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Preview: Library of Congress: News from the John W. Kluge Center

News from the John W. Kluge Center - Recent Updates



News from the John W. Kluge Center - Recent Updates



 



Call for Applications: Jon B. Lovelace Fellowship for the Study of the Alan Lomax Collection—Dispatch December 2, 2016

Fri, 02 Dec 2016 11:00:06 -0600

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is now accepting applications for Jon B. Lovelace Fellowship for the Study of the Alan Lomax Collection. The application deadline is February 1, 2017.

The Lovelace Fellowship, established in 2015 for the study of the Alan Lomax Collection, pays tribute to the 60-year friendship between philanthropist Jon B. Lovelace and James H. Billington, who served as Librarian of Congress from 1987-2015. Under Billington’s leadership and through the generous benefaction of Jon and Lillian Lovelace, the Alan Lomax Collection was acquired in 1999 by the American Folklife Center and the Association for Cultural Equity at Hunter College. The Lomax Collection is a major collection of ethnographic field audio recordings, motion pictures, photographs, manuscripts, correspondence and other materials that represent Lomax’s lifetime of work to document and analyze traditional music, dance, storytelling and other expressive genres that arise from cultural groups in many parts of the world, particularly the United States, England, Scotland, Ireland, Italy, Spain, and the Caribbean. Lomax (1915-2002) was one of the greatest documenters of traditional culture during the twentieth century.

The Lovelace Fellowship supports research that contributes significantly to a greater understanding of the work of Alan Lomax and the cultural traditions he documented over the course of a vigorous and highly productive seventy-year career. Conducting full time research on-site at the Library of Congress, the fellowship provides an opportunity for a period of up to 8 months of concentrated use of the collections of the Library of Congress, through full-time residency in the Library's John W. Kluge Center. A stipend of $4,200 per month supports the Fellow.

APPLY ONLINE: Applications should be submitted through the Kluge Center’s online application system. Save and return to your application, manage letters of reference, and receive notification of submission all through our online portal. Visit https://klugefellowships.fluidreview.com/ to get started.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.

 The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.




Scholars to Discuss African Immigrants in the U.S., Dec. 15—Dispatch December 1, 2016

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 10:27:01 -0600

Contemporary African immigration and African communities in the U.S. will be the focus of a half-day symposium at the Library of Congress on Dec. 15. “Contemporary African Immigrants in the United States” will be hosted by noted historian Toyin Falola, the current Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South at the Library of Congress. The symposium will be held from 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 15 in room 119 on the first floor of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. The scholars participating are: Dr. Toyin Falola, Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair in the Humanities and a University Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas Dr. Abdul Karim Bangura, Researcher-in-residence of Abrahamic Connections and Islamic Peace Studies at the Center for Global Peace in the School of International Service at American University and the Director of The African Institution, both in Washington, D.C. Dr. Nemata Blyden, Associate Professor of History and International Affairs and Interim Director of the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program at The George Washington University Dr. Kenneth Harrow, Distinguished Professor of English, African Literature and Cinema at Michigan State University Dr. Moses Ochonu, Professor of History at Vanderbilt University What: “Contemporary African Immigrants in the United States”, hosted by historian Toyin Falola, 2016 Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South. When: Thursday, December 15, 2016, 2:00 - 5:00 p.m. – note earlier start time Where: Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/ Falola is the author of numerous books, including “The African Diaspora: Slavery, Migration and Globalization,” “Violence in Nigeria: The Crisis of Religious Politics and Secular Ideologies,” “The Power of African Cultures,” and “Nationalism and African Intellectuals.” As a series editor, he manages leading monograph series for the following publishers: Routledge, Palgrave Macmillan, Cambria Press, Carolina Academic Press, the University of Rochester Press, and the Cambridge University Press. He also serves on the board of more than 20 journals on African Studies. He was the vice-president of the International Scientific Committee, UNESCO Slave Route Project. Falola is now the president of the Consortium of Pan-African University Press. He currently serves on the Library of Congress Scholars Council. Falola has spent the past four months at the Library of Congress researching a project titled “African Immigrant Communities in the United States.” Falola seeks to document and to structure into a discernible narrative framework the stories and experiences of African intellectual and professional migrants to North America and Europe in what is being called “the moment of brain drain.” He also wants to produce both a collection of aesthetically independent and readable stories of migration, its challenges, and its triumphs, and an archive of immigrant experiences for scholars and policymakers. The Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South is a distinguished senior research position in residence at the Library appointed by the Librarian of Congress. Using research facilities and services at the Library, the scholar is expected to explore the history of the regions of Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, and the islands of the Pacific including Australia and New Zealand, using the immense foreign language collections of the Library of Congress. The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, b[...]



Jameson Fellow Wendy Wong to Lecture on Slavery in the Early Republic, Nov. 17—Dispatch November 10, 2016

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 15:00:08 -0600

On Thursday November 17 at 4 p.m., Jameson Fellow Wendy Wong will lecture on slavery in the early American Republic.

As Americans publicly debated their foreign relations in the 1790s, they enacted on their own soil the very foreign conflicts that they claimed not to want. In her talk, Jameson Fellow Wendy Wong examines the neutrality crisis through the publicizing of information in print, exploring the ways that the struggle to remain neutral was fraught with irony, even as it meant resisting being drawn into foreign conflict. In particular, her talk focuses on how the slavery question arose in public debates over neutrality, challenging the Early Republic’s stability and its ability to remain neutral.

Historian Wendy Wong is the 2016 J. Franklin Jameson Fellow in American History at the Library of Congress. She is working on a book project tentatively titled “Diplomatic Subtleties and Frank Overtures: Print Publicity, Neutrality, and the Politics of Slavery in the Early American Republic, 1793–1801.” The Jameson Fellowship is offered jointly by the Library of Congress and the American Historical Association.

What:Neutrality, Print Publicity, and the Politics of Slavery in the Early Republic” a lecture by Jameson Fellow Wendy Wong.

When: Thursday, November 17, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

Where: Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.

Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed.

Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on news from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.

 




Kluge Fellow Sheryl Kaskowitz to Discuss "Government Song Woman" Sidney Robertson, Nov. 3--Dispatch, October 27, 2016

Thu, 27 Oct 2016 11:00:08 -0500

On Thursday, November 3rd at 4 p.m., Kluge Fellow Sheryl Kaskowitz will lecture on the “government song woman” and folk-music collector Sidney Robertson. In her travels as a “government song woman” during the 1930s, folk-music collector Sidney Robertson recorded a wide range of musical expression that would help to shape the folk music revival in the decades that followed. Kluge Fellow Sheryl Kaskowitz discusses how beyond this important musical contribution, Sidney's letters and reports from these trips paint a vivid picture of life in Depression-era America and shed light on the government's use of music in the service of uniting the people during the New Deal. What: “'Delight in What It Is to be an American': Sidney Robertson on the Road, 1935-1937” a lecture by Kluge Fellow Sheryl Kaskowitz. When: Thursday, November 3, 2016, 4:00 p.m. Where: Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/ The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge. Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on news from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.   [...]



Sociologist Bruce Carruthers to Deliver Maguire Lecture, Oct. 28—Dispatch October 14, 2016

Fri, 14 Oct 2016 09:00:55 -0500

Sociologist Bruce Carruthers will discuss how credit and credit decision-making in the United States has developed over the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries, in the annual Maguire Lecture at the Library of Congress on Oct. 28. Carruthers, who held the Cary and Ann Maguire Chair in Ethics and American History at the Library’s John W. Kluge Center in 2016, will present "The Economy of Promises: Trust and Credit in America," at 3 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 28, in the Whittall Pavilion on the ground floor of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. In his lecture, Carruthers will examine how the automated credit scores and credit-rating systems of today have evolved from older methods that depended on individual reputations and personal relationships. He will also investigate how, in an economy that depends on credit, people manage trust and how they reduce uncertainty and vulnerability. The talk will be the culmination of three months of research on the topic as the Maguire Chair at the Library of Congress. Carruthers used the Library’s collections to research the project for an upcoming book tentatively titled "An Economy of Promises: Trust and Credit in America." What: “The Economy of Promises: Trust and Credit in America”, the Annual Maguire Address at the Library of Congress, hosted by The John W. Kluge Center When: Friday, October 28, 2016, 3:00 p.m. – note the special date and time Where: Whittall Pavilion, Ground floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/ A sociologist of economy and law, Carruthers is the John D. MacArthur Chair and Professor of Sociology and director of the Buffett Institute for Global Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author or co-author of five books on markets, business, the economy and politics. His most recent book, "Money and Credit: A Sociological Approach," examined the social dimensions of money and credit and the individual and corporate levels. His 2009 book "Bankrupt: Global Lawmaking and Systemic Financial Crisis," co-authored with Terence C. Halliday, studied how global actors have shaped corporate bankruptcy laws around the world. At Northwestern, his areas of research include the historical evolution of credit as a problem in the sociology of trust, regulatory arbitrage, what modern derivatives markets reveal about the relationship between law and capitalism, and the regulation of credit for poor people in early 20th-century America. Carruthers has held visiting fellowships at the Russell Sage Foundation, the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and the Institute for Advanced Study in Berlin. He has also received a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1991. The Cary and Ann Maguire Chair is a distinguished senior research position in residence at the Library appointed by the Librarian of Congress. Using research facilities and services at the Library of Congress, the scholar is expected to explore the history of America with special attention to the ethical dimensions of domestic economic, political and social policies and present a lecture on the research at the end of the tenure. For more information, visit loc.gov/kluge/fellowships/maguire.html/ The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to welcome all patrons. Please request ADA accommodations five days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov.   Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on news from The John W. Kluge Center.   The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and polit[...]



Kluge Fellow Sarah Cameron to Lecture on Kazakh Famine of the 1930s, Oct. 20—Dispatch October 13, 2016

Thu, 13 Oct 2016 11:02:38 -0500

On Thursday, October 20th at 4 p.m., Kluge Fellow Sarah Cameron will lecture on the Kazakh Famine of the 1930s.

In her talk, Cameron will analyze a little-known episode of Stalinist social engineering, the Kazakh famine of 1930-33, which led to the death of more than 1.5 million people, a quarter of Soviet Kazakhstan’s population. Using memoirs, oral history accounts, and archival documents, she will explore the stories of those who lived through the famine, ask how this crisis reshaped Soviet Kazakhstan and what it meant to be "Kazakh," and how the case of the Kazakh famine alters understandings of development and nation-building under Stalin. Read more about her project on our blog >

Sarah Cameron is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Maryland, College Park. As a 2016 Kluge Fellow she researched a book project titled, “The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan.”

What: The Hungry Steppe: Famine, Violence and the Making of Soviet Kazakhstan” a lecture by Kluge Fellow Sarah Cameron.

When: Thursday, October 20, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

Where: Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.

Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed.

Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on news from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.




Luis Campos Arrives as Astrobiology Chair at The John W. Kluge Center—Dispatch October 5, 2016

Wed, 05 Oct 2016 11:14:32 -0500

Luis Campos has arrived as the fourth Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology at The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress. His tenure began on Oct. 3, 2016. He will be in residence for 12 months. A historian of science, Campos is currently Associate Professor of History at The University of New Mexico. He is the author of “Radium and the Secret of Life” and is co-editor of “Making Mutations: Objects, Practices, Contexts.” While at the Kluge Center, Campos will use the Library collections to examine the intersection between astrobiology and synthetic biology. Synthetic biology, according to Campos, seeks to engineer novel forms of life. Astrobiology is interested in discovering novel forms of life. “Both synthetic biology and astrobiology are fields deeply concerned with developing a comprehensive understanding of the full potential of living systems,” Campos says. “My humanistic analysis will explore the historical and emerging contemporary connections between two of today’s most compelling fields of research in the contemporary life sciences.” Campos holds an appointment as a Senior Fellow at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Center for Health Policy at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of numerous articles, lectures, and conference papers on synthetic biology and the future of life and has appeared on the Travel Channel, the Discovery Channel, and PBS. A current member of the Editorial Board for the Journal of the History of Biology and Secretary-elect of the History of Science Society, Campos received his Ph.D. in the History of Science from Harvard University and his M.Phil. in the History and Philosophy of Science from University of Cambridge. The Astrobiology Chair at the Kluge Center is the result of collaboration between the NASA Astrobiology Program and the Library of Congress. It is named for Baruch "Barry" Blumberg, the late Kluge Center Scholars Council member, Nobel laureate and founding director of the NASA Astrobiology Institute. Funded by NASA, and executed by the Kluge Center in consultation with the NASA Astrobiology Institute, the chair holder conducts research at the intersection of the science of astrobiology and its humanistic and societal implications. One senior researcher is appointed annually to be in residence at the John W. Kluge Center, to make use of the Library of Congress collections in exploration of these questions, as well as to convene related programs on astrobiology’s role in culture and society. Campos will be the fourth scholar to hold the Astrobiology Chair: previous chair holders include astrobiologist and planetary scientist David Grinspoon (2012-2013); Steven Dick, former chief historian at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (2013-2014); and historian of recent science Nathaniel Comfort (2015-2016). The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The center attracts distinguished scholars to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at http://www.loc.gov/kluge. [...]



Edward Widmer Appointed Director of The John W. Kluge Center—Dispatch September 29, 2016

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 11:00:40 -0500

Historian, author, librarian and former presidential speechwriter Edward L. (Ted) Widmer, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs in New York and a senior fellow and adjunct professor of history at Brown University, has been appointed director of The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress, effective Oct. 3, 2016. Widmer’s career spans the worlds of academia, politics and journalism. He is the author or editor of many historical treatises, including a book published this month, “The New York Times Disunion: A History of the Civil War”; “Listening In: The Secret White House Recordings of John F. Kennedy”; a biography of Martin Van Buren; and “Ark of the Liberties: America and the World,” a 2008 publication that was featured as an “Editors’ Pick” by the New York Times. A forthcoming book, to be released in 2017, is “Lincoln on the Verge: An Odyssey, By Rail.” Widmer was a lecturer in history and literature at Harvard University from 1993-1997. He briefly left academia to serve as special assistant to the president for National Security Affairs and director for speechwriting at the National Security Council, from 1997-2000, crafting foreign-policy speeches for President Bill Clinton. In his capacity as a special adviser to the president for special projects (2000-2001), he advised President Clinton on issues related to history and scholarship. Widmer continued his work with Clinton as a special assistant from 2001-2004, conducting in-depth interviews with the former president as he wrote his autobiography “My Life.” Simultaneously, Widmer returned to the academic world as the inaugural director of the C.V. Starr Center for the Study of the American Experience, at Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland (2001-2006). From 2006-2012, he served as the Beatrice and Julio Mario Santo Domingo Director and Librarian at the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University. Under his direction, the Library upgraded its digital architecture and engaged in several digital partnerships and ventures including the creation of a digital archive of Haitian historical materials and participation in the World Digital Library, which is hosted by the Library of Congress. Widmer returned to public service in 2012, when he accepted the role of senior adviser to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton during her last year in office. He then returned to Brown as assistant to the president of Brown University for special projects (2012-2015), in which capacity he prepared a history of the university to commemorate its 250th anniversary (“Brown: The History of an Idea”), and returned to the classroom as an adjunct professor of history. Widmer has been with the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs since 2015. He has been a frequent contributor to a variety of publications, including the New York Times, the Boston Globe and Politico. He also serves on the board of the Massachusetts Historical Society. Widmer holds an A.B. in the history and literature of France and America, an A.M. in history, and a Ph.D. in the history of American civilization, all from Harvard University. The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge. Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @K[...]



Kislak Fellowship Deadline Extended until October 31—Dispatch September 20, 2016

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 09:00:45 -0500

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress continues to accept applications for the Kislak Fellowship for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas. The application deadline has been extended until October 31, 2016.

Kislak Fellowships are short-term fellowships for independent scholars, undergraduate and graduate students, and college and university faculty to conduct research based on items from the Kislak Collection, a major collection of rare books, manuscripts, historic documents, maps and art of the Americas donated to the Library of Congress by the Jay I. Kislak Foundation of Miami Lakes, FL. The collection contains some of the earliest records of indigenous peoples in North America and superb objects from the discovery, contact, and colonial periods, especially for Florida, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica.

Conducting full time research on-site at the Library of Congress, the fellowship provides an opportunity for a period of up to 3 months of concentrated use of the collections of the Library of Congress, through full-time residency in the Library's John W. Kluge Center. A stipend of $4,200 per month supports the Fellow.

APPLY ONLINE: Applications should be submitted through the Kluge Center’s online application system. Save and return to your application, manage letters of reference, and receive notification of submission all through our online portal. Visit https://klugefellowships.fluidreview.com/ to get started.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.




Call for Applications: Kluge Fellowships in Digital Studies—Dispatch September 16, 2016

Fri, 16 Sep 2016 13:01:15 -0500

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is now accepting applications for Kluge Fellowships in Digital Studies. The digital studies fellowships are for research related to the impact of the digital revolution on society, culture, and international relations. The application deadline is December 6, 2016.

Kluge Fellowships in Digital Studies are open to scholars and practitioners worldwide for deep, empirically-grounded research into the consequences of the digital revolution on how people think, how society functions, and on international relations. Proposals may also explore and analyze emerging trends and new phenomena that may generate consequential changes in the future. All proposals must state the importance of the research to fundamental thinking about the human condition.

Conducting full time research on-site at the Library of Congress, up to three (3) Fellows will be expected to engage in scholarly research on the digital revolution’s impact on how we think, how we live, and how we relate to one another. A stipend of $4,200 per month for a period of up to 11 months supports the Fellows. Scholars should include a discussion of how the resources of the Library of Congress will inform the intended research; scholars are encouraged to think creatively of how the Library’s collections may be used.

APPLY ONLINE: Applications should be submitted online through the Kluge Center’s online application system. Save and return to your application, manage letters of reference, and receive confirmation of submission all through our new online portal. Visit https://klugefellowships.fluidreview.com/ to get started.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.




“Emergence of Life” Symposium Occurs September 15—Dispatch September 8, 2016

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 11:01:32 -0500

How life emerges on Earth, in the lab, and elsewhere will be the subject of a day-long astrobiology symposium on September 15. Titled “The Emergence of Life: On the Earth, in the Lab, and Elsewhere,” the event will be hosted by Nathaniel Comfort, the current NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology at the Library’s John W. Kluge Center. It will occur on Thursday, September 15. The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place in room 119 on the first floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. Tickets are not needed. The Kluge Center is sponsoring the event as part of its joint NASA/Library of Congress Astrobiology Program. What: “The Emergence of Life: On the Earth, in the Lab, and Elsewhere,” a full day astrobiology symposium hosted by Astrobiology Chair Nathaniel Comfort. When: Thursday, September 15, 2016, 9:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. Where: Room 119, Thomas Jefferson Building, Library of Congress On Twitter:#LifeEmerges Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. The event comprises a series of panels that feature scientists, humanities scholars and journalists. Participants scheduled to appear include: Nsikan Akpan, science writer and producer, PBS News Hour Steven Benner, synthetic biologist, Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution Jim Cleaves, chemist, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute Bill Mesler, independent science writer Sophia Roosth, historian of science, Harvard University Matt Schrenk, geomicrobiologist, Michigan State University Carl Zimmer, award-winning science writer, New York Times The event also will feature the incoming NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology for 2016-2017, historian of science Luis Campos, and two previous chair holders: planetary scientist David Grinspoon; and historian and astronomer Steven Dick. See the full schedule at http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/news/originslife.html Nathaniel Comfort is a historian of recent science and a professor at the Institute of the History of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University. His books include "The Science of Human Perfection: How Genes Became the Heart of American Medicine" (2012) and "The Tangled Field: Barbara McClintock’s Search for the Patterns of Genetic Control" (2001). In a recent post on our blog, Comfort explained his newest book project, an examination of the genomic revolution’s effects on origins of life research. Read the interview. The September 15th program is part of the Kluge Center’s ongoing Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Astrobiology Program, which investigates the intersection of astrobiology research with humanistic and societal concerns. A senior scholar position at the Kluge Center, previous Astrobiology Chairs were held by planetary scientist Dr. David Grinspoon and astronomer Dr. Steven Dick. Historian of science Luis Campos will be the 2016-2017 Astrobiology Chair. The Astrobiology Chair is the result of collaboration between the NASA Astrobiology Program and the Library of Congress. Funded by NASA, and executed by the Kluge Center in consultation with the NASA Astrobiology Institute, the program promotes research at the intersection of the science of astrobiology and its humanistic and societal implications. A senior researcher is appointed annually to be in residence at the Kluge Center, to make use of the Library of Congress collections, as well as to convene related programs that ensure the subject of astrobiology’s role in culture and society receives considered treatment each year in Washington, D.C. Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @Klug[...]



Scholars Toyin Falola, Barry Posen Arrive at the Kluge Center—Dispatch September 7, 2016

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 14:03:08 -0500

Historian Toyin Falola and political scientist Barry Posen arrived this month at The John W. Kluge Center for periods as senior scholars in residence. Falola will hold the Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South; Posen will hold the Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations.

Toyin Falola is distinguished scholar of African history and a member of the Library of Congress Scholars Council. The Jacob and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair in the Humanities and a University Distinguished Teaching Professor at the University of Texas at Austin, at the Kluge Center Falola will research a project titled “African Immigrant Communities in the United States.” He is the author of numerous books, including “The African Diaspora: Slavery, Migration and Globalization,” “Violence in Nigeria: The Crisis of Religious Politics and Secular Ideologies,” “The Power of African Cultures,” and “Nationalism and African Intellectuals.”

Barry Posen is a political scientist who is currently the Ford International Professor of Political Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and director of the MIT Security Studies Program. He is the author of three books, including “Restraint: A New Foundation for U.S. Grand Strategy,” “Inadvertent Escalation: Conventional War and Nuclear Risks,” and the award-winning “The Sources of Military Doctrine.” At the Kluge Center, Posen will study the implications for the United States of a multipolar international order.

Read more about Toyin Falola here.

Read more about Barry Posen here.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with members of the U.S. Congress and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge/.




Wayne Wiegand Appointed Distinguished Visiting Scholar—Dispatch August 19, 2016

Fri, 19 Aug 2016 11:00:12 -0500

Wayne A. Wiegand, a leading scholar of American public libraries and American book history, has been appointed a distinguished visiting scholar at The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress. His appointment begins in January 2017 and will conclude in early May.

Wiegand is the F. William Summers Professor Emeritus of Library and Information Studies and American Studies at Florida State University.

At the Kluge Center, Wiegand will research his current book project—a history of the American public school library. The project incorporates five perspectives: the history of public school education; the history of American librarianship; the social history of reading (including the history of print culture); the history of childhood; and the history of cultural institutions as places. While in residence, he will use the vast array of database services, particularly newspaper databases, to which the Library of Congress subscribes in order to unearth the voices of tens of thousands of public school library users over the generations.

Wiegand was cofounding Director of the Center for the History of Print and Digital Culture at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (est. 1992), and co-founder and former Director of the Florida Book Awards (est. 2006), now the nation’s most comprehensive state book awards program. He taught in library schools at the University of Kentucky (1976-86), the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1987-2002), and Florida State University (2003-2010).

In addition to over one hundred scholarly articles, Wiegand is author of “Politics of an Emerging Profession: The American Library Association, 1876-1917” (1986), “‘An Active Instrument for Propaganda:” American Public Libraries During World War I” (1989), “Irrepressible Reformer: A Biography of Melvil Dewey” (1996), and “Main Street Public Library: Reading Spaces and Community Places in America’s Heartland, 1876-1956” (2011). For the academic year 2008-2009, he was on a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities to write “‘Part of Our Lives:’ A People’s History of the American Public Library” (2015). He is the co-editor with Donald G. Davis, Jr. of the “Encyclopedia of Library History” (1994).

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.




Emergence of Life Subject of Astrobiology Symposium, September 15—Dispatch August 16

Tue, 16 Aug 2016 13:00:15 -0500

How life emerges on Earth, in the lab, and elsewhere will be the subject of a day-long astrobiology symposium on September 15. Titled, “The Emergence of Life: On the Earth, in the Lab, and Elsewhere,” the event will be hosted by Nathaniel Comfort, the current NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology at the Library’s John W. Kluge Center. It will occur on Thursday, September 15. The event, which is free and open to the public, will take place in room 119 on the first floor of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. Tickets are not needed. The Kluge Center is sponsoring the event as part of its joint NASA/Library of Congress Astrobiology Program. The event comprises a series of panels that feature scientists, humanities scholars and journalists. Participants scheduled to appear include: Nsikan Akpan, science writer and producer, PBS News Hour Steven Benner, synthetic biologist, Foundation for Applied Molecular Evolution Jim Cleaves, chemist, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institute Bill Mesler, independent science writer Sophia Roosth, historian of science, Harvard University Matt Schrenk, geomicrobiologist, Michigan State University Carl Zimmer, award-winning science writer, New York Times The event also will feature the incoming NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology for 2016-2017, historian of science Luis Campos, and two previous chair holders: planetary scientist David Grinspoon; and historian and astronomer Steven Dick. For a schedule and further information, visit http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/news/originslife.html. Nathaniel Comfort is a historian of recent science and a professor at the Institute of the History of Medicine at The Johns Hopkins University. His books include "The Science of Human Perfection: How Genes Became the Heart of American Medicine" (2012) and "The Tangled Field: Barbara McClintock’s Search for the Patterns of Genetic Control" (2001). The program is part of the Kluge Center’s ongoing Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Astrobiology Program, which investigates the intersection of astrobiology research with humanistic and societal concerns. A senior scholar position at the Kluge Center, previous Astrobiology Chairs were held by planetary scientist Dr. David Grinspoon and astronomer Dr. Steven Dick. Historian of science Luis Campos will be the 2016-2017 Astrobiology Chair. The astrobiology chair is the result of collaboration between the NASA Astrobiology Program and the Library of Congress. Funded by NASA, and executed by the Kluge Center in consultation with the NASA Astrobiology Institute, the program promotes research at the intersection of the science of astrobiology and its humanistic and societal implications. A senior researcher is appointed annually to be in residence at the Kluge Center, to make use of the Library of Congress collections, as well as to convene related programs that ensure the subject of astrobiology’s role in culture and society receives considered treatment each year in Washington, D.C. Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.  The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http:[...]



Reminder: Juan Cole to Lecture on Peace in the Quran, Aug. 18—Dispatch August 15, 2016

Mon, 15 Aug 2016 18:00:05 -0500

Juan Cole, a prominent scholar and blogger who writes on the Muslim world’s relationship with the West, will discuss notions of peace found in the Quran, in a lecture at the Kluge Center on Aug. 18. “Peace and Concord in the Quran” will take place at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 18, in room 119 on the first floor of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.  The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. Cole is the current Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South at the Library’s John W. Kluge Center.  He is the Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan and the author of “The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is changing the Middle East” (2014).  His “Informed Comment” blog provides historical context to modern-day events in the Muslim world.  He has commented extensively on al-Qaeda, the Taliban, Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran. While at the Kluge Center Cole has been researching a project titled, “The Idea of Peace in the Quran.”  He has used the Library’s collections to examine concepts of peace in Muslim scriptures, tracing the evolution of peace and corollary ideas chronologically and contextually through the text, with special attention to sets of words grouped together that refer to the topic. The author or editor of more than 10 books on the Middle East, Cole has appeared on “The ABC Nightly News,” “Nightline,” “The Today Show,” “Charlie Rose,” “Anderson Cooper 360,” “Chris Hayes’ All In,” “Rachel Maddow,” “Democracy Now!” and “The Colbert Report.” What:“Peace and Concord in the Quran,” a lecture by Kluge Chair Juan Cole. When: Thursday, August 18, 2016, 4:00 p.m. Where: Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/ The Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South is a distinguished senior research position in residence at the Library, appointed by the Librarian of Congress. Using research facilities and services at the Library, the scholar is expected to explore the regions including Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, and the islands of the Pacific including Australia and New Zealand, using the immense foreign-language collections of the Library of Congress. Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr. The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge. [...]



Call for Applications: Kislak Fellowships for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas—Dispatch August 5, 2016

Fri, 05 Aug 2016 11:00:20 -0500

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is now accepting applications for Kislak Fellowships for the Study of the History and Cultures of the Early Americas. The application deadline is October 15, 2016.

Kislak Fellowships are short-term fellowships for independent scholars, undergraduate and graduate students, and college and university faculty to conduct research based on items from the Kislak Collection, a major collection of rare books, manuscripts, historic documents, maps and art of the Americas donated to the Library of Congress by the Jay I. Kislak Foundation of Miami Lakes, FL. The collection contains some of the earliest records of indigenous peoples in North America and superb objects from the discovery, contact, and colonial periods, especially for Florida, the Caribbean, and Mesoamerica.

Conducting full time research on-site at the Library of Congress, the fellowship provides an opportunity for a period of up to 3 months of concentrated use of the collections of the Library of Congress, through full-time residency in the Library's John W. Kluge Center. A stipend of $4,200 per month supports the Fellow.

APPLY ONLINE: Applications should be submitted through the Kluge Center’s online application system. Save and return to your application, manage letters of reference, and receive notification of submission all through our online portal. Visit https://klugefellowships.fluidreview.com/ to get started.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.




Juan Cole to Lecture on Peace in the Quran, Aug. 18—Dispatch August 4, 2016

Thu, 04 Aug 2016 11:00:05 -0500

Juan Cole, a prominent scholar and blogger who writes on the Muslim world’s relationship with the West, will discuss notions of peace found in the Quran, in a lecture at the Kluge Center on Aug. 18. “Peace and Concord in the Quran” will take place at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 18, in room 119 on the first floor of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.  The event is free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. Cole is the current Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South at the Library’s John W. Kluge Center.  He is the Richard P. Mitchell Collegiate Professor of History at the University of Michigan and the author of “The New Arabs: How the Millennial Generation is changing the Middle East” (2014).  His “Informed Comment” blog provides historical context to modern-day events in the Muslim world.  He has commented extensively on al-Qaeda, the Taliban, Iraq, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran. While at the Kluge Center Cole has been researching a project titled, “The Idea of Peace in the Quran.”  He has used the Library’s collections to examine concepts of peace in Muslim scriptures, tracing the evolution of peace and corollary ideas chronologically and contextually through the text, with special attention to sets of words grouped together that refer to the topic. The author or editor of more than 10 books on the Middle East, Cole has appeared on “The ABC Nightly News,” “Nightline,” “The Today Show,” “Charlie Rose,” “Anderson Cooper 360,” “Chris Hayes’ All In,” “Rachel Maddow,” “Democracy Now!” and “The Colbert Report.” What: “Peace and Concord in the Quran,” a lecture by Kluge Chair Juan Cole. When: Thursday, August 18, 2016, 4:00 p.m. Where: Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed. Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/ The Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South is a distinguished senior research position in residence at the Library, appointed by the Librarian of Congress. Using research facilities and services at the Library, the scholar is expected to explore the regions including Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, South and Southeast Asia, and the islands of the Pacific including Australia and New Zealand, using the immense foreign-language collections of the Library of Congress. Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr. The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge [...]



August at the Kluge Center—Dispatch August 1, 2016

Mon, 01 Aug 2016 11:15:06 -0500

This August at the Kluge Center:

Events

LECTURE

“Peace and Concord in the Qur’an”
with Kluge Chair Juan Cole

Thursday, August 18, 2016, 4:00 p.m.
Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building

The Muslim scripture, the Qur'an or Koran, has been analyzed a great deal for its ideas on a whole range of subjects, from late antique economic practices to notions of the just war. The literature on its ideas regarding peace, however, is remarkably small. Yet peace is central to this book on a whole range of dimensions, from community relations to inner, mystical composure, to visions of heaven and the world after the Judgment Day. This talk by Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the South Juan Cole will provide a tour of the eirenic messages of the Qur'an.

--------------------------------

Call for Proposals: Astrobiology Chair and Kissinger Chair

The Kluge Center is now accepting applications for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology and the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy & International Relations.

 

Apply online: https://klugefellowships.fluidreview.com/

--------------------------------

Coming in September

ASTROBIOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

“The Emergence of Life: On Earth, in the Lab, and Elsewhere”

Hosted by Astrobiology Chair Nathaniel Comfort

Thursday, September 15, 2016 -- ­all day
Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building

The emergence of life is among the most compelling questions in astrobiology. This symposium will bring together scientists, humanists, and authors to explore what we know about the origins of life, how we came to know it, and what it means. Hosted by Astrobiology Chair Nathaniel Comfort.

Events are held inside the historic Library of Congress Thomas Jefferson Building.

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to welcome all patrons. Please request ADA accommodations five days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our email alerts for news and funding opportunities from the Kluge Center.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.




New Kluge Fellows Announced—Dispatch July 29, 2016

Fri, 29 Jul 2016 09:00:18 -0500

The 2016 Kluge Fellows Have Been Announced

The John W. Kluge Center is very pleased to announce our 2016 Kluge Fellows. This diverse group of scholars hail from institutions across the U.S. as well as one scholar from Ireland and one scholar from Russia.

The Fellows represent the disciplines of political science, romance languages, modern language and literature, art history, foreign affairs, and various sub-disciplines of history, including political history, world history, Civil War history, American history and British history.

All Fellows have received a terminal advanced degree within the past seven years, as per the eligibility requirements for the Fellowship.

Click here to meet the Fellows!

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.




Kluge Center Announces Call for Applications for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology—Dispatch July 26, 2016

Tue, 26 Jul 2016 09:00:36 -0500

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is now accepting applications for the Baruch S. Blumberg NASA/Library of Congress Chair in Astrobiology. The application deadline is December 1, 2016.

The Astrobiology Chair is a distinguished senior research position in residence at the Library of Congress for a period of up to twelve months. Using research facilities and services at the Library of Congress, the scholar engages in research at the intersection of the science of astrobiology and its humanistic and social implications. The appointment ensures the subject of astrobiology’s role in culture and society receives considered treatment each year in Washington, D.C.

The Chair is open to scholars and leading thinkers in the fields of astrobiology, astronomy, planetary science, the history of science, philosophy, religion, sociology, anthropology, ethics, literature, the arts, paleontology, Earth and atmospheric sciences, geological sciences or other fields. The Chair may undertake research on a wide range of issues related to how life begins and evolves, or examine the social, religious, ethical, legal, and cultural concerns that arise from researching the origins, evolution, and nature of life in the universe.

Information about the Chair may be found on our website: http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/fellowships/NASA-astrobiology.html. A stipend during the term of appointment supports the scholar.

APPLY ONLINE: Applications can now be submitted online through the Kluge Center’s new online application system. Save and return to your application, manage letters of reference, and receive confirmation of submission all through our online portal. Visit https://klugefellowships.fluidreview.com/ to get started.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge




Lectures on the 14th Amendment and Prostitution in Korea, Next Week at the Kluge Center—Dispatch July 21, 2016

Thu, 21 Jul 2016 10:00:47 -0500

Next week the Kluge Center hosts two lectures by Kluge Fellows on Wednesday, July 27 and Thursday, July 28.

On Wednesday, July 27 at 4 p.m., Kluge Fellow Taja-Nia Henderson will discuss Section 3 of the 14th Amendment, which barred from public officeholding Confederate officials and military personnel who had previously taken an oath to uphold the federal constitution. Henderson is Associate Professor of Law at Rutgers University School of Law.

What:Framing Treason: War, Reconciliation, and Memory in the Making of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution,” a lecture by Kluge Fellow Taja-Nia Henderson.

When: Wednesday, July 27, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

Where: Pickford Theater, Third floor, James Madison Memorial Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, D.C. – note different location

On Thursday, July 28 at 4 p.m., Kluge Fellow Jeong-Mi Park will discuss how the South Korean government controlled military prostitutes catering to American servicemen, making these “dangerous” women into “patriotic” subjects. Park is Research Assistant Professor at the Research Institute of Comparative History and Culture at Hanyang University.

What:Making Patriotic Prostitutes: The South Korean Government's Policies on Prostitution for the U.S. Military,” a lecture by Kluge Fellow Jeong-Mi Park.

When: Thursday, July 28, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

Where: Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.

Both events are free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed.

Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to welcome all patrons. Please request ADA accommodations five days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on events at The John W. Kluge Center.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge




Kluge Center Announces Call for Kissinger Chair Applications and Nominations—Dispatch July 19, 2016

Tue, 19 Jul 2016 12:00:09 -0500

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress is now accepting applications and nominations for the Henry A. Kissinger Chair in Foreign Policy and International Relations. The application deadline is November 1, 2016.

The Kissinger Chair is a distinguished senior research position in residence at the Library’s John W. Kluge Center that engages in research on foreign policy and international affairs that will lead to publication. The chair holder receives a monthly stipend, an office inside the magnificent Thomas Jefferson Building, and full access to the Library’s vast array of historical, linguistic, and legal resources to draw upon for research on any aspect of foreign policy or international relations involving the United States.

Past chair holders include:

  • Aaron L. Friedberg, Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University;
  • Klaus W. Larres, Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professor at University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill;
  • C. Raja Mohan, Nonresident Senior Associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace;
  • Ambassador Teresita C. Schaffer, Nonresident Senior Fellow at The Brookings Institution; and
  • John Bew, Reader in History and Foreign Policy at the War Studies Department at King's College London.

The most recent Kissinger Chair, Bruce Jentleson, spent nine months at the Kluge Center completing his forthcoming book on 20th century leaders who made major breakthroughs for peace and security.

Information about the Kissinger Chair may be found on our website: http://www.loc.gov/loc/kluge/fellowships/kissinger.html. The deadline for applications is November 1, 2016.

APPLY ONLINE: Applications should be submitted through the Kluge Center’s online application system. Save and return to your application, manage letters of reference, and receive confirmation of submission all through our online portal. Visit https://klugefellowships.fluidreview.com/ to get started.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on research opportunities from The John W. Kluge Center. Follow us on Twitter: @KlugeCtr.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge.




Kluge Fellow Danille Christensen to Deliver Botkin Lecture, July 19—Dispatch July 15, 2016

Fri, 15 Jul 2016 13:00:21 -0500

Kluge Fellow Danille Christensen will deliver a 2016 Benjamin A. Botkin Folklife Lecture on Tuesday, July 19 at 12:00 p.m. in the Library of Congress Pickford Theater. The Botkin Lecture Series is organized and hosted by the Library’s American Folklife Center.

The talk, titled “Home Canning: Cultural Narratives, Technological Change, and the Status of Traditional Knowledge,” will cover the history of home canning—a practice of the American past that is currently experiencing a revival. Drawing on filmstrips, posters, cartoons, newspaper captions, manuals, and mail-order catalogs, Christensen will explore the shift from home canning to industrialized canning and the dismissal or even demonization of the domestic labor and knowledge of women.

Christensen is Assistant Professor in the Department of Religion and Culture at Virginia Tech. Her scholarship examines the ways people shape everyday speech, action, and objects as they seek to influence and persuade others, and she is especially interested in gendered domestic labor as a site of commentary and display. As a Kluge Fellow she is completing her book “Freedom from Want: Home Canning in the American Imagination.”

What:Home Canning: Cultural Narratives, Technological Change, and the Status of Traditional Knowledge,” a 2016 Botkin lecture by Kluge Fellow Danille Christensen

When: Tuesday, July 19, 2016, 12:00 p.m. – note special date and time

Where: Pickford Theater, Third floor, James Madison Memorial Building, 101 Independence Ave. S.E., Washington, D.C.

Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed.

Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to welcome all patrons. Please request ADA accommodations five days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on events at The John W. Kluge Center.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge




Peng Guoxiang Arrives as Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the North—Dispatch July 13, 2016

Wed, 13 Jul 2016 11:15:04 -0500

Chinese scholar Peng Guoxiang has arrived at the Library of Congress John W. Kluge Center as the Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the North. His tenure began in July and he will be in residence for six months. Peng is an accomplished scholar of Chinese philosophy and the Confucian tradition and its influence on modern-day Chinese society. He is currently the Qiu Shi Distinguished Professor of Chinese Philosophy, Intellectual History and Religions at Zhejiang University, and director of the Center for Cultural China Studies, Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies at Peking University. At the Kluge Center, Peng will continue his research on the religious dimensions of Confucianism and the political and social thought of contemporary Confucianism. His work strives to present a more accurate, balanced and complete picture of Confucian tradition through analysis of original sources and secondary literature in history, philosophy and religion. His work also attempts to deepen contemporary understandings of Chinese thought and cultures in relation to other global traditions. Peng’s publications include: "This Worldly Concern: The Political and Social Thought of Mou Zongsan (1909-1995)" (2016), "Revision and New Discovery: Historical Study of Pre-Modern Confucianism from Northern Song till Early Qing Dynasty" (2013 and 2015), "Reconstruction of This Culture of Ours: Confucianism and The Contemporary World" (2013) and "Confucian Tradition from Classical Period to Its Contemporary Transformation: Speculation and Interpretation" (2012). Peng also serves as the vice president of the International Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and Western Philosophy. He has previously been the Arthur Lynn Andrews Distinguished Visiting Professor of Asian Studies at the University of Hawaii; a visiting professor at the Chinese University of Hong Kong; a visiting scholar at Harvard University; a visiting research fellow at Bochum Ruhr University, the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity in Germany, the Goethe University in Frankfurt, the National Taiwan University, and a distinguished visiting scholar at the National University of Singapore. In 2009, he received the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award, which is bestowed by the Humboldt Foundation and the Ministry of Education and Research of Germany. The Kluge Chair in Countries and Cultures of the North is a distinguished senior research position in residence at the Library appointed by the Librarian of Congress. Using research facilities and services at the Library of Congress, the scholar is expected to explore the history of the regions of North America, Europe, Russia and East Asia, using the immense foreign-language collections in the specialized reading rooms of the Library. Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on news from The John W. Kluge Center. The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge. [...]



Kluge Fellow Michael Sizer to Discuss Parisian Medieval Politics, July 14—Dispatch July 7, 2016

Thu, 07 Jul 2016 11:03:13 -0500

On Thursday, July 14 at 4 p.m., Kluge Fellow Michael Sizer will lecture on the popular politics of late medieval Paris.

In his talk, Sizer will examine the late Middle Ages, one of the most tumultuous periods in European political history, featuring revolts, riots, popular preachers, processions, and other engagements of the people in the political realm that was "unheard of in previous times" according to one chronicler of the period. Kluge Fellow Michael Sizer discusses the popular politics of late medieval Paris (1380-1422) and what bearing it may have on the way we understand popular political culture today.

Historian Michael Sizer is a current Kluge Fellow at the Library of Congress and a faculty member at Maryland Institute College of Art.

What:Popular Politics and Public Opinion in Late Medieval Paris,” a lecture by Kluge Fellow Michael Sizer.

When: Thursday, July 14, 2016, 4:00 p.m.

Where: Room LJ-119, First floor, Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.

Free and open to the public. Tickets are not needed.

Directions and maps: http://www.loc.gov/visit/directions/

The John W. Kluge Center is pleased to welcome all patrons. Please request ADA accommodations five days in advance at (202) 707-6362 or ADA@loc.gov.

Received this email from a colleague? Subscribe to our RSS feed to stay up-to-date on events at The John W. Kluge Center.

The John W. Kluge Center was established at the Library of Congress in 2000 to foster a mutually enriching relationship between the world of ideas and the world of action, between scholars and political leaders. The Center attracts outstanding scholarly figures to Washington, D.C., facilitates their access to the Library’s remarkable collections, and helps them engage in conversation with policymakers and the public. Learn more at: http://www.loc.gov/kluge