of the artists are painted on the right side, just off the mural as follows:

Liberation Summer Project
Class of 1999

Courtney Snelling
Ellyn Jackson
Lovineeha Gooch
Naijal Abdul

Directors:
Kobi Little
Gaidi Taraj

Sponsored by:
21st Century Leadership Group
1999

This is uploaded in honor of Black History Month 2018.

In conjunction with the National Voting Rights Museum in Selma, AL is the Civil Rights Memorial Mural. The mural is located in a small park at the southern end of the Civil Rights landmark Edmund Pettus Bridge. The center of the mural features Martin Luther King Jr. with the Pettus Bridge. Here is the official description of this mural:

The lives depicted in the mural are: Jonathan Daniels (1939-1965); killed on August 20, 1965 after being released from jail for participating in a demonstration in Fort Deposit on August 14; Viola Gregg Liuzzo (1925-1965); shot to death in her car on on the last night of the 1965 Selma Voting Rights March; Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. (1929-1968); assassinated on April 4, 1968, the day after supporting striking sanitation workers in Memphis; Rev. James Reeb (1927-1965); died on March 11, 1965 in Selma, after being attacked by a group of white supremacists and; Jimmie Lee Jackson (1938-1965); a Viet Nam war veteran who was shot twice in the abdomen by an Alabama state trooper on February 18, 1965 in Marion, Alabama and succumbed to his wounds eight days later.

The names of the artists are painted on the right side, just off the mural as follows:

Liberation Summer Project
Class of 1999

Courtney Snelling
Ellyn Jackson
Lovineeha Gooch
Naijal Abdul

Directors:
Kobi Little
Gaidi Taraj

Sponsored by:
21st Century Leadership Group
1999

This is uploaded in honor of Black History Month 2018.


Media Files:
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Lincoln Bas-relief scenes #4 - Louisville Waterfront ParkLincoln Bas-relief scenes #4 - Louisville Waterfront Park

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 22:17:41 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo: The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features four bas-reliefs which illustrate scenes of Lincoln's ties to Kentucky. The sculptures were created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces. Scene #4: Slavery and Emancipation The slavery bas relief contains life-sized figures of slaves being loaded onto a riverboat. The shackles in this piece were molded from the actual antique chain of a slave-era shackle, owned by the artist. The fourth bas relief is a moving depiction of slaves shackled together for transport by riverboat. Raised in a deeply religious household by Separatist Baptist parents, from an early age, Abraham Lincoln abhorred the institution of slavery and considered it a moral wrong. Disagreeing with both defenders of slavery and abolitionists, Lincoln nonetheless came to believe that the Declaration of Independence, by stating that “all men are created equal,” and the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, by outlawing slavery north of the Ohio River, had placed the institution “in course of ultimate extinction.” First-hand knowledge of slavery also bolstered these views. Writing to his friend Joshua Speed in 1855, Lincoln recalled their trip of August 1841 on the Ohio River, during which he saw a dozen enslaved African Americans being transported to New Orleans: “That sight was a continual torment to me; and I see something like it every time I touch the Ohio, or any other slave-border.” To others he asked: “Can we, as a nation, continue together permanently – half slave, half free?” As president during the Civil War, military considerations and Lincoln’s longstanding antislavery views combined to answer this question. On January 1, 1863, Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. One year later, he risked losing his presidency by supporting the Thirteenth Amendment that abolished slavery in the United States. Information taken from here: louisvillewaterfront.com/explore-the-park/features/lincol... This is uploaded in honor of Black History Month 2018.The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features four bas-reliefs which illustrate scenes of Lincoln's ties to Kentucky. The sculptures were created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces. Scene #4: Slavery and Emancipation The slavery bas relief contains life-sized figures of slaves being loaded onto a riverboat. The shackles in this piece were molded from the actual antique chain of a slave-era shackle, owned by the artist. The fourth bas relief is a moving depiction of slaves shackled together for transport by riverboat. Raised in a deeply religious household by Separatist Baptist parents, from an early age, Abraham Lincoln abhorred the institution of slavery and considered it a moral wrong. Disagreeing with both defenders of slavery and abolitionists, Lincoln nonetheless came to believe that the Declaration of Independence, by stating that “all men are created equal,” and the Northwest Ordinance of 1787, by outlawing slavery north of the Ohio River, had placed the institution “in course of ultimate extinction.” First-hand knowledge of slavery also bolstered these views. Writing to his friend Joshua Speed in 1855, Lincoln recalled their trip of August 1841 on the Ohio River, during which he saw a dozen enslaved African Americans being transported to New Orleans: “That sight was a continual torment to me; and I see something like it every time I touch the Ohio, or any other slave-border.” To others he asked:[...]


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Lincoln Bas-relief scenes #3 - Louisville Waterfront ParkLincoln Bas-relief scenes #3 - Louisville Waterfront Park

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 22:16:40 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features four bas-reliefs which illustrate scenes of Lincoln's ties to Kentucky. The sculptures were created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces.

Scene #3: A House Divided

In his famous speech of June 16, 1858, senatorial candidate Abraham Lincoln invoked the biblical injunction, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” When war came on April 12, 1861, President Lincoln’s own family became a house divided, as most of Mary Lincoln’s relatives, the Todds of Lexington, supported the Confederacy.

The Lincolns felt keenly the deaths of Mary’s half-brother Samuel at the battle of Shiloh and her brother Alexander at Baton Rouge. Lincoln was visibly shaken when he learned that his friend and brother-in-law, Confederate Brigadier General Benjamin Hardin Helm, had been killed in the battle of Chickamauga. The conflict permanently estranged the Lincolns from Mary’s sister, the widowed Emilie Todd Helm. Sharing in the nation’s wounds, Lincoln anticipated, in his Second Inaugural Address, the need for true reconciliation, “with malice toward none, with charity for all.”

Information taken from here: louisvillewaterfront.com/explore-the-park/features/lincol...

This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.

The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features four bas-reliefs which illustrate scenes of Lincoln's ties to Kentucky. The sculptures were created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces.

Scene #3: A House Divided

In his famous speech of June 16, 1858, senatorial candidate Abraham Lincoln invoked the biblical injunction, “A house divided against itself cannot stand.” When war came on April 12, 1861, President Lincoln’s own family became a house divided, as most of Mary Lincoln’s relatives, the Todds of Lexington, supported the Confederacy.

The Lincolns felt keenly the deaths of Mary’s half-brother Samuel at the battle of Shiloh and her brother Alexander at Baton Rouge. Lincoln was visibly shaken when he learned that his friend and brother-in-law, Confederate Brigadier General Benjamin Hardin Helm, had been killed in the battle of Chickamauga. The conflict permanently estranged the Lincolns from Mary’s sister, the widowed Emilie Todd Helm. Sharing in the nation’s wounds, Lincoln anticipated, in his Second Inaugural Address, the need for true reconciliation, “with malice toward none, with charity for all.”

Information taken from here: louisvillewaterfront.com/explore-the-park/features/lincol...

This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.


Media Files:
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Lincoln Bas-relief scenes #2 - Louisville Waterfront ParkLincoln Bas-relief scenes #2 - Louisville Waterfront Park

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 22:15:58 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo: The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features four bas-reliefs which illustrate scenes of Lincoln's ties to Kentucky. The sculptures were created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces. Scene #2: Lincoln's Kentucky Connections When Thomas Lincoln moved his family to Spencer County, Indiana, in December 1816, he was following a well-worn path laid out by thousands of other households from the Upper South. Similarly, at age twenty-two, Abraham Lincoln left his father’s household and made his way to New Salem, Indiana—a growing village inhabited by many former Kentuckians. Lincoln was already well integrated into an important network of Kentuckians who continued to shape his life and career when he moved to Springfield, Illinois in 1837. John Todd Stuart, his first law partner, had encouraged Lincoln to run for political office and study the law as early as 1832. In Springfield, Lincoln also met his best friend, Louisville-native Joshua Speed. Like many of his generation, Lincoln found inspiration in the great Kentucky statesman, Henry Clay. With Mary Todd Lincoln, who came from one of Kentucky’s most prominent families, he formed an ambitious, intellectually rich, and politically powerful partnership. Lincoln often turned to fellow Kentuckians for advice, guidance, and support as a lawyer, politician, and president. Information taken from here: louisvillewaterfront.com/explore-the-park/features/lincol... This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features four bas-reliefs which illustrate scenes of Lincoln's ties to Kentucky. The sculptures were created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces. Scene #2: Lincoln's Kentucky Connections When Thomas Lincoln moved his family to Spencer County, Indiana, in December 1816, he was following a well-worn path laid out by thousands of other households from the Upper South. Similarly, at age twenty-two, Abraham Lincoln left his father’s household and made his way to New Salem, Indiana—a growing village inhabited by many former Kentuckians. Lincoln was already well integrated into an important network of Kentuckians who continued to shape his life and career when he moved to Springfield, Illinois in 1837. John Todd Stuart, his first law partner, had encouraged Lincoln to run for political office and study the law as early as 1832. In Springfield, Lincoln also met his best friend, Louisville-native Joshua Speed. Like many of his generation, Lincoln found inspiration in the great Kentucky statesman, Henry Clay. With Mary Todd Lincoln, who came from one of Kentucky’s most prominent families, he formed an ambitious, intellectually rich, and politically powerful partnership. Lincoln often turned to fellow Kentuckians for advice, guidance, and support as a lawyer, politician, and president. Information taken from here: louisvillewaterfront.com/explore-the-park/features/lincol... This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.[...]


Media Files:
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Lincoln Bas-relief scenes #1 - Louisville Waterfront ParkLincoln Bas-relief scenes #1 - Louisville Waterfront Park

Mon, 19 Feb 2018 22:15:06 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo: The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features four bas-reliefs which illustrate scenes of Lincoln's ties to Kentucky. The sculptures were created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces. Scene #1 Lincoln's Formative Years in Kentucky Born on February 12, 1809, near Hodgenville, Kentucky, Abraham Lincoln was the first president of the United States born outside the original thirteen colonies. Lessons learned from his early years on the Kentucky frontier shaped our 16th President immeasurably. Lincoln’s parents, Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks, were both second-generation “pioneers,” who married on June 12, 1806, near Springfield, Kentucky. They taught their son the meaning of hard work and perseverance and instilled in him a profound love of learning—a love that Abraham’s stepmother, Sarah Johnston Lincoln, continued to nurture in him. From an early age, Lincoln became an avid reader. He was largely self-taught, becoming one of Illinois’ most successful lawyers long before his election as president in 1860. As an adult, Lincoln thought of himself as a Kentuckian and a selfmade man. He advised others to find their calling as he did: “get the books, and read, and study them carefully.” Information taken from here: louisvillewaterfront.com/explore-the-park/features/lincol... This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features four bas-reliefs which illustrate scenes of Lincoln's ties to Kentucky. The sculptures were created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces. Scene #1 Lincoln's Formative Years in Kentucky Born on February 12, 1809, near Hodgenville, Kentucky, Abraham Lincoln was the first president of the United States born outside the original thirteen colonies. Lessons learned from his early years on the Kentucky frontier shaped our 16th President immeasurably. Lincoln’s parents, Thomas Lincoln and Nancy Hanks, were both second-generation “pioneers,” who married on June 12, 1806, near Springfield, Kentucky. They taught their son the meaning of hard work and perseverance and instilled in him a profound love of learning—a love that Abraham’s stepmother, Sarah Johnston Lincoln, continued to nurture in him. From an early age, Lincoln became an avid reader. He was largely self-taught, becoming one of Illinois’ most successful lawyers long before his election as president in 1860. As an adult, Lincoln thought of himself as a Kentuckian and a selfmade man. He advised others to find their calling as he did: “get the books, and read, and study them carefully.” Information taken from here: louisvillewaterfront.com/explore-the-park/features/lincol... This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.[...]


Media Files:
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Lincoln Memorial - Louisville Waterfront ParkLincoln Memorial - Louisville Waterfront Park

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 20:54:45 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features a 12′ statue of Lincoln seated on a rock and looking out over the river. The statue was created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces. The face of the granite amphitheater seating is engraved with four famous Lincoln quotes, and the site is planted with a variety of trees, including several that were Lincoln favorites.

Read more: louisvillewaterfront.com/explore-the-park/features/lincol...

This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.

The Lincoln Memorial at Waterfront Park features a 12′ statue of Lincoln seated on a rock and looking out over the river. The statue was created by Louisville artist Ed Hamilton and dedicated June 4, 2009 remembering the bicentennial of his birth. The memorial site, designed by world-renowned landscape architects Hargreaves Associates, is a tree-canopied landscape with an amphitheater that faces the river and provides a frame for the sculptural pieces. The face of the granite amphitheater seating is engraved with four famous Lincoln quotes, and the site is planted with a variety of trees, including several that were Lincoln favorites.

Read more: louisvillewaterfront.com/explore-the-park/features/lincol...

This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.


Media Files:
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4622/25479947437_92b5991671_b.jpg




Cannon used by George WashingtonCannon used by George Washington

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 20:54:10 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

Cannon used by George Washington in defense of Fort Loudon, 1756. This is located at the George Washington Office Museum in Old Town Winchester, VA facing Cork St.

This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.

Cannon used by George Washington in defense of Fort Loudon, 1756. This is located at the George Washington Office Museum in Old Town Winchester, VA facing Cork St.

This is uploaded in honor of President's Day 2018.


Media Files:
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James K. Polk Ancestral Home - Columbia, TNJames K. Polk Ancestral Home - Columbia, TN

Sun, 18 Feb 2018 20:52:34 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo: From Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_K._Polk_Ancestral_Home The James K. Polk Ancestral Home is a historic house museum at 301 West 7th Street in Columbia, Tennessee. Built in 1816, it is the only surviving private residence of United States President James K. Polk. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1961, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The James K. Polk House is located just west of the commercial central downtown area of Columbia, at the southwest corner of West 7th and South High Streets. It is an L-shaped brick building, two stories in height, with a gabled roof. The front facade, facing West 7th Street, is three bays wide, with the main entrance in the rightmost bay, recessed in a segmented-arch opening. The door is flanked by sidelight windows and topped by a semi-oval transom window with tracery, and the interior walls of the recess are paneled. The other bays house windows, which are topped by lintels of brick and a stone keystone. The interior retains finishes period to its construction, but has otherwise been adapted for museum displays. The property includes a reproduction of the kitchen outbuilding that would have been present during Polk's residency; none of the outbuildings from his time survive. The house was built in 1816 by Samuel Polk, and was the home of his son, U.S. President James K. Polk, for several years as a young adult. It is the only surviving private residence associated with President Polk to survive. James lived in the house until 1819, when he left to read law in Nashville, and for a time after his return to Columbia, where he opened his law practice. The house remained in the Polk family for many years, and passed through several owners before its acquisition by the state of Tennessee in 1929. The museum is operated by the James K. Polk Association. The fountain on the site was moved here in 1893 after Polk Place, the president's later home, was demolished. On March 27, 2017, the Tennessee Senate voted 20-6 to relocate the remains of President Polk and his wife Sarah Childress Polk from the Tennessee State Capitol in Nashville to the house.From Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_K._Polk_Ancestral_Home The James K. Polk Ancestral Home is a historic house museum at 301 West 7th Street in Columbia, Tennessee. Built in 1816, it is the only surviving private residence of United States President James K. Polk. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1961, and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The James K. Polk House is located just west of the commercial central downtown area of Columbia, at the southwest corner of West 7th and South High Streets. It is an L-shaped brick building, two stories in height, with a gabled roof. The front facade, facing West 7th Street, is three bays wide, with the main entrance in the rightmost bay, recessed in a segmented-arch opening. The door is flanked by sidelight windows and topped by a semi-oval transom window with tracery, and the interior walls of the recess are paneled. The other bays house windows, which are topped by lintels of brick and a stone keystone. The interior retains finishes period to its construction, but has otherwise been adapted for museum displays. The property includes a reproduction of the kitchen outbuilding that would have been present during Polk's residency; none of the outbuildings from his time survive. The house was built in 1816 by Samuel Polk, and was the home of his son, U.S. President James K. Polk, for several years as a young adult. It is the only surviving private residence associated with President Polk to survive. James lived in the house until 1819, when he left to read law in Nashville, and for a time after his return to Columbia, where he opened his law practice. The house remained in the Polk f[...]


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F9F-5 Panther - Aviation Heritage Park - Bowling Green, KYF9F-5 Panther - Aviation Heritage Park - Bowling Green, KY

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 21:07:59 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

This Grumman F9F-5 Panther was built for the Navy in 1952. It is dedicated to Bowling Green native LCDR John Joseph Magda who flew during World War II, then became a Blue Angels pilot, then died during a combat mission in the Korean War. Magda flew a Grumman Panther for the Blue Angels, but not this one as this one was given that decoration while put on display here.

This Grumman F9F-5 Panther was built for the Navy in 1952. It is dedicated to Bowling Green native LCDR John Joseph Magda who flew during World War II, then became a Blue Angels pilot, then died during a combat mission in the Korean War. Magda flew a Grumman Panther for the Blue Angels, but not this one as this one was given that decoration while put on display here.


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Fireman's Memorial Fountain - Chattanooga, TNFireman's Memorial Fountain - Chattanooga, TN

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 21:07:02 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

The Fireman's Fountain was built in 1888 to memorialize firemen Henry Iler and W.M. Peak who lost their lives in the line of duty. It is located in a small triangular park across the street from the Hamilton County Courthouse. At one point, the small park was surrounded by a fence and was the home of two aligators.

Here is the description of the fountain from the Fountain Square District listing on the National Register of Historic Places:
Fireman's Memorial Fountain, Georgia, Sixth and Lookout Streets (1888): This fountain, designed by the J. L. Mott Company of New York, is located on the base of a triangular park created by three streets. It is 27 feet high, is divided into three sections, and stands in the center of an octagonal concrete catch basin that is 25 feet across and 1-1/2 feet deep. The cast iron fountain is hollow and has decorative features bolted to it. These features include scrollwork, acanthus leaves, flowers, and animal heads at each point of the catch basins located at each of the three levels.

The Fireman's Fountain was built in 1888 to memorialize firemen Henry Iler and W.M. Peak who lost their lives in the line of duty. It is located in a small triangular park across the street from the Hamilton County Courthouse. At one point, the small park was surrounded by a fence and was the home of two aligators.

Here is the description of the fountain from the Fountain Square District listing on the National Register of Historic Places:
Fireman's Memorial Fountain, Georgia, Sixth and Lookout Streets (1888): This fountain, designed by the J. L. Mott Company of New York, is located on the base of a triangular park created by three streets. It is 27 feet high, is divided into three sections, and stands in the center of an octagonal concrete catch basin that is 25 feet across and 1-1/2 feet deep. The cast iron fountain is hollow and has decorative features bolted to it. These features include scrollwork, acanthus leaves, flowers, and animal heads at each point of the catch basins located at each of the three levels.


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Henderson County Courthouse - Lexington, TNHenderson County Courthouse - Lexington, TN

Sat, 17 Feb 2018 21:05:12 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

TN Post Card #41 - Henderson County Courthouse - Lexington, TN

This post card is part of my Tennessee Courthouses Collection. Each Courthouse is available as an individual post card, or you can buy a poster of all Middle Tennessee Courthouses.

Order this Post Card now!

Text on the back:
This is Henderson County's fifth courthouse. It was built in 1961 at a cost of $500,000 and renovated in 1994.

TN Post Card #41 - Henderson County Courthouse - Lexington, TN

This post card is part of my Tennessee Courthouses Collection. Each Courthouse is available as an individual post card, or you can buy a poster of all Middle Tennessee Courthouses.

Order this Post Card now!

Text on the back:
This is Henderson County's fifth courthouse. It was built in 1961 at a cost of $500,000 and renovated in 1994.


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Old Court House - Winchester, VAOld Court House - Winchester, VA

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 21:43:00 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.

The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.


Media Files:
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Old Court House (Front) - Winchester, VAOld Court House (Front) - Winchester, VA

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 21:41:57 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.

The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.


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Old Court House (Corner) - Winchester, VAOld Court House (Corner) - Winchester, VA

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 21:40:54 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

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The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.

The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.


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1916 Confederate Statue - Winchester, VA1916 Confederate Statue - Winchester, VA

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 21:40:02 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

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The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.

The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.


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Old Court House (Clock Tower) - Winchester, VAOld Court House (Clock Tower) - Winchester, VA

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 21:39:05 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.

The Frederick County Courthouse is a historic county courthouse located in Winchester, VA. It was built in 1840, and is a two-story, rectangular, brick building on a stone foundation and partial basement in the Greek Revival style. It measures 50 feet by 90 feet, and features a pedimented Doric order portico and a gabled roof surmounted by a cupola. Also on the property is a contributing Confederate monument, dedicated in 1916, consisting of a bronze statue of a soldier on a stone base. The building houses the Old Court House Civil War Museum.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. It is located in the Winchester Historic District.


Media Files:
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4720/39546093654_60366fde75_b.jpg




Army of Tennessee Headquarters - Tullahoma, TNArmy of Tennessee Headquarters - Tullahoma, TN

Tue, 13 Feb 2018 21:38:18 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

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During the Civil War, the Confederate forces commanded by Lt. Gen Braxton Bragg were located here from Jan-July 1863 and is now commemorated by this monument. This is the park in front of the old Tullahoma High School, but in the early days of the city this area was also the town square.

During the Civil War, the Confederate forces commanded by Lt. Gen Braxton Bragg were located here from Jan-July 1863 and is now commemorated by this monument. This is the park in front of the old Tullahoma High School, but in the early days of the city this area was also the town square.


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William Tell Statue - Tell City, INWilliam Tell Statue - Tell City, IN

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 21:43:25 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

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In the 1850s, a group of Swiss immigrants moved to create their own town in southern Indiana. They named their city after Swiss folk hero William Tell.

Here's the very brief famous tale of William Tell:
In 1307 Tell and his son visited the town of Altdorf and refused to bow to the hat of leader Albrecht Gessler. Gessler—intrigued by Tell's famed marksmanship but resentful of his defiance—devised a cruel punishment. Tell and his son were to be executed. However, he could redeem his life by shooting an apple off the head of his son Robert in a single attempt. Tell split the apple with a bolt from his crossbow.

On the grounds of the City Hall in Tell City are some memorials to William Tell. First is a statue dedicated in 1974 which was based on a statue in Altdorf. Also there is a light-up wire-frame apple with an arrow going right through the center.

In the 1850s, a group of Swiss immigrants moved to create their own town in southern Indiana. They named their city after Swiss folk hero William Tell.

Here's the very brief famous tale of William Tell:
In 1307 Tell and his son visited the town of Altdorf and refused to bow to the hat of leader Albrecht Gessler. Gessler—intrigued by Tell's famed marksmanship but resentful of his defiance—devised a cruel punishment. Tell and his son were to be executed. However, he could redeem his life by shooting an apple off the head of his son Robert in a single attempt. Tell split the apple with a bolt from his crossbow.

On the grounds of the City Hall in Tell City are some memorials to William Tell. First is a statue dedicated in 1974 which was based on a statue in Altdorf. Also there is a light-up wire-frame apple with an arrow going right through the center.


Media Files:
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4673/26364558218_8c87a6b895_b.jpg




William Tell's apple light - Tell City, INWilliam Tell's apple light - Tell City, IN

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 21:42:30 -0800

SeeMidTN.com (aka Brent) posted a photo:

(image)

In the 1850s, a group of Swiss immigrants moved to create their own town in southern Indiana. They named their city after Swiss folk hero William Tell.

Here's the very brief famous tale of William Tell:
In 1307 Tell and his son visited the town of Altdorf and refused to bow to the hat of leader Albrecht Gessler. Gessler—intrigued by Tell's famed marksmanship but resentful of his defiance—devised a cruel punishment. Tell and his son were to be executed. However, he could redeem his life by shooting an apple off the head of his son Robert in a single attempt. Tell split the apple with a bolt from his crossbow.

On the grounds of the City Hall in Tell City are some memorials to William Tell. First is a statue dedicated in 1974 which was based on a statue in Altdorf. Also there is a light-up wire-frame apple with an arrow going right through the center.

In the 1850s, a group of Swiss immigrants moved to create their own town in southern Indiana. They named their city after Swiss folk hero William Tell.

Here's the very brief famous tale of William Tell:
In 1307 Tell and his son visited the town of Altdorf and refused to bow to the hat of leader Albrecht Gessler. Gessler—intrigued by Tell's famed marksmanship but resentful of his defiance—devised a cruel punishment. Tell and his son were to be executed. However, he could redeem his life by shooting an apple off the head of his son Robert in a single attempt. Tell split the apple with a bolt from his crossbow.

On the grounds of the City Hall in Tell City are some memorials to William Tell. First is a statue dedicated in 1974 which was based on a statue in Altdorf. Also there is a light-up wire-frame apple with an arrow going right through the center.


Media Files:
http://farm5.staticflickr.com/4631/39339166385_5f10846854_b.jpg