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Copyright: Copyright 2017 Logophilia Limited and Paul McFedries
 



beach-spreading

Fri, 29 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0000

pp. Taking up more than one's fair share of space on a crowded beach.

On September 6, the borough council of Belmar,N.J., voted to outlaw an increasingly common practice known as beach spreading," with the new ban set to take effect at the start of the summer 2018 season.
—Janine Puhak, “'Beach spreading' banned in New Jersey shore town: 'People weren’t using common sense and decency',” Fox News, September 7, 2017

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cryomation

Thu, 28 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0000

n. To reduce a dead body to a powder by freeze-drying it with liquid nitrogen and then crushing the remains.

But trends in the funeral industry are beginning to shift as new and reconceived rituals, designed to be more culturally and environmentally sustainable, come into public awareness. "We're hearing these new words starting to emerge from the field; one is aquamation, a cremation done with water," explains Dr Interlandi. "Or you've got cryomation, where the body is actually submerged in liquid nitrogen and crushed afterwards."
—Siobhan Hegarty, “This fashion designer makes clothes for dead bodies,” ABC News, September 10, 2017

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situationship

Thu, 14 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0000

n. A relationship between two people that is more than a friendship, but less than a romance.

For all the boyfriends that were never really my boyfriend, past hookups and their mealy scars of things left unsaid, there was now a clever umbrella term: situationships. And getting involved in a situationship might be the worst thing you can do to yourself.
—Carina Hsieh, “Is the 'Situationship' Ruining Modern Romance?,” Cosmopolitan, May 1, 2017

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fatberg

Wed, 13 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0000

n. A massive, hardened agglomeration of fatty substances, particularly one found in a sewer and caused by homeowners and businesses pouring fats down drains.

First, someone might pour molten turkey fat down a drain. A few blocks away, someone else might flush a wet wipe down a toilet. When the two meet in a dank sewer pipe, a baby fatberg is born.
—Erika Engelhaupt, “Huge Blobs of Fat and Trash Are Filling the World’s Sewers,” National Geographic, August 16, 2017

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hatfishing

Fri, 08 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0000

pp. Tricking a potential dating partner by wearing a hat to hide one's baldness or receding hairline.

When the internet talks about hatfishing, its regarded as a male analogue to women who overdo makeup. The idea is that both sexes use some form of trickery to misrepresent who they are underneath.
—Jason Chen, “If You’ve Never Seen the Top of Your Tinder Date’s Head, Perhaps You’re Being Hatfished,” The Cut, August 23, 2017

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witness tree

Thu, 07 Sep 2017 04:00:00 +0000

n. An extremely old tree, particularly one that was present at one or more important historical events.

Today, only four trees survive from Washingtons time--he died at Mount Vernon in 1799....No one is more aware of the mortality of the witness trees near the mansion than Joel King, a Mount Vernon gardener who is on a mission to propagate them.
—Adrian Higgins, “This gardener is working to preserve George Washington’s last surviving trees,” The Washington Post, February 20, 2017

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tree blindness

Wed, 30 Aug 2017 04:00:00 +0000

n. The disregard of the trees in one's environment.

There was a time when knowing your trees was a matter of life and death, because you needed to know which ones were strong enough to support a house and which ones would feed you through the winter. Now most of us walk around, to adapt a term devised by some botanists, tree blind. But heres the good news: Tree blindness can be cured.
—Gabriel Popkin, “Cure Yourself of Tree Blindness,” The New York Times, August 26, 2017

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neighbor spoofing

Tue, 22 Aug 2017 04:00:00 +0000

pp. Using a false caller ID to make a scam phone call appear to originate in the callee's local area.

There are now a billion robocalls going to cellphones and landlines every month. Many of them look like they're from your neighbor. It's not really your neighbor, of course. It's neighbor spoofing--which means using the internet to make it look like a scammer (who could be anywhere in the world) is calling from your area.
—Sally Helm & Kenny Malone, “Episode 789: Robocall Invasion,” NPR, August 18, 2017

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gloatrage

Tue, 04 Jul 2017 04:00:00 +0000

n. Triumphant satisfaction that a person's behaviour is as bad as expected, combined with outrage at that behaviour.

An unfortunate consequence of the mainstream medias outrage (or gloatrage) is that political bias has begun to leak from the opinion pages into the news coverage, giving detractors further reason to eschew what have been traditionally high-quality news outlets such as the Washington Post and the New York Times.
—Neil Winward, “Why the Fourth Estate Is Crumbling,” The Market Mogul, July 3, 2017

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fearonomics

Fri, 30 Jun 2017 04:00:00 +0000

n. The negative impact of fear and anxiety on economic activity; the use of fear to sell products and services.

One big lesson learned is the need to prevent panic during a public health emergency. The new phrase is to "{h fear-guard h}" a country. During many disease outbreaks, say experts, a pandemic of fear can be more devastating to a society and an economy than the disease itself.
—“A call to '{h fear-guard h}' countries in a pandemic,” Christian Science Monitor, June 23, 2017

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