Subscribe: Huffduffer: story
http://huffduffer.com/tags/story/rss
Added By: Feedage Forager Feedage Grade A rated
Language: English
Tags:
desire  djsneverendingstory –  djsneverendingstory  girard  history  music  new  podcast  world  – djsneverendingstory   
Rate this Feed
Rate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feedRate this feed
Rate this feed 1 starRate this feed 2 starRate this feed 3 starRate this feed 4 starRate this feed 5 star

Comments (0)

Feed Details and Statistics Feed Statistics
Preview: Huffduffer: story

story on Huffduffer



story



 



Veritas - Kevin Shipp

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 11:48:07 GMT

Veritas Radio w/ Mel Fabregas http://www.veritasradio.com/guests/2018/02feb/VS-180201-kshipp.php


Media Files:
http://public.manticore.com/veritas/VS-180201-kshipp-b2p.mp3




Veritas - Chris Knowles

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 11:47:31 GMT

Veritas Radio w/ Mel Fabregas http://www.veritasradio.com/guests/2018/02feb/VS-180207-cknowles.php


Media Files:
http://public.manticore.com/veritas/VS-180207-cknowles-a4u.mp3




The Curious Case of the Russian Flash Mob at the West Palm Beach Cheesecake Factory - Radiolab

Thu, 22 Feb 2018 01:09:27 GMT

When Robert Mueller released his indictment a few days ago, alleging that 13 Russian nationals colluded to disrupt the 2016 ... http://www.radiolab.org/story/curious-case-russian-flash-mob-west-palm-beach-cheesecake-factory/


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/radiolab_podcast/radiolab_podcast18russianflashmob2.mp3




The Voice in Your Head - A Tribute to Joe Frank - Radiolab

Fri, 16 Feb 2018 18:40:19 GMT

How do you pay proper tribute to a legend that many people haven’t heard of? http://www.radiolab.org/story/voice-your-head-tribute-joe-frank/


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/radiolab_podcast/radiolab_podcast18joefranktribute.mp3




Charles C. Mann: The Wizard and the Prophet - The Long Now

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 23:17:18 GMT

Two ways to save humanity Mann titled his talk “The Edge of the Petri Dish.” He explained, “If you drop a couple protozoa in a Petri dish filled with nutrient goo, they will multiply until they run out of resources or drown in their own wastes.” Humans in the world Petri dish appear to be similarly doomed, judging by our exponential increases in population, energy use, water use, income, and greenhouse gases. How to save humanity? Opposing grand approaches emerged from two remarkable scientists in the mid-20th century who fought each other their entire lives. Their solutions were so persuasive that their impassioned argument continues 70 years later to dominate how we think about dealing with the still-exacerbating exponential impacts. Norman Borlaug, the one Mann calls “the Wizard,” was a farm kid trained as a forester. In 1944 he found himself in impoverished Mexico with an impossible task—solve the ancient fungal killer of wheat, rust. First he invented high-volume crossbreeding, then shuttle breeding (between winter wheat and spring wheat), and then semi-dwarf wheat. The resulting package of hybrid seeds, synthetic fertilizer, and irrigation became the Green Revolution that ended most of hunger throughout the world for the first time in history. There were costs. The diversity of crops went down. Excess fertilizer became a pollutant. Agriculture industrialized at increasing scale, and displaced smallhold farmers fled to urban slums. William Vogt, who Mann calls “the Prophet,” was a poor city kid who followed his interest in birds to become an isolated researcher on the revolting guano islands of Peru. He discovered that periodic massive bird die-offs on the islands were caused by the El Niño cycle pushing the Humboldt Current with its huge load of anchovetas away from the coast and starving the birds. The birds were, Vogt declared, subject to an inescapable “carrying capacity.“ That became the foundational idea of the environmental movement, later expressed in terms such as “limits to growth,” “ecological overshoot,” and “planetary boundaries.” Vogt spelled out the worldview in his powerful 1948 book, The Road to Survival. The Prophets-versus-Wizards debate keeps on raging—artisanal organic farming versus factory-like mega-farms; distributed solar energy versus centralized fossil fuel refineries and nuclear power plants; dealing with climate change by planting a zillion trees versus geoengineering with aerosols in the stratosphere. The question continues: How do we best manage our world Petri dish? Restraint? Or innovation? Can humanity change its behavior at planet scale? Mann ended by pointing out that in 1800 slavery was universal in the world and had been throughout history. Then it ended. How? Prophets say that morally committed abolitionists did it. Wizards say that clever labor-saving machinery did it. Maybe it was the combination. --Stewart Brand http://longnow.org/seminars/02018/jan/22/wizard-and-prophet/


Media Files:
http://podcast.longnow.org/salt/redirect/salt-020180122-mann-podcast.mp3




Don Melton on Apple, Safari, WebKit and Netscape

Wed, 14 Feb 2018 18:24:15 GMT

Don Melton is popularly known as the father of the Safari web browser or WebKit. He’s basically a web browser legend. Not only does Don tell us a lot of great stuff about Safari, WebKit, Apple and more, but he was also an early Netscape employee, so we get some more great details about that company, especially in its later stages.


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/internethistorypodcast/148._Don_Melton_on_Apple_Safari_WebKit_and_Netscape.mp3




Om Malik on Blogging and Web2.0 | Internet History Podcast

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 09:39:13 GMT

Om Malik is, of course, a legend. One of the first journalists on the “tech beat” in the 1990s, one of the first bloggers to “turn pro,” one of the driving forces behind the Web 2.0 time period, and one of the most trusted analysts of the technology industry in general, today he is a venture capitalist at True Ventures. http://www.internethistorypodcast.com/2017/10/om-malik-on-blogging-and-web2-0/


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/internethistorypodcast/154._Om_Malik_on_Blogging_and_Web_2.0.mp3




James Delbourgo, “Collecting the World: The Life and Curiosity of Hans Sloane” (Allen Lane, 2017) |

Mon, 12 Feb 2018 08:53:21 GMT

James Delbourgo‘s new book Collecting the World: The Life and Curiosity of Hans Sloane (Allen Lane, 2017) tells the fascinatingly complex and controversial story of Hans Sloane, the man whose collection and last will laid the foundation for the British Museum, the first national, free, public museum. For Delbourgo, Sloane was for far too long an overlooked figure, who knitted together the interests of a rising empire through methods of botany, natural history and medicine. Overshadowed in part by his counterpart Isaac Newton, Sloane’s life synchronizes with the changes from seventeenth-century England to eighteenth-century Britain. His life and the time are deeply interwoven with slavery and a new world of commerce. It was thanks to this interconnected world and the many intermediaries that Sloane managed to accumulate so many weird and wonderful objects from different places. He collected, catalogued, and exhibited them according to his own belief system, which centered around binaries of enlightenment versus superstition and sober empiricism versus magic. More than anything, Delbourgo’s book reveals the complex lives and stories around Hans Sloane’s collection and the many different peoples, places and stories that are attached to the silent objects, even today. It raises important historical questions about ownership and authorship of public museums, collections and curatorial practices and makes them relevant for us today. Ricarda Brosch is a museum assistant (trainee) at the Asian Art Museum Berlin (Museum fur Asiatische Kunst Berlin Stiftung Preussischer Kulturbesitz), which is due to reopen as part of the Humboldt Forum in 2019. Her research focuses on Ming and Qing Chinese art & material culture, transcultural interchanges, especially with Timurid and Safavid Iran, as well as provenance research & digital humanities. You can find out more about her work by following her on Twitter @RicardaBeatrix or getting in touch via [email protected]. http://files.newbooksnetwork.com/art/030artdelbourgo.mp3Podcast: Download (Duration: 1:30:29 — 82.9MB)Share/Like this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) http://newbooksnetwork.com/james-delbourgo-collecting-the-world-the-life-and-curiosity-of-hans-sloane-penguin-2017/


Media Files:
http://files.newbooksnetwork.com/art/030artdelbourgo.mp3




The cult of Mary Beard – podcast | News | The Guardian

Fri, 9 Feb 2018 16:14:25 GMT

How a late-blossoming classics don became Britain's most beloved intellectual https://www.theguardian.com/news/audio/2018/feb/09/the-cult-of-mary-beard-podcast


Media Files:
https://flex.acast.com/audio.guim.co.uk/2018/02/05-52831-gdn.lr.180205.sb.cult-of-mary-beard-britains-beloved-intellectual.mp3




The Bitcoin Podcast Network: Crypto Until Infinity #2: Music and Smart Contracts

Fri, 9 Feb 2018 06:35:03 GMT

The second episode of the Bitcoin Podcast Network’s music broadcast, Crypto Until Infinity, features music from singers and rappers that are crypto enthusiasts. Host DJsNeverEndingStory describes some of the uses of smart contracts within music blockchain platforms. http://djsneverendingstory.com http://musicoin.org/nav/artist/0x35326a07175d4f0cc9701057c7dad14bc377c678 http://musicoin.org Music 00:01:05 – OG Menace – One 4 Me 00:04:12 – Layla Khepri – Smile and Wave 00:07:37 – Jay-Kaze – Meditation 00:09:53 – Jonny Avalon – Beautiful Day 00:12:41 – Rx the Pharm Tech – Game That Can’t Be Played 00:14:04 – Rx the Pharm Tech – Cliffhangin 00:25:20 – DJsNeverEndingStory – Insane If you're a singer, rapper, musician or beat-maker, and would like your music featured on the show, please contact DJsNeverEndingStory using the contact form on http://djsneverendingstory.com http://thebitcoinpodcast.libsyn.com/crypto-until-infinity-2-music-and-smart-contracts


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/thebitcoinpodcast/CryptoUntilInfinity_EP2_MusicAndSmartContracts.mp3?dest-id=279592




René Girard on ritual sacrifice and the scapegoat | Entitled Opinions

Thu, 8 Feb 2018 17:50:36 GMT

  René Girard was born in 1923, in the southern French city of Avignon on Christmas day. Between 1943 and 1947, he studied in Paris at the École des Chartres, an institution for the training of archivists and historians, where he specialized in medieval history. In 1947 he went to Indiana University on a year's fellowship and eventually made almost his entire career in the United States. He completed a Ph.D. in history at Indiana University in 1950 but also began to teach literature, the field in which he would first make his reputation. He taught at Duke University and at Bryn Mawr before becoming a professor at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. In 1971 he went to the State University of New York at Buffalo for five years, returned to Johns Hopkins, and then finished his academic career at Stanford where he taught between 1981 and his retirement in 1995. Girard was the first Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French language, literature, and civilization at Stanford University. With his first two books, Deceit, Desire, and the Novel and Dostoievski: du double à l'unité, Girard rejected the literary retreat of the 1950s and early 1960s from concern with history, society, and the psyche. His initial works analyzed literary texts of Cervantes, Stendhal, Flaubert, Proust, and Dostoyevsky in terms of "triangular" or "mimetic" desire: our desires are copied from models or mediators whose objects of desire become our objects of desire. But the model or mediator we imitate can become our rival if we desire precisely the object he is imagined to have. Or other imitators of the same model may compete with us for the same objects. Jealousy and envy are inevitably aroused in this mimetic situation. Girard began to study primitive religions from the standpoint of the mimetic concept, and he saw that mimesis usually led to collective violence against a single victim, the scapegoat. Girard's most important book is Things Hidden since the Foundation of the World. In the form of a dialogue with two psychiatrists, Jean-Michel Oughourlian and Guy Lefort, its format is a triptych: (1) Fundamental Anthropology, (2) The Judeo-Christian Scriptures, (3) Individual Psychology. In this book Girard declared himself, in effect, as a Christian and advocated a nonsacrificial reading of the Gospels and the divinity of Christ. Girard continues to lecture and write and still offers a seminar at Stanford, where he and his wife Martha make their home. Retired since the summer of 1995, Girard is still actively engaged in thinking and writing.     https://entitledopinions.stanford.edu/ren-girard-ritual-sacrifice-and-scapegoat


Media Files:
https://entitledopinions.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/eo10002_0.mp3




René Girard on mimetic desire | Entitled Opinions

Thu, 8 Feb 2018 17:50:01 GMT

René Girard was born in 1923, in the southern French city of Avignon on Christmas day. Between 1943 and 1947, he studied in Paris at the École des Chartres, an institution for the training of archivists and historians, where he specialized in medieval history. In 1947 he went to Indiana University on a year's fellowship and eventually made almost his entire career in the United States. He completed a Ph.D. in history at Indiana University in 1950 but also began to teach literature, the field in which he would first make his reputation. He taught at Duke University and at Bryn Mawr before becoming a professor at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. In 1971 he went to the State University of New York at Buffalo for five years, returned to Johns Hopkins, and then finished his academic career at Stanford where he taught between 1981 and his retirement in 1995. Girard was the first Andrew B. Hammond Professor of French language, literature, and civilization at Stanford University. With his first two books, Deceit, Desire, and the Novel and Dostoievski: du double à l'unité, Girard rejected the literary retreat of the 1950s and early 1960s from concern with history, society, and the psyche. His initial works analyzed literary texts of Cervantes, Stendhal, Flaubert, Proust, and Dostoyevsky in terms of "triangular" or "mimetic" desire: our desires are copied from models or mediators whose objects of desire become our objects of desire. But the model or mediator we imitate can become our rival if we desire precisely the object he is imagined to have. Or other imitators of the same model may compete with us for the same objects. Jealousy and envy are inevitably aroused in this mimetic situation. Girard began to study primitive religions from the standpoint of the mimetic concept, and he saw that mimesis usually led to collective violence against a single victim, the scapegoat. Girard's most important book is Things Hidden since the Foundation of the World. In the form of a dialogue with two psychiatrists, Jean-Michel Oughourlian and Guy Lefort, its format is a triptych: (1) Fundamental Anthropology, (2) The Judeo-Christian Scriptures, (3) Individual Psychology. In this book Girard declared himself, in effect, as a Christian and advocated a nonsacrificial reading of the Gospels and the divinity of Christ. Girard continues to lecture and write and still offers a seminar at Stanford, where he and his wife Martha make their home. Retired since the summer of 1995, Girard is still actively engaged in thinking and writing. https://entitledopinions.stanford.edu/ren-girard-mimetic-desire


Media Files:
https://entitledopinions.stanford.edu/sites/default/files/eo10002.mp3







The Incomparable | A Three-Edged Sword (Episode 185)

Wed, 31 Jan 2018 00:34:52 GMT

It was the dawn of a new age—the rise of sci-fi shows with story arcs, complex characters, and computer-based special effects. “Babylon 5” was a trailblazing TV series and we give it the treatment it deserves in this double-sized episode. The curious can join us for a lengthy pre-Spoiler Horn conversation about why we like the show, and the veterans can stick around for detailed, spoilery conversations about where the show went during its five seasons on the air. https://www.theincomparable.com/theincomparable/185/


Media Files:
https://www.theincomparable.com/podcast/theincomparable185.mp3




The Bitcoin Podcast Network: Crypto Until Infinity #1: Musicoin - More Power, More Money

Sat, 27 Jan 2018 00:24:19 GMT

In the first episode of the Bitcoin Podcast Network’s music broadcast, Crypto Until Infinity, host DJsNeverEndingStory explains the freedoms and monetary benefits of being an independent artist with music on the blockchain. Musicoin is compared to traditional streaming services like Spotify with an emphasis on royalty payout. Enjoy the music from this premiere episode with all beats produced by DJsNeverEndingStory. http://djsneverendingstory.com http://musicoin.org/nav/artist/0x35326a07175d4f0cc9701057c7dad14bc377c678 http://musicoin.org Music 00:01:16 – DJsNeverEndingStory – Stoney Mountain (Alexvnder Remix) 00:12:25 – DJsNeverEndingStory – Floating Halcyon 00:14:35 – DJsNeverEndingStory – Bonfire 00:17:28 – DJsNeverEndingStory – Stoney Mountain 00:19:45 – DJsNeverEndingStory – Lost and Forgotten 00:22:05 – DJsNeverEndingStory – She Loves The Producer 00:24:30 – DJsNeverEndingStory – Until Infinity 00:30:00 – DJsNeverEndingStory – 2 Rover Trucks If you're a singer, rapper, musician or beat-maker, and would like your music featured on the show, please contact DJsNeverEndingStory using the contact form on http://djsneverendingstory.com http://thebitcoinpodcast.libsyn.com/crypto-until-infinity-1-musicoin-more-power-more-money


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/thebitcoinpodcast/CryptoUntilInfinity_EP1_MusicoinMorePowerMoreMoney.mp3?dest-id=279592




Did You Get the Memo? | Dell Technologies United States

Thu, 25 Jan 2018 09:49:30 GMT

Communication’s come a long way since the days of Samuel Morse. We crack the code on how it’s evolved in this episode. https://www.delltechnologies.com/en-us/perspectives/podcasts/trailblazers/s02-e02-did-you-get-the-memo.htm#autoplay=false&autoexpand=true&episode=201&transcript=false


Media Files:
http://tracking.feedpress.it/link/16581/8074482/67c33eea.mp3




How to Be a Hero - Radiolab

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 20:20:40 GMT

What are people thinking when they risk their lives for someone else?  Is heroism an act of sympathy or empathy?   http://www.radiolab.org/story/how-be-hero/


Media Files:
https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/radiolab_podcast/radiolab_podcast18howtohero.mp3




044 The Remaking of America during Reconstruction & the Gilded Age

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 03:11:46 GMT

This week at ITPL, the American history podcast, I interview historian Richard White, author of, The Republic for Which It Stands: The US during Reconstruction & the Gilded Age, 1865-1896. In this extraordinary period, industrialization booms, mass migration surges into the West, and the South is reincorporated back into the Union. But it’s also a period of political turmoil, strikes, anti-immigrant sentiment, fear of big business and inequality, and a white supremacist uprising to impose the Jim Crow order. http://inthepastlane.com/episode-044/


Media Files:
http://traffic.libsyn.com/inthepastlane/044_The_Remaking_of_America_during_Reconstruction__the_Gilded_Age.mp3




Ottessa Moshfegh Reads “An Honest Woman” | The New Yorker

Sun, 21 Jan 2018 20:59:59 GMT

Ottessa Moshfegh joins Deborah Treisman to read her story “An Honest Woman,” from the October 24, 2016, issue of The New Yorker. https://www.newyorker.com/podcast/the-authors-voice/ottessa-moshfegh-reads-an-honest-woman


Media Files:
https://www.wnyc.org/widgets/ondemand_player/thenewyorker/#file=https://www.podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/audio.wnyc.org/tnyauthorsvoice/tnyauthorsvoice101716_moshfegh.mp3




Neil De Grasse Tyson: Bringing Space to Everybody — David Perell

Sun, 21 Jan 2018 10:53:40 GMT

Neil De Grasse Tyson has served as Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City since 1996. He discovered his love for the universe at an early age when he visited the Hayden Planetarium, less than 100 yards from where we recorded this interview. You may know him as the modern version of Carl Sagan or seen Cosmos, his Netflix show where he takes viewers on a journey across the universe. Or maybe you know him from Startalk, where he brings on popular guests including former US Presidents, astronauts, comedians and athletes from outside the scientific realm to show how culturally pervasive and entertaining science can be. In this episode we talk about his new book, his career trajectory, role models, how he thinks about education, and the intersection of pop culture and science.Astrophysics for People in a HurryPlease leave an honest review on iTunes. Your ratings and reviews really help and I read each one http://www.perell.com/podcast/neil-degrasse-tyson


Media Files:
https://static1.squarespace.com/static/55576406e4b02e4679105dc2/t/590ab276ff7c500c50f6a429/1493873414578/Neil+De+Grasse+Tyson_mixdown_02.mp3/original/Neil+De+Grasse+Tyson_mixdown_02.mp3