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Published: Tue, 17 Jan 2017 15:34:40 GMT

 






Changing Skyline: Another black church says farewell to Graduate Hospital neighborhood
The lavender velvet pews at the First Colored Wesley Methodist Church in the Graduate Hospital neighborhood were packed from end to end, just like in the old days. The choir was in fine form as it delivered a rousing version of "We've Come This Far by Faith." As the strong winter sun filtered through the tall, arched stained-glass windows, the second-floor sanctuary felt as cozy as a rowhouse living room.






Good Eye: The grandest lobby in Philadelphia is grand again
In the early 20th century, Philadelphia's Horace Trumbauer was the go-to architect for America's newly rich industrial barons. When he wasn't designing their classically inspired townhouses and country retreats, he was providing them with grand hotels to stage their fancy balls. The largest and most ornate of these was the Benjamin Franklin Hotel at Ninth and Chestnut Street.



Changing Skyline: The city has lost control of its sidewalks
There are close to 1.5 million people living in Philadelphia, and every one of them is a pedestrian at one time or another. Yet City Hall sometimes seems surprised to learn that people travel on two feet.



Changing Skyline: An umbrella for pedestrians
Young-Hwan Choi arrived in Philadelphia from his native South Korea in August. By October, the University of Pennsylvania architecture student had devised an elegant new design for the sidewalk sheds that protect pedestrians during construction. And he was barely into his second semester when New York announced it was adopting his innovative system as its official prototype.






How a Drexel prof's Christmas 'wish' stirred a Twitter tempest
This much is clear: On Twitter, nobody hears your sarcasm. George Ciccariello-Maher, an associate professor in Drexel University's politics department, learned that lesson the hard way over the weekend, when he tapped out a series of racially charged satirical tweets that he says were intended to mock white supremacists.






Good Eye: From flop house to luxury apartments, the many lives of Locust Street's Lincoln Apartments
Cities are always in flux and so are their buildings. The Lincoln Apartments, at the corner of Locust and Camac, has reinvented itself multiple times in its 124-year history. Its ups and downs neatly track the changing fortunes of Locust Street.