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Latest news, sport, business, comment, analysis and reviews from the Guardian, the world's leading liberal voice



Published: Mon, 25 Sep 2017 06:48:43 GMT2017-09-25T06:48:43Z

Copyright: Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. 2017
 



German election: Merkel wins fourth term but far-right AfD surges to third

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 17:33:19 GMT2017-09-24T17:33:19Z

Chancellor returns but with diminished authority as first openly nationalist party in decades enters Bundestag

Angela Merkel has secured a fourth term as German chancellor but with her authority diminished, after her conservative bloc secured the lead position in parliamentary elections but failed to halt the march of rightwing populists.

Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) was celebrating its historic third place success last night, having secured 13% of the vote, according to exit polls, marking the first time in almost six decades that an openly nationalist party will enter the Bundestag.

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Monday briefing: Merkel weakened by surge of far right

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:33:22 GMT2017-09-25T05:33:22Z

Election win marred by 13% vote for anti-immigrant AfD … Trump issues revised version of travel ban … Labour to begin conference with debt pledge

Good morning and welcome to the Guardian’s daily briefing. I’m Martin Farrer and these are the top stories this Monday morning.

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Labour MPs accuse Corbyn of ducking discussion about Brexit

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 19:43:36 GMT2017-09-24T19:43:36Z

Senior figures criticise lack of debate at conference about relationship with EU, with one saying it makes party ‘a laughing stock’

Jeremy Corbyn avoided an embarrassing row on Sunday over Labour’s position on the single market and free movement after party members voted to exclude Brexit from a series of debates at the party’s annual conference.

Delegates picked eight “contemporary motions” including on housing, the NHS and social care but decided against motions about the party’s policy on the future relationship with the EU.

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BBC political editor given bodyguard for Labour conference

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 22:56:44 GMT2017-09-24T22:56:44Z

Laura Kuenssberg will reportedly be accompanied by security team after being jeered for her treatment of Corbyn

The BBC’s political editor, Laura Kuenssberg, is being protected by security guards at the Labour party conference this week following abuse she has received over her role, according to reports.

Related: Yvette Cooper ‘sick to death of vitriol’ directed at Laura Kuenssberg

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New Zealand party leaders woo Winston Peters' support after election stalemate

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 06:08:36 GMT2017-09-25T06:08:36Z

Both National and Labour need New Zealand First’s nine seats to form government, in negotiations expected to take weeks

New Zealand’s major political parties are scrambling to woo the support of the smaller New Zealand First party to form a government after Saturday’s stalemate election.

Neither the incumbent National party, led by a revitalised Bill English, nor the opposition Labour party, led by Jacinda Ardern, are in a position to take office, with 15% of the vote still to be counted.

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Trump travel ban extended to blocks on North Korea, Venezuela and Chad

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 06:09:30 GMT2017-09-25T06:09:30Z

President’s proclamation may throw major hurdle in front of ongoing court challenges to ban which blocked travel from six majority-Muslim countries

Donald Trump has announced new travel restrictions on visitors to the United States that will expand his controversial travel ban to eight countries.

The new proclamation, which will come into effect on 18 October, will continue to target travellers from Somalia, Yemen, Syria, Libya and Iran, but also adds North Korea, Chad and Venezuela to the list of targeted countries. Sudan has been dropped from the administration’s list of nations and Iraqi citizens will be subjected to “additional scrutiny” but will not face any blanket bans.

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David Davis starts fresh talks denying Johnson has changed Brexit plan

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 04:25:44 GMT2017-09-25T04:25:44Z

Brexit secretary arrives in Brussels for new round of negotiations amid reports of Tory disagreements over strategy

The Brexit secretary, David Davis, will arrive in Brussels on Monday to begin a fresh round of talks about British withdrawal from the EU against a backdrop of renewed cabinet infighting over Britain’s negotiating strategy.

Davis will meet the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, in the Belgian capital in the morning to commence the fourth round of negotiations.

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'Trump’s secret Yemen war': UK role in US counter-terrorism causes unease

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 06:00:06 GMT2017-09-25T06:00:06Z

As new figures point to doubling of covert US airstrikes in Yemen, MPs and human rights groups voice concerns over British involvement

Donald Trump has more than doubled the number of covert US airstrikes in Yemen compared with the final year of Barack Obama’s presidency, new estimates show.

The rise, combined with Trump’s rollback of Obama-era safeguards, has sparked renewed concern from MPs and human rights groups over the UK’s role in US counter-terrorism operations, in Yemen and other countries with which Britain is not at war.

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Jared Kushner used private email account for official business – reports

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 00:07:50 GMT2017-09-25T00:07:50Z

Lawyers for president’s son-in-law say Kushner complied with government record-keeping rules by forwarding all emails to his official account

Donald Trump’s son-in-law and close adviser, Jared Kushner, used a private email account alongside his official White House account to exchange messages with other administration officials, according to reports.

The emails included correspondence about media coverage, event planning and other subjects, Politico reported on Sunday. Kushner’s lawyer, Abbe Lowell, said his client complied with government record-keeping rules by forwarding all the emails to his official account.

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Humpback whale carcass exhumed from NSW beach after protests

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 03:24:03 GMT2017-09-25T03:24:03Z

Port Macquarie-Hastings council bows to community concerns and begins removing a whale it buried at Nobbys beach

A large excavator has started digging up an 18-tonne humpback whale that was buried at a mid-northern New South Wales beach a week ago.

The 12-metre whale died after being beached and its carcass was buried at Port Macquarie’s Nobbys beach because it was too big to be moved.

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Too high: men rescued from Scafell Pike 'unable to walk due to cannabis'

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 14:39:03 GMT2017-09-24T14:39:03Z

‘Words fail us,’ say police after four men had to be helped down from England’s highest mountain in the Lake District

Four men were rescued from England’s highest mountain after “becoming incapable of walking due to cannabis use”, police have said.

Cumbria police were called at about 6.30pm on Saturday after the group ran into difficulty on Scafell Pike, a 978-metre (3,210ft) peak in the Lake District.

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Snowy peak syndrome: why UK organisations remain white at the top

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 06:00:06 GMT2017-09-25T06:00:06Z

BAME representation drops off sharply at senior levels, new research shows. But why? And what is needed for change?

They call it snowy peak syndrome: no matter how colourful the foothills and middle reaches of the average British organisation are, the top is nearly always very white.

A research project conducted by Operation Black Vote and the Guardian has established that barely 3% of the most powerful, prominent 1,000 people in Britain are from ethnic minorities.

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The Today programme needs more than a harrumphing John Humphrys | Fiona Sturges

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:30:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:30:05Z

The show’s editor, Sarah Sands, has got a lot of stick for her direction, but her attempt to make it more relevant is exactly what’s required

The BBC Radio 4 listener whose blood pressure isn’t regularly sent off the charts by the Today programme is a rare one indeed. Young people declare it too old, while old people say it’s too young. No one likes John Humphrys apart from the scores of people who can’t get enough of his harrumphing, and would picket Broadcasting House in the unlikely event of him being crowbarred from his desk. Women invariably find it too male, though there are men who still balk at the sound of two female presenters. Pity the poor mug patrolling the programme’s Twitter feed and wading through the torrent of indignation and invective while still on the first coffee of the day.

Lately, however, the ire levelled at the programme has gone up a notch. The extra helping of irritation has largely been directed at Sarah Sands, who was appointed editor in January following eight years in charge of the London Evening Standard. Among the complaints thus far – and it’s been said that many are coming from inside the network – are that it has become lightweight and magazine-ish, that fashion and arts stories are being given undue prominence, that the political argy-bargy has been toned down, and that it is failing to set the news agenda.

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'It's like walking through fire' – the rise of competitive fitness

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:00:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:00:05Z

From log carrying to trail running, events such as Tribal Clash and CrossFit are growing fast. What’s the appeal of this hardcore approach to training?

You probably didn’t notice but at the end of this summer, on the sandy beach of Bantham, near Kingsbridge in South Devon, 960 men and women gathered for a gruesome battle. For an entire weekend, this stretch of English coastline saw teams of furious men and women dashing across hilly trails, hoisting atlas stones and lugging a 240kg sandworm, in both blistering heat and torrential rain.

This wasn’t a Viking re-enactment (too much compression gear for that), but an annual competitive fitness event called Tribal Clash, the appetite for which is almost as strong as the participants’ mettle. Since its launch in 2013, Tribal Clash has more than doubled in size, from 100 teams of four to 160 teams of six, and has also begun holding a second annual event in Portugal.

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The male contraceptive pill? Bring it on | Angela Saini

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:00:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:00:05Z

Women have shouldered the burden of birth control for too long

Tomorrow is World Contraception Day, a perfect time to remember just what a radical difference birth control, and particularly the pill (60 years old this year), has made to women’s lives. What you may not know is that contraception is also about to experience a revolution: we are on the cusp of – wait for it – a new male contraceptive.

Allow me to recap. In October last year, a team of international scientists announced that they had developed a hormone injection (so, not a pill) for men that is almost 96% effective at preventing pregnancy in their partners. This makes it about as reliable as condoms when they are used correctly, which frequently they’re not.

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Super savers: meet the coupon queen and the cashback king

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:00:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:00:05Z

Saving Money Week As part of our series on saving cash, here’s how three canny consumers make their budgets stretch further

It has been four years since Great Yarmouth resident Smith, 32, paid full price for anything at the supermarket. “It all started one night when I couldn’t sleep,” she says. “I got up and started looking for coupons on the internet, which I could combine with supermarket deals to get the item for free. I became really good at it and then a friend encouraged me to start a blog online. So I did.” She now has almost a million followers on her Facebook page, Couponmumuk, and spends up to 14 hours a day sourcing coupons and bargains that she can share.

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Is it possible to reverse Type 2 diabetes?

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:59:06 GMT2017-09-25T05:59:06Z

Most doctors only address the symptoms, but the disease can be beaten into remission. However, it requires losing a lot of weight – and keeping it off

Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition that can lead to heart disease, nerve damage, kidney disease and blindness. However, it is possible to beat it into remission. The pancreas can begin again making insulin, the hormone that regulates levels of glucose in the blood. The liver can reassert itself as the body’s reservoir for glucose and stop pumping out unwanted sugar. And many people who have been taking tablets to control their type 2 diabetes can potentially throw them away. This is good for the NHS, because 5% to 10% of people have type 2 diabetes. However, to beat it, you would need to lose about 10% of your body weight – and keep it off.

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Are you ready for that jelly? Why it’s time to start eating jellyfish

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:00:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:00:05Z

There are too many of them in the sea, and the problem is only going to get worse. Is the solution to fry them up and eat them?

The world has a jellyfish problem. In 2014, they invaded a Scottish salmon farm, killing 300,000 fish overnight. They have shut down power stations, incapacitated a US nuclear warship and had a significant socioeconomic impact on tourist areas. At the moment, a group of Australian scientists are researching the possibility that they will eventually utterly destroy all other life in the oceans.

The answer? Cooking them, according to one Italian scientist. Stefano Piraino, a zoology professor at the University of Salento, is about to embark on a European commission-funded study to try to demonstrate that the ideal location for jellyfish is on our dinner tables.

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Lakes of mercury and human sacrifices – after 1,800 years, Teotihuacan reveals its treasures

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 17:52:01 GMT2017-09-24T17:52:01Z

When archaeologists found a tunnel under Mexico’s ‘birthplace of the gods’, they could only dream of the riches they would discover. Now its wonders – from jewel-eyed figures to necklaces of human teeth – are being revealed to the world

In 2003, a tunnel was discovered beneath the Feathered Serpent pyramid in the ruins of Teotihuacan, the ancient city in Mexico. Undisturbed for 1,800 years, the sealed-off passage was found to contain thousands of extraordinary treasures lying exactly where they had first been placed as ritual offerings to the gods. Items unearthed included greenstone crocodile teeth, crystals shaped into eyes, and sculptures of jaguars ready to pounce. Even more remarkable was a miniature mountainous landscape, 17 metres underground, with tiny pools of liquid mercury representing lakes. The walls of the tunnel were found to have been carefully impregnated with powdered pyrite, or fool’s gold, to give the effect in firelight of standing under a galaxy of stars.

The archaeological site, near Mexico City, is one of the largest and most important in the world, with millions of visitors every year. This was its most exciting development for decades – and the significance of these new discoveries is explored in a major exhibition opening this month at the de Young Museum in San Francisco.

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Jaguars send message to Donald Trump by taking a knee at Wembley | Sean Ingle

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 19:25:41 GMT2017-09-24T19:25:41Z

A show of unity from Jacksonville players and staff was backed by a dominant performance on the pitch that overwhelmed Baltimore Ravens 44-7

The message was simple, defiant and express-delivered to an orange-tinged septuagenarian living 3,600 miles away in Washington DC. As the Star Spangled Banner rang out across Wembley, 27 players and staff of the Jacksonville Jaguars and Baltimore Ravens dropped to one knee to protest against President Donald Trump – the largest number at an NFL game. Dozens more on the Jaguars staff, including their owner, Shahid Khan, linked hands on the touchline in support.

Some say sport and politics should not mix. But after Trump’s explosive tweets over the weekend, during which he suggested that players who refused to stand for the national anthem should be fired and called on owners to “get that son of a bitch off the field” if they disrespected the flag, it was impossible to see how the two were not conjoined.

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British & Irish Lions to reduce fixtures for 2021 South Africa tour

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 21:00:03 GMT2017-09-24T21:00:03Z

• Organisers believe there is not enough ‘meaningful’ opposition
• Premiership clubs concerned about workload of leading players

The British & Irish Lions tour to South Africa in 2021 will be cut to eight matches in a move that will be welcomed by England’s Premiership clubs, but future trips could be restored to 10 fixtures with the four home unions keeping their options open.

Talks with New Zealand, Australia and South Africa about an agreement to cover the three tours in the next 12 years are approaching a conclusion. The Lions have come under pressure from the Premiership, which secured the backing of the Rugby Football Union, to cut the duration of tours and reduce the load on leading players.

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Fifa set to reverse controversial poppy ban for home-nations teams

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 21:30:04 GMT2017-09-24T21:30:04Z

• Decision would allow shirts or armbands to display poppy symbol
• Ban could be lifted in time for England’s proposed friendly against Germany

Fifa is set to lift its controversial ban on the home nations teams wearing poppies on their shirts or armbands in time for England’s proposed friendly against Germany the evening before Armistice Day.

There was widespread annoyance last year when the world game’s governing body fined the English, Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish football associations after all defied the ban and players wore poppy-printed armbands during World Cup qualifying matches.

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Justin Thomas completes remarkable season with $10m FedEx Cup win

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 22:36:27 GMT2017-09-24T22:36:27Z

• Xander Schauffele wins Tour Championship by one stroke from Thomas
• FedEx winner will rise to No4 in the world rankings this week

Justin Thomas has $10m worth of consolation after losing the Tour Championship by a stroke to Xander Schauffele. Sunday on the outskirts of Atlanta golf produced one of its curious scenarios in which even the runner-up had cause for epic celebration.

For Thomas, the FedEx Cup was fitting reward for a season which returned five victories, one of which was a major championship, the US PGA. Schauffele has cause to be equally delighted with his efforts. Not only did he see off a stellar field at East Lake but his rookie year on the PGA Tour has brought two wins and a cataclysmic rise from the position of merely seeking to retain his card. Even after a share of fifth at the US Open and victory at the Greenbrier Classic Schauffele was 82nd in the world rankings, in what proves an indication of his earlier standing.

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Exeter’s Henry Slade displays true quality in victory over Wasps

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:22:34 GMT2017-09-24T18:22:34Z

• Exeter Chiefs 31-17 Wasps
• Chiefs stand two points clear at top of Premiership

Anyone who assumed Exeter would slip back into the chasing pack this autumn is forgetting what made the Chiefs champions last May. Whether it be a grey Sunday in Devon or a blazing summer’s afternoon at Twickenham Rob Baxter’s squad pride themselves on being men for all seasons and here was another good example. Last season’s triumph, if anything, has given them extra impetus.

The Chiefs’ status as top dogs in the Premiership after four games is all the more praiseworthy considering how many senior players are currently on the sidelines. Even with half their first XV missing and their dazed young back-row forward Sam Simmonds departing prematurely on a stretcher, they had far too much vim and vigour for an off-colour Wasps side whose own lengthy injury list appears to be nibbling away at their confidence and composure.

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Moeen Ali’s blistering century sets up England victory over West Indies

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 17:49:22 GMT2017-09-24T17:49:22Z

England 369-9; West Indies 245
• England won the third ODI by 124 runs

The anticipation was that the boundaries at Bristol would be too short for one of the most popular left-handed batsmen in the world. And so it proved. But it was not just Chris Gayle who was delivering a hail of sixes into the stands at square-leg. Moeen Ali, the man who protested earlier this summer that he “can’t hit sixes like the others”, sped to the second fastest century hit by an Englishman in a one-day international match.

Moeen’s response to peppering the ball into the stands so regularly was a little more self-effacing than we have come to expect from Gayle, who struck 94 – including six sixes – before he was brilliantly run out by Adil Rashid.

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Kelly Holmes reveals she self-harmed at height of athletics career

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 16:18:01 GMT2017-09-24T16:18:01Z

Olympic champion speaks out about experience of depression as new figures reveal mental health crisis among girls

Dame Kelly Holmes has spoken about how she self-harmed at the height of her athletic career as figures emerged showing that mental health problems are rising sharply among teenage girls and young women.

Holmes, who won gold in the 800m and 1500m at the Athens Olympics in 2004, said that the year before her victories she was cutting herself regularly to release the anguish she was experiencing as a result of suffering sporting injuries.

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Jürgen Klopp’s wide-eyed entertainers likely to win more admirers than medals | Jacob Steinberg

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 21:30:04 GMT2017-09-24T21:30:04Z

Liverpool’s helter-skelter win over Leicester was a thrilling spectacle but suggested a side lacking the ruthless streak that defines title-winners

As selection headaches go, it is not exactly as nagging as having to choose between Fabio Borini and Rickie Lambert. Nor is it like living in fear of Fernando Torres picking up an injury that leaves David N’Gog as the squad’s only fit forward. Unlike his predecessors Jürgen Klopp is not weighed down by such concerns. Instead Liverpool’s manager has what he might describe as the rather cool dilemma of working out how to make the most of his enviable attacking options now that Sadio Mané is free from suspension and Philippe Coutinho is showing why Barcelona targeted him in the summer.

Klopp will have terrific fun arranging his forwards. Whom to leave out? Coutinho, the scorer of a stunning free-kick in Saturday’s 3-2 win over Leicester City, looks untouchable. But Mohamed Salah, who scored the opener with a header from Coutinho’s cross, is electric on the right, Mané’s potent speed terrifies defences and Roberto Firmino knits it all together with his slippery movement off the ball. The extra competition even seems to be stirring Daniel Sturridge, who came off the bench at the King Power Stadium to set up Jordan Henderson for Liverpool’s decisive third goal. Maybe the solution is to restore Mané against Spartak Moscow on Tuesday and turn Coutinho into Liverpool’s Andrés Iniesta by pulling him into midfield at the expense of Emre Can or Georginio Wijnaldum.

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Hughie Fury’s defeat by Joseph Parker marred by ‘conspiracy’ claims

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 16:24:00 GMT2017-09-24T16:24:00Z

Briton’s promoter vows to have split decision overturned and claims corruption is rife at boxing’s highest level after majority decision loss in WBO title fight

Hughie Fury’s failure to dislodge the WBO world heavyweight champion Joseph Parker in his first major fight was accompanied by such passionate wailing from his supporters that he left the Manchester Arena a wounded king rather than a fallen prince.

Perversely, the young Mancunian’s reputation is enhanced rather than diminished. That will be minor comfort to him, however, given Parker is now perfectly placed to pursue much bigger nights: against the winner of the putative rematch between Tony Bellew and David Haye, followed by a mega-fight next summer against Anthony Joshua. There is also the prospect of fighting Deontay Wilder, the unbeaten American knockout artist.

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Tomer Hemed sinks Newcastle as Brighton grab much-needed win

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 17:25:00 GMT2017-09-24T17:25:00Z

If Brighton & Hove Albion get relegated this season it will not be for a lack of valour, focus or determination. This narrowest of home wins against a team who were technically their better will be celebrated in this part of the south coast, though probably only briefly. The next test, at Arsenal next Sunday, is only around the corner.

Tomer Hemed’s dextrous second-half volley was enough to separate the home side from a Newcastle United who had come into the match after three consecutive wins and left it reminded of the fine margins of Premier League football. For Brighton, meanwhile, it was back-to-back victories at the Amex Stadium.

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Manchester United’s ugly win the perfect preparation for CSKA Moscow mission | Ben Fisher

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 17:08:48 GMT2017-09-24T17:08:48Z

Southampton victory shows José Mourinho’s men have rediscovered their ruthless streak just as a testing month of fixtures looms

For more than half an hour, José Mourinho sat waiting on the Manchester United team coach outside St Mary’s doubtless basking in the comfort of a job well done after extending his side’s unbeaten run to eight matches. They displayed a callous efficiency and a charming stubbornness in an unforgiving and occasionally ugly performance that earned United victory and a fifth clean sheet in six Premier League matches. Romelu Lukaku, though, was still stationed inside in doping control, and, such is the ruthlessness of this United team at present, they left for Southampton airport without him.

Lukaku was ultimately the match‑winner but this was a result built upon steely foundations. Chris Smalling and Daley Blind offered late reinforcements and by the end United had six defenders on the pitch and sometimes eight, nine or even 10 men behind the ball. Lukaku was left estranged for large parts of the second half as a rejuvenated Southampton penned in the visitors.

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Eliud Kipchoge remains marathon’s big boss despite missing world record | Sean Ingle

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 14:49:12 GMT2017-09-24T14:49:12Z

The Kenyan showed in Berlin why he can be considered the greatest marathon runner in history despite failing to overhaul his compatriot Dennis Kimetto’s mark of 2hr 2min 57sec in challenging conditions

One by one his biggest rivals slipped away, lost in the murk and the mist of an autumnal Berlin morning, until the only opponent Eliud Kipchoge had left was an unheralded Ethiopian, Guye Adola, running his first marathon – and a ticking clock.

Then the unthinkable happened. With five miles to go and the official world record of 2hr 2min 57sec still in his grasp, the greatest marathon runner in history began to wobble. A gap of a metre to Adola became five, then 20. The world-record attempt was gone, and so – it seemed – was an unbeaten record stretching back three years. It was the athletics’ equivalent of a celebrated heavyweight champion being dumped on his pants in the 10th round by an unheralded no-hoper.

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Peter Sagan times sprint to perfection to win third world title in a row

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 15:28:19 GMT2017-09-24T15:28:19Z

• Sagan wins in photo finish from Norway’s Alexander Kristoff
• Slovakian is first to win three consecutive world crowns

Peter Sagan won his third world title in a row in a dramatic finish to the men’s road race at the World Championships in Norway.

The Slovakian had barely featured among the lead riders throughout the 267.5km race in Bergen. He was classified 80th approaching the final climb up Salmon Hill, but timed his ride to perfection as he held off the Norwegian Alexander Kristoff in a sprint finish to become the first man to win three consecutive world crowns.

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Slaven Bilic feeling the heat after Spurs shine glaring light on West Ham flaws | David Hytner

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 21:30:04 GMT2017-09-24T21:30:04Z

Coach retains fans’ goodwill but the way his side flirted with humiliation against Tottenham was ominous for a man aware of the harsh realities of his profession

Slaven Bilic knows how it goes in his line of work. Once a manager is in danger, once the narrative becomes entrenched, it can begin to feel like the long kiss goodbye. “Once that’s opened, then it basically doesn’t stop,” the West Ham manager said after his team’s 3-2 home defeat against Tottenham Hotspur on Saturday. “Game by game or two games by two games – it’s the way it is in modern football. Once you open that page …”

Bilic turned that page last season, when only a 1-0 win against Spurs with three games to go persuaded the West Ham hierarchy to stick with him. But three successive Premier League defeats at the start of this season ensured that the mention of his name were prefaced by words like “under-fire” and “beleaguered”.

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Two dazzling tries from Rob Horne sees Northampton victorious at London Irish

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:14:08 GMT2017-09-24T18:14:08Z

• London Irish 25-40 Northampton
• Saints’ first-half onslaught opened up match-winning lead

Not exactly the homecoming London Irish were hoping for, rather a few home truths on a first Premiership match here for 16 months and the brutal reality of the arduous slog ahead. Chief among the lessons for the Exiles is the danger posed by a start as sluggish as theirs. They stirred themselves after the break but Irish were ultimately outclassed by Northampton, for whom the Australian centre Rob Horne registered his first two tries and caught the eye throughout.

The fact that the Saints were themselves ragged at times in the second half will not please Jim Mallinder, but his side’s recovery following their opening‑day embarrassment continues to impress with this a third win in a row since then. George North is finding some form, Luther Burrell too – although he limped off with a knee injury after the break – and Courtney Lawes does not seem capable of dropping his excellent standards at present.

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Oumar Niasse finally measures up for Ronald Koeman’s underachievers

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 21:29:04 GMT2017-09-24T21:29:04Z

• Niasse arrives from bench to give Everton win over Bournemouth
• His attitude was perfect, says Blues manager Koeman

Oumar Niasse collected his man-of-the-match award and left Goodison Park wearing an Everton tracksuit on Saturday. Nothing remarkable there – he is, despite Ronald Koeman’s best efforts, still an Everton player after all – although the striker’s attire underlined the speed of his transformation from outcast to saviour. Unlike his team-mates, Niasse does not have a club suit to wear.

The Senegal international was not part of Koeman’s squad when they were fitted for suits in the summer but Everton have ordered one for their £13.5m signing in time for Burnley’s visit on Sunday. It is the least they can do. The manager should ensure it is tailored to perfection, and leave a thank you note in the pocket.

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'It's smoke and mirrors': Arsène Wenger takes aim at cryotherapy

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 21:30:04 GMT2017-09-24T21:30:04Z

• Arsenal face three games in seven days, including Belarus trip
• ‘The ones who prove it works are paid by the guy who says it does’

Arsène Wenger has questioned whether modern recovery treatments for players such as cryotherapy actually work and wonders if they have been pushed by specialists with vested interests.

The Arsenal manager is at the beginning of a demanding week, in which his team face West Bromwich at Emirates Stadium on Monday and return to their home ground for another Premier League fixture against Brighton on Sunday, which kicks off at 12 noon. In between times, they play Bate Borisov in Belarus in the Europa League on Thursday.

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Thibaut Courtois confident resurgent Chelsea are hitting form at right time

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 21:30:04 GMT2017-09-24T21:30:04Z

• Champions face Atlético Madrid and Manchester City this week
• Eden Hazard still easing back from the bench after ankle injury

If there were any Chelsea fans still worrying whether they would make a better fist of defending their Premier League title than the previous attempt, the clinical way in which Antonio Conte’s side dispatched Stoke City on Saturday has surely dispelled those doubts.

A third successive away win courtesy of Álvaro Morata’s brilliant hat-trick ensured they remain within touching distance of the two Manchester clubs at the top of the nascent table, even if Conte will be more than happy to remain the shadows for now.

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Labour can’t afford to get emotional over Brexit | Zoe Williams

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 15:30:47 GMT2017-09-24T15:30:47Z

An open letter asking Corbyn to cleave to the single market lends a with-us-or-against-us emotional charge to what should be a purely practical issue

Thirty Labour MPs, together with trades unionists, MEPs and mayors, signed an open letter on the eve of party conference, asking – begging? – Jeremy Corbyn to make Labour the party of the single market and the customs union. There were ideas in there that should appeal to the Labour leader – workers’ rights rather than curbs on immigration, solidarity with the rest of Europe, public services that are protected by judiciously not setting the economy on fire. Yet it was an unintelligent manoeuvre, platitudinous on the surface, divisive in its unspoken binaries, for exactly the same reason Theresa May’s Florence speech was platitudinous and divisive.

Tory Brexit has become a fight to the death between small-state, low-tax, free-market fundamentalists and one-nation, politeness-and-prosperity, small-and-large-C conservatives. Labour Brexit, in this letter’s frame, is turning into a battle between market-sympathetic, social-democratic “centrists” and hard-left, anti-capitalist change-makers. All the ideological faultlines opened up by a decade of political acrimony and man-made hardship have met in this one issue, and it is the wrong issue.

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Robots have already taken over our work, but they’re made of flesh and bone | Brett Frischmann and Evan Selinger

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:00:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:00:05Z

Many jobs in the modern economy have been sapped of their humanity. How should we resist the rise of ‘digital Taylorism’?

Most of the headlines about technology in the workplace relate to robots rendering people unemployed. But what if this threat is distracting us from another of the distorting effects of automation? To what extent are we being turned into workers that resemble robots?

Take taxi drivers. The prevailing wisdom is they will be replaced by Uber drivers, who in turn will ultimately be replaced by self-driving cars. Those lauding Transport for London’s refusal to renew Uber’s licence might like to consider how, long before that company “disrupted” the industry, turn-by-turn GPS route management and dispatch control systems were de-skilling taxi drivers: instead of building up navigational knowledge, they increasingly rely on satnavs.

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‘We can provide a politics of hope, a politics for the people’

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 20:00:25 GMT2017-09-23T20:00:25Z

Labour needs to build on its electoral success and prepare for government

What a difference six months makes. The political landscape is barely recognisable from the day Theresa May stood in Downing Street to announce a snap general election. The pundits expected a Tory landslide. The election would strengthen the government’s hand in the Brexit negotiations and stabilise the country, they agreed. Labour faced oblivion.

Related: Brexit battles face Jeremy Corbyn’s ‘mainstream’ party in Brighton

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The Guardian view on Germany’s elections: Merkel’s victory | Editorial

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:14:29 GMT2017-09-24T18:14:29Z

It is worrying that a xenophobic nationalist party will have a parliamentary presence but the mainstream parties will dominate the government

With her centre-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party leading today’s vote, Angela Merkel is set to remain Germany’s chancellor, for a fourth consecutive term. This comes as no surprise. Her popularity has remained high. While her party captured a lower percentage of votes than in 2013, she was dominant throughout the campaign while her main opponent, the Social Democrat Martin Schulz, failed to mount a convincing challenge. Just a fifth of voters backed the Social Democrats (SPD), and Mr Schulz announced that he would not renew the grand coalition with Mrs Merkel, who will now open talks with the pro-business FDP liberals (at 10%) and the Greens (at 9%).

Europe’s most powerful leader has delivered yet more proof of her political resilience. Key to Mrs Merkel’s longevity is what some observers have called her strategy of “asymmetric demobilisation”: by co-opting many of her mainstream adversaries’ policies, whether on nuclear energy, minimum wage or gay marriage, she has left them very little space indeed. What space has opened up is on the extremist, nationalist fringe. By reaching 13%, the far-right Alternative für Deutschland (AfD) has come out stronger than many had anticipated during the campaign. For the first time in decades, a xenophobic and rabidly anti-European movement will be represented in the Bundestag.

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Britain's newspapers could learn a lot from Jimmy the milkman | Hugh Muir

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:23:30 GMT2017-09-24T18:23:30Z

We have a 20th-century press ill-equipped in spirit and practical capability to connect with the diversity of 21st-century Britain

When I look at the dwindling circulation graphs for Britain’s newspapers the image of a glider plane comes to mind. It’s being piloted expertly – for many remain products of high quality – but decidedly to earth.

I am also reminded of a ride I once took on a milk float driven around Blackburn by John “Jimmy” Mather. That had been his family’s trade for a generation and all was well until Blackburn changed and a large number of families of Asian descent moved to his patch. Many, especially the women, had no English. He couldn’t speak to them, he couldn’t sell to them. He could have thrown up his hands and piloted his own sales graph to decline. Instead, he learned Gujarati. Not fluently, but enough to connect with and befriend his customers. The market changed, so Jimmy changed. There is a great deal our press could learn from Jimmy.

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May’s delirious cabinet is in denial about who really controls Brexit | Matthew d’Ancona

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 16:42:18 GMT2017-09-24T16:42:18Z

Senior Tories such as Boris Johnson and Philip Hammond seem detached from reality, fighting battles that aren’t within their power to win

In the chilling Edgar Allan Poe story The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar, a terminally ill man seeks to be hypnotised at the point of death, suspended “in an unusually perfect state of mesmeric trance”. The grotesque experiment appears to work. As Valdemar lies in a stupefied limbo, his doctors are forced to concede that death has “been arrested by the mesmeric process”.

Theresa May’s government experienced something disturbingly close to this in the hours that followed the exit poll on the night of 8 June. The loss of her Commons majority was an electoral disaster, a calamitous weakening of the authority that the prime minister had explicitly sought to enhance in the first place.

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May’s Florence speech confirmed it: we need to ditch Brexit | Hugo Dixon

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:00:00 GMT2017-09-24T18:00:00Z

After the prime minister’s U-turns, the push is on for a soft Brexit. But the best deal of all is, and always was, staying in the EU

Theresa May’s Florence speech rams home why we shouldn’t be quitting the European Union at all.

Related: Theresa May's Florence speech: key points

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Forget for the many, not the few. Labour's new slogan is 'no screw-ups'

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:51:45 GMT2017-09-24T18:51:45Z

Jeremy Corbyn shows how far he has come by skilfully avoiding talking about Brexit at a party conference that is mainly a party

Everywhere you look, there’s someone grinning. And almost all the smiles are genuine; only a few look forced. Wind back a year and it was different story. At the 2016 party conference in Liverpool, everyone was grim-faced, with Momentum and Labour centrists barely on spitting terms with one another, yet still seemingly locked in a mutual death spiral. Even the bright-eyed optimists had all but given up on Labour.

Then came the general election and the Tories’ hitherto unexpected desire to self-destruct. Overnight, Labour went from being a party on the margins to being not just a credible opposition, but a possible government in waiting. Despair turned to hope and the 2017 Labour party conference in Brighton became more of a party than a conference. There was a contagious excitement among the delegates. A sense that their time was coming. It wasn’t a matter of if, but when.

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Britain's growing debt problem demands a fresh set of eyes | Phillip Inman

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 14:39:44 GMT2017-09-24T14:39:44Z

The OBR’s figures haven’t added up for years. It’s time for an in-depth examination of where the economy is going

It’s a sad economic choice: accept the need for mounting debts just to achieve moderate growth or crack down on borrowing and get no growth at all.

When there are queues at food banks and child poverty is on the rise, it might seem irresponsible to choose between reckless growth and sober stagnation. Neither option does the poorest any favours, but that appears to be the main dilemma for central bank policymakers.

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Social media are testing the legal boundaries of free speech | Open door

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 16:46:35 GMT2017-09-24T16:46:35Z

The law on hate speech shaped itself in response to physical confrontations. But now we also live in cyberspace

‘Fighting words” is American legal shorthand for the issue of how far a person’s public speech may inflame listeners before it can be justly restrained. Basically, it asks if the speech is likely to produce imminent lawless action.

In the UK and some other jurisdictions the same legal issue is labelled more sedately. “Public order” and “breach of the peace” are common markers of an old legal dilemma to which technology is giving new complexity. How police, prosecutors, judges and legislators react to it will influence the way social media affect the practical exercise of freedoms of association, assembly and expression in future.

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Red admiral thrives in butterfly count while whites show decline

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:01:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:01:05Z

A record 60,000 people took part in the Big Butterfly Count but each participant saw on average only 11 butterflies, the lowest since the count began in 2010

Summer’s washout failed to dampen the prospects for the red admiral, one of the UK’s most popular butterflies, whose numbers rose by 75% compared with last year, according to the annual Big Butterfly Count.

Other butterfly species were less fortunate, however, with declines seen across the three common species of white butterflies. The green-veined white and both the large white and small white were down more than a third on last year, reflecting difficult weather conditions.

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Survey reveals scale of hostility towards Arabs in Britain

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:00:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:00:05Z

Most people polled say Arabs have failed to integrate, and support racial profiling against them by police

The scale of hostility in Britain towards Islam and Arabs is revealed in a YouGov survey showing most UK voters believe Arabs have failed to integrate themselves into British society, and their presence has not been beneficial.

The survey also shows that most voters back security policing based on assumptions about the likelihood of races to commit crimes – so-called racial profiling.

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Uber faces double battle against London ban and scrutiny of hiring practices

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 16:19:43 GMT2017-09-24T16:19:43Z

Ride-hailing group’s London manager says it has not been asked to make changes but would ‘like to know what we can do’

Uber will be fighting for its future on two fronts this week, as the ride-hailing service attempts to reverse the revocation of its London licence while appealing against a landmark ruling on the way it engages its drivers.

The dual efforts will come against the backdrop of the company being branded a “disgrace” by the shadow chancellor, John McDonnell, while the Labour leader, Jeremy Corbyn, said Transport for London (TfL) had raised “serious concerns” about safety but suggested Uber would have an opportunity to “mend its ways”.

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Exposed: ‘secretive’ NHS cost-cutting plans include children’s care

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 23:01:06 GMT2017-09-24T23:01:06Z

Documents reveal £5m cuts in South Gloucestershire will include cancer diagnostics and treatment for children with complex needs

Cancer diagnostics and treatment for children with complex needs are among services earmarked for cost-cutting plans considered by the NHS to plug a funding gap, according to documents seen by campaigners.

The plans, by South Gloucestershire clinical commissioning group and released under a freedom of information request, show that waiting targets for non-urgent operations are also due to be relaxed under the “capped expenditure process” (CEP) as the health service seeks to balance its books in the current financial year.

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Lost Rubens portrait of James I's 'lover' is rediscovered in Glasgow

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 10:28:13 GMT2017-09-24T10:28:13Z

Painting of George Villiers, first Duke of Buckingham, thought to have been a copy, is identified as original after 400 years

A long-lost portrait of perhaps one of the most famous gay men in history by the Flemish artist Peter Paul Rubens has been found in Glasgow.

The portrait showing George Villiers, the first Duke of Buckingham, thought to have been James VI and I’s lover, had been hanging in a National Trust for Scotland property and was believed to be a copy of the lost original, which had been missing for almost 400 years.

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Falling number of NHS child psychiatrists provokes 'deep concern'

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:51:42 GMT2017-09-24T18:51:42Z

Shortage of mental heath specialists comes at same time as distress among children is rising, says Royal College of Psychiatrists

The number of NHS psychiatrists helping troubled children and young people in England is falling despite the growing demand for care, new official figures have shown.

The total number of psychiatrists working in children and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) fell from 1,015 full-time equivalent posts in May 2013 to 948 in May this year. The figure includes all doctors working in CAMHS psychiatry, both consultants and trainees.

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Davis dismissive of Johnson's influence on May's Florence speech

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:46:10 GMT2017-09-24T18:46:10Z

Brexit secretary says ‘policy had been coming a long time’ as new evidence of cabinet power struggles emerge

Boris Johnson’s personal blueprint for leaving the EU had no influence on the prime minister’s flagship speech in Florence, David Davis, the Brexit secretary, has said.

Davis dismissed the idea that Johnson had changed the government’s thinking on Brexit after allies of the foreign secretary briefed several newspapers that his 4,000-word Telegraph article stopped the prime minister veering towards a softer Brexit.

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Parsons Green suspect's foster parents are shellshocked, says son

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 16:00:48 GMT2017-09-24T16:00:48Z

Penny and Ron Jones have yet to return home after Ahmed Hassan, 18, whom they fostered, was charged over attack

The foster parents who looked after the prime suspect in the Parsons Green terror in west London attack have been left shellshocked by the ordeal, their son has said.

Penny Jones, 71, and her husband Ron, 81, have yet to return to their home in Sunbury-on-Thames, Surrey.

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Improving fire safety in high-rises after Grenfell blaze 'could take years'

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 20:49:39 GMT2017-09-24T20:49:39Z

Government document says completing repair work on buildings that failed tests will take far longer than the public expects

Completing repair work on the hundreds of buildings that have failed fire safety tests in the aftermath of the Grenfell Tower disaster could take years due to the scale of the task, according to a government document.

In an email seen by the Guardian, a senior civil servant in the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) warned that new ideas and skills for high-rise building work will be required to repair the vast number of unsafe flats, schools and hospitals in the timely manner demanded by the public.

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Caseload almost doubles at UK antislavery body as remit widens

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 20:50:42 GMT2017-09-24T20:50:42Z

Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority investigates possible abuses at carwashes and in construction, textile, cleaning and warehousing sectors

The UK’s antislavery body has launched 185 investigations since May, nearly double its total for the whole of last year, after assuming powers that allow it to look beyond the food and farming sector.

The Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority (GLAA) is scrutinising the treatment of workers in carwashes, construction, textile manufacture, cleaning and warehouse operations. A number of prosecutions are already under way and the first case under its new remit is expected to come to court as early as next month.

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Teenager arrested after six injured in ‘noxious substance attack’ in London

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 04:23:45 GMT2017-09-24T04:23:45Z

Boy, 15, held on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm in incident at shopping centre in Stratford

Six people have been injured after a noxious substance was thrown during an incident at a shopping centre in east London.

A 15-year-old boy has been arrested on suspicion of causing grievous bodily harm in connection with the incident on Saturday evening.

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Man rescued alive after 30-metre fall down mineshaft in Cornwall

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 15:45:08 GMT2017-09-24T15:45:08Z

Coastguard rescuers used ropes to reach injured man in his 50s who fell down shaft of disused mine on coastal path at St Just

A man has been rescued after falling about 30 metres down a mineshaft in Cornwall.

A paramedic and a firefighter were lowered on ropes to the injured man and were giving him first aid, Cornwall Fire and Rescue Service said. Rescuers took three hours to reach the man, believed to be in his mid-50s, and extracted him from the disused mineshaft at Port Nanven on the coastal path near St Just. The coastguard said the initial call for help was made shortly after midday on Sunday.

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Royal Bank of Scotland delays introduction of low-rate credit card

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 14:40:36 GMT2017-09-24T14:40:36Z

Chief executive says high level of consumer debt is factor in decision despite bank’s shrinking share of market

Royal Bank of Scotland has postponed plans to introduce a cut-price credit card amid concerns about the £200bn of lending amassed by UK households.

The bank, which is 70% owned by the taxpayer, has decided against launching a more competitive credit card at a time when the consumer credit market – personal loans, credit cards and car finance – is facing scrutiny from the Bank of England.

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New Brexit rules ‘could lead to unskilled workforce crisis’

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 19:29:24 GMT2017-09-23T19:29:24Z

IPPR thinktank warns UK may suffer if rules for non-EU migrant workers are extended to EU citizens for access to jobs market

A swath of UK industry would find it “near impossible” to recruit non-skilled workers from Europe post-Brexit if proposals recently outlined in a draft government document were enacted, according to the IPPR thinktank.

According to the Home Office document, leaked earlier this month, rules that apply to non-EU migrant workers could be extended to their EU counterparts when determining who has access to the UK jobs market.

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'Everything's changed': despair of Briton held without charge in Bangladesh

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 00:28:05 GMT2017-09-24T00:28:05Z

Hasnat Karim remains in prison although no evidence has been produced to implicate him in 2016 Holey Bakery attack in which more than 20 were killed

It was supposed to be a celebration. On 1 July 2016, Hasnat Karim, a British-Bangladeshi businessman, and his wife, Sharmina Parveen, took their two children out for their daughter’s 13th birthday at Holey Artisan Bakery Cafe, an upscale Dhaka restaurant. They had gone early so their son could later watch a cartoon at home, where a birthday cake was waiting.

As they scanned the menu, gunmen claiming allegiance to the Islamic State stormed the cafe. Over 10 hours, they murdered more than 20 people, mostly foreigners, and held the others hostage.

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Nurses who failed English test aimed at curbing immigration set for a reprieve

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 23:05:29 GMT2017-09-23T23:05:29Z

Hurdle that included correct use of tenses and essay structure led to dramatic fall in skilled staff registering

Language rules introduced to curb immigration are set to be relaxed after they prevented native English-speaking nurses from working in the NHS.

The NHS has a shortage of 40,000 nurses and recruiters and NHS employers have been lobbying for looser language requirements so that thousands of nurses from countries such as Australia, India and the Philippines can work in Britain.

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Transport chaos looms as rail unions widen strikes over driver-only trains

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 15:00:19 GMT2017-09-23T15:00:19Z

Carefully planned walkouts will cause commuter misery next month, as the government and train operators try to save money

Pity British commuters this autumn. In southern England, Merseyside, East Anglia and the east coast main line they will face a wave of disruption after strikes were announced for Tuesday 3 October and Thursday 5 October. London Underground will also face disruption on the later date.

Privately, the rail workers’ union, the RMT, and drivers’ union Aslef believe they can win improved pay and conditions for their members and ensure the safety of the travelling public as rail firms attempt to introduce trains without guards.

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South-east England to bask in warm weather as breeze brings up hot air

Sat, 23 Sep 2017 16:27:15 GMT2017-09-23T16:27:15Z

Temperatures in the region could hit 23C on Sunday, with Northern Ireland also expected to enjoy some sun – but inland areas could see showers

Summer may be over but those living in the south-east of England are set for another helping of warm, dry weather on Sunday.

The region could be enjoying predicted highs of 22 to 23C by the afternoon, following a damp start to the weekend.

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Historic referendum on independence leaves Iraqi Kurds polarised

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 04:00:03 GMT2017-09-25T04:00:03Z

In Erbil, a festival feel is building before the vote on 25 September. In Sulaimaniya, 150 miles away, it’s business as usual

Its streets bustled with Sunday shoppers. Its teahouses brimmed with men who preferred playing dominoes to talking politics. And on boulevards and in town squares, there was hardly a Kurdish flag to be seen.

On the eve of a historic day in Kurdistan, its two biggest hubs were a tale of two cities. In Erbil, the centre of the independence referendum to be held on 25 September, a festival feel that had built for the past week had taken over neighbourhoods. Flags fluttered from street poles, and car windows and shops were festooned with banners proclaiming the dawn of self-determination.

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Senate blow for Macron as he pushes through unpopular reforms

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 19:28:12 GMT2017-09-24T19:28:12Z

Partial results showed the centre-right Republican party on track to keep majority after vote for about half of the 348 seats

Emmanuel Macron’s centrist party suffered its first electoral blow on Sunday as rival conservatives dominated elections to the French Senate. The French president is embarking on unpopular changes to labour law and other reforms he hopes will reinvigorate the economy.

Related: Macron takes a page from Trump to change France's labour laws

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Pakistani MP who says Imran Khan harassed her faces wave of abuse

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:00:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:00:05Z

Ayesha Gulalai Wazir is denounced by her party, while some on social media say she should be whipped or attacked with acid

When the Pakistani politician Ayesha Gulalai Wazir accused the cricket-star-turned-opposition-leader Imran Khan of sexual harassment, the vitriol unleashed against her was swift and vicious.

First, leaders of Khan’s Pakistan Tehreek-e Insaf (PTI) party – which Gulalai also belongs to – publicly denounced her and demanded 30 million rupees (£218,000) in compensation for damage to his reputation and “mental torture”.

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Ted Cruz joins Republicans ranged against Graham-Cassidy healthcare bill

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 19:39:02 GMT2017-09-24T19:39:02Z

Effort to replace ACA appears doomed as Cruz indicates Lee will follow him and Collins says it is ‘very difficult’ for her to envision voting for the bill

The Trump administration’s latest efforts to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) appeared to be disintegrating over the weekend, as a growing number of Republican senators indicated they would vote against the so-called Graham-Cassidy bill.

Related: Trump attacks McCain and other Republicans over healthcare failure

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Libyan general Khalifa Haftar accused of human rights abuses

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 05:00:05 GMT2017-09-25T05:00:05Z

Ex-CIA asset, due to meet Italian officials in Rome, ordered soldiers to commit war crimes, according to legal experts

European leaders are embracing a Libyan general who has ordered his soldiers to commit war crimes, according to new evidence that has been analysed by senior legal experts.

The allegation of human rights abuses by Gen Khalifa Haftar, a former CIA asset who controls nearly half of Libya from his base in the east, comes as the general is due to arrive in Rome on Tuesday, where he will be received by Italian officials. The visit is a radical departure for Italy, who had previously shunned Haftar and seen him as a major obstacle to stability in the region because of his refusal to recognise the UN-backed government in the west.

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Bali volcano: 34,000 flee Mount Agung as tremor magnitude intensifies

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 07:28:52 GMT2017-09-24T07:28:52Z

Number of people leaving homes in the shadow of the volcano has tripled amid fears it could erupt for the first time in more than 50 years

More than 34,000 people have fled from a rumbling volcano on Bali as the magnitude of tremors grows, prompting fears it could erupt for the first time in more than 50 years, an official has said.

Related: Bali: travel warning issued as volcano threatens to erupt

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Greek police expose audacity of £3,000-a-day pickpocketing gang

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 13:09:44 GMT2017-09-24T13:09:44Z

Officers detail crackdown on major criminal network that worked shifts and in teams to distract and prey on tourists

The audacity and creativity of a pickpocket gang who worked shifts, employed teams of runners and made tourists their exclusive prey has been revealed by one of the most successful crackdowns to date on street crime in Greece.

Pickpocketing may flourish in tourist havens, but in Athens, where visitor numbers are booming, thieves appear to have been on a roll. With takings in excess of €3,500 (£3,100) a day, pickpockets posing as holidaymakers built a criminal network of unprecedented scale, “working” the public transport system for the best part of a decade.

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Portuguese children to crowdfund European climate change case

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 23:01:06 GMT2017-09-24T23:01:06Z

Group from region hit by deadly forest fires to sue 47 countries alleging failure to tackle climate change threatens their right to life

Portuguese schoolchildren from the area struck by the country’s worst forest fires are seeking crowdfunding to sue 47 European countries, alleging that the states’ failure to tackle climate change threatens their right to life.

The children, from the Leiria region of central Portugal, where fires this summer killed more than 60 people and left hundreds injured, are being represented by British barristers who are experts in environmental and climate change law.

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North Korea foreign minister says firing rockets on US mainland 'inevitable'

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 07:25:42 GMT2017-09-24T07:25:42Z

Ri Yong Ho tells the UN general assembly that Donald Trump was on a ‘suicide mission’ as tensions between the nations escalate further

North Korea has said that firing its rockets at the US mainland was “inevitable” after Donald Trump called Pyongyang’s leader “rocket man”, in a further escalation of rhetoric between the two leaders.

North Korean foreign minister Ri Yong Ho’s remarks before the United Nations general assembly came hours after US Air Force B-1B Lancer bombers escorted by fighter jets flew in international airspace over waters east of North Korea, in a show of force the Pentagon said demonstrated the range of military options available to the US president.

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Architect defends treatment of workers at Louvre Abu Dhabi

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 15:15:44 GMT2017-09-24T15:15:44Z

Jean Nouvel dismisses ‘old question’ over exploitation, saying conditions were better than for some in Europe

The French architect Jean Nouvel has defended his Louvre museum in Abu Dhabi, a massive domed complex that opens in November, from accusations it was built by exploited and abused migrant workers.

The building opens on 11 November, 10 years after the Paris museum signed an unprecedented £663m deal to allow Abu Dhabi to use its name for 30 years and borrow 300 works from its collection.

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Australia failing to meet Paris targets and more renewables needed, report says

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:00:00 GMT2017-09-24T18:00:00Z

Australia Institute report says 66-75% renewable energy target by 2030 needed to meet its commitments

With the Coalition still hamstrung by internal divide over a clean energy target, a new report shows Australia is in danger of not meeting its Paris agreement commitments unless it acts soon.

A report by the Australia Institute’s climate and energy program examined the government’s own modelling of the nation’s greenhouse gas emission reduction targets and found Australia could either transition to a 66-75% renewable energy target by 2030 to meet its commitments, or push the responsibility on to other sectors, such as agriculture or manufacturing.

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Catalan campaigners hand out a million referendum ballots

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 15:30:53 GMT2017-09-24T15:30:53Z

Thousands gather across Catalonia to show support for 1 October independence vote that Madrid has vowed to stop

Catalan independence campaigners have held rallies across the region, distributing 1m ballot papers a week before people are due to vote in a sovereignty referendum that the Spanish government has vowed to stop.

Thousands of people congregated in town squares around Catalonia on Sunday to show their support for the vote as tensions between the pro-independence regional government and the Spanish state continued to rise.

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'Jeremy Corbyn has exceeded expectations': Sadiq Khan talks to Katharine Viner – video

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 21:57:51 GMT2017-09-24T21:57:51Z

Guardian editor-in-chief Katharine Viner asks Sadiq Khan, the mayor of London, about housing in the capital, Brexit and Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn. Khan’s verdict on Corbyn is: ‘Good manifesto, energising Labour supporters who’d left our fold, bringing them back, energise a new generation of Labour voters … huge progress made by Jeremy in the space of two years’

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Mixed reactions after Uber stripped of London licence – video

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 18:55:28 GMT2017-09-22T18:55:28Z

The ride-hailing firm was stripped of its London licence on Friday after it was deemed the company was not a 'fit and proper' private car hire operator. The London mayor Sadiq Khan says he fully supports the decision to revoke Uber’s licence, but there was mixed reaction on the streets

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Qandeel Baloch: the life, death and impact of Pakistan’s working class icon

Fri, 22 Sep 2017 11:00:45 GMT2017-09-22T11:00:45Z

The life, death and impact of Pakistan’s working-class icon Qandeel Baloch, killed in 2016 after becoming a social media celebrity. This film tells Qandeel’s story through her own videos and media appearances. A young, fearless woman who collided with Pakistan’s mainstream media, Qandeel exposed the religious right and challenged middle-class morality. From her life before stardom in a rural village to her early days in entertainment as a model and actor, Qandeel gained attention by making provocative web videos. We get to know Qandeel through her family, admirers and those she interacted with and inspired. The film also analyses her life through the lens of class and power politics and connects it to women’s continuing struggle for self-expression in Pakistan

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Kingsman: The Golden Circle: Colin Firth on the superspy comedy sequel – video

Thu, 21 Sep 2017 15:25:56 GMT2017-09-21T15:25:56Z

The second Kingsman film sees the dapper British secret agents go up against American supervillain Poppy Adams, played by Julianne Moore, with the help of Statesman, their US equivalent. Kingsman: The Golden Circle is out now in the UK, and is released on 21 September in Australia and 22 September in the US.

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Portugal's biggest wildfire: 'We all thought we were going to die' – video

Tue, 19 Sep 2017 07:00:11 GMT2017-09-19T07:00:11Z

On 17 June, a fire swept through the forests of central Portugal, killing 64 people and destroying more than 480 houses. After a summer of record numbers of wildfires across southern Europe, the Guardian travelled to devastated villages in Portugal to find out why the June fire was so deadly, and what can be done to prevent it happening again


*Satellite imagery courtesy of Deimos Imaging, an UrtheCast Company

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'I'll be here until I die': Florida Keys residents on life after Hurricane Irma

Mon, 18 Sep 2017 13:12:50 GMT2017-09-18T13:12:50Z

A week on from the devastation caused by Hurricane Irma, Florida Keys residents are finding strength in one another as they try to piece together their homes and make sense of what happened

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The Child in Time review – an agonising portrayal of panic and guilt

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 06:00:06 GMT2017-09-25T06:00:06Z

Benedict Cumberbatch and Kelly Macdonald are both brilliant as the parents whose child goes missing in a deeply affecting drama. Plus: Antiques Roadshow hits Brideshead

God, that’s not an easy watch, the first 10 minutes or so of The Child in Time (BBC1). First, Stephen (Benedict Cumberbatch) returns home in a police car and goes inside to tell his wife, Julie (Kelly Macdonald), the worst news in the world: that their four-year-old daughter Kate has disappeared. “She was there,” he says. “She was there, she was just there, she was right there.”

Next, we’re a few years down the line. Stephen, a writer of children’s books as well as a member of a government childcare committee, is trying – inevitably not entirely successfully – to carry on with some kind of life. Without Julie, however, who, also inevitably, now lives separately. How can a marriage ever survive that? Not just the loss and the pain, but the blame and the guilt, too.

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Marvel vs Capcom Infinite review: too much power, no responsibility

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 06:00:06 GMT2017-09-25T06:00:06Z

The hyper-accelerated tag team brawling series returns with a beginner-friendly riot of mega combos – but the first casualty is nuance

Over the course of two decades, the Marvel vs Capcom franchise has mutated into a sprawling crazy quilt of exuberant brawling. Look for a unifying theme and it seems to be loopy excess, with overflowing character rosters, screen-filling hyper combos and a fondness for mob-handed tag-team battles. “Gonna take you for a ride!” declared Marvel vs Capcom 2’s jazzy selection screen ear-worm, and if the shield-chucking, hellfire-hosing action could occasionally be chaotic to the point of confusion, it was certainly never dull.

Six years on from Ultimate Marvel vs Capcom (a buffed-up version of the third instalment that boosted its warrior headcount to an impressive 48) and here comes a new challenger. In Marvel Vs Capcom Infinite, the conflict implied in the title has become inextricable. A diabolical team-up by Marvel’s tetchy AI zealot Ultron and Mega Man’s lantern-jawed nemesis Sigma has forcibly fused the two corporate universes together, creating an uncanny hybrid dimension.

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TV's Front Row is a pulped and processed version of radio's. Why?

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 17:05:11 GMT2017-09-24T17:05:11Z

This low-interest, no-risk reboot of Radio 4’s long-running culture strand is yet another reminder of how terminally timid BBC TV always is with the artsFront Row, on Radio 4, is reliable, it is competent, it is always there, just after the news and the Archers. Its presenters are interested in their subjects, and good journalists. It knows what it is; it feels comfortable in its skin. I would care if it got taken off air. One can see, then, after the demise of BBC television’s The Culture Show and Newsnight Review (each shunted around the schedules until they died of confusion) why it was chosen to form the template of a new BBC2 arts show.But would Front Row work on TV? There was trouble before the first programme even aired on Saturday evening. Instead of giving the regular radio presenters – Kirsty Lang, Samira Ahmed and John Wilson – jobs on the telly, new anchors for the small-screen version were announced. They were to be BBC media editor Amol Rajan, radio presenter and former actor Nikki Bedi, and, weirdly, Giles Coren, not everyone’s cup of tea, a journalist noted for his newspaper restaurant reviews and for having presented The Supersizers, but having no apparent qualifications for fronting an arts show aside from once having won the bad sex award for his debut novel, Winkler. Then came an interview in the Radio Times in which Coren declared he had not been to the theatre much for the past seven years (owing to paternal bathtime duties) and found the medium “stressful”; Rajan confessed to the sin of enjoying Andrew Lloyd Webber; and Bedi said she disliked sitting through very long plays without intervals. Continue reading...[...]


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For Love or Money review – Northern Broadsides strike comedy gold

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 14:20:57 GMT2017-09-24T14:20:57Z

Viaduct, Halifax
Blake Morrison transposes a corrupt, covetous 18th-century Paris to 1920s Yorkshire in a lively satire directed by and starring Barrie Rutter

Northern Broadsides have made a habit of giving European classics a Yorkshire setting. So it seems fitting that Barrie Rutter’s farewell, at least on home soil, to the company he founded should be a version by Blake Morrison of Alain-René Lesage’s Turcaret.

Related: Angels and demons: the unmissable theatre, comedy and dance of autumn 2017

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Seoul Kimchi: ‘The soup should be offered on prescription’ – review

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 05:00:36 GMT2017-09-24T05:00:36Z

This tiny restaurant is as uncomfortable as it gets, but the Korean cooking makes it all worthwhile

Seoul Kimchi, 275 Upper Brook Street, Manchester M13 0HR (0161 273 5556). Meal for two, excluding wine: £30-£45

The cab rumbles down a broad street just to the south of Manchester city centre, of the sort even its planner would struggle to love. To one side is the hefty sprawl of the Royal Infirmary. To the other is the blood centre. If you’re leaking, or bits of you are falling off, this is clearly the place to be. It is not the kind of drag you would necessarily go down in search of dinner. But then sometimes worthwhile restaurants are the product of happenstance rather than design.

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Simon Amstell review – perky, pained, anxious, ironic, wise – and funny

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 10:49:50 GMT2017-09-24T10:49:50Z

Leicester Square theatre, LondonFrom his long process, after coming out, of self-acceptance to his newfound romantic happiness, this is classic, neurotic, angst-ridden Amstell If there were any doubts that romantic bliss might have dulled Simon Amstell’s neurotic edge, they’re allayed in the opening seconds of the first night of his new tour. He may be six years into a relationship, have just published his first book and made a splash with the recent TV mockumentary Carnage. But he still can’t help telling us – it’s the first thing he says – how undermined he feels by a single empty seat on the front row. Plus ca change, plus c’est le meme angst-ridden Amstell, laying bare his overthought emotional life in the name of our entertainment.The new show is called What Is This?, with emphasis firmly on the middle word. The “this” is life, that mysterious thing Amstell can’t bring himself to just get on with like everyone else. After all: why? OK, so he’s not as riddled with self-loathing as he once was. Back then, he could barely get out of bed; now, “I get out of bed, but I don’t know why I’ve done it.” Existential angst, or wealthy man’s privilege? A bit of both. Amstell doesn’t remotely apologise for being famous – one droll gag finds him repaying his mum for the use of her womb by introducing her to Derren Brown. But it’s clear celebrity is just one more circle of alienation for a man whose every social interaction feels like an out-of-body experience. Continue reading...[...]


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LCD Soundsystem review – dream band back from the dead

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 08:00:39 GMT2017-09-24T08:00:39Z

Glasgow Barrowlands
Six years after their ‘farewell’ show, James Murphy’s dance-punk magpies have returned, bigger and bolder than ever

Before a snare is hit, before LCD Soundsystem supremo James Murphy starts gesticulating at the monitor sound desk, there is a charge in the air. It telegraphs the delight that, to paraphrase one of LCD Soundsystem’s album titles, this is actually happening.

A gig that should not have been, this second night in Glasgow promotes a fourth LCD album – the recently released American Dream – that should not have been, either. Lairy gratitude informs the dancing that erupts with the first keyboard blobs of Get Innocuous!, LCD’s perfect set-opening gambit. Second only to Oasis as a lauded pilferer of others’ catalogues, Murphy grafts the vocals of David Bowie on to the synth lines of Kraftwerk, somehow making it sound all LCD. (A fab graphic rendition online illustrates the track’s structure.)

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Unbelievable review: Katy Tur's Trump tale relives an utterly insane campaign

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 12:15:55 GMT2017-09-24T12:15:55Z

NBC reporter writes with the bravery and wit she showed as Trump and his fans attacked her. She also exposes the worrying decline of broadcast news itself

Towards the end of last year’s election, NBC correspondent Katy Tur and her colleagues played a game no other presidential contest had inspired: name a campaign headline too crazy to be real.

Related: Devil's Bargain review: Steve Bannon and the making of President Joe Pesci

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Momentum building in Brighton as grassroots group goes mainstream

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 17:04:43 GMT2017-09-24T17:04:43Z

The World Transformed festival was once seen as rival event to Labour conference, but now even non-Corbynite MPs take part

On the way down the hill towards the Labour conference on the Brighton seafront, delegates cannot miss Momentum’s message, spraypainted across the front of the Synergy Centre: “Join the party.”

The building is one of nine venues hosting the grassroots group’s festival, The World Transformed. Once seen by many in Labour as a rival event, within 12 months, it has become part of the mainstream. Activists are here to celebrate, but also to be at the heart of the Labour party.

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Land of tassels, swags and sash windows: a swipe at Britain's pseudo-Georgian wonderland

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 14:00:46 GMT2017-09-24T14:00:46Z

It’s cheap, boring, shoddy and everywhere. But now artist Pablo Bronstein has turned his love-hate relationship with Britain’s ‘pseudo-Georgian’ architecture into a delightful show

Fibreglass porches, panelled garage doors and uPVC sash windows have rarely been celebrated in the hallowed halls of the Royal Institute of British Architects, but then Pablo Bronstein isn’t your usual suspect for an exhibition at the Portland Place pile. “I like to think it’s a bit Christine Hamilton,” says the artist, standing in one of the rooms, wallpapered a buttercup yellow, that he has erected in the RIBA’s gallery.

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Cornwall: the UK's new literary capital?

Mon, 25 Sep 2017 06:00:06 GMT2017-09-25T06:00:06Z

Following in the foaming wake of Poldark’s TV success, and picking up a tradition taking in Du Maurier and Woolf, a new wave of Cornish reading is rising

Where are most British novels set? Well, the smart money would be on London. But once you get out of the capital, I’d lay a bet on Cornwall being the landscape that inspires the biggest number of fictional backdrops.

The rugged, dramatic coastline will have a lot to do with it, of course. Winston Graham’s Ross Poldark, recently seen on telly equipped with smouldering good looks and preposterous abs, would not carry half as many hearts aloft if his frequent (and, one suspects, often unnecessary) horseback gallops across the cliffs weren’t framed by the sun setting over the storm-lashed Atlantic. Daphne du Maurier has lured many a literary traveller to the county, just as Joss Merlyn and his murderous wreckers guided unwary ships on to the rocks in Jamaica Inn, or the siren call of the foreboding Manderley (in reality Du Maurier’s home Menabilly, near Fowey) in Rebecca.

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'My people will disappear': Rohingya call for Bradford to give sanctuary again

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 09:55:26 GMT2017-09-24T09:55:26Z

Yorkshire city with Europe’s biggest Rohingya community urged to offer haven for those fleeing crackdown in Myanmar

Nijam Uddin Mohammed recalls vividly his first day in Bradford: “Ninth of December 2008 – the most life-changing date of my life.” He remembers the eight-hour flight from Dubai to Manchester and the biting winter air when they landed. The hour-long coach journey up the M62, and his dad being confused about why people weren’t walking on the road, as they did in Bangladesh.

He also remembers being warmly welcomed by Bengalis, who brought curry to the £26-a-night Ibis hotel where they were staying. The 36-year-old was among the first group of Rohingya refugees to arrive in Bradford, the city more than 300 of the “world’s most persecuted minority” now call home – their biggest community in Europe.

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Feelers out for insect fine dining in Bangkok

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 11:00:43 GMT2017-09-24T11:00:43Z

Insects have long been a staple in the countryside of Thailand. Now, a top chef is creating a buzz in Bangkok by putting this eco-friendly protein on the menu

Were it not for the cocoa-dusted silkworms garnishing the dish, an unknowing diner might never realise there was anything out of the ordinary about this tiramisu. There may be only three dainty insects visible but 30% of the luscious mascarpone cream in the confection is powdered pupae, which add a barely detectable bitterness that harmonises with the espresso-saturated sponge fingers. The same goes for the innocuous-looking ravioli stuffed with mascarpone, Provençal herbs and water beetle flesh, which tastes like crab.

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‘Dazzling and worrying’: my memories of Bruce Chatwin and In Patagonia

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 07:30:39 GMT2017-09-24T07:30:39Z

Forty years ago, Chatwin’s debut book transformed travel writing. But just 12 years later, its author was dead. The Observer theatre critic, Chatwin’s editor for that book, reflects on a brief, brilliant career‘Does anyone read Bruce Chatwin these days?” asked Blake Morrison, reviewing his letters seven years ago. Well, someone must: nearly 30 years after his death, all six of Chatwin’s books are still in print. But it is true that when the dominant writers of the 1970s and 1980s are discussed, Chatwin’s name is rarely among them. The penalty of once being fashionable is that you may come to be thought of as merely fashionable. Almost violently successful at first, his books are now less likely to be mentioned than the Moleskine notebooks in which he sketched and jotted.Vintage’s 40th anniversary edition of In Patagonia is an invitation to look again at one of the most vivid but elusive writers of the late 20th century. Chatwin’s first book, it helped to change the idea of what travel writing could be. It appeared at a rich literary moment, when both reportage and the novel were beginning to fly high in new directions. I remember the time well – I edited In Patagonia and in doing so became friends with the author. Angela Carter and Ryszard Kapuściński, Martin Amis, Ian McEwan and Salman Rushdie were already publishing; Julian Barnes was preparing to take off. In Patagonia was in a category of its own. It[...]


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The Big Anxiety festival: mental health, science and the healing power of art

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 18:00:00 GMT2017-09-24T18:00:00Z

The world’s biggest mental health and arts festival features more than 60 events, ranging from relaxing art installations to Awkward Conversations

Anxiety can come in many forms: from feeling nervous about giving a presentation, to not wanting to leave the house. But can an arts festival provide some sort of balm for mental health problems?

An ambitious and large scale project, The Big Anxiety festival – a University of New South Wales initiative run over seven weeks in Sydney – is trying to not only get people talking about their mental health, but also to alleviate some of the associated pain.

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Why India's farmers want to conserve indigenous heirloom rice

Sun, 24 Sep 2017 10:00:42 GMT2017-09-24T10:00:42Z

India was once home to 100,000 rice varieties, but high-yield, less hardy hybrids have taken over encouraging farmers to safeguard more resistant strainsIndia is rice country: the cereal provides daily sustenance for more than 60% of the population. Half a century ago, it was home to more than 100,000 rice varieties, encompassing a stunning diversity in taste, nutrition, pest-resistance and, crucially in this age of climate change and natural disasters, adaptability to a range of conditions.Today, much of this biodiversity is irretrievably lost, forced out by the quest for high-yield hybrids and varieties encouraged by government agencies. Such “superior” varieties now cover more than 80% of India’s rice acreage. Continue reading...[...]


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