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Preview: Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen



The Peabody Award-winning Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen, from PRI and WNYC, is public radio’s smart and surprising guide to what's happening in pop culture and the arts. Each week, Kurt Andersen introduces you to the people who are creating and shaping



Last Build Date: Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 -0500

Copyright: PRI and WNYC
 



And Don’t Call Me Shirley

Thu, 01 Dec 2016 00:00:00 -0500

An hour about spoofs, parodies, and lampoonery. Mel Brooks and David Zucker talk about the art of mocking movies. Then, Edgar Wright, Simon Pegg and Nick Frost deconstruct action flicks. And a live, unplugged performance by "Weird Al" Yankovic.

(Segments in this episode have aired previously)

(image) And Don’t Call Me Shirley


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/kTzQ6m8L-Ko/studio120116_cms687643_pod.mp3




Sharon Jones's Soul Revival

Mon, 28 Nov 2016 06:00:00 -0500

Sharon Jones burst onto the music scene about 10 years ago — she was backed by The Dap-Kings, a straight-out-of-the-1960s funk band with a fantastic horn section.  And at just 5 feet tall, Sharon had all of the funk and spark of James Brown. The band was made up of young hipsters, and while Jones was decades their senior, she’d dance circles around them onstage. She’d lead church choirs and had a day job as a prison guard, before finally breaking into the music business. Her swift rise was cut short by cancer — she died Nov. 18 at age 60.

We’d recently featured Sharon in a story about “This Land is Your Land” (she and the Dap-Kings did a terrific cover of the song). In it she explained how Woody Guthrie’s spoke to her in a surprising way. Today we’re releasing a special extended cut of her part of the story — plus her 2007 interview and performance in our studio.

(image) Sharon Jones's Soul Revival


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/fgE2OFhbwE8/studio112816_cms684289_pod.mp3




All Shakespeare All the Time

Thu, 24 Nov 2016 00:00:00 -0500

On the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, we look at the ways his work continues to change and adapt. In the 19th century, Shakespeare’s work got caught up in minstrel shows — and African-American actors are still struggling to claim the Bard as their own. Also, we find out how a father-son team is changing the way Shakespeare sounds by bringing back his original pronunciation. And we go inside the pioneering immersive theater experience “Sleep No More,” which might be the longest-running Shakespeare adaptation ever.

Segments in this show have aired previously.

(image) All Shakespeare All the Time


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/l3qcctNeDp0/studio112416_cms684603_pod.mp3




Remembering Ultra-American Musician Leon Russell

Mon, 21 Nov 2016 06:00:00 -0500

Leon Russell passed away last week — he was 74. During the 1970s, he forged a musical career unlike almost anyone else’s before or since: an ultra-American mix of country, blues, gospel, and rock n’ roll, collaborating with musicians from all those genres.

Kurt spoke with Russell in the summer of 2015 when a 40-year-old documentary about Russell’s musical career was finally released. Director Les Blank filmed Russell at the height of his stardom in the 70s, but Russell held the release of the film until after Blank’s death. “Les Blank is a wonderful documentarian, but I felt like it had a lot of coverage that didn’t have to do with me — you know, a lot of sunsets,” he explained.

Russell also told Kurt about how a childhood injury influenced his artistic development, the provenance of Mick Jagger’s famous dance, and his collaboration with Elton John.

(image) Remembering Ultra-American Musician Leon Russell


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/_7JilvV0OS0/studio112116_cms594648_pod.mp3




Y’all, Youse, or Yinz?

Thu, 17 Nov 2016 00:00:00 -0500

On this week’s show, novelist Brit Bennett reads from her debut novel, “The Mothers.” Plus, Josh Katz gives us a tour of American regionalisms. And Leonor Caraballo and Abou Farman create art in the face of the cancer. 

(image) Y’all, Youse, or Yinz?


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/GgQZ5Sm4oQ4/studio111716_cms683908_pod.mp3




DJ Shadow’s Record-Breaking Album

Mon, 14 Nov 2016 06:00:00 -0500

Twenty years ago this week, DJ Shadow set a Guinness World Record for creating an album made up entirely of samples, many of them from LPs he rescued from the 50-cent bin. But “Endtroducing” is also musically and compositionally inventive, and it caught the attention of the hip-hop world. DJ Shadow has moved on, but some of his fans (including Derek John) still haven't gotten over it.  

(image) DJ Shadow’s Record-Breaking Album


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/_Hk3tqz9VmI/studio111416_djshadow.mp3




This Land is Trump's Land

Thu, 10 Nov 2016 00:00:00 -0500

This week: How a former reality TV star was elected president. Then, Pulitzer Prize winner Tracy K. Smith writes a poem inspired by a Baton Rouge protester. And we explore the creation of Woody Guthrie’s “This Land is Your Land.”

(image) This Land is Trump's Land


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/c3IfR5F_69U/studio111016_cms681298_pod.mp3




Live from New York, It’s Election Night!

Mon, 07 Nov 2016 06:00:00 -0500

Nobody defined the satirical style of “Saturday Night Live” more than Jim Downey. He wrote for the show for over 33 seasons and was SNL’s head writer for 10 years. Downey gives us a behind-the-scenes look at how SNL crafted political sketches throughout the years — including dealing with reluctant politicians, his favorite jokes that were too risqué for the air, and how cast members like Daryl Hammond developed their pitch-perfect impressions.

(image) Live from New York, It’s Election Night!


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/0VlcbQhaHBw/studio110716_cms680179_pod.mp3




Eugenia Cheng, Guilty Pleasures & Jacob Collier

Thu, 03 Nov 2016 00:00:00 -0400

On this week’s show, Eugenia Cheng whips up a delicious math lesson for Kurt. Plus, writer Sadie Stein defends one of the most detested words in the English language. Then, an art historian and a scientist explore the connection between bird plumage and air pollution. And Jacob Collier plays live with an instrument built by an MIT engineer. 

(image) Eugenia Cheng, Guilty Pleasures & Jacob Collier


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/BmUXW_913h0/studio110316_cms677502_pod.mp3




Spooky Scary Studio 360: How to Make Your Skeleton Scary

Mon, 31 Oct 2016 07:00:00 -0400

Happy Halloween!

Jack Handey, thinker of Deep Thoughts, takes on the ultimate holiday question: If a skeleton’s not scary, what’s the point of having one? He offers a few tips on how to make your skeleton live up to its reputation so you’re not burying just another ho-hum pile of bones.

(Originally aired October 27, 2006)

(image) Spooky Scary Studio 360: How to Make Your Skeleton Scary


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/mZ2IFvJWXAQ/studio103116_cms604138_pod.mp3




Oh the Horror!

Thu, 27 Oct 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Spine-tingling tales from the Studio 360 crypt! “Evil Dead” director Sam Raimi talks about the horrors of Hollywood filmmaking. We audit Tom Savini’s course in decapitation and dismemberment. And the late, great Wes Craven revisits Elm Street and explains why “Scream,” is, ultimately, a family movie. 

(image) Oh the Horror!


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/8iZOm8gzhGI/studio102716_cms672209_pod.mp3




Spooky Scary Studio 360: She Sees Your Every Move

Wed, 26 Oct 2016 07:00:00 -0400

In anticipation of Halloween, Studio 360 is sharing some of our favorite spooky segments from our archive.

Photographer Michele Iversen captures strangers in private spaces — without their permission. At night she sits in her car and watches the glowing windows of strangers' homes, waiting for the perfect shot. Iversen’s story always elicits strong reactions from our listeners — often of horror.

(Originally aired December 17, 2010)

(image) Spooky Scary Studio 360: She Sees Your Every Move


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/Oi8gXLNb-ws/studio102616_cms573415_pod.mp3




Spooky Scary Studio 360: Making Haunted Houses Scarier

Tue, 25 Oct 2016 07:00:00 -0400

In anticipation of Halloween, Studio 360 is sharing some of our favorite spooky segments from our archive.

Ike Sriskandarajah brings a story of how a composer’s visit to a haunted house made him realize there was a whole industry that needed better music. After visiting LA’s Haunted Hayride, Chris Thomas called the park’s hotline and said, “Hey, love your attraction, but it was undercut instantly by this terrible music.” A few weeks later, he got a call back — from the manager of the park. With that, Thomas composed what might be the first original score for any haunted attraction.

(Originally aired October 24, 2014)

(image) Spooky Scary Studio 360: Making Haunted Houses Scarier


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/sDFvx34Gs2A/studio102516_cms593793_pod.mp3




Spooky Scary Studio 360: Alice Cooper

Mon, 24 Oct 2016 07:00:00 -0400

In anticipation of Halloween, Studio 360 is sharing some of our favorite spooky segments from our archive.

No musician has died more often or more dramatically in front of more people than Alice Cooper. His highly theatrical rock shows have variously ended with depictions of him being electrocuted, beheaded, or hanged.

In real life, he's managed to survive very nicely — now in his 60's, he still performs those over-the-top live shows. He talks with Kurt Andersen about what it was like when he moved to Greenwich, Connecticut, eyeliner and all, and why he’ll probably never retire.

(Originally aired September 3, 2015)

(image) Spooky Scary Studio 360: Alice Cooper


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/t9hHendcQRU/studio102416_cms604163_pod.mp3




American Icons: The Lincoln Memorial

Thu, 20 Oct 2016 00:00:00 -0400

This is America's soapbox.

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Kurt Andersen looks into how the Lincoln Memorial became an American Icon. Sarah Vowell discusses the battle over Lincoln's memory, which lasted for three generations. Dorothy Height, a veteran of the Civil Rights Movement, recalls witnessing Marian Anderson’s historic concert there in 1939, and hearing Martin Luther King, Jr., declare “I have a dream” in 1963.  And a former White House aide sets the record straight on Richard Nixon's infamous 4 am trip to the Lincoln Memorial, where he met with student protesters to denounce the Vietnam War.

Actor David Strathairn reads the Gettysburg Address, which is engraved on the Memorial, for Studio 360.

(Originally aired February 19, 2010)

 

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(image) American Icons: The Lincoln Memorial


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/eWT5UnnzoQc/studio102016_cms671837_pod.mp3




Brit Bennett on Church, Racism, and Her Novel “The Mothers”

Mon, 17 Oct 2016 07:00:00 -0400

Brit Bennett came to prominence in a way that was unheard of in the literary world a generation ago. She published a piece about racial justice in Jezebel in 2014, and it provoked a huge discussion online and demonstrated what a fine writer she is.

Soon enough, she was hearing from literary agents and now she’s publishing her debut novel, “The Mothers.” She talks with Kurt Andersen about how attending different churches in her childhood informed the book, and why she started her novel by revealing its biggest secret. 

(image) Brit Bennett on Church, Racism, and Her Novel “The Mothers”


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/h3pr5nAjXaU/studio101716_cms672152_pod.mp3




So You Think You're Creative?

Thu, 13 Oct 2016 00:00:00 -0400

We're always talking about creativity, but what do we mean? Can we find creativity, can we measure it, can we encourage it? Kurt talks with Gary Marcus, a psychology professor about what science tells us about creativity. A researcher puts jazz musicians into an fMRI machine and has them improvise; an intrepid reporter gets her creativity tested and scored; and a little girl introduces us to her imaginary friends (all of them).

(Originally aired: November 23, 2012)

(image) So You Think You're Creative?


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/I9JEjeZrV3c/studio101316_cms670381_pod.mp3




Eric Kandel, Snowblink, & “Walk on the Wild Side”

Thu, 06 Oct 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Neuroscientist Eric Kandel explains how art affects the brain. Plus, we find out why Lou Reed’s “Walk on the Wild Side” is a work of non-fiction. And the indie duo Snowblink plays their dreamy music live in our studio.  

(image) Eric Kandel, Snowblink, & “Walk on the Wild Side”


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/30CfM7mxfss/studio100616_cms669355_pod.mp3




Hail to the Entertainer in Chief

Thu, 29 Sep 2016 00:00:00 -0400

A special about the cozy relationship between politics and entertainment. Former "Spy" staffer and "New Yorker" editor Susan Morrison reveals the origin of Donald Trump’s “short-fingered vulgarian” nickname. Then, author Neal Gabler explains how Hollywood invaded the Oval Office. And Lawrence O’Donnell reviews his least favorite reality TV show: the 2016 presidential race.

(image) Hail to the Entertainer in Chief


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/6rkTj-YUWBk/studio092916_cms667538_pod.mp3




360 Preview: The Short-Fingered Vulgarian

Mon, 26 Sep 2016 07:00:00 -0400

Kurt co-founded "Spy" magazine in 1986 — and Donald Trump was a fixture from the very first issue. In this sneak peek of this week’s episode, Kurt talks with "Spy" co-conspirator (and current "New Yorker" magazine editor) Susan Morrison about their days skewering the “shuttle-owning dilettante” who would become the Republican presidential nominee. They trace the history of the nickname “short-fingered vulgarian” from its conception in the offices of "Spy" to its appearance in the 2016 presidential race. “We had empirical evidence that it upset Trump,” Susan recalls. “He would circle pictures of his hands in gold Sharpie and send them to us.” 

Listen to the full episode — all about the cozy relationship between show business and American politics — this Thursday.

(image) 360 Preview: The Short-Fingered Vulgarian


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/qdMUGBLq4wE/studio092616_cms665734_pod.mp3




Dystopias

Thu, 22 Sep 2016 00:00:00 -0400

There are so many ways the world could go wrong — electing the wrong candidate is only one of them. Charlie Brooker, creator of the hit sci-fi show “Black Mirror,” gets his dystopian ideas from our digital devices. Then, novelist Gary Shteyngart reads from his darkly funny book about the near-future, “Super Sad True Love Story.” And Janelle Monáe plays songs from the 28th century.

(image) Dystopias


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/AJCH46YyWcE/studio092216_cms665593_pod.mp3




360 Extra: So Long, Edward Albee

Tue, 20 Sep 2016 18:29:00 -0400

Edward Albee died last week, at 88. His most famous play, “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf,” marked his Broadway debut and won Albee his first Tony Award. It’s a searing play about the toxic love we share with family — and the secrets we don’t share. Those themes would define Albee’s work for decades.

Back in 2004, Studio 360 sent reporter Sarah Lemanczyk to interview Albee about his decision, well into his 70s, to tinker with his very first produced play, “The Zoo Story.” Albee was about to debut a new first act as a sort of prequel to the original play. Lemanczyk was a huge fan of Albee’s, but she was appalled at this idea — and she had the audacity to tell Albee to his face.

(Originally aired: June 5, 2004)

(image) 360 Extra: So Long, Edward Albee


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/lV5QmqDDwnc/studio092016_cms665082_pod.mp3




Angel Olsen, Sheldon Harnick, & The Science of Singing

Thu, 15 Sep 2016 00:00:00 -0400

On this week’s show, the art and science of singing. At the age of 92, Broadway lyricist Sheldon Harnick hasn’t lost any of the wit and insight that helped him write “Fiddler on the Roof.” Also, we find out what cutting-edge medical science can do to save the voices of aging singers. And indie singer-songwriter Angel Olsen plays live in our studio.

(image) Angel Olsen, Sheldon Harnick, & The Science of Singing


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/GXQYEJnhl34/studio091516_cms663214_pod.mp3




360 Extra: Philippe Petit, Man on Wire

Sun, 11 Sep 2016 09:00:00 -0400

On the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, we wanted to revisit Kurt’s conversation with an artist who had a special relationship with the World Trade Center site.

It had all the glamour, conspiracy, and danger of a classic heist movie, but it was real — and the hero was wearing slippers. In the early hours of August 7, 1974, 24-year-old Philippe Petit and some friends snuck to the top of the Twin Towers and rigged a 140-foot steel cable between them.  And then, 1,350 feet above the ground and without a net, Petit walked, danced, and even lay down on the wire between them.  The feat transfixed the world.  It later became the subject of the 2009 Oscar-winning documentary “Man on Wire.”

Back in 2008, Kurt visited the site of the walk (at that point, Ground Zero) with Petit and director James Marsh. “I was a young wire-walker busy conquering an idea.” Petit explains, “I never thought of the consequences.”

(Originally aired: July 25, 2008)

Correction: In the audio for this segment, Kurt misstated the title of Steve Reich's composition reflecting on the September 11th terrorist attacks. It is "WTC 9/11" (not "WTC View," which is the name of play by Brian Sloan.)

 

Video: Philippe Petit walks between the Twin Towers (from "Man On Wire")

 

(image) 360 Extra: Philippe Petit, Man on Wire


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/oWKfvf-LIE4/studio091116_cms661935_pod.mp3




Going Viral

Thu, 08 Sep 2016 00:00:00 -0400

How does a deadly plague inside “World of Warcraft” spread like a real virus? Also, rabies experts connect the dots between “The Iliad,” “Twilight,” and Louis Pasteur. And an apocalyptic world where children should be seen and not heard — the sound they make can be deadly.

(image) Going Viral


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/t5msEgQ1D5U/studio090816_cms661154_pod.mp3




360 Live: Dr. Rachel Yehuda Misses Her Rats

Wed, 07 Sep 2016 09:00:00 -0400

Rachel Yehuda is a professor of psychiatry and neuroscience at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. For years, Dr. Yehuda researched PTSD by measuring stress hormones in lab rats. But when she began investigating PTSD in Holocaust survivors, she found that her methods were hitting a little close to home:

“A man got up, and he said, ‘biologic science? Are you trying to give Hitler a posthumous victory?’...He was so angry. And all I could think of at that moment was that I missed my rats.”

Her story was part of a live event hosted by Studio 360 and The Story Collider at WNYC’s Jerome L. Greene Performance Space, where scientists and comedians told true stories about their encounters with science.  You can hear Aparna Nancherla’s tale of cheating her way to science fair glory in our September 1, 2016 episode.

Produced with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

(image) 360 Live: Dr. Rachel Yehuda Misses Her Rats


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/cV1v5W-LaK4/studio090716_cms658517_pod.mp3




360 Live: Herman Pontzer Ends Up in the Hot Seat

Tue, 06 Sep 2016 09:00:00 -0400

Herman Pontzer is a professor of anthropology at Hunter College, where he investigates human and ape evolution. A few years ago, while studying the Hadza hunter-gatherer tribe, Dr. Pontzer’s experiment almost went up in flames:

“We look at each other and we realize: everything we have is flammable. The tents, the sleeping bags, the computers…not to mention this five gallon cocktail of liquid nitrogen and Hadza pee.”

His story was part of a live event hosted by Studio 360 and The Story Collider at WNYC’s Jerome L. Greene Performance Space, where scientists and comedians told true stories about their encounters with science.  You can hear Aparna Nancherla’s tale of cheating her way to science fair glory in our September 1, 2016 episode.

Tomorrow in the feed: why psychiatrist Rachel Yehuda misses her rats.

Produced with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

(image) 360 Live: Herman Pontzer Ends Up in the Hot Seat


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/3QCyta5GhIg/studio090616_cms658514_pod.mp3




360 Live: Wyatt Cenac Drives Drunk (for Science)

Mon, 05 Sep 2016 09:00:00 -0400

Wyatt Cenac is a comedian and former correspondent for The Daily Show. He’s no scientist – but while completing a community service requirement in high school, he conducted a little experiment to answer one of modern science’s burning questions: 

“I was like…how could Shaquille O’Neal drive on two beers? Or how could Shaquille drive on like three beers, and a couple shots of whiskey, and maybe some weed?”

His story was part of a live event hosted by Studio 360 and The Story Collider at WNYC’s Jerome L. Greene Performance Space, where scientists and comedians told true stories about their encounters with science.  You can hear Aparna Nancherla’s tale of cheating her way to science fair glory in our September 1, 2016 episode.

Tomorrow in the feed: how anthropologist Herman Pontzer ended up in the hot seat.

Produced with support from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

(image) 360 Live: Wyatt Cenac Drives Drunk (for Science)


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/vTrpzc56v1w/studio090516_cms658513_pod.mp3




Back to School Special

Thu, 01 Sep 2016 00:00:00 -0400

School is back in session, so Studio 360 is hitting the books. Kurt calls up his favorite teacher from high school to compare notes. The novelist Nicholson Baker signs up to be a substitute teacher. And comedian Aparna Nancherla reveals the shocking secret that destroyed her career in science before it started. 

(image) Back to School Special


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/zfhhcFpqM9I/studio090116_cms658396_pod.mp3




Amanda Palmer, Jace Clayton, & Lydia Loveless

Thu, 25 Aug 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Jace Clayton has traveled the world collecting and playing music as DJ /rupture, and he gives Kurt a lesson in spinning records. Plus, the singer-songwriter Lydia Loveless overcame her social anxiety by coming to terms with the fact that everyone is laughing at you. And indie lightning rod Amanda Palmer picked up the ukulele on a whim, but when she started playing Radiohead’s famously downbeat songs on it, she discovered the perfect mix of sweet and salty.

(image) Amanda Palmer, Jace Clayton, & Lydia Loveless


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/9MB2j3hbkp4/studio082516_cms656896_pod.mp3




Hari Nef, Clive James, & Nadja Spiegelman

Thu, 18 Aug 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Revered British critic Clive James aims his razor wit at the golden age of cable drama — and he finds that even shows with dragons deserve some respect. Plus, Nadja Spiegelman grew up in a family that encourages artistic expression — her mother is the New Yorker’s art editor and her father is the author of “Maus.” But when she started writing a memoir about her mother’s family, she discovered that not all truth-telling is welcome. And the trans actress Hari Nef lands the role of a lifetime, straight out of college.

(image) Hari Nef, Clive James, & Nadja Spiegelman


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/8_IHp164XsE/studio081816_cms654755_pod.mp3




Singing in the Chorus

Thu, 11 Aug 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Eric Whitacre has written extremely popular choral music — but his real breakthrough came when, over YouTube, he started inviting amateur singers from all over the world to join in. Also, how Aimee Mann tried to understand a friend’s death by writing a song. And composer Julia Wolfe digs deep into the culture of coal country with her Pulitzer Prize-winning oratorio “Anthracite Fields.”

(image) Singing in the Chorus


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/_AnHEOOtLo0/studio081116_cms652512_pod.mp3




Danny McBride, Sian Heder, & Frankenstein

Thu, 04 Aug 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Danny McBride has built a comedy empire by playing foul-mouthed, egotistical jerks — but he wants you to know that he’s not really like that. Also, the writer-director Sian Heder explains how a lousy job she took when she was just starting out inspired her new movie, “Tallulah.” And we travel back in time 200 years, to the climate catastrophe that inspired Mary Shelley’s “Frankenstein.”

(image) Danny McBride, Sian Heder, & Frankenstein


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/ABDQUZWmMkw/studio080416_cms649671_pod.mp3




Evolution

Thu, 28 Jul 2016 00:00:00 -0400

It’s been over 150 years since "On the Origin of Species" was published, but we’re still fighting over Charles Darwin’s big theory. One of Darwin's descendants, Ruth Padel, writes poems about her famous relative. Spencer Wells gathers DNA around the world to determine where we came from. An amateur paleontologist finds a way to believe in both God and the fossil record. Plus, a science fiction story by Lydia Millet imagines the downside of messing too much with our genes.

(Originally aired November 20, 2009)

(image) Evolution


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/KVqqa7KRrPY/studio072816_cms642460_pod.mp3




Viggo Mortensen, Diane Arbus, & Perfecting a British Accent

Thu, 21 Jul 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Actor Viggo Mortensen brings some of his own outdoorsy skills to his role as a dad raising his kids off the grid in “Captain Fantastic.” Also, with a new exhibit of her early photographs, it’s time to reconsider Diane Arbus’ conflicted legacy. And Kurt gets a lesson on speaking like a proper Brit from an accent coach.  

(image) Viggo Mortensen, Diane Arbus, & Perfecting a British Accent


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/pRvSM5-xC_0/studio072116_cms642431_pod.mp3




Can Laughing Make Us Healthier?

Thu, 14 Jul 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Is the old cliché true — is laughter the best medicine? Kurt Andersen and Mary Harris, host of the podcast Only Human, go to a laughter yoga class to find out. Also, we hear from a neuroscientist who studies laughter and moonlights as a standup comedian. Comic Chris Gethard explains why he resisted getting help for his depression out of fear of losing his humorous edge — and how getting treatment transformed his career. And we find out when medical humor is — and is not — just what the doctor ordered.

(image) Can Laughing Make Us Healthier?


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/Bo7V7hudfrU/studio071416_cms637599_pod.mp3




Coming of Age

Thu, 07 Jul 2016 00:00:00 -0400

We all grow up, eventually. Kurt Andersen talks with Lois Lowry, whose novel “The Giver” helped define dystopian young adult fiction. Also, writer Junot Diaz explains why he couldn’t finish his Pulitzer-winning coming of age novel “The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao” until he turned 40. Plus, the story of how a Kiss album helped an immigrant kid feel a little less lonely.

(image) Coming of Age


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/LyP_C40ZPDU/studio070716_cms637531_pod.mp3




The World According to "Star Wars" & Margaret Glaspy Plays Live

Thu, 30 Jun 2016 00:00:00 -0400

The legal scholar and former Obama administration advisor Cass Sunstein explains the hidden lessons "Star Wars" teaches about the law, politics, and philosophy. Plus, we find out about a theater company that’s perfectly happy playing to an audience of one — in fact, it’s designed that way. And the indie rocker Margaret Glaspy plays a live solo set.

(image) The World According to "Star Wars" & Margaret Glaspy Plays Live


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/qwunV6aO1kU/studio063016_cms633941_pod.mp3




Songs in the Key of Reinvention: Haim, Shamir, and Basia Bulat

Thu, 23 Jun 2016 00:00:00 -0400

This week, three live music performances by artists who have transformed themselves. First, the sisters of the pop group Haim got their start in their parents’ classic rock cover band — and went on to play with Stevie Nicks. Then, how a bad breakup led Basia Bulat to a musical breakthrough. And Shamir Bailey proves that musical style can be as fluid as gender identity.

(image) Songs in the Key of Reinvention: Haim, Shamir, and Basia Bulat


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/zHgCglNWVLM/studio062316_cms626909_pod.mp3




American Icons: The Disney Parks

Thu, 16 Jun 2016 00:00:00 -0400

This is America’s vision of utopia. Generations of Americans have grown up with Walt Disney shaping our imaginations. In 1955, Disney mixed up some fairy tales, a few historical facts, and a dream of the future to create an alternate universe. Not just a place for fun, but a scale model of a perfect world. “Everything that you could imagine is there,” says one young visitor. “It's like living in a fantasy book.” And not just for kids: one-third of Walt Disney World’s visitors are adults who go without children. Visiting the parks, according to actor Tom Hanks, is like a pilgrimage — the pursuit of happiness turned into a religion. Futurist Cory Doctorow explains the genius of Disney World, while novelist Carl Hiaasen even hates the water there. Kurt tours Disneyland with a second-generation “imagineer” whose dead mother haunts the Haunted Mansion. We’ll meet a former Snow White and the man who married Prince Charming — Disney, he says, is “the gayest place on Earth. It’s where happy lives.” (Originally aired October 18, 2013) Special thanks to Julia Lowrie Henderson, Shannon Geis, Alex Gallafent, Nic Sammond, Steve Watts, Angela Bliss, Todd Heiden, Shannon Swanson, Katie Cooper, Nick White, Marie Fabian, Posey Gruener, Jason Margolis, Chris DeAngelis, Jenelle Pifer, Debi Ghose, Maneesh Agrawala, and Tony DeRose. Bonus Track: Cory Doctorow on the Disney theme parks Hear Kurt's full conversation with Doctorow about his life-long obsession with Disney in general, and the Haunted Mansion specifically.   Video: Walt Disney's original plan for Epcot width="465" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sLCHg9mUBag?wmode=transparent&autohide=1&rel=0&showinfo=0&feature=oembed&enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a5988232319702290542" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sLCHg9mUBag">   Inside the Magic Kingdom Annabel Fabian, 9, and her mom Genie Cesar-Fabian, and Tigger (Marie Fabian)   Above the firehouse on Main Street USA sits Walt's private study where he would work and entertain guests at Disneyland (Andy Castro/Flickr)   Izzy Kleiman has been an Annual Passholder to Disneyland since she was 5 (Katie Cooper)   Disney incorporates tiny details into the park design, such as Sleeping Beauty's woodland friends perched outside her castle (Loren Javier/Flickr)   Michael Clowers and Clay Chaffin (who played Prince Charming) at Walt Disney World in 1989; the couple has been together ever since (Clay Chaffin)   Entrance to the Haunted Mansion, an attraction in New Orleans Square, where facades are copied from real buildings in New Orleans (Loren Javier/Flickr)   Madame Leota in the Haunted Mansion was modeled after the face of Leota Toombs Thomas, who worked in the model shop where Haunted Mansion was developed (Loren Javier/Flickr)   Julie, Marita, [...]


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/hJStReTFFWY/studio061616_cms623076_pod.mp3




Maria Bamford, Fantastic Negrito, and Scoring Tickets to “Hamilton”

Thu, 09 Jun 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Comedian Maria Bamford is primed for a well-deserved breakthrough with her new show, “Lady Dynamite.” We get a live performance from Fantastic Negrito, who sings about hot-button issues like race and gentrification. And we find out what it really takes to get tickets to “Hamilton.”

(image) Maria Bamford, Fantastic Negrito, and Scoring Tickets to “Hamilton”


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/WaB_nK1WYXM/studio060916_cms623077_pod.mp3




Couture de Force

Thu, 02 Jun 2016 00:00:00 -0400

In this week’s special fashion episode, Kurt gets some style advice from the industry’s most quotable observer, Simon Doonan. We take a look at how World War II shaped New York Fashion Week. Plus, Isabel Toledo became an internationally recognized designer after dressing Michelle Obama for her first Inauguration — we take a peek inside her studio. 

(image) Couture de Force


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/s8IyF8vGekE/studio060216_cms622415_pod.mp3




American Icons: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial

Thu, 26 May 2016 00:00:00 -0400

(Studio 360) This is the monument that changed how America remembers war.  How do you build a monument to a war that was more tragic than triumphant? Maya Lin was practically a kid when she got the commission to design the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the National Mall. “The veterans were asking me, ‘What do you think people are going to do when they first come here?’” she remembers. “And I wanted to say, ‘They’re going to cry.’" Her minimalistic granite wall was derided by one vet as a “black gash of shame.” But inscribed with the name of every fallen soldier, it became a sacred place for veterans and their families, and it influenced later designs like the National September 11 Memorial. We’ll visit a replica of the wall that travels to veterans’ parades around the country, and hear from former Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel about how this singular work of architecture has influenced how we think about war.   Bonus Track: Kurt Andersen's full interview with Maya Lin Hear Kurt's full interview with Lin about what it was like to stir up a national controversy at such a young age, and how her artistic career has evolved in the three decades since the memorial was created.   Bonus Track: Angela Matthews remembers Joseph Sintoni Angela Matthews reads the letter she left at The Wall for her high school sweetheart, Joseph Sintoni. It was featured in Laura Palmer's book Schrapnel From the Heart.    Images from the Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Memorial Resource Center  A watercolor from Maya Lin's entry to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial 1981 design competition. She designed the memorial at only 21 years old as part of her architecture classwork at Yale University. (Library of Congress) The 1982 Veterans Day dedication of The Wall (Courtesy of Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund) The view from the top of the wall, looking toward the Lincoln Memorial (undated) (Library of Congress ) The Three Servicemen in color in 2011 (Courtesy of Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund (Dan Arant)) Kurt Andersen and journalist Laura Palmer visit the memorial in 2012 (Eric Molinsky) Aseneth Blackwell remembers her husband, veteran Frederick D. Blackwell, at her visit to The Wall on Memorial Day 2012 (Eric Molinsky) Offerings left on Memorial Day 2006 ( Library of Congress (Carol M. Highsmith)) Kurt (R) interviews Duery Felton (L), the curator of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial collection (Eric Molinsky) The peace poncho Kurt mentions in the radio program, sitting below a bag of bullets and a pack of Lucky Strikes (Eric Molinsky) Sharon Denitto helps visitors to The Moving Wall locate names of loved ones (Courtesy of Sharon Denitto)         [...] American Icons: The Vietnam Veterans Memorial


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/6gt7Acq7GSQ/studio052616_cms621155_pod.mp3




Podcast Special: Why Hodor is the Heart of "Game of Thrones"

Tue, 24 May 2016 11:48:00 -0400

"Game of Thrones" is the most pirated TV show ever — and it’s most beloved character is Hodor, the tall, strong, and slow-on-the-uptake man who valiantly protects the offspring of the Stark family. It's always been a mystery why Hodor can only say one word, "hodor," but the most recent episode of GoT gave us a major reveal — and electrifying plot twist. 

Last fall, producer Sean Rameswaram talked with Kristian Nairn, the musician-turned-actor who plays Hodor. Nairn shares some surprising behind-the-scenes details (those are dozens of real rabbits on his cloak), as well as how he ended up taking the role. 

Listen to the interview above (*spoilers in the audio*), with some highlights below. 

Interview highlights:

  • 3:25 — Why Nairn took the role: His mother was a big fan of the books and told him he should accept the part if it was offered.
  • 4:25 — What you would never expect about his costume: "It smells of eight thousand corpses," Narin laughs. His character ends up wearing over 70 dead rabbits as part of his costume for continuity. "You can literally smell it before you see it," he reveals. 
  • 7:10 — Playing two versions of Hodor: One of Nairn's favorite moments is when his character gets to kill someone while he's possessed by another character, showing a totally different side to the gentle giant. 
(image)
(image) Podcast Special: Why Hodor is the Heart of "Game of Thrones"


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/NGxaThLxTY0/studio052416_cms622129_pod.mp3




William Bell, Richard Russo, Jennifer Finney Boylan, & Sylvia Plath

Thu, 19 May 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Writing the song “Born Under a Bad Sign” made William Bell a soul legend, but he never recorded it himself — until now. Also, the writers Richard Russo and Jennifer Finney Boylan talk about plot twists in their long friendship. And we ask whether Sylvia Plath’s poetry can ever get out from under the shadow of her suicide.

(image) William Bell, Richard Russo, Jennifer Finney Boylan, & Sylvia Plath


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/HxAS3NlUh8o/studio051916_cms620739_pod.mp3




Frank Langella, Rebecca Miller, & Character Alignment

Thu, 12 May 2016 00:00:00 -0400

Frank Langella has been drawn to characters with dark sides, from Dracula to Richard Nixon. But his latest Broadway role is his scariest yet — an old man with dementia. Also, a conversation with the writer/director Rebecca Miller, whose movie “Maggie’s Plan” is a romantic comedy with a very funny twist. And we’ll hear how Dungeons & Dragons invented the perfect personality test.

(image) Frank Langella, Rebecca Miller, & Character Alignment


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/CRb-02sR7IY/studio051216_cms604169_pod.mp3




“Fiddler on the Roof,” "Untitled Film Stills," & “The Outsiders”

Thu, 05 May 2016 00:00:00 -0400

This week, three American Icons. First, a Jewish milkman from a Russian village becomes an American everyman — and a Broadway star — in “Fiddler on the Roof.” Then, Cindy Sherman photographs herself as characters from imaginary movies, and starts a revolution in feminist self-portraiture. And, just a teenager herself, S. E. Hinton rewrites the rules of young adult novels with “The Outsiders.”

(image) “Fiddler on the Roof,” "Untitled Film Stills," & “The Outsiders”


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/F7Axd-78JNo/studio050516_cms602253_pod.mp3




Tilda Swinton, JFK the Opera, & Yeasayer Plays Live

Thu, 28 Apr 2016 00:00:00 -0400

In a career full of surprises, the actor Tilda Swinton has become an icon — but she’s never thought of what she does as acting. Also, we hear from the team behind a new opera about John F. Kennedy’s last night. And the band Yeasayer brings its experimental brand of indie pop to our live studio.

(image) Tilda Swinton, JFK the Opera, & Yeasayer Plays Live


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/-O6swd_cSTA/studio042816_cms599751_pod.mp3




A Master Class in Musical Theater & The Origin of the World’s Sexiest Song

Thu, 21 Apr 2016 00:00:00 -0400

This week, Kurt Andersen gets a master class in musical theater from veteran Broadway producer Jack Viertel. Also, we hear from the Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Anna Quindlen about how she managed a midlife career switch with aplomb. And the surprising story behind how Marvin Gaye came up with one of the greatest R&B songs ever.

(image) A Master Class in Musical Theater & The Origin of the World’s Sexiest Song


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/h8SipZfO3ag/studio042116_cms597633_pod.mp3




All Shakespeare All the Time

Thu, 14 Apr 2016 00:00:00 -0400

On the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death, we look at the ways his work continues to change and adapt to the culture we live in. In the 19th century, Shakespeare’s work got caught up in minstrel shows — and African-American actors are still struggling to claim the Bard as their own. Also, we find out how a father-son team is changing the way Shakespeare sounds by bringing back his original pronunciation. And we go inside the pioneering immersive theater experience “Sleep No More,” which might be the longest-running Shakespeare adaptation ever.

(image) All Shakespeare All the Time


Media Files:
http://feeds.wnyc.org/~r/studio360/podcast/~5/0bTD9x2Gj10/studio041416_cms595296_pod.mp3