Subscribe: Comments on: Why Most Manga Books Are Small and Black-and-White
http://www.yaoi911.com/why-most-manga-books-are-small-and-black-and-white/feed
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade B rated
Language: English
Tags:
blockquote  comment  don  fans  japanese yaoi  japanese  onclick quote  quote  western produced  western  work  yaoi review  yaoi 
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Comments on: Why Most Manga Books Are Small and Black-and-White

Comments on: Why Most Manga Books Are Small and Black-and-White



For all your Yaoi emergencies...



Last Build Date: Mon, 10 Apr 2017 05:18:40 +0000

 



By: artdjmaster

Fri, 07 Nov 2008 23:11:37 +0000

You're very welcome!!



By: Alex Woolfson

Tue, 04 Nov 2008 12:12:18 +0000

Originally Posted By artdjmaster@Alex, I think you should go ahead and publish Yaoi Firsts any way you want it. If you publish it in the large format, you should absolutely include those sexy, full-colour pinups! *drool*
Pin-ups, huh? You mean like a centerfold? I have a few sexy double-page spreads (one of which Yaoi 911™ News and Downloads subscribers get to see the pencils for in the Artifice Previews download.) But I haven't considered adding actual centerfold-type art. Hmmm....
On the other hand, you might be paying a pretty penny for those large, colour pages.
Oh, yes. I will. About four times as much than if the book was printed in black-and-white. But, as I said, I'm making the book I've always wanted to read and that involves supersized color art on premium glossy paper. Hopefully, other fans will find that appealing too. ;-)
Because people don't normally read BL on the train, the large size will not be an issue because it will mostly be read at home (in bed, with the lights down low, the soft music playing, the towel nearby... :)
LOL!
Do you plan on having your book printed in Canada? ... (Most of the major comic books are printed here, and some manga like Viz's Shojo Beat line)
It's true that some of the best comics printing in North America is done in Montreal at Quebecor. That said, North American color printing is far too expensive for an independent publisher like myself. I will be printing overseas in Hong Kong where the printing prices are more affordable. The quality is actually just as good -- which is important because I am looking to create a premium comic. The drawback is time -- you have to wait a few months for the books to be shipped back via boat. And, of course, because of the language differences, you have to be very clear and very prepared when you send your materials to be printed. I am working hard to be both. And I'm happy to wait a bit, so long as the finished product is excellent. ;-)
Anyways, you should think about advertising in gay newspapers and such. You should even approach magazines, such as Freshman, who advertise artbooks, photography books, and other gay literature.
Absolutely. While I am definitely writing with female fans in mind, I am also writing for my fellow gay men. It is my hope that gay publications and readers will find our work appealing and that we'll be able to generate a bit of buzz -- and hopefully happy customers.
Hope to see it in stores soon!!!
Thanks! Things are coming along well with our stories. The pencils for Chapter One: "Tough" are about a third of the way done and I'll be posting some of them up here by the end of the month. And I've been hard at work building our Online Store -- it should be ready for public view by the New Year. Thanks very much for your encouragement and support, Oliver. It is very much appreciated. :-D Alex


By: gynocrat

Tue, 04 Nov 2008 12:03:46 +0000

@The Yaoi Review - I simply did not want to start from a disadvantage by having readers see a very plain American name and think it must not be a good novel. Ouch? Who the heck does that? With the current NA fandom, Japanese Yaoi comes from established mangaka that fans are aware of-- there's no real newcomers to discover. As for GloBL, a majority of what's out there and successful right now are from mangaka from Spain or Italy - with studio names rather than 'a plain American name'. I think fans judge not by the author, but by the art style. If you've got art that captures that Japanese aesthetic, fans of Japanese BL will drop the bias long enough to consider the story and who wrote it. :) They seem to have no problem copping to liking certain styles--and they tend to prefer the authentic Japanese aesthetic over the more Western GloBL. The sad thing is, there really is no set GloBL style - most GloBL creators have their own form of art style, it's not as easy to pin down--nonetheless, if it doesn't look like the work from Japan, most fans of the Japanese BL aren't interested in supporting it.



By: Alex Woolfson

Tue, 04 Nov 2008 11:48:25 +0000

@The Yaoi Review - The short answer? You should make the yaoi book that will give you the most satisfaction -- IMHO, this is the only way to have a chance at making quality art (and the hard truth is, the only person we can be absolutely sure will read our work is ourselves, so might as well make it a good time. ;-) ) That said, I think Tina (gynocrat) makes some excellent points about not coming off as misleading or coy. If you are designing your pages for a left-to-right read because you love that aesthetic, then have at it. But if it is meant to obscure the fact that it is a "Western produced novel" then it could very well backfire -- and frankly, at this point, with so much yaoi available and a strong market for gay literature in general here in the U.S., I don't believe that it would buy you all that much. (And considering the positive response I've received for my own efforts, I certainly don't consider a plain American name to be a liability. ;-) ) Also, for what it's worth, if you are considering being published by a third-party Yaoi publisher, you should check with a few of the ones you'd like to work with about what formats they accept -- before you get locked into a format. Because this whole right-to-left format with Original English Manga is a bit politically charged with the fans, some publishers might have specific thoughts or restrictions on it. You should definitely take a look at this survey/post for some very strong opinions on this. As a creator, I think it would be a good idea to get a feel for what the general temperature is on this issue. As yaoi become more known and popular, I personally believe it's going to matter less-and-less where it comes from. What will matter is quality. Make a great, sexy compelling book and people will read it. If it has a Japanese yaoi aesthetic, then all but the most dogmatic traditional yaoi fans will find it appealing. It sounds like your primary motivations are aesthetic. Follow those instincts. But I wouldn't worry so much about being stigmatized for being a Western creator of manga-style comics. I really do think that it will soon be a non-issue, at least here in the U.S.. What matters is the quality of the work. Keep your attention there and you'll be fine. :-) Good luck!


By: The Yaoi Review

Tue, 04 Nov 2008 11:11:49 +0000

Thanks. I personally like the traditional Japanese format which is why I would choose to keep it that way. Where I may differ is more in the look of the characters and their roles. I don't know that I will stick to a traditional seme/uke role nor do I feel that one of my characters HAS to look like a young boy. I prefer manly characters where switching up isn't an issue. Also, as far as a pen name is concerned, as I stated above I wanted something more androgynous. I never said I was going to use a Japanese pen name to try and deceive my readers. I simply did not want to start from a disadvantage by having readers see a very plain American name and think it must not be a good novel. As you said yourself, there is already a negative bias.



By: SilapaJarun

Tue, 04 Nov 2008 10:45:11 +0000

@The Yaoi Review -
I’m working on my own yaoi graphic novel and was going to have it published as the standard Japanese yaoi titles are, in the smaller size and reading right to left.
I don't see how reading right to left matters if the original work was written in English. If the work was originally formatted in Japanese and altering it would deviate from the artist/writer's original vision then I'd like it to retain the right to left feel. Otherwise adopting right to left for a work originally in English is a bit like masquerading the work unnecessarily. Simply, as a *reader I don't care but you as the creator are free to do as you please.
I was also going to work under a pen name that didn’t immediately give away that this was a Western produced novel. My concern is that if I didn’t, it would limit my audience because people may not give it a change if they know it is not from Japan.
*** I don't agree with this at all. There is enough negative bias towards OEL and to have a western creator put up an act is going to be annoying to the audience and to the creator. Just be proud of your work and be yourself. If you want a Japanese pen name then I hope when people send you a fan email asking about Japan---you are ready to answer them or simply drop the act and admit "I was scared no one would give me a chance so I'm playing Japanese for the sake of my publication".
Am I being overly paranoid?
*** Yes.
I find I look at Western yaoi differently myself but usually only because the look and feel is different from what I am used to anyway and enjoy.
*** Every work is unique. That's the point of creating. I find that the handicap in western yaoi is because it is purposefully trying to mimic trends set in Japan or Korea (due to marketing pressures understandably). I think Western bl can break new ground and redefine the genre by being *different. At the same time Western yaoi is suffering from low quality art. Some works look sloppily drawn/toned and try very hard to copy styles of Japanese artists which is unnecessary.
I would like to hear what other yaoi fans have to say regarding Western produced yaoi.
*** Western produced yaoi should stop getting hung up on playing inside the predefined yaoi template (and exactly what are the rules of yaoi?). Write good stories, produce good art and don't market low quality work and assume yaoi readers will buy "anything". Yaoi is more than just manga read right to left or the same old uke/seme template. The stories can be more rich and engaging if the creator has the means (I know you guys have limits on pages etc). Anyways ~ good luck.


By: artdjmaster

Tue, 04 Nov 2008 08:49:57 +0000

@Alex, I think you should go ahead and publish Yaoi Firsts any way you want it. If you publish it in the large format, you should absolutely include those sexy, full-colour pinups! *drool* On the other hand, you might be paying a pretty penny for those large, colour pages. I've always thought, that in a black-and-white manga, the few colour pages actually become more special because their appeal is heightened by the other non-colour pages. If you choose to represent a sexy scene in full-colour, and then the rest of the story in B&W, you might save a little money on ink and paper costs. Because people don't normally read BL on the train, the large size will not be an issue because it will mostly be read at home (in bed, with the lights down low, the soft music playing, the towel nearby... :) However you decide to publish your book, consider the thoughtfulness of a random, sexy pinup intertwined with the main story, REALLY. In colour, ya gotta have those pinups! Do you plan on having your book printed in Canada? I'm not sure if it's still cheaper to print here, but it's worth a look ;) (Most of the major comic books are printed here, and some manga like Viz's Shojo Beat line). Anyways, you should think about advertising in gay newspapers and such. You should even approach magazines, such as Freshman, who advertise artbooks, photography books, and other gay literature. Hope to see it in stores soon!!! Your first customer up north, Oliver



By: The Yaoi Review

Tue, 04 Nov 2008 08:22:55 +0000

Thanks for your input. I'm looking for feedback from all areas... I don't like to limit myself. As far as my pen name, I wanted it to be more like a one word name, not necessarily Asian, like the author you referenced but not "Suzi Jones" either. Something that doesn't put a set image into someone's head about whether this is a man or woman, Asian or Caucasian. There is a Spanish male author that had a great one word name (can't think of it, of course) but that's what got me thinking about it. I wouldn't have known he was Spanish or a man without looking into who he was.



By: gynocrat

Tue, 04 Nov 2008 07:10:39 +0000

I’m working on my own yaoi graphic novel and was going to have it published as the standard Japanese yaoi titles are Are you publishing it yourself? If so, then you do what you want-- but remember, finding the right printer to handle it that way might be tough. I was also going to work under a pen name that didn’t immediately give away that this was a Western produced novel. My concern is that if I didn’t, it would limit my audience because people may not give it a change if they know it is not from Japan. I don't think you're being paranoid, but I think you're being willfully misleading, and that's not going to sit well with fans. Yayoi Neko published this way at a time where this sort of thing didn't matter [I don't people realize just how long she's been doing this ^_-] but from the start, she's made appearances at yaoicon and goes by the name Thundertori at Deviant. Fans know she's not a Japanese mangaka despite her pen name and Incubus being published in the Japanese standard. These days, I've seen critics and fans alike actively denounce creators they think are 'posing' or 'misrepresenting' themselves. Tread lightly. I find I look at Western yaoi differently myself but usually only because the look and feel is different from what I am used to anyway and enjoy. I don call my work 'western yaoi', I've settled on GloBL. If you want your work produced, and promoted as Japanese Yaoi, then I strongly suggest you submit to a Japanese publisher. :) I would like to hear what other yaoi fans have to say regarding Western produced yaoi. Do you want 'other fans' thought on GloBL, or do you want 'Japanese Yaoi fans' thoughts on GloBL? There's a big difference. Many fans of the Japanese genre will never like GloBL for many reasons--it's not what they're used to enjoying, whereas many fans of GloBL like it because-- it's different from the Japanese standard. I would try asking this question at places where fans of the Japanese genre hang out--since you're trying to make a story that will appeal to them, that's likely where you should seek feedback. :)
By: The Yaoi Review

Tue, 04 Nov 2008 06:43:03 +0000

Alex (or anyone), I'm curious of your thoughts on this. I'm working on my own yaoi graphic novel and was going to have it published as the standard Japanese yaoi titles are, in the smaller size and reading right to left. I was also going to work under a pen name that didn't immediately give away that this was a Western produced novel. My concern is that if I didn't, it would limit my audience because people may not give it a change if they know it is not from Japan. Am I being overly paranoid? I find I look at Western yaoi differently myself but usually only because the look and feel is different from what I am used to anyway and enjoy. Anyone can chime in on this. I would like to hear what other yaoi fans have to say regarding Western produced yaoi. Thanks!