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Comments for Lee Romero



On Content, Collaboration and Findability



Last Build Date: Wed, 12 Oct 2011 12:15:16 -0500

 



Comment on Language change over time in your search log by Lee Romero

Wed, 12 Oct 2011 12:15:16 +0000

Thanks, Hoss - I intuitively agree with your points but I have found no data or reports actually supporting that assertion. That's part of why I've been posting in this on this topic - I think there is insight to be gained to actually prove these assumed truths are actually true (or to find out that they're not true or to be able to more precisely identify what are the factors that influence these metrics). Are you aware of any journal articles (or even blog posts like mine) that support your points? I'd be very interested!



Comment on Language change over time in your search log by Hoss

Tue, 11 Oct 2011 19:38:35 +0000

The specific domain of your data/site and the use case stories of your user base are going to be the primary factor in this sort of metric If you run a news site, or an ecommerce portal selling new products, then numbers like these shouldn't surprise anyone. If you host an encyclopedia, or a database of medical ailments+symptoms, or a parts catalog for antique repair, or a site on stamp collecting, etc... the results are all going to be massively different.



Comment on Language change over time in your search log by Lee Romero

Tue, 11 Oct 2011 18:23:58 +0000

Otis - I did not do that with this data set but I did apply quite a few normalizations to the data in my prior post (the 80-20 ... post). What I found was that it did not make that huge of a difference. I was pretty aggressive with the normalization - removing stop words, stemming, ignoring word order, case, many kinds of punctuation, etc. - and I found that it "raised" that curve by about 1% (on the Y axis, i.e., count of searches) along the X axis (i.e., how deep into the list of terms you go) from about 1% on the X axis until about 20% - after that, the lines just grew closer together. It's hard to compare the two because of the difference in what the curves mean, but I would guess it might push overlap from about 13% to maybe the upper teens? I'll give it a try for a few months and report back here, though. Thanks!



Comment on Language change over time in your search log by Otis Gospodnetic

Tue, 11 Oct 2011 18:00:20 +0000

Lee - I wonder how different your results would be if you were to normalize queries, say using http://code.google.com/p/google-refine/ . Or maybe you already did that?



Comment on 80-20: The lie in your search log? by Lee Romero » Blog Archive » Language change over time in your search log

Tue, 11 Oct 2011 03:05:01 +0000

[...] previous post, “80-20: The lie in your search log?“, highlighted how the slope of “short head” of your search terms may not be as [...]



Comment on 80-20: The lie in your search log? by Lee Romero » Blog Archive » The Findability Gap by Lou Rosenfeld

Fri, 23 Sep 2011 12:28:05 +0000

[...] Slide 24 – As I’ve written about before, I would say that the 80/20 rule is more than just “not quite accurate”.  But [...]



Comment on Enterprise Taxonomy – The Structure in Detail by Sandra Fidler

Mon, 22 Aug 2011 16:24:50 +0000

Generally I don't read post on blogs, however I wish to say that this write-up very forced me to try and do it! Your writing taste has been amazed me. Thanks, quite nice article.



Comment on 80-20: The lie in your search log? by Lee Romero

Tue, 02 Aug 2011 11:52:31 +0000

Otis - I do think this kind of report is useful, but currently I'm still not entirely sure what one might do with the insight. I have a few data points myself (i.e., I understand what this curve looks like for a couple of search solutions) but I have not yet been able to determine if there is really an underlying interpretation of the shape. If there were a means to understand what this curve looks like for a good-sized set of solutions and then be able to compare traits of those search solutions, I think it could be more insightful. I also wish I knew what the "something important" is - I've tried engendering interest in "comparing notes" across solutions via the SearchCoP community on Yahoo! groups without any luck so far.



Comment on 80-20: The lie in your search log? by Otis Gospodnetic

Mon, 01 Aug 2011 22:11:25 +0000

I'm wondering if you think a report like this is something every search analytics tool should have? I'm asking because we have a Search Analytics service (see http://sematext.com/search-analytics/index.html ) but don't have such a report. And your point 2) above ("the shape of this curve tells you something important about how you can manage your search solution") sounds intriguing, although I also don't yet know what that "something important" is.



Comment on 80-20: The lie in your search log? by Ed Dale

Tue, 07 Jun 2011 16:37:37 +0000

My search terms per month follow simialr curves, it takes 50% or higher to acheive 80% of the queries. Very different from external ecommerce search.